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James W. Pennebaker, Chair The University of Texas at Austin, SEA 4.212, Austin, TX 78712 • (512) 475-7596

Catharine H Echols

Associate Professor Ph.D., University of Illinois

Catharine H Echols

Contact

  • Phone: (512) 471-4879
  • Office: SEA 5.220
  • Office Hours: Tues 3:30-4, Thurs 3:30-5, & by appointment
  • Campus Mail Code: A8000

Biography

Dr. Echols received her Ph.D. from the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. Her research explores a number of issues related to the acquisition of language. The general focus of her research is with two questions fundamental to language development: (a) how infants identify words and other linguistic units in the speech stream and (b) how they associate words to appropriate real world referents. She is investigating the first question by assessing whether infants can use prosodic cues-such as stress, intonation or rhythm to identify words in speech. In relation to the second question, she is investigating whether infants can use linguistic context to determine the meanings of novel words. Additional projects pertain to the acquisition of grammar and children's understanding of various functions of language (e.g., irony and sarcasm). This research is funded through a grant from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. Dr. Echols is in the Developmental and Cognition & Perception areas in Psychology. 

Selected Publications:

Echols, C. H., Crowhurst, M. J., & Childers, J. B. (1997). The perception of rhythmic units in speech by infants and adults. Journal of Memory and Language, 36, 202-225.

Albin, D. D., & Echols, C. H. (1996). Characteristics of stressed and word-final syllables in infant-directed speech: Implications for word-level segmentation. Infant Behavior and Development, 19, 401-418.

Hura, S. L., & Echols, C. H. (1996). The role of stress and articulatory difficulty in children's earliest productions. Developmental Psychology, 32, 165-176.

Echols, C. H. (1996). A role for stress in early speech segmentation. In J. L. Morgan & K. Demuth (Eds.), Signal to syntax: Bootstrapping from speech to grammar in early acquisition (pp. 151-170). Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum.

Echols, C. H. (1993). A perceptually-based model of children's earliest productions. Cognition, 46, 245-296.

Interests

Cognitive development and language acquisition

PSY 333P • Child Language

43690 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm SEA 1.332
show description

Examination of theory and research concerning the development of language in the child. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Only one of the following may be counted: Linguistics 373 (Topic 1: Child Language), 373 (Topic: Language Acquisition), Psychology 333P. Prerequisite: For psychology majors, upper-division standing and Psychology 301 and 418 with a grade of at least C in each; for nonmajors, upper-division standing, Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C, and one of the following with a grade of at least C: Biology 318M, Civil Engineering 311S, Economics 329, Educational Psychology 371, Electrical Engineering 351K, Government 350K, Mathematics 316, 362K, Mechanical Engineering 335, Psychology 317, Sociology 317L, Social Work 318, Statistics 309, Statistics and Scientific Computation 302, 303, 304, 305, 306, 318.

PSY 394S • Current Topics In Devel Psy

43950 • Fall 2014
Meets M 1200pm-300pm SEA 1.332
show description

Seminars in Developmental Psychology. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

 

PSY 379H • Honors Research II

44170 • Spring 2014
Meets M 300pm-600pm SEA 2.116
show description

Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing, Psychology 301 and 418 with a grade of at least C in each, Psychology 458 and 359H, and consent of the honors adviser.

PSY 333P • Child Language

43735 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm SEA 3.250
show description

Examination of theory and research concerning the development of language in the child. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Only one of the following may be counted: Linguistics 373 (Topic 1: Child Language), 373 (Topic: Language Acquisition), Psychology 333P. Prerequisite: For psychology majors, upper-division standing and Psychology 301 and 418 with a grade of at least C in each; for nonmajors, upper-division standing, Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C, and one of the following with a grade of at least C: Biology 318M, Civil Engineering 311S, Economics 329, Educational Psychology 371, Electrical Engineering 351K, Government 350K, Mathematics 316, 362K, Mechanical Engineering 335, Psychology 317, Sociology 317L, Social Work 318, Statistics 309, Statistics and Scientific Computation 302, 303, 304, 305, 306, 318.

PSY 359H • Honors Research I

43835 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm SEA 1.332
show description

Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing, Psychology 301 and 418 with a grade of at least C in each, six semester hours of upper-division coursework in psychology, a grade point average of at least 3.50 in psychology courses taken at the University, a University grade point average of at least 3.25, and consent of the honors adviser.

PSY 333P • Child Language

43275 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm SEA 3.250
show description

Examination of theory and research concerning the development of language in the child. Only one of the following may be counted: Linguistics 373 (Topic 1: Child Language), 373 (Topic: Language Acquisition), Psychology 333P.

PSY 394S • Lang, Cul, And Cognitive Devel

43510 • Fall 2012
Meets W 900am-1200pm SEA 1.332
show description

Seminars in Developmental Psychology. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

 

PSY S333N • Cognitive Development

87726 • Summer 2012
Meets MTWTHF 100pm-230pm SEA 3.250
show description

The course will provide an overview of cognitive development from infancy to adolescence, with an emphasis on the earlier years. We will discuss perspectives on cognitive change, as well as current research exploring the conceptual capabilities of infants; children’s reasoning about the physical, biological and social world; language acquisition; and developments in memory, reasoning and other cognitive capabilities.

Course objectives:

To have general knowledge of the developmental changes in various cognitive domains. To acquire a basic understanding of research methods and approaches used in the study of cognitive development. To apply your knowledge in reasoning about current issues related to cognitive development.

PSY 379H • Honors Research II

43360 • Spring 2012
Meets M 100pm-400pm SEA 2.116
show description

Course objectives:

  1. To conduct, analyze and interpret an independent research project.

  2. To improve your skills in thinking and writing about research.

  3. To enhance your ability to present your ideas to others.

PSY 333P • Child Language

43160 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm SEA 3.250
show description

The course will be an advanced introduction to language acquisition. It will cover various theoretical perspectives on language development as well as current knowledge and ongoing research in the areas of phonology, semantics, syntax and pragmatics. Topics of current interest, such as language and the brain, bilingualism, and language/thought interactions also will be discussed.

PSY 359H • Honors Research I

43270 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 930am-1100am SEA 2.224
show description

Course objectives:

  1. To plan and design an independent research project.

  2. To improve your skills in thinking and writing about research.

  3. To enhance your ability to present your ideas to others.

PSY S333N • Cognitive Development

87772 • Summer 2011
Meets MTWTHF 100pm-230pm SEA 3.250
show description

Course description: The course will be an introduction to cognitive development. It will provide

an overview of cognitive change from infancy to adolescence, with an emphasis on the earlier years.

The course will cover various theoretical perspectives on cognitive change as well as current

research in areas such as infant perception and cognition, categorization, memory, problem-solving

and language.

Course objectives:

1. To understand current theories of the process of cognitive development.

2. To acquire a basic knowledge of research methods and issues related to

the study of cognitive development.

3. To develop your academic skills, particularly the ability to think and

read from a critical perspective.

PSY 333P • Child Language

43730 • Spring 2011
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm SEA 3.250
show description

Course description: The course will be an advanced introduction to language acquisition. It will

cover various theoretical perspectives on language development as well as current knowledge and

ongoing research in the areas of phonology, semantics, syntax and pragmatics. Topics of current

interest, such as language and the brain, bilingualism, and language/thought interactions also will be

discussed.

Writing Flag: This course carries the Writing Flag. Writing Flag courses are designed to give

students experience with writing in an academic discipline. In this class, you can expect to write

regularly during the semester, complete substantial writing projects, and receive feedback from your

instructor to help you improve your writing. You will also have the opportunity to revise one or

more assignments, and to read and discuss your peers' work. You should therefore expect a

substantial portion of your grade to come from your written work.

PSY 394S • Lang, Cul, And Cognitive Devel

44000 • Spring 2011
Meets T 900am-1200pm SEA 1.332
show description

Seminars in Developmental Psychology. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

PSY 333N • Cognitive Development

43115 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm NOA 1.102
show description

Prerequisites

PSY 304, 305, 333D, OR 355 IS STRONGLY RECOMMENDED.

Course Description

This course will be an advanced introduction to cognitive development. It will provide an overview of cognitive change from infancy to adolescence, with an emphasis on the earlier years. The course will cover various theoretical perspectives on cognitive change as well as current research in areas such as infant perception and cognition, categorization, number, understanding of biological and physical concepts, problem-solving and language.

Grading Policy

First paper = 10%

Second paper = 15%

Third paper = 15%

5 reaction papers = (5 x 2%) 10%

Midterm exam= 20%

Final exam = 30%

Texts

TBA

PSY 333N • Cognitive Development

87110 • Summer 2010
Meets MTWTHF 100pm-230pm NOA 1.124
show description

Prerequisites

PSY 304, 305, 333D, OR 355 IS STRONGLY RECOMMENDED.

Course Description

This course will be an advanced introduction to cognitive development. It will provide an overview of cognitive change from infancy to adolescence, with an emphasis on the earlier years. The course will cover various theoretical perspectives on cognitive change as well as current research in areas such as infant perception and cognition, categorization, number, understanding of biological and physical concepts, problem-solving and language.

Grading Policy

First paper = 10%

Second paper = 15%

Third paper = 15%

5 reaction papers = (5 x 2%) 10%

Midterm exam= 20%

Final exam = 30%

Texts

TBA

PSY 333P • Child Language-W

43875 • Spring 2010
Meets MWF 1100-1200 SEA 2.108
show description

 1
PSY 333P, Child Language, Spring 2010
 
Meeting time & location: MWF 11 a.m. – 12 noon, SEA 2.108
Unique # 43875
 
Professor:  Dr. Catharine Echols
Office:  SEA 5.220
Telephone:  471-4879
e-mail:  echols@psy.utexas.edu
Office hours:  Tues. 3:30-4:30 p.m., Fri 2-3 p.m. & by appointment
 
TA: Jess Jankowitsch
Office:  SEA 2.122
Telephone:  267-733-5091
e-mail: jessjank@mail.utexas.edu
Office hours: Mon 12-1 p.m., Wed 4-5 p.m., Fri 10-11 a.m. & by appointment
 
Text:  Hoff, E. (2009). Language Development (4th ed.). Belmont, CA: Thomson Wadsworth.
 
Readings:  The text will be supplemented by articles that will be available from Abel’s Copy Shop,
715D W. 23rd St. (in the bottom floor of the University Towers garage).  These articles are also part
of the required reading for the course.  
 
Course description:  The course will be an advanced introduction to language acquisition.  It will
cover various theoretical perspectives on language development as well as current knowledge and
ongoing research in the areas of phonology, semantics, syntax and pragmatics.  Topics of current
interest, such as language and the brain, bilingualism, and language/thought interactions also will be
discussed.  The course is a substantial writing component course.
 
Prerequisites: The Psychology Department will drop all students who do not meet the following
prerequisites:  (a) PSY 301 with a C or better; (b) PSY 418 (or an equivalent listed in the course
schedule) with a C or better; (c) Upper-Division standing (60 hours completed)
 
Course objectives: 
 1. To understand current theories of the process of language development.
 2. To acquire a basic knowledge of research methods and issues related to
  the study of language development.
 3. To develop your academic skills, particularly the ability to think and
  read from a critical perspective and to express your ideas in written form. 
 
Course requirements: 
(1) Written assignments:  This class is a “substantial writing component course.”  The writing
assignments will include 3 term papers and 5 short “reaction papers.”  In addition, you will be
required to turn in a brief description of the topic for the papers.   
 (a) Papers.  The primary writing assignment will consist of three interrelated papers.  The first
paper will be a summary of several research articles describing a specific aspect of language
development.  That paper should be about 3-5 type-written pages in length.  For the second paper,
you will expand the first paper, making it into a critical analysis of that particular area of research; it
should be about 5-7 pages.  Finally, in the third paper, you will build on your second paper by
proposing a study to investigate an issue raised in that earlier paper (you will only need to propose a
 2
study; the assignment does not involve actually carrying out a study).  Thus, you will be
incorporating the feedback received on your first paper into the second paper, as well as adding to it,
and you will again incorporate feedback to produce the third paper.  The length of that paper
(including the revised section) should be about 8-10 pages.  Detailed handouts on the assignment
will be passed out during the semester.  We encourage you to meet with us for help in coming up
with a topic for your paper and in thinking about ideas for a study.  We will also be happy to talk
with you if problems or questions arise while you are writing your papers.  The first paper will
account for 10% of your course grade and the second and third each will account for 15%.
 Late term paper policy.  Papers not turned in at the start of class on the day they are due will
lose 2 points.  For each additional day (ending at 5 p.m.), you will lose 2 more points.  
 (b) Reaction papers.  You will be asked to write 6 short papers (2-3 paragraphs each)
responding to readings for the course.  The goal is to provide an opportunity for thinking critically
about current issues in language development, and expressing those thoughts in writing.  Papers will
be graded on a 10-point scale.  We will be seeking your personal reactions to the reading, not simply
a description of the content.  Due dates for the reaction papers are listed on the class schedule (late
papers will be penalized).  The 6 papers, together, will be worth 12% of your grade.  You will be
getting a separate hand-out describing in greater detail what we expect from these “reaction papers.”  
(2) Exams:  There will be two midterms and one final examination.  The exams will consist of 
multiple choice and short essay questions.  Exam questions will be taken from lectures and from the
text and readings.  The midterms will each account for 14% and the final will account for 20% of
your grade in the course.  The final will focus on the latter part of the course; it will be similar to the
midterm exams, although given during the scheduled final exam time.  Probable exam dates are
listed in the syllabus.  Exam grades will be posted on Blackboard and you will be permitted to look
over your exams during office hours; however, exams will not be returned to you. 
 Exam make-up policy.  No make-up exams will be given without a medical excuse unless you
have talked with Dr. Echols, have a very good reason for not being able to take the exam on the
scheduled date and have explicitly been granted permission by her to take a make-up.  If you have a
real conflict, it is to your advantage to talk with Dr. Echols as early as possible (although she is
making no promises that a make-up will be allowed regardless of when you talk with her).  Make-up
exams will differ from the regular exams and may be more difficult.  We reserve the right to require
verification both of medical and other excuses for requesting make-ups.  If you miss any exam
without a verifiable medical or personal excuse, you will be given a 0 for the exam.
Attendance & preparation:  Class meetings will follow a lecture/discussion format.  Attendance 
is strongly recommended.  Lectures will include material that cannot be found in the book or
assigned readings.  The exams will include questions from all three sources.  You will get more out
of the lecture if you have done the readings ahead of time, and you will be better able to contribute
to the discussion.  If you miss a class, it will be your responsibility to find out from a classmate what
happened in class (including handouts, assigned readings, announcements and lecture content).  Do
not, however, ask the TA or professor for notes from missed classes (exceptions may be made in the
case of a long absence for a verifiable medical reason).  Please avoid being late to class as it is
disruptive and you may miss important announcements.
Grading:  The final grades for the course will be assigned as follows:  At the end of the semester, 
scores will be weighted so that the three exams will account for 48% of the final grade, the
combined scores for the reaction papers will account for 12%, and the three papers will account for
40%.  Letter grades will then be calculated as follows:  Scores that are 90% or above will be an “A,”
scores between 80-89% will be a “B,” scores between 70-79% will be a “C,” and scores between 60-
69% will be a “D.”  This course will use the plus/minus grading system.  If you have questions about
the grading policy, please talk to the professor or the TA.
 3
Academic integrity:  Academic integrity is an integral and essential part of the educational 
process.  Because dishonesty harms the individual, other students and the integrity of the University,
scholastic dishonesty of any type WILL NOT be tolerated.  The penalty for academic dishonesty of 
any type is a grade of F and referral to the Dean of Student’s Office.  
Students with disabilities: The University of Texas at Austin provides upon request appropriate 
academic accommodations for qualified students with disabilities.  For more information, contact the
Office of the Dean of Students at 471-6259, 471-4641 TTY.  I am available to discuss any
appropriate academic accommodations that might be necessary for this course.  
Office hours:  The tentative office hours of the professor and TA are printed on the syllabus; any
changes in office hours will be announced in class.  Feel free to drop in during those times for
assistance in understanding lecture materials or readings, to figure out what you may have done
wrong on a test, or for help with writing assignments.  You can also ask general questions about
language development, the field of psychology or such issues as preparing for graduate school.  If
you can not come in during office hours, you can make an appointment by talking with us after class,
calling us at the numbers listed on the syllabus or sending e-mail.  We will try to schedule extra
office hours before exams and/or paper due dates.
 4
Tentative Schedule
 
Dates Topic/Assignments    Reading
 
Jan 20-22 Intro/overview
 
Jan 25-29 Intro to the study of language development  Hoff Ch. 1
 Library Information Session on Jan. 29; meet in PCL 1.124
 
Feb 1-5 Biological bases/critical periods/language universals Hoff Ch. 2 (pp. 39-71)
 Paper Topic due Feb. 1; RP 1 due Feb. 5  Senghas
   
Feb 8-12 Development of communicative competence   Hoff Ch 3 (pp. 89-104)
 RP 2 due Feb 15    Baldwin 
 
Feb 15-19  Infant abilities/phonological development  Hoff Ch 4 
 Paper 1 due Feb. 19    
 
Feb 22-24 Phonological devt cont’d
 
Feb 26 EXAM 1
 
Mar 1-5 Lexical development    Hoff Ch 5 
     Gleitman
 
Mar 8-12 Lexical devt/Language, culture & cognition  Hoff Ch 7
 RP 3 due Mar 8    Bowerman & Choi
 
Mar 15-19  SPRING BREAK
 
Mar 22-26 Syntax & Morphological devt    Hoff Ch 6
 Paper 2 due Mar 26    Chomsky; Piaget
 
Mar 29-Apr 5 Syntax – alternate accounts    Saffran et al.; Bates & 
 RP 4 due Apr 2     Elman
 
April 7  EXAM 2
 
Apr 9-12 Bilingualism     Hoff Ch 8
     Werker
 
Apr 14-16 Later devts in communicative competence   Hoff Ch 3 (pp. 104-131)
 RP 5 due Apr 16    Happé
 
Apr 19-21 Language in the school years    Hoff Ch 9
 
Apr 23-30 Language in special populations   Hoff Ch 10
 Final Paper due Apr 30    Goldin-Meadow
 
May 3-7 Language in other species; Summing up  Hoff Ch 2 (pp. 72-86)
 RP 6 due May 5    Tomasello
 
May 14, Friday, 9 a.m. to 12 noon     FINAL EXAM
 
THIS SCHEDULE IS TENTATIVE.  There will some adjustment in reading assignments and topics
as the semester progresses.  Adjustments will be announced in lecture.  You should rely on those
announcements, in addition to the syllabus, for reading assignments and due dates.

PSY 379H • Honors Research II-W

44025 • Spring 2010
Meets W 100pm-300pm SEA 4.242
show description

 1
PSY 379H, Honors Research II, Spring 2010
 
Meeting time & location:    Wednesday 1-3 p.m., SEA 4.242
Unique # 44025
 
Professor:  Dr. Catharine Echols
Office:  SEA 5.220
Telephone:  471-4879
e-mail:  echols@psy.utexas.edu
Office hours:  Tues. 3:30-4:30 p.m., Fri 2-3 p.m. & by appointment
 
TA: Judith Easton
Office:  SEA 3.324B 
Telephone:  471-0111
e-mail: jeaston1@mail.utexas.edu
Office hours: Tues. 10 a.m.-12 p.m., Wed. 11 a.m.-12 p.m. & by appointment
 
Texts: Pyrczak, F., & Bruce, R. R. (2005). Writing empirical research reports: A basic
guide for students of the social and behavioral sciences ( 5th ed.). Los Angeles:
Pyrczak Publishing.
 
 Cronk, B. C. (2006).  How to use SPSS: A step-by-step guide to analysis and
interpretation (4th ed.).  Los Angeles: Pyrczak Publishing.
 
 American Psychological Association (2001). Publication manual (5th ed.).
Washington, D.C.: American Psychological Association.
 
 Additional readings may be assigned during the semester.  The additional readings
will be made available through the University of Texas Libraries electronic reserves.
 
Prerequisite:  Admission into the Psychology Department Honors Program and PSY 359H,
Honors Research I.  
 
Course objectives: 
 1. To conduct, analyze and interpret an independent research project.
 2. To improve your skills in thinking and writing about research.
 3. To enhance your ability to present your ideas to others. 
 
Course requirements: 
 
1. Analysis Plan.  The analysis plan is a revision of the research proposal that you submitted at
the end of the fall semester, including any revisions required to incorporate changes that have
been made in your methods and/or conceptual approach to your project.  In addition, you will
add your specific hypotheses and the analyses that you plan to conduct to test them, then report
the predicted outcomes.  You will give a brief presentation on this plan.
 
 2
2. Poster.  At the end of the semester, the entire class will participate in a poster session, to
which other psychology students and faculty will be invited.  You are expected to produce a
poster that describes your project and its findings
 
3. Research Report.  This paper will be the final report of your project and will build on the
proposal that you submitted last semester and on the analysis plan.  It should contain an
overview of the problem and literature review, a description of the design, experimental
procedures, stimuli and hypotheses, a results section in which you describe the analyses and
findings, and a discussion of the results and their implications.  This paper should be about 15-20
pages in length, and should follow APA format.  
 
Detailed handouts for each assignment will be passed out during the semester. 
 
In addition, several class sessions will be devoted to topics that are relevant for those planning
research and professional careers in psychology and related fields.  There will be assigned
readings and possibly other assignments for these sessions.
 
Attendance & preparation:  The discussions with the professor and other students that take
place during class time are a fundamental part of this course.  Consequently, attendance is
expected.  If you miss more than one class, you will need to provide a written explanation of
your absence, accompanied by any relevant documentation.  Effective discussions also require
that participants are prepared.  Therefore, you should come to each class meeting prepared to
participate.  Please avoid being late to class as it is disruptive to the instructor and other students.
 
Grading:  The final grade will be calculated as follows:  Your first paper (the analysis plan) and
presentation will account for 30% of the grade, class participation for 10%, and your final paper,
including the overall quality of your project, combined with your poster, will account for 60% of
the grade.  
 
Academic integrity:  Academic integrity is an integral and essential part of the educational
process.  Because dishonesty harms the individual, other students and the integrity of the
University, scholastic dishonesty of any type WILL NOT be tolerated.  The penalty for academic
dishonesty of any type is a grade of F and referral to the Dean of Student’s Office. 
 
Students with disabilities:  The University of Texas at Austin provides upon request
appropriate academic accommodations for qualified students with disabilities.  For more
information, contact the Office of the Dean of Students at 471-6259, 471-4641 TTY.  Dr. Echols
is available to discuss any appropriate academic accommodations that might be necessary for
this course.
 
Office hours:  The office hours of the professor and TA are printed on the syllabus; any changes
in office hours will be announced in class.  Please feel free to visit during those times for
assistance with issues pertaining to this course—such as advice on conducting your project,
analyses, interpreting your results, writing, or constructing a poster—as well as for more general
questions regarding the field of psychology or such issues as preparing for graduate school.  If
you can not come in during office hours, you can make an appointment by talking with one of us
after class, by calling us at the numbers listed on the syllabus or by sending e-mail. 
 3
 
 
CLASS SCHEDULE
 
Date Tentative Topic Assignment 
 
Jan. 20 Introduction/updates
 
Jan. 27 Individual meetings 
 
Feb. 3 Issues in conducting experimental research  
 
Feb. 10 Topic:  Ethics in psychological research 
 
Feb. 17 Statistical analyses
 
Feb. 24 Individual meetings 
 
Mar. 3 Analysis Plan presentations ANALYSIS PLAN DUE
 
Mar. 10 Analysis Plan presentations
 
Mar. 17 SPRING BREAK – NO CLASS
 
Mar. 24 Topic:  Students’ choice
 
Mar. 31 Individual meetings  
 
Apr. 7 Topic:  Students’ choice 
 
Apr. 14 Writing analysis and results sections Pyrczyk, Ch. 10
 
Apr. 21 Graphics resources 
 
Apr. 28 Writing discussion sections and abstracts Pyrczyk Ch. 11 & !2
 
May 5 Poster Session  POSTER DUE
 
May 12 FINAL PAPER DUE*
 
*Supervisors also should have the opportunity to read and grade final papers before a course
grade is submitted; I will need grades from supervisors by 12 noon on Monday May 17.  It will
be each student’s responsibility to check with the supervisor regarding the amount of time that
s/he needs for grading the paper.  Depending on the supervisor’s requirements, some students
may need to complete their papers prior to May 12.  
 
 

PSY 359H • Honors Research I

44215 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 930-1100 SEA 3.250
show description

 1
PSY 359H, Honors Research I, Fall 2009
 
Meeting time & location: TTh 9:30 – 11 a.m., SEA 3.250
Unique # 44215
 
Professor:  Dr. Catharine Echols
Office:  SEA 5.220
Telephone:  471-4879
e-mail:  echols@psy.utexas.edu
Office hours:  Tues. 11-12, Fri. 2-3 & by appointment
 
TAs: Judith Easton
Office:  SEA 3.324B  
Telephone:  471-0111
e-mail: jeaston1@mail.utexas.edu
Office hours: Tues. 2-3:30, Thurs. 11:30-1 & by appointment
 
Texts: Pyrczak, F., & Bruce, R. R. (2007). Writing empirical research reports: A basic guide for
students of the social and behavioral sciences ( 6th ed.). Los Angeles: Pyrczak Publishing.
 
 American Psychological Association (2001). Publication manual (5th ed.). Washington,
D.C.: American Psychological Association.
 
 Additional readings may be assigned during the semester.  The additional readings will be
made available through the University of Texas Libraries electronic reserves.   
 
Prerequisites:  The Psychology Department will drop from any upper-division course all students
who do not meet the following prerequisites: PSY 301 with a C or better; PSY 418 (or equivalent
listed in the course schedule) with a C or better; and upper-division standing (60 hours completed).  
Additional requirements for this course are acceptance into the Psychology Honors Program or
permission of the instructor.   
 
Course objectives:  
 1. To plan and design an independent research project.
 2. To improve your skills in thinking and writing about research.
 3. To enhance your ability to present your ideas to others.  
 
Course requirements:  
 
1. Topic Summary.  The topic summary is an overview (approximately one page in length) of the
area of research that you plan to explore for your project, including some general research questions
that may be of interest to you.   
 
2. Literature Review.  The first major writing assignment is a description of the general research
question that you plan to pursue and a discussion and analysis of research pertaining to that topic.  It
should be about 5-6 type-written pages in length.
 
 2
3. IRB/IACUC Proposal.  In this assignment, you will write a proposal for the Institutional Review
Board, if your study requires human subjects, or to the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee,
if your project involves animals.  These proposals should follow all of the guidelines for submission
to these bodies; the guidelines will be discussed in class.  Note that you will need to do this
assignment even if you are working in a lab that already has IRB/IACUC approval that covers your
project.
 
4.  Research Proposal.  For this assignment, you will revise the literature review, incorporating the
comments and suggestions that you receive on it.  You will then build on that first paper to include
your proposed study, containing a description of the design, experimental procedures, stimuli and
hypotheses.  This paper should be about 10 pages in length.   
 
Detailed handouts for each assignment will be passed out during the semester.  Due dates for the
papers are listed on the syllabus.  
 
In addition, several small in-class or take-home assignments will be given over the course of the
semester.   
 
Attendance & preparation:  The discussions with the professor and other students that take place
during class time are a fundamental part of this course.  Consequently, attendance is expected.  If you
miss more than one class, you will need to provide a written explanation of your absence,
accompanied by any relevant documentation.  Effective discussions also require that participants are
prepared.  Therefore, you should complete readings and other assignments for a particular class
session prior to the class meeting.  Please avoid being late to class as it is disruptive to the instructor
and other students.
 
Grading:  The final grade will be calculated as follows:  Your first paper (the literature review) will
account for 25% of the grade, class participation and small assignments for 12.5%, the IRB/IACUC
proposal for 12.5%, and your final paper (the revision of the literature review and methods section),
along with your final presentation, will account for 50% of the grade.  The plus/minus grading system
will be used in this course.   
 
Academic integrity:  Academic integrity is an integral and essential part of the educational process.  
Because dishonesty harms the individual, other students and the integrity of the University, scholastic
dishonesty of any type WILL NOT be tolerated.  The penalty for academic dishonesty of any type is
a grade of F and referral to the Dean of Student’s Office.  
 
Students with disabilities:  The University of Texas at Austin provides upon request appropriate
academic accommodations for qualified students with disabilities.  For more information, contact the
Office of the Dean of Students at 471-6259, 471-4641 TTY.  Dr. Echols is available to discuss any
appropriate academic accommodations that might be necessary for this course.
 
Office hours:  The office hours of the professor and TA are printed on the syllabus; any changes in
office hours will be announced in class and/or via e-mail.  Please feel free to visit during those times
for assistance with issues pertaining to this course—such as selecting a research topic, designing your
study, or understanding research that you are reading—as well as for more general questions
regarding the field of psychology or such issues as preparing for graduate school.  If you can not
come in during office hours, you can make an appointment by talking with one of us after class, by
calling us at the numbers listed on the syllabus or by sending e-mail.  
 3
 
 
CLASS SCHEDULE
 
Date Tentative Topic Assignment
 
Aug. 27 Introduction & overview of honors program
 
Sept. 1-3 Individual meetings – no regular class meetings  
 
Sept. 8-10 Searching and reviewing the literature   
 
Sept. 15-17 Refining a research topic Topic Summary due on Sept. 17
 
Sept. 22-24 Analyzing & integrating the literature P&B Chs 1 & 6  
 
Sept. 29-Oct. 1 Writing an introduction/literature review P&B Chs 5 & 7
 
Oct. 6-8 Generating research questions & hypotheses P&B Chs 2, 3 & 4  
 
Oct. 13-15 Professional Issues/Applying to graduate school Literature Review due on Oct. 15
 
Oct. 20-22 Designing a study P&B Ch 8   
 
Oct. 27-29 Individual meetings – no regular class meetings   
 
Nov. 3-5 Ethical issues in research/human subjects
 
Nov. 10-12 Writing a methods section P&B Chs 9 & 10  
  IRB/IACUC Proposal due on Nov.  10
 
Nov.  17-19 Presentations
 
Nov. 24 Presentations
 
Nov. 26 THANKSGIVING – NO CLASS
 
Dec. 1-3 Piloting and other next steps Final Paper due on Dec. 11  
 
 
THIS SCHEDULE IS TENTATIVE.  There almost certainly will be some adjustment in topics and
assignments as the semester progresses.  Adjustments will be announced in class.  You should rely on
those announcements, in addition to the syllabus, for assignments.  

PSY 333P • Child Language-W

43125 • Spring 2009
Meets MWF 1100-1200 SEA 3.250
show description

Examination of theory and research concerning the development of language in the child. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Only one of the following may be counted: Linguistics 373 (Topic 1: Child Language), 373 (Topic: Language Acquistion), Psychology 333P.  Prerequisite: For psycholog majors, upper-divison standing and Psychology 301 and 418 with a grade of at least C in each; for nonmajors, upper-division standing, Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C, and one of the following with a grade of at least C: Biology 318M, Civil Engineering 311S, Economics 329, Eucational Psychology 371, government 350K, Mathematics 316, Psychology 317, Sociology 317L, Social Work 318, Statistics 309.

PSY 394S • Lang, Cul, And Cognitive Devel

43420 • Spring 2009
Meets W 900-1200 SEA 1.332
show description

Seminars in Developmental Psychology. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

PSY 394S • Current Topics In Devel Psy

43422 • Spring 2009
Meets F 1200-300pm SEA 1.332
show description

Seminars in Developmental Psychology. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

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