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Jacqueline Woolley, Chair The University of Texas at Austin, SEA 4.212, Austin, TX 78712 • (512) 475-7596

Robert A Josephs

Professor Ph.D., University of Michigan

Robert A Josephs

Contact

Biography

Dr. Josephs plans to accept a graduate student to his laboratory for Fall of 2015.

Dr. Josephs heads the Clinical Neuroendocrinology Laboratory at UT-Austin. He is also a member of UT-Austin’s Institute for Neuroscience andUT-Austin's Institute for Mental Health Research.

The primary research objective of the Clinical Neuroendocrinology Laboratory is to gain a better understanding of the etiology of mood and anxiety disorders. We borrow techniques from behavioral neuroendocrinology, molecular genetics, and social-personality psychology. We conduct field studies and laboratory experiments. Our field studies use longitudinal designs to look prospectively at the emergence of mood and anxiety disorders in populations exposed to high levels of stress and trauma. Our laboratory experiments employ a wide variety of pharmacologic agents to test various candidate mechanisms underlying the etiology of mood and anxiety disorders.  

Selected Representative Publications

Interests

Clinical Neuroendocrinology

PSY 418 • Statistics And Research Design

42560 • Spring 2015
Meets TTH 930am-1100am SEA 2.108
show description

Students may not enroll in Psychology 418 more than twice. Survey of statistics, including central tendency, variability and inference, and scientific methodology used in psychological research. Three lecture hours and two discussion hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C and credit for one of the following: Mathematics 302, 303D, 403K, 305G, 408C, 408K, 316; or Statistics and Scientific Computation 302, 303, 304, 305, 306, 318.

PSY 418 • Statistics And Research Design

43605-43610 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm NOA 1.116
show description

Students may not enroll in Psychology 418 more than twice. Survey of statistics, including central tendency, variability and inference, and scientific methodology used in psychological research. Three lecture hours and two discussion hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C and credit for one of the following: Mathematics 302, 303D, 403K, 305G, 408C, 408K, 316; or Statistics and Scientific Computation 302, 303, 304, 305, 306, 318.

PSY 418 • Statistics And Research Design

43635-43640 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm NOA 1.116
show description

Students may not enroll in Psychology 418 more than twice. Survey of statistics, including central tendency, variability and inference, and scientific methodology used in psychological research. Three lecture hours and two discussion hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C and credit for one of the following: Mathematics 302, 303D, 403K, 305G, 408C, 408K, 316; or Statistics and Scientific Computation 302, 303, 304, 305, 306, 318.

PSY 418 • Statistics And Research Design

43950-43955 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm NOA 1.116
show description

Students may not enroll in Psychology 418 more than twice. Survey of statistics, including central tendency, variability and inference, and scientific methodology used in psychological research. Three lecture hours and two discussion hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C and credit for one of the following: Mathematics 302, 303D, 403K, 305G, 408C, 408K, 316; or Statistics and Scientific Computation 302, 303, 304, 305, 306, 318.

PSY 418 • Statistics And Research Design

43655-43660 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm NOA 1.116
show description

Students may not enroll in Psychology 418 more than twice. Survey of statistics, including central tendency, variability and inference, and scientific methodology used in psychological research. Three lecture hours and two discussion hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C and credit for one of the following: Mathematics 302, 303D, 403K, 305G, 408C, 408K, 316; or Statistics and Scientific Computation 302, 303, 304, 305, 306, 318.

PSY 418 • Statistics And Research Design

43675-43680 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm NOA 1.116
show description

Students may not enroll in Psychology 418 more than twice. Survey of statistics, including central tendency, variability and inference, and scientific methodology used in psychological research. Three lecture hours and two discussion hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C and credit for one of the following: Mathematics 302, 303D, 403K, 305G, 408C, 408K, 316; or Statistics and Scientific Computation 302, 303, 304, 305, 306, 318.

PSY 418 • Statistics And Research Design

43210-43215 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm NOA 1.116
show description

Statistics is a branch of applied mathematics. Understanding statistics is critical not only for those who work in science and related disciplines, but also for those who wish to understand the results of these efforts. David Brooks (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/David_Brooks_(journalist)) has laid out of list of eight essential things to do while in college. One of them is to take a course in statistics. Without a working knowledge of statistics, we are forced to rely upon the conclusions and interpretations of the authors and publicists of a study, and sometimes (believe it or not!), those interpretations are misleading and just flat-out wrong: (http://www.senseaboutscience.org.uk/index.php/site/other/78/). It is hard to overstate the application of statistics. Whenever data are collected, statistics are used to analyze those data. For example, statistics form the interpretive basis of nearly all studies in medicine, psychology, neuroscience, public policy, economics, the biological sciences, and so on and so forth. In this course, you will be provided with the basic tools to understand, evaluate, conduct, and communicate behavioral research. Specifically, you will learn about frequency distributions, central tendency, variability, probability, hypothesis testing, t-tests (for independent and related samples), effect sizes, statistical power, estimation using confidence intervals, one-way and two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), correlation, non-parametric statistics, including the chi-square statistic (goodness of fit and independence), the sign test, and several others, and binomial probabilities (including the binomial test and the test of a population proportion). Approximately the first two and one half weeks of the course focus on methodology and related issues, with the remainder of the course focusing on descriptive and inferential statistics. Because this is also an intensive writing requirement, you will be required to complete weekly writing assignments, a term paper, and an in-class oral presentation.

Although this is not a course on computers, the use of computers is critical for data analysis, and the presentation of the results of experiments. To this end, we will familiarize you with a number of software applications, including but not limited to Excel, Word, PowerPoint, and SPSS.

PSY 418 • Statistics And Research Design

43240-43245 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm NOA 1.116
show description

Statistics is a branch of applied mathematics. Understanding statistics is critical not only for those who work in science and related disciplines, but also for those who wish to understand the results of these efforts. David Brooks (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/David_Brooks_(journalist)) has laid out of list of eight essential things to do while in college. One of them is to take a course in statistics. Without a working knowledge of statistics, we are forced to rely upon the conclusions and interpretations of the authors and publicists of a study, and sometimes (believe it or not!), those interpretations are misleading and just flat-out wrong: (http://www.senseaboutscience.org.uk/index.php/site/other/78/). It is hard to overstate the application of statistics. Whenever data are collected, statistics are used to analyze those data. For example, statistics form the interpretive basis of nearly all studies in medicine, psychology, neuroscience, public policy, economics, the biological sciences, and so on and so forth. In this course, you will be provided with the basic tools to understand, evaluate, conduct, and communicate behavioral research. Specifically, you will learn about frequency distributions, central tendency, variability, probability, hypothesis testing, t-tests (for independent and related samples), effect sizes, statistical power, estimation using confidence intervals, one-way and two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), correlation, non-parametric statistics, including the chi-square statistic (goodness of fit and independence), the sign test, and several others, and binomial probabilities (including the binomial test and the test of a population proportion). Approximately the first two and one half weeks of the course focus on methodology and related issues, with the remainder of the course focusing on descriptive and inferential statistics. Because this is also an intensive writing requirement, you will be required to complete weekly writing assignments, a term paper, and an in-class oral presentation. 

Although this is not a course on computers, the use of computers is critical for data analysis, and the presentation of the results of experiments. To this end, we will familiarize you with a number of software applications, including but not limited to Excel, Word, PowerPoint, and SPSS.

PSY 418 • Statistics And Research Design

43170-43175 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm NOA 1.116
show description

Statistics is a branch of applied mathematics. Understanding statistics is critical not only for those who work in science and related disciplines, but also for those who wish to understand the results of these efforts. David Brooks (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/David_Brooks_(journalist)) has laid out of list of eight essential things to do while in college. One of them is to take a course in statistics. Without a working knowledge of statistics, we are forced to rely upon the conclusions and interpretations of the authors and publicists of a study, and oftentimes (believe it or not!), those interpretations are misleading and sometimes flat-out wrong: (http://www.senseaboutscience.org.uk/index.php/site/other/78/). It is hard to overstate the application of statistics. Whenever data are collected, statistics are used to analyze those data. For example, statistics form the interpretive basis of nearly all studies in medicine, psychology, neuroscience, public policy, economics, the biological sciences, and so on and so forth. In this course, you will be provided with the basic tools to understand, evaluate, conduct, and communicate research. Specifically, you will learn about frequency distributions, central tendency, variability, probability, hypothesis testing, t-tests (for independent and related samples), effect sizes, statistical power, estimation using confidence intervals, one-way and two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), correlation, the chi- square statistic (goodness of fit and independence), and binomial probabilities (including the binomial test and the test of a population proportion). Approximately the first two and one half weeks of the course focus on methodology and related issues, with the remainder of the course focusing on descriptive and inferential statistics. Because this is also an intensive writing requirement, you will be required to complete weekly writing assignments, a term paper, and an in-class oral presentation.

Although this is not a course on computers, the use of computers is critical for data analysis, and the presentation of the results of experiments. To this end, we will familiarize you with a number of software applications, including but not limited to Excel, Word, PowerPoint, and SPSS.

PSY 418 • Statistics And Research Design

43110-43115 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm NOA 1.116
show description

Statistics is a branch of applied mathematics. Understanding statistics is critical not only for those who work in science and related disciplines, but also for those who wish to understand the results of these efforts. David Brooks, the columnist who writes for the New York Times, is a commentator on “The Newshour with Jim Lehrer” and is also a frequent analyst on NPR’s “All Things Considered”. He has laid out of list of eight essential things to do while in college. One of them is to take a course in statistics. Without a working knowledge of statistics, we are forced to rely upon the conclusions and interpretations of the authors and publicists of a study, and oftentimes (believe it or not!), those interpretations are misleading and sometimes flat-out wrong: (http://www.senseaboutscience.org.uk/index.php/site/other/78/). It is hard to overstate the application of statistics. Whenever data are collected, statistics are used to analyze those data. For example, statistics form the interpretive basis of nearly all studies in medicine, psychology, neuroscience, public policy, economics, the biological sciences, and so on and so forth. In this course, you will be provided with the basic tools to understand, evaluate, conduct, and communicate research. Specifically, you will learn about frequency distributions, central tendency, variability, probability, hypothesis testing, t-tests (for independent and related samples), effect sizes, statistical power, estimation using confidence intervals, one- way and two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), correlation, linear regression, the chi-square statistic (goodness of fit and independence), and binomial probabilities (including the binomial test and the test of a population proportion). Approximately the first three weeks of the course focus on methodology and related issues, with the remainder of the course focusing on descriptive and inferential statistics. Because this is also an intensive writing requirement, you will be required to complete weekly writing assignments and a term paper.

Although this is not a course on computers, the use of computers is critical for data analysis, and the presentation of the results of experiments. To this end, we will familiarize you with a number of software applications, including but not limited to Excel, Word, PowerPoint, and SPSS.

PSY 418 • Statistics And Research Design

43130-43135 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm NOA 1.116
show description

Statistics is a branch of applied mathematics. Understanding statistics is critical not only for those who work in science and related disciplines, but also for those who wish to understand the results of these efforts. David Brooks, the columnist who writes for the New York Times, is a commentator on “The Newshour with Jim Lehrer” and is also a frequent analyst on NPR’s “All Things Considered”. He has laid out of list of eight essential things to do while in college. One of them is to take a course in statistics. Without a working knowledge of statistics, we are forced to rely upon the conclusions and interpretations of the authors and publicists of a study, and oftentimes (believe it or not!), those interpretations are misleading and sometimes flat-out wrong: (http://www.senseaboutscience.org.uk/index.php/site/other/78/). It is hard to overstate the application of statistics. Whenever data are collected, statistics are used to analyze those data. For example, statistics form the interpretive basis of nearly all studies in medicine, psychology, neuroscience, public policy, economics, the biological sciences, and so on and so forth. In this course, you will be provided with the basic tools to understand, evaluate, conduct, and communicate research. Specifically, you will learn about frequency distributions, central tendency, variability, probability, hypothesis testing, t-tests (for independent and related samples), effect sizes, statistical power, estimation using confidence intervals, one- way and two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), correlation, linear regression, the chi-square statistic (goodness of fit and independence), and binomial probabilities (including the binomial test and the test of a population proportion). Approximately the first three weeks of the course focus on methodology and related issues, with the remainder of the course focusing on descriptive and inferential statistics. Because this is also an intensive writing requirement, you will be required to complete weekly writing assignments and a term paper.

Although this is not a course on computers, the use of computers is critical for data analysis, and the presentation of the results of experiments. To this end, we will familiarize you with a number of software applications, including but not limited to Excel, Word, PowerPoint, and SPSS.

PSY 418 • Statistics And Research Design

43680-43685 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm NOA 1.116
show description

 Course Objectives: Statistics is a branch of applied mathematics. Understanding statistics is  critical not

only for those who work in science and related disciplines, but also for those who wish to understand the

results of these efforts. David Brooks, the columnist who writes for the New York Times, is a

commentator on “The Newshour with Jim Lehrer” and is also a frequent analyst on NPR’s “All Things

Considered”. He has laid out of list of eight essential things to do while in college. One of them is to take

a course in statistics. Without a working knowledge of statistics, we are forced to rely upon the conclusions

and interpretations of the authors and publicists of a study, and oftentimes (believe it or not!), those

interpretations are misleading and sometimes flat-out wrong:

(http://www.senseaboutscience.org.uk/index.php/site/other/78/). It is hard to overstate the application of

statistics. Whenever data are collected, statistics are used to analyze those data. For example, statistics

form the interpretive basis of nearly all studies in medicine, psychology, neuroscience, public policy,

economics, the biological sciences, and so on and so forth. In this course, you will be provided with the

basic tools to understand, evaluate, conduct, and communicate research. Specifically, you will learn about

frequency distributions, central tendency, variability, probability, hypothesis testing, t-tests (for

independent and related samples), effect sizes, statistical power, estimation using confidence intervals, oneway

and two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), correlation, linear regression, the chi-square statistic

(goodness of fit and independence), and binomial probabilities (including the binomial test and the test of a

population proportion). Approximately the first three weeks of the course focus on methodology and

related issues, with the remainder of the course focusing on descriptive and inferential statistics. Because

this is also an intensive writing requirement, you will be required to complete weekly writing assignments

and a term paper.

Although this is not a

PSY 418 • Statistics And Research Design

43065-43070 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm NOA 1.116
show description

Meets with 43070

Prerequisites

PSY 301 with a grade of at least C, M 302 or higher-level mathematics course, and a major in psychology.

Course Description

Understand, evaluate, conduct, and communicate scientific research. Basics of research methodology and statistics. First four weeks focus on methodology, remainder focuses on descriptive and inferential statistics. Although this is not a course on computers, the use of computers is essential in the analysis and presentation of the results of experiments. We will familiarize you with a number of software applications, including Eudora, Excel, Microsoft Word, PsychInfo, and SPSS.

Grading Policy

A series of weekly written assignments due in lab, worth approximately 10% of your final grade.

A term paper worth approximately 20% of your final grade. The term paper assignment will involve teaming up with 2-3 of your classmates and generating a new research idea that you will empirically test. 10% of this grade will come from anonymous evaluations of you by your groupmates.

Three exams worth about 30% of your final grade. The first exam will cover methods; the latter two will cover statistics.

A Power Point in-class presentation worth about 10% of your final grade.

A non-comprehensive final exam worth approximately 30% of the final course grade. This exam will test your knowledge of statistics, but will not examine research methodology. The final exam will composed of a variety of question types, including fill-in-blank, multiple choice, true/false, and essay.

Texts

Interactive Statistics http://www.introstats.net

APA Publication Manual

PSY 418 • Statistics And Research Design

43085-43090 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm NOA 1.116
show description

 

Prerequisites

PSY 301 with a grade of at least C, M 302 or higher-level mathematics course, and a major in psychology.

Course Description

Understand, evaluate, conduct, and communicate scientific research. Basics of research methodology and statistics. First four weeks focus on methodology, remainder focuses on descriptive and inferential statistics. Although this is not a course on computers, the use of computers is essential in the analysis and presentation of the results of experiments. We will familiarize you with a number of software applications, including Eudora, Excel, Microsoft Word, PsychInfo, and SPSS.

Grading Policy

A series of weekly written assignments due in lab, worth approximately 10% of your final grade.

A term paper worth approximately 20% of your final grade. The term paper assignment will involve teaming up with 2-3 of your classmates and generating a new research idea that you will empirically test. 10% of this grade will come from anonymous evaluations of you by your groupmates. Three exams worth about 30% of your final grade. The first exam will cover methods; the latter two will cover statistics. A Power Point in-class presentation worth about 10% of your final grade. A non-comprehensive final exam worth approximately 30% of the final course grade. This exam will test your knowledge of statistics, but will not examine research methodology. The final exam will composed of a variety of question types, including fill-in-blank, multiple choice, true/false, and essay.

Texts

Interactive Statistics http://www.introstats.net

APA Publication Manual

PSY 418 • Statistics & Research Design-W

43845-43850 • Spring 2010
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm NOA 1.116
show description

Psy 418 Spring Session, 2010 Course Syllabus (Instructor: Josephs)
Instructor: Bob Josephs josephs@mail.psy.utexas.edu
Lecture TTH, NOA 1.16, 0 2:00-3:15    Teaching Assistants:
Ashley Brock, Shasta Ihorn, brockah@mail.utexas.edu, shasta.ihorn@gmail.com
Office Phone: 471-9788     Lab: #43845 (Wed: 1-3). SEA 2.114
Lab: #43850 (Wed: 1-3). SEA 2.122
Office: 3.204 SEA
    Office: SEA 2.114 & 2.122
OH:  Wednesdays, 3-4 pm, and by appt.    OH: Brock (TBA); Ihorn (TBA). All PSY 418 Office Hours & Walk-in Times are held in SEA 2.122
Required Materials:
Suter, W. Newton, & Lindgren, Henry Clay (1989). Experimentation in Psychology: A Guided Tour. Boston, MA: Allyn and Bacon. (SL). Pickup photocopy at Paradigm. 407 W 24th St. 472-7986. You might also be able to find it cheaper online.
Interactive Statistics (IS).  Available at the University Coop Bookstore, 2246 Guadalupe.  Austin, TX 78705.  Ph: 476-7211.  You might be able to find it cheaper online (new or used).
A calculator. Must be able to perform square roots.
Course Objectives: First and foremost, to have fun.  Second, to understand, evaluate, conduct, and communicate research in behavioral science. To this end, you will be expected to master the basics of research methodology and statistics. Approximately the first three weeks of the course focus on methodology and related issues, with the remainder of the course focusing on descriptive and inferential statistics. Also, there are numerous writing assignments.
Although this is not a course on computers, the use of computers is essential in the analysis and presentation of the results of experiments. To this end, we will familiarize you with a number of software applications, including but not limited to Excel, Word, PowerPoint, and SPSS.
Requirements: You can earn a maximum of 347 points in the class.  Here’s how:
The lab, or writing component is worth 132 points.  Your TA will cover these assignments in greater detail in lab.  To avoid confusion, please be aware of the following rule:  For all written assignments, the following late submission rules apply:
If you turn in the submission late (past the deadline) by more than 1 minute, you will receive half credit.  If you are late by more than 24 hours, you will receive no credit.
Writing Center: I strongly encourage you to use the Undergraduate Writing Center, FAC 211, 471-6222: <http://uwc.utexas.edu/home>http://uwc.utexas.edu/home). The Undergraduate Writing Center offers free, individualized, expert help with writing for any UT undergraduate, by appointment or on a drop-in basis. Any undergraduate enrolled in a course at UT can visit the UWC for assistance with any writing project. They work with students from every department on campus, for both academic and non-academic writing. Whether you are writing a lab report, a resume, a term paper, a statement for an application, or your own poetry, UWC consultants will be happy to work with you. Their services are not just for writing with "problems." Getting feedback from an informed audience is a normal part of a successful writing project. Consultants help students develop strategies to improve their writing. The assistance they provide is intended to foster independence. Each student determines how to use the consultant's advice. The consultants are trained to help you work on your writing in ways that preserve the integrity of your work.

Statistics Tutoring:  There is tutoring for Psychology Statistics at the UT Learning Center at Jester, listed as “Statistics for Social Sciences.”  There is free “drop-in” tutoring, but you probably have to get an appointment to get someone who is qualified to tutor statistics.  One-on-one tutoring runs $13.50/hr, but apparently there are a few ways to get the fee waived. http://www.utexas.edu/student/utlc/tutoring/appointment_tutoring.php
There is also free statistics consulting.  Here is the link: http://ssc.utexas.edu/consulting/free-consulting
The methods and statistics component involves four exams and is worth 215 points. The first exam will cover methods and is worth 35 points; the next two will cover statistics and are each worth 40 points.  The final exam is a comprehensive statistics exam (does not cover methods) and is worth 100 points.
Grades: Except for the four exams, the class is NOT graded on a curve. Thus, in principle, everyone in the course could earn an "A".  Research has indicated that absolute grading, as opposed to grading on a curve, encourages cooperation rather than competition because your course grade cannot benefit from poor performance on the part of your classmates.  The exams are curved in manner that has become standard for math and physics classes.  The top three scores are averaged, and then the difference between this average and a perfect score is added to everyone’s score.  For example, if the average of the top three scores on the 2nd exam is a 35, then everyone in the class receives an additional 5 points.  There is no extra credit and there are no makeup exams.
A = 319 – 347 pts
A- = 312 – 318.99
B+ = 305 – 311.99
B = 284 – 304.99
B- = 277 – 283.99
C+ = 270 – 276.99
C = 250 – 269.99
C- = 243 – 249.99
D+ = 236 – 242.99
D = 215 – 235.99
D- = 208 – 214.99
F = 0 207.99
Out of respect for your classmates, please turn off or do not bring to class noise-emitting electronic devices. These include beepers, cell phones, and watch chimes.
Notice about Disabilities:
The University of Texas at Austin provides upon request appropriate academic accommodations for qualified students with disabilities. For more information, contact the Office of the Dean of Students at 471-6259, 471-4641 TTY.
Scholastic Dishonesty:
You are expected to do independent work on all exams and papers. Read the information on this website carefully, as ignorance of these UT rules is not a defense: http://deanofstudents.utexas.edu/sjs/academicintegrity.html.  Your TAs will cover this critical issue in some depth in lab.  However:
Students who violate University rules on scholastic dishonesty will be summarily referred to the Office of the Dean of Students.  This office (and not your instructor) will resolve the case.  Although the University of Texas at Austin does not have a formal Honor System, by enrolling in this class you are agreeing to abide by certain rules and regulations.  You will abide by the Honor System that is set in place by the McCombs School of Business.  Specifically, you vow not to lie, cheat or steal, or commit any act of fraud, nor will you tolerate those who do. Furthermore, by enrolling in this class, you understand that any violation of these principles may result in your dismissal from the University.

Rules and regulations:
Changes to paper deadlines, exam dates, etc. are announced in class. You are responsible for announcements that are made in class. Due to the inevitable and unavoidable problems that are associated with electronic mail, your all-knowing instructor cautions you not to rely on this unreliable method of communication.  That said, he will send out email announcements. However, all official class business will be conducted during lecture and lab. If you miss a lecture or lab, you are responsible for determining what you missed.
Psychology Departmental Regulations:
The Psychology Department will drop all students who do not meet the ?following prerequisites: PSY 301 with a C or better; Math 302 or a ?higher level mathematics course; and a major in Psychology.
University Regulations:
The University of Texas at Austin provides upon request appropriate ?academic accommodations for qualified students with disabilities. ?For more information, contact the Office of the Dean of Students at ?471-6259, 471-4641 TTY.
Tentative Lecture and Reading Schedule (some changes are inevitable, but any changes will be announced at least a week in advance)
Week of...     Reading and exam schedule     Topics to be covered
             
Jan 18     SL chaps 1& 2     Introduction/Syllabus
             
Jan 25     SL chap 3     Reasoning/Theory
         
Feb 1    SL chaps 4&5    Variables/Control
             
Feb 8    SL chaps 6&7    Artifacts/Design
             
Feb 15    IS chaps 1&2
Exam I (does not cover IS)    Stats intro/Freq Distr.
           
Feb 22    IS chaps 3&4    Central Tendency/ Variance/Probability
             
Mar 1    IS chap 5    Hypothesis Testing I
             
Mar 8    IS chaps 6&7    Hypothesis Testing II
           
Mar 15    Spring Break    No assignment
       
Mar 29    IS chap 9
Exam II     Conf Intervals/Effect size
Apr 5    IS Chap 10 (skip 10.4 to end of chap)    ANOVA
             
Apr 12    IS chap 12    Chi square goodness of fit and test of independence
             
Apr 19    No Reading     Binomial distribution, sign test, CI of a proportion
             
Apr 26    IS chap 11 Exam III
    Covariation & Correlation/Linear regression
             
May 3    No reading    In-class presentations

PSY 418 • Statistics & Research Design-W

44020-44025 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 1100-1230pm NOA 1.116
show description

Psy 418 Fall Session, 2009 Course Syllabus (Instructor: Josephs)

Instructor: Bob Josephs josephs@mail.psy.utexas.edu

Lecture TTH, NOA 1.16, 11:00-12:15 & 2:00-3:15

Teaching Assistants:

Ashley Brock, Shasta Ihorn, Molly Ireland, Ross Otto

brockah@mail.utexas.edu, molly.ireland@gmail.com, rotto@mail.utexas.edu, shasta.ihorn@gmail.com

Office Phone: 471-9788

Lab: #44020 (Wed: 11-1) #44040 (Wed: 1-3). SEA 2.114

Lab: #44025 (Wed: 11-1) #44045 (Wed: 1-3). SEA 2.122

Office: 3.204 SEA

 

Office: SEA 2.114 & 2.122

OH:  Wednesdays, 2-4 pm, and by appt.

OH: TBA

Required Materials:

Suter, W. Newton, & Lindgren, Henry Clay (1989). Experimentation in Psychology: A Guided Tour. Boston, MA: Allyn and Bacon. (SL). Pickup photocopy at Paradigm. 407 W 24th St. 472-7986.

Interactive Statistics (IS).  Available at the University Coop Bookstore, 2246 Guadalupe.  Austin, TX 78705.  Ph: 476-7211.  You might be able to find it cheaper online (new or used).

A calculator. Must be able to perform square roots.

Course Objectives: First and foremost, to have fun.  Second, to understand, evaluate, conduct, and communicate research in behavioral science. To this end, you will be expected to master the basics of research methodology and statistics. Approximately the first three weeks of the course focus on methodology and related issues, with the remainder of the course focusing on descriptive and inferential statistics. Also, there are numerous writing assignments.

Although this is not a course on computers, the use of computers is essential in the analysis and presentation of the results of experiments. To this end, we will familiarize you with a number of software applications, including but not limited to Excel, Word, PowerPoint, and SPSS.

Requirements: You can earn a maximum of 347 points in the class.  Here’s how:

The lab, or writing component is worth 132 points.  Your TA will cover these assignments in greater detail in lab.

Writing Center: I strongly encourage you to use the Undergraduate Writing Center, FAC 211, 471-6222: <http://uwc.utexas.edu/home>http://uwc.utexas.edu/home). The Undergraduate Writing Center offers free, individualized, expert help with writing for any UT undergraduate, by appointment or on a drop-in basis. Any undergraduate enrolled in a course at UT can visit the UWC for assistance with any writing project. They work with students from every department on campus, for both academic and non-academic writing. Whether you are writing a lab report, a resume, a term paper, a statement for an application, or your own poetry, UWC consultants will be happy to work with you. Their services are not just for writing with "problems." Getting feedback from an informed audience is a normal part of a successful writing project. Consultants help students develop strategies to improve their writing. The assistance they provide is intended to foster independence. Each student determines how to use the consultant's advice. The consultants are trained to help you work on your writing in ways that preserve the integrity of your work.

 

The methods and statistics component involves four exams and is worth 215 points. The first exam will cover methods and is worth 35 points; the next two will cover statistics and are each worth 40 points.  The final exam is a comprehensive statistics exam (does not cover methods) and is worth 100 points.

Grades: Except for the four exams, the class is NOT graded on a curve. Thus, in principle, everyone in the course could earn an "A".  Research has indicated that absolute grading, as opposed to grading on a curve, encourages cooperation rather than competition because your course grade cannot benefit from poor performance on the part of your classmates.  The exams are curved in manner that has become standard for math and physics classes.  The top three scores are averaged, and then the difference between this average and a perfect score is added to everyone’s score.  For example, if the average of the top three scores on the 2nd exam is a 35, then everyone in the class receives an additional 5 points.  There is no extra credit and there are no makeup exams.

A = 319 – 347 pts

A- = 312 – 318.99

B+ = 305 – 311.99

B = 284 – 304.99

B- = 277 – 283.99

C+ = 270 – 276.99

C = 250 – 269.99

C- = 243 – 249.99

D+ = 236 – 242.99

D = 215 – 235.99

D- = 208 – 214.99

F = 0 207.99

Out of respect for your classmates, please turn off or do not bring to class noise-emitting electronic devices. These include beepers, cell phones, and watch chimes.

Notice about Disabilities:

The University of Texas at Austin provides upon request appropriate academic accommodations for qualified students with disabilities. For more information, contact the Office of the Dean of Students at 471-6259, 471-4641 TTY.

Scholastic Dishonesty:

You are expected to do independent work on all exams and papers. Read the information on this website carefully, as ignorance of these UT rules is not a defense: http://deanofstudents.utexas.edu/sjs/academicintegrity.html.  Your TAs will cover this critical issue in some depth in lab.  However:

Students who violate University rules on scholastic dishonesty will be subject to disciplinary penalties, including expulsion from the University.  Although the University of Texas at Austin does not have a formal Honor System, by enrolling in this class you are agreeing to abide by certain rules and regulations.  You will abide by the Honor System that is set in place by the McCombs School of Business.  Specifically, you vow not to lie, cheat or steal, or commit any act of fraud, nor will you tolerate those who do. Furthermore, by enrolling in this class, you understand that any violation of these principles may result in your dismissal from the University.

 

Rules and regulations:

Changes to paper deadlines, exam dates, etc. are announced in class. You are responsible for announcements that are made in class. Due to the inevitable and unavoidable problems that are associated with electronic mail, your all-knowing instructor cautions you not to rely on this unreliable method of communication.  That said, he will send out email announcements. However, all official class business will be conducted during lecture and lab. If you miss a lecture or lab, you are responsible for determining what you missed.

Psychology Departmental Regulations:

The Psychology Department will drop all students who do not meet the ?following prerequisites: PSY 301 with a C or better; Math 302 or a ?higher level mathematics course; and a major in Psychology. 

University Regulations:

The University of Texas at Austin provides upon request appropriate ?academic accommodations for qualified students with disabilities. ?For more information, contact the Office of the Dean of Students at ?471-6259, 471-4641 TTY.

Tentative Lecture and Reading Schedule (some changes are inevitable, but any changes will be announced at least a week in advance)

Week of...

Reading and exam schedule

Topics to be covered

 

 

 

Aug 24

SL chaps 1& 2

Introduction/Syllabus

 

 

 

Aug 31

SL chap 3

Reasoning/Theory

 

 

 

Sep 7

SL chaps 4&5

Variables/Control

 

 

 

Sep 14

SL chaps 6&7

Artifacts/Design

 

 

 

Sep 21

IS chaps 1&2

Exam I (does not cover IS)

Stats intro/Freq Distr.

 

 

 

Sep 28

IS chaps 3&4

Central Tendency/ Variance/Probability

 

 

 

Oct 5

IS chap 5

Hypothesis Testing I

 

 

 

Oct 12

IS chaps 6&7

Hypothesis Testing II

 

 

 

Oct 19

IS chap 9

Exam II

Conf Intervals/Effect size

Oct 26

IS Chap 10 (skip 10.4 to end of chap)

ANOVA

 

 

 

Nov 2

IS chap 12

Chi square goodness of fit and test of independence

 

 

 

Nov 9

No Reading

Binomial distribution, sign test, CI of a proportion

 

 

 

Nov 16

IS chap 11

 

Covariation & Correlation/Linear regression

 

 

 

Nov 23

Exam III            Thanksgiving

No assignment

 

 

 

Nov 30

No reading

In Class Presentations

Mythbusters paper due on Wednesday, December 10, 2008 by 1:00 pm

FINAL EXAM: DECEMBER X, 2009 (3 HOURS).

PSY 418 • Statistics & Research Design-W

44040-44045 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm NOA 1.116
show description

Psy 418 Fall Session, 2009 Course Syllabus (Instructor: Josephs)

Instructor: Bob Josephs josephs@mail.psy.utexas.edu

Lecture TTH, NOA 1.16, 11:00-12:15 & 2:00-3:15

Teaching Assistants:

Ashley Brock, Shasta Ihorn, Molly Ireland, Ross Otto

brockah@mail.utexas.edu, molly.ireland@gmail.com, rotto@mail.utexas.edu, shasta.ihorn@gmail.com

Office Phone: 471-9788

Lab: #44020 (Wed: 11-1) #44040 (Wed: 1-3). SEA 2.114

Lab: #44025 (Wed: 11-1) #44045 (Wed: 1-3). SEA 2.122

Office: 3.204 SEA

 

Office: SEA 2.114 & 2.122

OH:  Wednesdays, 2-4 pm, and by appt.

OH: TBA

Required Materials:

Suter, W. Newton, & Lindgren, Henry Clay (1989). Experimentation in Psychology: A Guided Tour. Boston, MA: Allyn and Bacon. (SL). Pickup photocopy at Paradigm. 407 W 24th St. 472-7986.

Interactive Statistics (IS).  Available at the University Coop Bookstore, 2246 Guadalupe.  Austin, TX 78705.  Ph: 476-7211.  You might be able to find it cheaper online (new or used).

A calculator. Must be able to perform square roots.

Course Objectives: First and foremost, to have fun.  Second, to understand, evaluate, conduct, and communicate research in behavioral science. To this end, you will be expected to master the basics of research methodology and statistics. Approximately the first three weeks of the course focus on methodology and related issues, with the remainder of the course focusing on descriptive and inferential statistics. Also, there are numerous writing assignments.

Although this is not a course on computers, the use of computers is essential in the analysis and presentation of the results of experiments. To this end, we will familiarize you with a number of software applications, including but not limited to Excel, Word, PowerPoint, and SPSS.

Requirements: You can earn a maximum of 347 points in the class.  Here’s how:

The lab, or writing component is worth 132 points.  Your TA will cover these assignments in greater detail in lab.

Writing Center: I strongly encourage you to use the Undergraduate Writing Center, FAC 211, 471-6222: <http://uwc.utexas.edu/home>http://uwc.utexas.edu/home). The Undergraduate Writing Center offers free, individualized, expert help with writing for any UT undergraduate, by appointment or on a drop-in basis. Any undergraduate enrolled in a course at UT can visit the UWC for assistance with any writing project. They work with students from every department on campus, for both academic and non-academic writing. Whether you are writing a lab report, a resume, a term paper, a statement for an application, or your own poetry, UWC consultants will be happy to work with you. Their services are not just for writing with "problems." Getting feedback from an informed audience is a normal part of a successful writing project. Consultants help students develop strategies to improve their writing. The assistance they provide is intended to foster independence. Each student determines how to use the consultant's advice. The consultants are trained to help you work on your writing in ways that preserve the integrity of your work.

 

The methods and statistics component involves four exams and is worth 215 points. The first exam will cover methods and is worth 35 points; the next two will cover statistics and are each worth 40 points.  The final exam is a comprehensive statistics exam (does not cover methods) and is worth 100 points.

Grades: Except for the four exams, the class is NOT graded on a curve. Thus, in principle, everyone in the course could earn an "A".  Research has indicated that absolute grading, as opposed to grading on a curve, encourages cooperation rather than competition because your course grade cannot benefit from poor performance on the part of your classmates.  The exams are curved in manner that has become standard for math and physics classes.  The top three scores are averaged, and then the difference between this average and a perfect score is added to everyone’s score.  For example, if the average of the top three scores on the 2nd exam is a 35, then everyone in the class receives an additional 5 points.  There is no extra credit and there are no makeup exams.

A = 319 – 347 pts

A- = 312 – 318.99

B+ = 305 – 311.99

B = 284 – 304.99

B- = 277 – 283.99

C+ = 270 – 276.99

C = 250 – 269.99

C- = 243 – 249.99

D+ = 236 – 242.99

D = 215 – 235.99

D- = 208 – 214.99

F = 0 207.99

Out of respect for your classmates, please turn off or do not bring to class noise-emitting electronic devices. These include beepers, cell phones, and watch chimes.

Notice about Disabilities:

The University of Texas at Austin provides upon request appropriate academic accommodations for qualified students with disabilities. For more information, contact the Office of the Dean of Students at 471-6259, 471-4641 TTY.

Scholastic Dishonesty:

You are expected to do independent work on all exams and papers. Read the information on this website carefully, as ignorance of these UT rules is not a defense: http://deanofstudents.utexas.edu/sjs/academicintegrity.html.  Your TAs will cover this critical issue in some depth in lab.  However:

Students who violate University rules on scholastic dishonesty will be subject to disciplinary penalties, including expulsion from the University.  Although the University of Texas at Austin does not have a formal Honor System, by enrolling in this class you are agreeing to abide by certain rules and regulations.  You will abide by the Honor System that is set in place by the McCombs School of Business.  Specifically, you vow not to lie, cheat or steal, or commit any act of fraud, nor will you tolerate those who do. Furthermore, by enrolling in this class, you understand that any violation of these principles may result in your dismissal from the University.

 

Rules and regulations:

Changes to paper deadlines, exam dates, etc. are announced in class. You are responsible for announcements that are made in class. Due to the inevitable and unavoidable problems that are associated with electronic mail, your all-knowing instructor cautions you not to rely on this unreliable method of communication.  That said, he will send out email announcements. However, all official class business will be conducted during lecture and lab. If you miss a lecture or lab, you are responsible for determining what you missed.

Psychology Departmental Regulations:

The Psychology Department will drop all students who do not meet the ?following prerequisites: PSY 301 with a C or better; Math 302 or a ?higher level mathematics course; and a major in Psychology. 

University Regulations:

The University of Texas at Austin provides upon request appropriate ?academic accommodations for qualified students with disabilities. ?For more information, contact the Office of the Dean of Students at ?471-6259, 471-4641 TTY.

Tentative Lecture and Reading Schedule (some changes are inevitable, but any changes will be announced at least a week in advance)

Week of...

Reading and exam schedule

Topics to be covered

 

 

 

Aug 24

SL chaps 1& 2

Introduction/Syllabus

 

 

 

Aug 31

SL chap 3

Reasoning/Theory

 

 

 

Sep 7

SL chaps 4&5

Variables/Control

 

 

 

Sep 14

SL chaps 6&7

Artifacts/Design

 

 

 

Sep 21

IS chaps 1&2

Exam I (does not cover IS)

Stats intro/Freq Distr.

 

 

 

Sep 28

IS chaps 3&4

Central Tendency/ Variance/Probability

 

 

 

Oct 5

IS chap 5

Hypothesis Testing I

 

 

 

Oct 12

IS chaps 6&7

Hypothesis Testing II

 

 

 

Oct 19

IS chap 9

Exam II

Conf Intervals/Effect size

Oct 26

IS Chap 10 (skip 10.4 to end of chap)

ANOVA

 

 

 

Nov 2

IS chap 12

Chi square goodness of fit and test of independence

 

 

 

Nov 9

No Reading

Binomial distribution, sign test, CI of a proportion

 

 

 

Nov 16

IS chap 11

 

Covariation & Correlation/Linear regression

 

 

 

Nov 23

Exam III            Thanksgiving

No assignment

 

 

 

Nov 30

No reading

In Class Presentations

Mythbusters paper due on Wednesday, December 10, 2008 by 1:00 pm

FINAL EXAM: DECEMBER X, 2009 (3 HOURS).

PSY 394V • Smnr In Socl & Personality Psy

43465 • Spring 2009
Meets W 400pm-700pm SEA 1.332
show description

Seminars in Social and Personality Psychology. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

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