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Jacqueline Woolley, Chair The University of Texas at Austin, SEA 4.212, Austin, TX 78712 • (512) 475-7596

Caryn L Carlson

Professor Ph.D., University of Georgia

Professor and Associate Chair of Advancement
Caryn L Carlson

Contact

Biography

Dr. Carlson does not plan to accept a new graduate student for fall of 2015. 

Caryn L. Carlson received her Ph.D. in psychology in 1984 from the University of Georgia. She completed postdoctoral work at Indiana University and spent three years as a faculty member at Virginia Tech before joining the Department of Psychology at UT  in 1989.  For most of her career, Dr. Carlson’s research program was funded by the National Institutes of Mental Health, and examined several aspects of the functioning of children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (see selected publications below).

Dr. Carlson in recent years has changed the focus of her work to the field of positive psychology and well-being. Her current primary interest is in gender differences in determinants of happiness/well-being and related topics (e.g., social media influences, intimacy in friendships). Dr. Carlson has taught seminars in Positive Psychology at both the graduate and undergraduate levels for the past several years. She received the 2009 Raymond Dickson Centennial Endowed Teaching Fellowship, the 2010 Eyes of Texas Award for excellence in service to the University, and the 2012 President's Associates Teaching Excellence Award.

Recent and current undergraduate Plan II and Psychology honor's students supervised by Dr. Carlson include:

  • Brooks Harbison (2012): Thesis, “To tell or not to tell: Gender differences in reactions to disclosing positive or negative information.” (Psychology Honors)
  • Mary McGeehan (2012): Thesis, "Assessing the decline in happiness in young females: Possible theories and solutions." (Plan II)
  • Daniel Faso (2011): Thesis, "The relationship between hope and well-being in parents of children with autism." (Psychology Honors)
  • Aimee Brown (2011): Thesis: Well-being, academic achievement and signature strengths in college students." (Plan II/Psychology Honors)
  • Rachel Meyerson (2010): Thesis, "Positive affect and couples' conflict resolution: A test of Fredrickson's Broaden-and-Build Model." (Plan II/Psychology Honors)
  • Owen O'Brien (2010): Thesis, "The influence of community on the efficacy of Positive Psychology exercises." (Plan II)
  • Sonya Crocker (2009) (awarded 2009 UT Outstanding Student of the Year Award): Thesis, "The myth of the "American Dream" and the true pursuit of happiness." (Plan II)
  • Sherry Yao (2009): Thesis, "Hope, Health, and Healing: Positive Psychology in Advanced Illness." (Psychology Honors
  • Connie Bogard (2008): Thesis, "The effect of religiosity on perceived stress and depression." (Psychology Honors)

Recent and Selected Representative Publications

BOOKS

Pliszka, S.R., Carlson, C.L., & Swanson, J.M. (1999). ADHD with comorbid disorders: Clinical assessment and management. NY: Guilford Publications.

ARTICLES

Willcutt, E.G., Nigg, J.T., Pennington, B.F., Solanto, M.V., Rohde, L.A., Tannock, R., Loo, S.K., Carlson, C.L., McBurnett, K., Lahey, B.B. (2012).  Validity of DSM-IV attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder symptom dimensions and subtypes.  Psychological Bulletin. doi: 10.1037/a0027347. Epub 2012 May 21.

Faso, D.J., Neal-Beevers, R., & Carlson, C.L. (2012). Vicarious futurity, hope, and well-being in parents of children with autism spectrum disorders.  Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders

Booth, J.E., Carlson, C.L., & Tucker, D.T. (2007). Performance on a neurocognitive measure of alerting differentiates the ADHD Combined and Inattentive subtypes: A preliminary report.  Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology, 22, 423-432.

Tamm, L., and Carlson, C.L. (2007). Task demands interact with the single and combined effects of medication and contingencies on children with Attention- Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder.  Journal of Attention Disorders, 10, 372-380.

Canu, W.H., & Carlson, C.L. (2007). Rejection sensitivity and social outcomes of young adult men with ADHD.  Journal of Attention Disorders, 10, 261-275.

Willcutt, E.G., & Carlson, C.L. (2005). The diagnostic validity of ADHD.  Journal of Clinical Neuroscience Research, 5, 219-230. 

 

 

Interests

Gender differences in determinants of happiness/well-being

PSY 364P • Positive Psych & The Good Life

42780 • Spring 2015
Meets TTH 930am-1100am SEA 3.250
show description

A survey of the emerging field of positive psychology, including assessment and determinants of well-being; human strengths and virtues; the good life considered from evolutionary, economic, sociological, and cross-cultural perspectives; and applications to issues such as social change. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Psychology 341K (Topic: Positive Psychology and the Good Life) and 364P may not both be counted. Prerequisite: For psychology majors, upper-division standing and Psychology 301 and 418 with a grade of at least C in each; for others, upper-division standing, Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C, and one of the following with a grade of at least C: Biology 318M, Civil Engineering 311S, Economics 329, Educational Psychology 371, Electrical Engineering 351K, Government 350K, Mathematics 316, 362K, Mechanical Engineering 335, Psychology 317, Sociology 317L, Social Work 318, Statistics 309, Statistics and Scientific Computation 302, 303, 304, 305, 306, 318.

PSY 194Q • Current Tpcs In Clinical Psy

42870 • Spring 2015
Meets M 1200pm-100pm SEA 3.250
show description

Seminars in Clinical Psychology. One or three lecture hours a wekk for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

PSY 364P • Positive Psych & The Good Life

43790 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 930am-1100am SEA 3.250
show description

A survey of the emerging field of positive psychology, including assessment and determinants of well-being; human strengths and virtues; the good life considered from evolutionary, economic, sociological, and cross-cultural perspectives; and applications to issues such as social change. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Psychology 341K (Topic: Positive Psychology and the Good Life) and 364P may not both be counted. Prerequisite: For psychology majors, upper-division standing and Psychology 301 and 418 with a grade of at least C in each; for others, upper-division standing, Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C, and one of the following with a grade of at least C: Biology 318M, Civil Engineering 311S, Economics 329, Educational Psychology 371, Electrical Engineering 351K, Government 350K, Mathematics 316, 362K, Mechanical Engineering 335, Psychology 317, Sociology 317L, Social Work 318, Statistics 309, Statistics and Scientific Computation 302, 303, 304, 305, 306, 318.

PSY 194Q • Current Tpcs In Clinical Psy

43910 • Fall 2014
Meets M 1200pm-100pm SEA 3.250
show description

Seminars in Clinical Psychology. One or three lecture hours a wekk for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

PSY 364P • Positive Psych & The Good Life

44145 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 930am-1100am SEA 3.250
show description

A survey of the emerging field of positive psychology, including assessment and determinants of well-being; human strengths and virtues; the good life considered from evolutionary, economic, sociological, and cross-cultural perspectives; and applications to issues such as social change. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Psychology 341K (Topic: Positive Psychology and the Good Life) and 364P may not both be counted. Prerequisite: For psychology majors, upper-division standing and Psychology 301 and 418 with a grade of at least C in each; for others, upper-division standing, Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C, and one of the following with a grade of at least C: Biology 318M, Civil Engineering 311S, Economics 329, Educational Psychology 371, Electrical Engineering 351K, Government 350K, Mathematics 316, 362K, Mechanical Engineering 335, Psychology 317, Sociology 317L, Social Work 318, Statistics 309, Statistics and Scientific Computation 302, 303, 304, 305, 306, 318.

PSY 194Q • Current Tpcs In Clinical Psy

44275 • Spring 2014
Meets M 1200pm-100pm SEA 3.250
show description

Seminars in Clinical Psychology. One or three lecture hours a wekk for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

PSY 364P • Positive Psych & The Good Life

43845 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 930am-1100am SEA 3.250
show description

A survey of the emerging field of positive psychology, including assessment and determinants of well-being; human strengths and virtues; the good life considered from evolutionary, economic, sociological, and cross-cultural perspectives; and applications to issues such as social change. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Psychology 341K (Topic: Positive Psychology and the Good Life) and 364P may not both be counted. Prerequisite: For psychology majors, upper-division standing and Psychology 301 and 418 with a grade of at least C in each; for others, upper-division standing, Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C, and one of the following with a grade of at least C: Biology 318M, Civil Engineering 311S, Economics 329, Educational Psychology 371, Electrical Engineering 351K, Government 350K, Mathematics 316, 362K, Mechanical Engineering 335, Psychology 317, Sociology 317L, Social Work 318, Statistics 309, Statistics and Scientific Computation 302, 303, 304, 305, 306, 318.

PSY 194Q • Current Tpcs In Clinical Psy

43940 • Fall 2013
Meets M 1200pm-100pm SEA 3.250
show description

Seminars in Clinical Psychology. One or three lecture hours a wekk for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

PSY 364P • Positive Psych & The Good Life

43495 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm SEA 3.250
show description

A survey of the emerging field of positive psychology, including assessment and determinants of well-being; human strengths and virtues; the good life considered from evolutionary, economic, sociological, and cross-cultural perspectives; and applications to issues such as social change. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Psychology 341K (Topic: Positive Psychology and the Good Life) and 364P may not both be counted. Prerequisite: For psychology majors, upper-division standing and Psychology 301 and 418 with a grade of at least C in each; for others, upper-division standing, Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C, and one of the following with a grade of at least C: Biology 318M, Civil Engineering 311S, Economics 329, Educational Psychology 371, Electrical Engineering 351K, Government 350K, Mathematics 316, 362K, Mechanical Engineering 335, Psychology 317, Sociology 317L, Social Work 318, Statistics 309, Statistics and Scientific Computation 302, 303, 304, 305, 306, 318.

PSY 194Q • Current Tpcs In Clinical Psy

43600 • Spring 2013
Meets M 1200pm-100pm SEA 3.250
show description

Seminars in Clinical Psychology. One or three lecture hours a wekk for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

PSY 364P • Positive Psych & The Good Life

43397 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm SEA 3.250
show description

 

This course provides a survey of the emerging field of Positive Psychology.

Class format will utilize both didactic and interactive components, with active participation expected from students in class discussions and exercises, as well as in assignments outside the classroom.  Course requirements include writing assignments, class participation, and a final examination.

On the first day, you will complete an in-class writing assignment about what you hope to gain from the class.  On the second day, you will take “pre- class” tests to assess some of the constructs addressed in the course (e.g., happiness), and we will view a Positive Psychology video lecture by Ed Diener.  For homework, take the signature strengths survey on Seligman’s website (www.authentichappiness.com).  In week 2, each student will give a “strength” story introduction and submit a list of his or her top 5 strengths, rank ordered to denote preferences for which strength students wish to be the topic of their Strength essay/presentation.

The remainder of the course is divided into 3 sections. In Section I, we will define the field of Positive Psychology, discuss relevant constructs and how to measure them, consider the notion of a “happiness set point”, and review relevant research on personality, emotional, and cognitive contributions to well-being.  In Section II, we will discuss human strengths and virtues, human values, and review the role of goal-setting and other motivational factors in happiness.  We will finish this section by addressing whether happiness SHOULD and CAN be increased, and by considering criticisms of the Positive Psychology field. In Section III, we will consider the good life from a variety of perspectives, including spiritual, evolutionary, biological, economic, and cross-cultural views. Finally, we will discuss how Positive Psychology may apply to social change and public policy (note that topics/dates may vary slightly from what’s listed).

This course carries the Writing Flag. Writing Flag courses are designed to give students experience with writing in an academic discipline. In this class, you can expect to write regularly during the semester, complete substantial writing projects, and receive feedback from your instructor to help you improve your writing. You will also have the opportunity to revise one or more assignments, and to read and discuss your peers' work. You should therefore expect a substantial portion of your grade to come from your written work.

PSY 194Q • Current Tpcs In Clinical Psy

43475 • Fall 2012
Meets M 1200pm-100pm SEA 3.250
show description

Seminars in Clinical Psychology. One or three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

PSY 341K • Positive Psych & The Good Life

43270 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm SEA 3.250
show description

This course provides a survey of the emerging field of Positive Psychology. Class format will utilize both didactic and interactive components, with active participation expected from students in class discussions and exercises, as well as in assignments outside the classroom. Course requirements include writing assignments, class participation, and a final examination.

On the first day, you will complete an in-class writing assignment about what you hope to gain from the class. On the second day, you will take “pre- class” tests to assess some of the constructs addressed in the course (e.g., happiness), and we will view a Positive Psychology video lecture by Ed Diener. For homework, take the signature strengths survey on Seligman’s website (www.authentichappiness.com). In week 2, each student will give a “strength” story introduction and submit a list of his or her top 5 strengths, rank ordered to denote preferences for which strength students wish to be the topic of their Strength essay/presentation.

The remainder of the course is divided into 3 sections. In Section I, we will define the field of Positive Psychology, discuss relevant constructs and how to measure them, consider the notion of a “happiness set point”, and review relevant research on personality, emotional, and cognitive contributions to well-being. In Section II, we will discuss human strengths and virtues, human values, and review the role of goal-setting and other motivational factors in happiness. We will finish this section by addressing whether happiness SHOULD and CAN be increased, and by considering criticisms of the Positive Psychology field. In Section III, we will consider the good life from a variety of perspectives, including spiritual, evolutionary, biological, economic, and cross- cultural views. Finally, we will discuss how Positive Psychology may apply to social change and public policy (note that topics/dates may vary slightly from what’s listed).

This course carries the Writing Flag. Writing Flag courses are designed to give students experience with writing in an academic discipline. In this class, you can expect to write regularly during the semester, complete substantial writing projects, and receive feedback from your instructor to help you improve your writing. You will also have the opportunity to revise one or more assignments, and to read and discuss your peers' work. You should therefore expect a substantial portion of your grade to come from your written work.

PSY 194Q • Current Tpcs In Clinical Psy

43460 • Spring 2012
Meets W 400pm-500pm SEA 3.250
show description

Seminars in Clinical Psychology. One or three lecture hours a wekk for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

PSY 341K • Positive Psych & The Good Life

43200 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm SEA 3.250
show description

This course provides a survey of the emerging field of Positive Psychology. Class format will utilize both didactic and interactive components, with active participation expected from students in class discussions and exercises, as well as in assignments outside the classroom. Course requirements include writing assignments, class participation, and a final examination.

On the first day, you will complete an in-class writing assignment about what they hope to gain from the class. On the second day, you will take “pre- class” tests to assess some of the constructs addressed in the course (e.g., happiness), and we will view a Positive Psychology video lecture by Ed Diener. For homework, take the

signature strengths survey on Seligman’s website (www.authentichappiness.com). Next Tuesday (1/25), each student will give a “strength” story introduction and submit a listing of his or her top 5 strengths, rank ordered to denote preferences for which strength students wish to be the topic of their Strength essay/presentation.

The remainder of the course is divided into 3 sections. In Section I, we will define the field of Positive Psychology, discuss relevant constructs and how to measure them, consider the notion of a “happiness set point”, and review relevant research on personality, emotional, and cognitive contributions to well-being. In Section II, we will discuss human strengths and virtues, human values, and review the role of goal-setting and other motivational factors in happiness. We will finish this section by addressing whether happiness SHOULD and CAN be increased, and by considering criticisms of the Positive Psychology field. In Section III, we will consider the good life from a variety of perspectives, including spiritual, evolutionary, biological, economic, and cross- cultural views. Finally, we will discuss how Positive Psychology may apply to social change and public policy (note that topics/dates may vary slightly from what’s listed).

This course carries the Writing Flag. Writing Flag courses are designed to give students experience with writing in an academic discipline. In this class, you can expect to write regularly during the semester, complete substantial writing projects, and receive feedback from your instructor to help you improve your writing. You will also have the opportunity to revise one or more assignments, and to read and discuss your peers' work. You should therefore expect a substantial portion of your grade to come from your written work.

PSY 194Q • Current Tpcs In Clinical Psy

43355 • Fall 2011
Meets W 400pm-500pm SEA 3.250
show description

Seminars in Clinical Psychology. One or three lecture hours a wekk for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

PSY 341K • Positive Psych & The Good Life

43780 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm SEA 3.250
show description

Course Description

This course provides a survey of the emerging field of Positive Psychology, including:

    o defining and assessing happiness and "the good life";

    o personality, emotional, cognitive, & motivational contributions to well-being;

    o human strengths, virtues, and values;

    o the issue of whether happiness should and/or can be increased;

    o the good life considered from spiritual, evolutionary, economic, sociological, and cross-cultural perspectives;     and

    o applications of positive psychology to issues such as social change and public policy.

Class format will utilize both didactic and interactive components, with active participation expected from students in class discussions and exercises, as well as in assignments outside the classroom.

Course Requirements

PRIOR TO THE FIRST DAY OF CLASS, RESTRICTED TO PSYCHOLOGY MAJORS.

Grading Policy

Writing assignments, class participation, and a final examination.

Texts

1) Peterson, C. (2006), A Primer in Positive Psychology. Oxford: Oxford University Press

2) Course packet

PSY 194Q • Current Tpcs In Clinical Psy

43965 • Spring 2011
Meets W 400pm-500pm SEA 3.250
show description

Seminars in Clinical Psychology. One or three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

PSY 341K • Positive Psych & The Good Life

43160 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm SEA 3.250
show description

Course Description

This course provides a survey of the emerging field of Positive Psychology, including:

    o defining and assessing happiness and "the good life";

    o personality, emotional, cognitive, & motivational contributions to well-being;

    o human strengths, virtues, and values;

    o the issue of whether happiness should and/or can be increased;

    o the good life considered from spiritual, evolutionary, economic, sociological, and cross-cultural perspectives;     and

    o applications of positive psychology to issues such as social change and public policy.

Class format will utilize both didactic and interactive components, with active participation expected from students in class discussions and exercises, as well as in assignments outside the classroom.

Course Requirements

PRIOR TO THE FIRST DAY OF CLASS, RESTRICTED TO PSYCHOLOGY MAJORS.

Grading Policy

Writing assignments, class participation, and a final examination.

Texts

1) Peterson, C. (2006), A Primer in Positive Psychology. Oxford: Oxford University Press

2) Course packet

PSY 194Q • Current Tpcs In Clinical Psy

43315 • Fall 2010
Meets W 400pm-500pm SEA 3.250
show description

Seminars in Clinical Psychology. One or three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

PSY 341k • Positive Psy & The Good Life-W

43925 • Spring 2010
Meets TTH 1100-1230pm SEA 3.250
show description



PSY 341K Positive Psychology and the Good Life (SWC)
Fall, 2009     TTh 11:00-12:15      SEA 3.250     (Unique # 43925)

Instructor:  Dr. Caryn Carlson                     TA:  Laura Marusich
Office/Phone:  SEA 4.212A/475-8493                 SEA 5.118
Office Hours:  W 8:00-9:30 & by app’t                 M,W,F 2-3 & by app’t
E-mail:  carlson@psy.utexas.edu                                     .utexas.edu

Text:  Peterson, C (2006).  A Primer in Positive Psychology.  Oxford Press.     

Description

This course provides a survey of the emerging field of Positive Psychology.
Class format will utilize both didactic and interactive components, with active participation expected from students in class discussions and exercises, as well as in assignments outside the classroom.  Course requirements include writing assignments, class participation, and a final examination.
On the first day, you will complete an in-class writing assignment about what they hope to gain from the class.  On the second day, you will take “pre- class” tests to assess some of the constructs addressed in the course (e.g., happiness), and we will view a Positive Psychology video lecture by Ed Diener.  For homework, take the signature strengths survey on Seligman’s website (www.authentichappiness.com).  Next Th. (9/3), each student will give a “strength” story introduction and submit a listing of his or her top 5 strengths, rank ordered to denote preferences for which strength students wish to be the topic of their Strength essay/presentation.
The remainder of the course is divided into 3 sections. In Section I, we will define the field of Positive Psychology, discuss relevant constructs and how to measure them, consider the notion of a “happiness set point”, and review relevant research on personality, emotional, and cognitive contributions to well-being.  In Section II, we will discuss human strengths and virtues, human values, and review the role of goal-setting and other motivational factors in happiness.  We will finish this section by addressing whether happiness SHOULD and CAN be increased, and by considering criticisms of the Positive Psychology field. In Section III, we will consider the good life from a variety of perspectives, including spiritual, evolutionary, biological, economic, and cross-cultural views. Finally, we will discuss how Positive Psychology may apply to social change and public policy (note that topics/dates may vary slightly from that listed).

Grading and Grading Scale 

Course grades will be based on class attendance/participation (20 points), a Section I reaction paper (5 points), a “signature strength” essay (first draft, 10 points; final draft, 10 points), a final “course portfolio” (30 points) and an in-class final exam (25 points). 

A =  92-100    B+ = 88-89    C+ = 78-79    D+ = 68-69    F = 0-59
A- = 90-91    B   = 82-87    C = 72-77    D = 62-67
B- = 80-81     C- = 70-71    D- = 60-61
 
Schedule of course topics, activities, and requirements

Date            Proposed Topics            ___                           Book Chapters
        COURSE INTRODUCTION AND OVERVIEW                                     
T 1/19        In class writing about course expectations/review syllabus       
Th, 1/21    Positive Psychology video/pre-questionnaires           
T, 1/26    Strength story introductions (submit list of top strengths)
       
        SECTION I- WHAT IS POSITIVE PSYCHOLOGY?                   2-4            
Th, 1/28    Definitions and measures
T, 2/2        Happiness set point                        
Th, 2/4    Personality, positive emotions, & flourishing                   
T, 2/9        Flow                   
Th, 2/11    Exercise 1 presentations (reaction paper due)

        SECTION II- STRENGTHS, VALUES, INCREASING HAPPINESS   5-7
T, 2/16    Character strengths and virtues               
Th, 2/18    Creativity (Michael Starbird)(tentative date)           
T, 2/23    Motivation and Goals (strength paper first draft due)               
Th, 2/25    Motivation and Goals                              
T, 3/2        The Last Lecture (Randy Pausch)           
Th, 3/4    Strengths presentations     
T, 3/9        Strengths presentations           
Th, 3/11    Strengths presentations               
T 3/16-Th 3/118    SPRING BREAK           
T, 3/23    Strengths presentations     
Th, 3/25    Should happiness be increased?   
T, 3/30    Can happiness be increased?       
Th, 4/1    Exercise II presentations
                   
        SECTION III- PERSPECTIVES ON THE GOOD LIFE     8-9; assigned readings
T, 4/6        Criticisms of Positive Psychology                      
Th, 4/8    Spiritual perspectives (Dave Collins)       
T, 4/13    Evolutionary and biological perspectives                   
Th, 4/15    Economic perspectives (final strength paper due)   
T, 4/20    Affluenza video               
Th, 4/22    Social change                                  
T, 4/27    Cultural perspectives                           
Th, 4/29    Exercise III presentations/ post-questionnaires   
T, 5/4        Other applications of Positive psychology   
Th, 5/6    My Last Lecture (course portfolio due)   

FINAL EXAMINATION: SATURDAY, MAY 15, 7-8:30 pm

       
 

Course activities

Outside-of-Class Exercises:
The course is divided into three sections.  In each section, students will complete 2 outside-of-class exercises and will offer a brief (5 minute) class presentation of their reactions to one of the exercises.  For section I, students will also write and submit a 2-page reaction paper for one of the two exercises; this paper will be edited and returned to the student (revisions may be included in the Course Portfolio, described below).  While students are not required to write/submit reaction papers for section II or III exercises, they may choose to do so to include in the Final Course Portfolio.

Journaling:
Students are encouraged- though not required- to keep a journal documenting their reactions to course material.  Students are free to use any format they choose for the journal.  One possibility is to set aside a few minutes each week to record reactions, lessons learned, points of interest to pursue further, etc. You may choose to include journal entries as “evidence” in the Course Portfolio.

Writing Assignments 
   
Section I Reaction Paper (5 points): 
For Section I, students will submit a reaction paper based on one of the two outside-of-class exercises.  The paper should be double-spaced, and must be at least 2 (but no longer than 2  1/2) pages in length.  This paper will be graded (5 points) and returned; a revision of it may be included in the final Course Portfolio.  See “Guidelines for reaction papers and presentations” on the last page of the syllabus.
   
Signature Strength Essay (20 points): 
Based on the signature strengths assessment that all students will complete during the first course week, each student will be asked to choose one of their top 5 strengths on which to write an essay.  The essay should be double-spaced, and must be at least 4 (but no longer than 4  1/2) pages in length (not counting your reference list).  The essay must include a citation of literature (from the text and outside sources), and you should also include personal anecdotes, reference to “exemplars” (which may be real people or literary characters), and/or perspectives from other fields, e.g., philosophy, literature, cross-cultural work, etc.  The first draft of the paper will be graded (10 points) and returned with comments.  Students will revise and resubmit the final version of the paper, which will be worth 10 points.  Students will make brief (i.e., 10-15 minute) presentations on their signature strength report.
 

Final Course Portfolio (30 points): 
A portfolio is a collection of work—like an artist’s portfolio. In this case, it is a selected collection of your work for this class, organized in a particular way to effectively convey your message.  Your portfolio should integrate content and research findings from course materials, in addition to personal reactions (e.g., to exercises).  To help organize the portfolio, include a table of contents with numbered pages.  The portfolio must be a minimum of 6 pages in length (not counting the table of contents and any reference list you decide to include).

Each portfolio will be different because you are different from each other. The portfolio should start with a reflective opening (@ 3-4 pages in length) that reviews your work in the class.  This opening should include some or all of the following:
•    how you have processed the information and activities of the semester;
•    what you knew when you came in and whether that has been substantiated or changed;
•    what you have learned with which you may not agree;
•    what challenges to you the semester may have posed;
•    what successes you achieved
 
In order to support your answer to the above questions, you will explain how the evidence—in the form of @ 3-4 Appendices —supports the claims you make. This evidence may include reaction papers, a summary of your “pre” and “post” assessment measures, excerpts from journal/on-line entries you may have made during the semester, responses to discussion questions, or anything else that provides evidence about the work you have done for the class. 

Grading Writing Assignments
Assignments are due at the beginning of class on the due date.  Assignments turned in after class starts will be considered late; late assignments will be assessed a penalty of two points each day late.  Students are expected to attend to both the style (e.g., grammar, syntax, structure) and content of their writing assignments. 

Students are encouraged to meet with the TA and to make use of the Undergraduate Writing Center for assistance with assignments. The UWC provides professional consulting services for students who want to improve their writing. Students can bring their assignments to the UWC and work with a consultant on any aspect of their writing--from brainstorming, to developing and organizing an argument, to learning the conventions of usage and punctuation.  If you visit the UWC, please request that they notify me about your meeting; this will allow me to track your progress.  The UWC also provides helpful writing handouts from their main website:  <http://uwc.utexas.edu/handouts>http://uwc.utexas.edu/handouts
 

Other Course Requirements

Final Exam (25 points)
There will be a comprehensive final examination given during the final exam period.  The final exam will include a combination of multiple choice and short answer questions.  Please be certain that you will be available to take the final, as makeup exams will not be given. FINAL EXAMINATION:  SATURDAY, MAY 15, 7-8:30 pm

Class Presentations, Attendance and Participation (20 points)
Throughout the semester, students are expected to be actively engaged in the class by making presentations (3 outside exercise presentations and the signature strength presentation), and by participating in class discussion (e.g., responding to discussion questions).
Presentations:  Ten points will be assigned for presentations (2 points for each of the 3 outside exercise presentations and 4 points for the strength presentation).  If you have a valid excuse for missing class on one of the outside exercise presentation days, you can submit a written reaction paper to receive the 2 points (Note: this can only be done once).
Attendance/participation:  Ten points will be assigned for class attendance and participation. Because this represents a significant portion of your grade, it should be clear that attendance is crucial.  If you have to miss a class and have a good excuse, please let me know as soon as possible.  In addition to attendance, points will be assigned based on the quality of student presentation and contributions to discussion, including familiarity with the readings, ability to express ideas clearly, ability to synthesize thoughts of others to form new insights or questions, ability to disagree constructively, and cooperation in building a stimulating and supportive intellectual atmosphere in class. 


Department and University Policies

The Psychology Department will drop all students who do not meet the following prerequisites:
(a) PSY 301 with a C or better
(b) PSY 418 (or an equivalent listed in the course schedule) with a C or better
(c) Upper-Division standing (60 hours completed)

The University of Texas at Austin provides upon request appropriate academic accommodations for qualified students with disabilities.  For more information, contact the Office of the Dean of Students at 471-6259, 471-4641 TTY.
 

Exercises/Reaction Papers
 For each section, complete two exercises. You will then choose one of the two exercises to present in class during the designated times.  For Section I, choose one of the two exercises on which to write and submit a 2-page reaction paper.  With instructor permission, you may substitute an exercise from the Peterson text for any of those below.
  SECTION I (if you choose 1, do EITHER a or b)  1a) Write and deliver a “gratitude letter” to someone who has been especially kind to you but has never been properly thanked.  Describe how this experience effected you and the recipient (Peterson, p. 31).  1b) Complete a “Gratitude diary” by writing down three things that go well each day and their causes every night for one week; provide a causal explanation for each good thing.  After a week, evaluate how the exercise made you feel (Peterson, p. 38).

2) Complete at least one “pleasurable” and one “philanthropic” activity, and comment on how each made you feel, both immediately following the activity and the next day (Peterson, p. 34).

3)  “Have a good day” (Peterson, p. 43; can complete for one week).

4)  Practice kindness (Lyubomirsky) by performing 5 acts of kindness over the course of a week (additional instructions on Blackboard).

5)  Savor life’s joys (Lyubomirsky) by relishing ordinary experiences of everyday life (additional instructions on Blackboard).

SECTION II

1) Use one of your top strengths in a new and different way every day for five days (Peterson, p. 158).   2) Read the biography of someone you admire (artist, scientist, writer, politician, public figure, athlete, etc.).  Discuss your impressions about what this person’s signature strengths might have been.  How early were they manifested, and what factors seemed to influence their development?    3) Ask a relative (grandparent, parent, sibling) to take the online “signature strengths” survey (www.authentichappiness.com).  Interview them based on the results, and describe any insights you gained about similarities and differences between your strengths and theirs.  To what do you attribute the patterns? 

4) Read the section on values in Steven Hayes book, “Get out of your mind and into your life: The New Acceptance and Commitment Therapy” (2005; New Harbinger Publications; posted on Blackboard).  Complete one of the values exercises at the end of the chapter, or the “values card sort”.

5)  Enhance optimism (Lyubomirsky) by creating a “Best Possible Selves” diary (additional instructions on Blackboard).

 SECTION III
1) Read about meditation from the website:  http://www.how-to-meditate.org, or via the “mindfulness” handouts (posted on Blackboard).  Meditate at least 20 minutes, 3 days in a row, and comment on the effects of the meditation.   2)  Attend a church service of a new/unfamiliar denomination (note:  the more you’re willing to step outside your comfort zone, the more you will get from this assignment; see Dave or me for suggestions).  Describe your experience (demographic characteristics of the members, aspects of the service, etc.).  What aspects of the readings on spirituality were captured by your experience?
3) Choose a country included on the “World Map of Happiness” (handout will distributed in class).  Do some reading about the country, and comment on the social, political, and/or cultural factors that may contribute to the country’s “happiness” ranking.  4) Write (and submit) an essay to NPR’s program, “This I believe.”  The essays should be between 350-500 words; see details at: http://www.npr.org/thisibelieve/agree.html   5)  Choose a favorite movie, novel, or artwork (e.g., musical selection, painting) that you feel illuminates or exemplifies some aspect of happiness or character strength.  Comment on how the writer/filmmaker/artist portrays his or her perspective; note consistencies or inconsistencies with what we’ve read or discussed. IF you present this in class, feel free to read an excerpt, show a video clip, etc. to illustrate.

6)  Write your own legacy (Peterson, p. 22)
 
 

Guidelines for reaction papers and presentations

The papers should be approximately between 2 and 2 ½ pages (doublespaced) in length, and should summarize the exercise AND your reactions to it.  You might include some or all of the following:  why you chose the exercise, what you predicted about the experience and how you actually felt about it, what you learned, discussion about how the exercise and your reaction to it relates to your readings in this (or any other) class, etc.  

You should also be prepared to give a 5-minute presentation of this (or the other Section 1) exercise in class.  Some of the exercises involve personal experiences that you might not feel comfortable sharing publicly, which is the rationale for asking you to present only one of the two exercises.  If you ever feel uncomfortable about presenting an exercise reaction in class, however, please discuss it with the TA or me and we will be happy to work out an alternative presentation with you.

You are not required to turn in reaction papers for the Section II or III exercises (though you may choose to include them in the portfolio), but I will ask you to report on which exercises you completed.


 

PSY 194Q • Current Tpcs In Clinical Psy

44120 • Spring 2010
Meets W 400pm-500pm SEA 3.250
show description

Seminars in Clinical Psychology. One or three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

PSY 341K • Positive Psy & The Good Life-W

44130 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 1100-1230pm SEA 3.250
show description

 

 

PSY 341K Positive Psychology and the Good Life (SWC)

Fall, 2009     TTh 11:00-12:15      SEA 3.250     (Unique # 44130)

 

Instructor:  Dr. Caryn Carlson                                             TA:  Sandra Pahl

Office/Phone:  SEA 3.216/475-8493                                 SEA 3.120

Office Hours:  W 8:00-9:30 & by app’t                                 T 9-11; Th 12:30-1:30 & by app’t

E-mail:  carlson@psy.utexas.edu                                     sandra.pahl@mail.utexas.edu

 

Text:  Peterson, C (2006).  A Primer in Positive Psychology.  Oxford Press.           

 

Description

 

This course provides a survey of the emerging field of Positive Psychology.

Class format will utilize both didactic and interactive components, with active participation expected from students in class discussions and exercises, as well as in assignments outside the classroom.  Course requirements include writing assignments, class participation, and a final examination. 

On the first day, you will complete an in-class writing assignment about what they hope to gain from the class.  On the second day, you will take “pre- class” tests to assess some of the constructs addressed in the course (e.g., happiness), and we will view a Positive Psychology video lecture by Ed Diener.  For homework, take the signature strengths survey on Seligman’s website (www.authentichappiness.com).  Next Th. (9/3), each student will give a “strength” story introduction and submit a listing of his or her top 5 strengths, rank ordered to denote preferences for which strength students wish to be the topic of their Strength essay/presentation.

The remainder of the course is divided into 3 sections. In Section I, we will define the field of Positive Psychology, discuss relevant constructs and how to measure them, consider the notion of a “happiness set point”, and review relevant research on personality, emotional, and cognitive contributions to well-being.  In Section II, we will discuss human strengths and virtues, human values, and review the role of goal-setting and other motivational factors in happiness.  We will finish this section by addressing whether happiness SHOULD and CAN be increased, and by considering criticisms of the Positive Psychology field. In Section III, we will consider the good life from a variety of perspectives, including spiritual, evolutionary, biological, economic, and cross-cultural views. Finally, we will discuss how Positive Psychology may apply to social change and public policy (note that topics/dates may vary slightly from that listed).

 

Grading and Grading Scale  

 

Course grades will be based on class attendance/participation (20 points), a Section I reaction paper (5 points), a “signature strength” essay (first draft, 10 points; final draft, 10 points), a final “course portfolio” (30 points) and an in-class final exam (25 points). 

 

A =  92-100            B+ = 88-89            C+ = 78-79            D+ = 68-69            F = 0-59

A- = 90-91            B   = 82-87            C = 72-77            D = 62-67

B- = 80-81             C- = 70-71            D- = 60-61


 

Schedule of course topics, activities, and requirements

 

Date                            Proposed Topics                         ___                           Book Chapters

                        COURSE INTRODUCTION AND OVERVIEW                                                                   

Th 8/27            In class writing about course expectations/review syllabus                   

T, 9/1             Positive Psychology video/pre-questionnaires                               

Th, 9/3            Strength story introductions (submit list of top strengths)

                       

                        SECTION I- WHAT IS POSITIVE PSYCHOLOGY?                           2-4               

T, 9/8             Definitions and measures

Th, 9/10            Happiness set point                                               

T, 9/15            Personality, positive emotions, & flourishing                                                   

Th, 9/17            Flow                                                  

T, 9/22            Exercise 1 presentations (reaction paper due)

 

                        SECTION II- STRENGTHS, VALUES, INCREASING HAPPINESS   5-7

Th, 9/24            Character strengths and virtues                                               

T, 9/29            Creativity (Michael Starbird)(tentative date)                          

Th, 10/1            Motivation and Goals (strength paper first draft due)                                       

T, 10/6            Motivation and Goals                                                                    

Th, 10/8            The Last Lecture (Randy Pausch)                                  

T, 10/13            Strengths presentations           

Th, 10/15            Strengths presentations                                   

T, 10/20            Strengths presentations                                               

Th, 10/22            Strengths presentations                                   

T, 10/27            Should happiness be increased?                 

Th, 10/29            Can happiness be increased?/Criticisms of Positive Psychology 

T, 11/3            Exercise II presentations

           

                        SECTION III- PERSPECTIVES ON THE GOOD LIFE                8-9; readings

Th, 11/5            Spiritual perspectives (Dave Collins) (final strength paper due)               

T, 11/10            Evolutionary and biological perspectives                              

Th, 11/12            Economic perspectives 

T, 11/17            Affluenza video                                                             

Th,11/19            Cultural perspectives

T, 11/24            Exercise III presentations/ post-questionnaires       

Th, 11/26            THANKSGIVING                                                                

T, 12/1            Social change                                                                         

Th, 12/3            My Last Lecture (course portfolio due)           

 

 

FINAL EXAMINATION: Monday, Dec. 14; 2-3:30 p.m.

 

 

Course activities

 

Outside-of-Class Exercises:

The course is divided into three sections.  In each section, students will complete 2 outside-of-class exercises and will offer a brief (5 minute) class presentation of their reactions to one of the exercises.  For section I, students will also write and submit a 2-page reaction paper for one of the two exercises; this paper will be edited and returned to the student (revisions may be included in the Course Portfolio, described below).  While students are not required to write/submit reaction papers for section II or III exercises, they may choose to do so to include in the Course Portfolio. 

 

Journaling:

Students are encouraged- though not required- to keep a journal documenting their reactions to course material.  Students are free to use any format they choose for the journal.  One possibility is to set aside a few minutes each week to record reactions, lessons learned, points of interest to pursue further, etc. You may choose to include journal entries as “evidence” in the Course Portfolio.

 

Writing Assignments 

           

Section I Reaction Paper (5 points): 

For Section I, students will submit a reaction paper based on one of the two outside-of-class exercises.  The paper should be double-spaced, and must be at least 2 (but no longer than 2  1/2) pages in length.  This paper will be graded (5 points) and returned; a revision of it may be included in the final Course Portfolio.  See “Guidelines for reaction papers and presentations” on the last page of the syllabus.

           

Signature Strength Essay (20 points): 

Based on the signature strengths assessment that all students will complete during the first course week, each student will be asked to choose one of their top 5 strengths on which to write an essay.  The essay should be double-spaced, and must be at least 4 (but no longer than 4  1/2) pages in length (not counting your reference list).  The essay must include a citation of literature (from the text and outside sources), and you should also include personal anecdotes, reference to “exemplars” (which may be real people or literary characters), and/or perspectives from other fields, e.g., philosophy, literature, cross-cultural work, etc.  The first draft of the paper will be graded (10 points) and returned with comments.  Students will revise and resubmit the final version of the paper, which will be worth 10 points.  Students will make brief (i.e., 10-15 minute) presentations on their signature strength report.


 

Final Course Portfolio (30 points): 

A portfolio is a collection of work—like an artist’s portfolio. In this case, it is a selected collection of your work for this class, organized in a particular way to effectively convey your message.  Your portfolio should integrate content and research findings from course materials, in addition to personal reactions (e.g., to exercises).  To help organize the portfolio, include a table of contents with numbered pages.  The portfolio must be a minimum of 6 pages in length (not counting the table of contents and any reference list you decide to include).

 

Each portfolio will be different because you are different from each other. The portfolio should start with a reflective opening (@ 3-4 pages in length) that reviews your work in the class.  This opening should include some or all of the following:

  • how you have processed the information and activities of the semester;
  • what you knew when you came in and whether that has been substantiated or changed;
  • what you have learned with which you may not agree;
  • what challenges to you the semester may have posed;
  • what successes you achieved

 

In order to support your answer to the above questions, you will explain how the evidence—in the form of @ 3-4 Appendices —supports the claims you make. This evidence may include reaction papers, a summary of your “pre” and “post” assessment measures, excerpts from journal/on-line entries you may have made during the semester, responses to discussion questions, or anything else that provides evidence about the work you have done for the class. 

 

Grading Writing Assignments

Assignments are due at the beginning of class on the due date.  Assignments turned in after class starts will be considered late; late assignments will be assessed a penalty of two points each day late.  Students are expected to attend to both the style (e.g., grammar, syntax, structure) and content of their writing assignments. 

 

Students are encouraged to meet with the TA and to make use of the Undergraduate Writing Center for assistance with assignments. The UWC provides professional consulting services for students who want to improve their writing. Students can bring their assignments to the UWC and work with a consultant on any aspect of their writing--from brainstorming, to developing and organizing an argument, to learning the conventions of usage and punctuation.  If you visit the UWC, please request that they notify me about your meeting; this will allow me to track your progress.  The UWC also provides helpful writing handouts from their main website:  <http://uwc.utexas.edu/handouts>http://uwc.utexas.edu/handouts

 

 

Other Course Requirements

 

Final Exam (25 points)

There will be a comprehensive final examination given during the final exam period.  The final exam will include a combination of multiple choice and short answer questions.  Please be certain that you will be available to take the final, as makeup exams will not be given. FINAL EXAMINATION: Monday, Dec. 14; 2-3:30 p.m.

 

Class Presentations, Attendance and Participation (20 points)

Throughout the semester, students are expected to be actively engaged in the class by making presentations (3 outside exercise presentations and the signature strength presentation), and by participating in class discussion (e.g., responding to discussion questions). To assist me in evaluating your effort, at the end of the semester you will provide me with a one-page self-assessment of your participation in the class.  The assessment should include an evaluation of your attendance, “formal” presentations, and contribution to discussion. 

Presentations:  Ten points will be assigned for presentations (2 points for each outside exercise presentation and 4 points for the strength presentation).

Attendance/participation:  Ten points will be assigned for class attendance and participation. Because this represents a significant portion of your grade, it is obvious that attendance is crucial.  If you have to miss a class and have a good excuse, please let me know as soon as possible.  In addition to attendance, points will be assigned based on the quality of student presentation and contributions to discussion, including familiarity with the readings, ability to express ideas clearly, ability to synthesize thoughts of others to form new insights or questions, ability to disagree constructively, and cooperation in building a stimulating and supportive intellectual atmosphere in class. 

 

 

Department and University Policies

 

The Psychology Department will drop all students who do not meet the following prerequisites:

(a) PSY 301 with a C or better

(b) PSY 418 (or an equivalent listed in the course schedule) with a C or better

(c) Upper-Division standing (60 hours completed) 

 

The University of Texas at Austin provides upon request appropriate academic accommodations for qualified students with disabilities.  For more information, contact the Office of the Dean of Students at 471-6259, 471-4641 TTY.

 

 

Exercises/Reaction Papers

 

For each section, complete two exercises. You will then choose one of the two exercises to present in class during the designated times.  For Section I, choose one of the two exercises on which to write and submit a 2-page reaction paper.  With instructor permission, you may substitute an exercise from the Peterson text for any of those below.

 

SECTION I (if you choose 1, do EITHER a or b)

 

1a) Write and deliver a “gratitude letter” to someone who has been especially kind to you but has never been properly thanked.  Describe how this experience effected you and the recipient (Peterson, p. 31).

1b) Complete a “Gratitude diary” by writing down three things that go well each day and their causes every night for one week; provide a causal explanation for each good thing.  After a week, evaluate how the exercise made you feel (Peterson, p. 38).

 

2) Complete at least one “pleasurable” and one “philanthropic” activity, and comment on how each made you feel, both immediately following the activity and the next day (Peterson, p. 34).

 

3)  “Have a good day” (Peterson, p. 43; can complete for one week).

 

4)  Practice kindness (Lyubomirsky) by performing 5 acts of kindness over the course of a week (additional instructions on Blackboard).

 

5)  Savor life’s joys (Lyubomirsky) by relishing ordinary experiences of everyday life (additional instructions on Blackboard).

 

SECTION II

 

1) Use one of your top strengths in a new and different way every day for five days (Peterson, p. 158).

 

2) Read the biography of someone you admire (artist, scientist, writer, politician, public figure, athlete, etc.).  Discuss your impressions about what this person’s signature strengths might have been.  How early were they manifested, and what factors seemed to influence their development? 

 

3) Ask a relative (grandparent, parent, sibling) to take the online “signature strengths” survey (www.authentichappiness.com).  Interview them based on the results, and describe any insights you gained about similarities and differences between your strengths and theirs.  To what do you attribute the patterns?

 

 

4) Read the section on values in Steven Hayes book, “Get out of your mind and into your life: The New Acceptance and Commitment Therapy” (2005; New Harbinger Publications; posted on Blackboard).  Complete one of the values exercises at the end of the chapter, or the “values card sort”.

 

5)  Enhance optimism (Lyubomirsky) by creating a “Best Possible Selves” diary (additional instructions on Blackboard).

 

 

SECTION III

 

1) Read about meditation from the website:  http://www.how-to-meditate.org, or via the “mindfulness” handouts (posted on Blackboard).  Meditate at least 20 minutes, 3 days in a row, and comment on the effects of the meditation.

 

2)  Attend a church service of a new/unfamiliar denomination (note:  the more you’re willing to step outside your comfort zone, the more you will get from this assignment; see Dave or me for suggestions).  Describe your experience (demographic characteristics of the members, aspects of the service, etc.).  What aspects of the readings on spirituality were captured by your experience?

 

3) Choose a country included on the “World Map of Happiness” (handout will distributed in class).  Do some reading about the country, and comment on the social, political, and/or cultural factors that may contribute to the country’s “happiness” ranking.

 

4) Write (and submit) an essay to NPR’s program, “This I believe.”  The essays should be between 350-500 words; see details at: http://www.npr.org/thisibelieve/agree.html

 

5)  Choose a favorite movie, novel, or artwork (e.g., musical selection, painting) that you feel illuminates or exemplifies some aspect of happiness or character strength.  Comment on how the writer/filmmaker/artist portrays his or her perspective; note consistencies or inconsistencies with what we’ve read or discussed. IF you present this in class, feel free to read an excerpt, show a video clip, etc. to illustrate.

 

6)  Write your own legacy (Peterson, p. 22)


 

 

Guidelines for reaction papers and presentations

 

The papers should be approximately between 2 and 2 ½ pages (doublespaced) in length, and should summarize the exercise AND your reactions to it.  You might include some or all of the following:  why you chose the exercise, what you predicted about the experience and how you actually felt about it, what you learned, discussion about how the exercise and your reaction to it relates to your readings in this (or any other) class, etc.  

 

You should also be prepared to give a 5-minute presentation of this (or the other Section 1) exercise in class.  Some of the exercises involve personal experiences that you might not feel comfortable sharing publicly, which is the rationale for asking you to present only one of the two exercises.  If you ever feel uncomfortable about presenting an exercise reaction in class, however, please discuss it with Brent or me and we will be happy to work out an alternative presentation with you.

 

You are not required to turn in reaction papers for the Section II or III exercises (though you may choose to include them in the portfolio), but I will ask you to report on which exercises you completed.

 

 

 

PSY 194Q • Current Tpcs In Clinical Psy

44290 • Fall 2009
Meets W 400pm-500pm SEA 5.106
show description

Seminars in Clinical Psychology. One or three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

PSY 341K • Positive Psy & The Good Life-W

43190 • Spring 2009
Meets TTH 1100-1230pm SEA 3.250
show description

Topics of contemporary interest that may vary from semester to semester. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: For psychology majors, upper-division standing and Psychology 301 and 418 with a grade of at least C in each; for nonmajors, upper-division standing, Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C, and one of the following with a grade of at least C: Biology 318M, Civil Engineering 311S, Economics 329, Educational Psychology 371, Government 350K, Mathematics 316, Psychology 317, Sociology 317L, Social Work 318, Statistics 309.

PSY 194Q • Current Tpcs In Clinical Psy

43380 • Spring 2009
Meets W 400pm-500pm SEA 3.250
show description

Seminars in Clinical Psychology. One or three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisites: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

Books

ADHD with Comorbid Disorders: Clinical Assessment and Management

ADHD with Comorbid Disorders: Clinical Assessment and Management

 

Pliszka, S.R., Carlson, C.L., Swanson, J.M.

ADHD with Comorbid Disorders: Clinical Assessment and Management
July 1999
Guilford Publications

 

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