Skip Navigation
UT wordmark
College of Liberal Arts wordmark
psychology masthead
James W. Pennebaker, Chair The University of Texas at Austin, SEA 4.212, Austin, TX 78712 • (512) 475-7596

Francisco Gonzalez-Lima

Professor Ph.D., University of Puerto Rico School of Medicine

George I. Sanchez Centennial Professorship
Francisco Gonzalez-Lima

Contact

Biography

Higher Education and Mentors

An honors graduate of Tulane University, New Orleans, Louisiana, Francisco Gonzalez-Lima received a B.S. in Biology in 1976 and a B.A. in Psychology in 1977. His Honors Thesis was supervised by Drs. Janis L. Dunlap, Arnold A. Gerall and Joan C. King. Dr. King’s teachings, in particular, motivated him to study the brain. During his last summer at Tulane he worked in the neuroendocrinology laboratory of Dr. Andrew V. Schally, who later that year earned a Nobel Prize. The enriching research experiences at Tulane convinced him to pursue a research career. While being recruited to continue studies at Tulane, he met Dr. Sven O.E. Ebbesson, a former Tulane neuroanatomy professor, who recruited him in a visit to Puerto Rico where Dr. Ebbesson was the new director of the medical sciences graduate program. In 1980 he received a Ph.D. in Anatomy and Neurobiology from the University of Puerto Rico School of Medicine, San Juan. Dr. Gonzalez-Lima was introduced to electrophysiology by Dr. Jose del Castillo, director of the Laboratory of Neurobiology, co-discoverer of quantum transmitter release (del Castillo and Katz--that led to a Nobel Prize to Katz), and a disciple of the Spanish school of Santiago Ramon y Cajal, founding father of modern neuroscience. Dr. Gonzalez-Lima’s research philosophy from thereon has been inspired by their example. His doctoral dissertation utilized electrophysiological recording of single cells and electrical stimulation of the brain and was supervised by Drs. James J. Keene, Jose del Castillo, Earl Kicliter, Hilda Lopez and Walter L. Stiehl. 

Faculty Beginnings and Humboldt Fellowship

At the age of 24, Dr. Gonzalez-Lima was appointed Assistant Professor of Anatomy at the newly formed Ponce School of Medicine, Ponce, Puerto Rico. He became part of the founding faculty that developed the curriculum and laboratories that brought U.S. accreditation to this medical school in 1980. He taught under the guidance of Dr. Walter L. Stiehl, director of the Department of Anatomy, who became his beloved mentor and research collaborator. Their most important work was published in a series of papers in the European Journal of Pharmacology. In 1981 he met the German Professor Henning Scheich in a study at the Caribbean Primate Research Center involving the newly developed 2-deoxyglucose autoradiographic method. Dr. Gonzalez-Lima was fascinated by the power of the neuroimaging approach to brain research and proposed an ambitious collaborative research project to Dr. Scheich. His resourceful work in the primate study led Dr. Scheich to invite him to go to Germany and sponsored his application to the prestigious Alexander von Humboldt Foundation. Special arrangements were made with Ponce School of Medicine so that Dr. Gonzalez-Lima could pursue postdoctoral research training in Germany as a Humboldt Research Fellow in 1982-83. This period in Germany at the Technical University of Darmstadt was a productive career experience that led to a very successful series of studies published mainly in Brain Research. After returning from Germany in 1983, Dr. Gonzalez-Lima was promoted to Associate Professor. His fruitful collaboration with Professor Scheich continued in follow-up trips to Germany sponsored by the German Science Foundation (DFG), in August-October 1984, October-December 1985 and August-September 1989. Their pioneering studies in animals, using a brain marker known as fluorodeoxyglucose or FDG, contributed for developing the FDG neuroimaging method in humans using positron emission tomography.

Texas Centennial Professorship and Consortium

At the Cajal Conference on Neurobiology in Madrid, Spain, September 1984, Dr. Gonzalez-Lima met Texas professors who were impressed by his brain research with FDG autoradiography. He was recruited to the new College of Medicine of Texas A&M University, where he became Assistant Professor in the Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology in January 1986. After he was recommended for promotion in 1989, the University of Texas at Austin recruited Dr. Gonzalez-Lima and he joined the new Institute for Neuroscience and the Department of Psychology as Associate Professor with tenure in January 1991. Dr. Gonzalez-Lima started an exciting revolution in brain metabolic mapping of learning functions, publishing the first neuroimaging studies of Pavlovian conditioning, behavioral habituation and sensitization, and the first book on brain imaging of learning and behavioral functions (Gonzalez-Lima et al, NATO ASI Vol. D68, 1992). This book was based on the first international conference on this topic that he organized with sponsorship from NATO and NSF. In 1992, his graduate student A. R. McIntosh and he published a report of the first application of structural equation modeling to neuroscience. This led to a series of pioneering papers on the use of path analysis in neuroimaging that culminated in them organizing an international symposium and the first edited volume on this subject (Gonzalez-Lima and McIntosh, Human Brain Mapping Vol. 2, 1994). After 1992, Dr. Gonzalez-Lima and his trainees published a series of studies with their new cytochrome oxidase method, the first enzyme histochemistry method allowing full quantification in terms of calibrated activity units. This approach led to numerous successful studies of cerebral energy metabolic capacity in various species and in Alzheimer’s disease patients, and to the organization of an international symposium and the first book on this subject (Gonzalez-Lima, 1998). In 1997 Dr. Gonzalez-Lima became Professor and Head of Behavioral Neuroscience, and in several years built this area by recruiting four new assistant professors. In 1999 he received joint appointments as Professor in the Division of Pharmacology and Toxicology. In 2000 Dr. Gonzalez-Lima received offers to become director of two neuroscience centers, but he stayed at Austin where he was honored with the first endowed chair named after a Hispanic professor in the USA, the George I. Sanchez Centennial Professorship in Liberal Arts and Sciences. In 2002 Dr. Gonzalez-Lima became Director of the Texas Consortium in Behavioral Neuroscience, a multi-million dollar doctoral and postdoctoral research training consortium of five Texas universities. Dr. Gonzalez-Lima has been an invited lecturer at over a hundred institutions (in Europe, USA, Canada, Latin America and Asia) and has served on national and international scientific advisory committees (most recently at the International Affairs Committee of the Society for Neuroscience and US National Academy of Science Committee to the International Brain Research Organization). In 2007 he was honored with the Distinguished Alumnus Award from his alma mater. In 2012 Dr. Gonzalez-Lima became the founding Chair of the Neuroscience section of the Texas Academy of Science and US Councilor of the International Behavioral Neuroscience Society. His laboratory has been at the forefront of neurometabolic studies of animal behavioral functions in the world, translating new interventions for human behavioral disorders and contributing over 300 scientific publications (in peer-reviewed journals, conference proceedings and books). 

 

Texas Consortium in Behavioral Neuroscience

Abstracts of Journal Articles in PubMed

Interests

Neuroscience, neuroanatomy, neurobiology, physiological psychology, psychobiology, learning and memory, brain energy modulation, and neural mechanisms of behavior

PSY 383C • Functional Neuroanatomy

43830 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 400pm-530pm SEA 2.116
show description

An examination of the anatomy of the brain and spinal cord, emphasizing connections and functions of neural systems. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Neuroscience 383C and Psychology 383C may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

PSY 332 • Behavioral Neuroscience

44000 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm NOA 1.124
show description

Neuroscientific study of behavioral functions: fundamental structure and function of the human nervous system, sensory systems and perception, motor systems and behavior, motivation and learning, brain disorders and maladaptive behavior. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: For psychology majors, upper-division standing and Psychology 301 and 418 with a grade of at least C in each; for nonmajors, upper-division standing, Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C, and one of the following with a grade of at least C: Biology 318M, Civil Engineering 311S, Economics 329, Educational Psychology 371, Electrical Engineering 351K, Government 350K, Mathematics 316, 362K, Mechanical Engineering 335, Psychology 317, Sociology 317L, Social Work 318, Statistics 309, Statistics and Scientific Computation 302, 303, 304, 305, 306, 318.

PSY 394P • Neurobiol Of Learning/Memory

44260 • Spring 2014
Meets F 130pm-430pm ARC 2.204
show description

Current Topics in Behavioral Neuroscience. Brain-behavior relationships, particularly recent research in behavioral neuroscience, including the anatomical and neurochemical mechanisms of behavioral events, and behavioral influences on the brain. Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Neuroscience 394P (Topic 1: Current Topics in Behavioral Neuroscience) and Psychology 394P (Topic 1) may not both be counted.

PSY 383C • Functional Neuroanatomy

43870 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm SEA 2.116
show description

An examination of the anatomy of the brain and spinal cord, emphasizing connections and functions of neural systems. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Neuroscience 383C and Psychology 383C may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

PSY 332 • Behavioral Neuroscience

43345 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm NOA 1.124
show description

Neuroscientific study of behavioral functions: fundamental structure and function of the human nervous system, sensory systems and perception, motor systems and behavior, motivation and learning, brain disorders and maladaptive behavior. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: For psychology majors, upper-division standing and Psychology 301 and 418 with a grade of at least C in each; for nonmajors, upper-division standing, Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C, and one of the following with a grade of at least C: Biology 318M, Civil Engineering 311S, Economics 329, Educational Psychology 371, Electrical Engineering 351K, Government 350K, Mathematics 316, 362K, Mechanical Engineering 335, Psychology 317, Sociology 317L, Social Work 318, Statistics 309, Statistics and Scientific Computation 302, 303, 304, 305, 306, 318.

PSY 394P • Neurobiol Of Learning/Memory

43585 • Spring 2013
Meets F 130pm-430pm ARC 2.204
show description

Current Topics in Behavioral Neuroscience. Brain-behavior relationships, particularly recent research in behavioral neuroscience, including the anatomical and neurochemical mechanisms of behavioral events, and behavioral influences on the brain. Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Neuroscience 394P (Topic 1: Current Topics in Behavioral Neuroscience) and Psychology 394P (Topic 1) may not both be counted.

PSY 383C • Functional Neuroanatomy

43415 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm SEA 2.116
show description

Professor: Dr. F. Gonzalez-Lima; gonzalez-lima@mail.utexas.edu Tel. 471-5895 (lab)

Schedule: Tuesdays and Thursdays 3:30-5 pm, at SEA 2.116 (computer lab)

Office hours: Tuesdays and Thursdays 2:30-3:30 PM, at SEA 3.236 Tel. 475-8497.

 

Objective: In this class we will examine the anatomical and functional organization of the human brain, emphasizing functional aspects of various neural systems, neuroimaging and translational research topics of clinical relevance. Both a conceptual understanding of central nervous system organization and the necessary memorization of specific neural structures and pathways will be required at the levels of macroscopic (MRI) and microscopic (histology) anatomical analysis.

 

Interactive course format: The course will be devoted to lectures and computer labs, student presentations and two exams (midterm and final).

1. Lectures: will be presented by the professor based on the assigned reading and internet resources. Assigned readings are due before the lectures.

2. Computer labs: are for the students to work on the internet tutorials under the guidance of the professor. Lab tutorials are assigned as homework after each topic.

3. Presentations: one or more students will be discussants of an assigned clinical example in one of the topics listed below. Each student should talk for 2-5 minutes introducing the example, including always neuroimaging findings, and raising translational research questions to stimulate a brief discussion on the topic before the computer labs.

 

Evaluation: Exams will be based mainly on lecture and lab material and discussions. There will be two objective exams, a midterm exam (35% of grade) and a final exam (40% of grade). Students will also be responsible for attendance to lectures and completion of computer labs, presentations and participation in discussions and professional ethical conduct at all times (25% of grade). Percent ranges for grades: A 100-94, A- 93-90, B+ 89-86, B 85-83, B- 82-80, C+ 79-76, C 75-73, C- 72-70, D+ 69-66, D 65-63, D- 62-60, F below 60%.

 

Required book chapters from: L. Heimer, The Human Brain and Spinal Cord, Springer-Verlag, New York/Berlin. First or second editions are fine.  (Optional 1st edition course packet for sell on demand at IT Copies, 512 W. MLK St., 476-6662, price $31.41).

 

FUNCTIONAL NEUROANATOMY TOPICS

The Heimer chapters should be studied before class: Chapter 1st edition (2nd edition)

 

Course materials can be accessed via blackboard at https://courses.utexas.edu/webapps/portal/frameset.jsp

 

1. Introduction to Computer Lab and the modern study of Neuroanatomy

 

2. Brain surface and dissection: Chapter 1, dissections 1-5 (1, 4)

 

3. Brain sections: Dissections 6 (Chapter 5)

Coronal and horizontal sections

 

4. Prenatal development and brain organization: Chapter 2 (2)

Neuroembryology

            Clinical examples: Mental retardation – Down’s syndrome

 

5. Somatosensory systems: Chapter 6 (9)

Basic somatosesnory pathway (discriminative touch)

Somatosensory pathways from the body

Somatosensory pathways from the face

            Clinical examples: Sensory neglect – Posterior parietal syndrome

 

6. Motor systems: Chapter 7 (15)

Basic motor pathways

            Clinical examples: Hemiplegia – Capsular infract

 

7. Sensory-motor integration: Basal ganglia and cerebellum: 8, 9 (16, 17)

Basal ganglia and cerebellum

            Clinical examples: Parkinson’s disease-Antipsychotics extrapyramidal syndrome

 

8. (Review), MIDTERM EXAM: Topics 1 to 7

 

9. Auditory system and language: Chapter 12 (14)

Auditory system anatomy and maturation

            Clinical examples: Psychic deafness-Auditory agnosia-Aphasias

 

10. Visual system: Chapter 13 (13)

Basic visual pathways

Central visual pathways

            Clinical examples: Blindsight-Visual agnosia

 

11. Hypothalamus and autonomic nervous system: 15, 16 (18, 19)

Hypothalamus and autonomic nervous system

            Clinical examples: Psychosomatic disorders-Coronary heart disease

 

12. Limbic system and reticular formation: 17, 10 (20, 21, 10)

Limbic system

Reticular formation and sleep

            Clinical examples: Psychomotor epilepsy-Anterior temporal syndrome-Amnesias

 

 

13. Cerebral cortex and thalamus 18, 19 (22)

Brodmann areas

            Clinical examples: Dementias-Alzheimer’s disease

 

Review for final exam

 

FINAL EXAM: Topics 9 to 13

 

For students with disabilities, I am available to discuss any appropriate academic accommodations that might be necessary for this course. Before course accommodations are made, a student may be required to provide documentation to the Office of the Dean of Students – Services for Students with Disabilities. They can be reached at 471-6259.

PSY S332 • Behavioral Neuroscience

87720 • Summer 2012
Meets MTWTHF 1130am-100pm NOA 1.102
show description

Professor: 

F. Gonzalez-Lima, Ph.D.

George I. Sanchez Centennial Professor, Behavioral Neuroscience Area, Department of Psychology (College of Liberal Arts), Division of Pharmacology and Toxicology (College of Pharmacy), Institute for Neuroscience and Center for Behavioral Neuroendocrinology (College of Natural Sciences)

Textbook/Resources:

Neuroscience - Exploring the Brain, 3rd Edition
Mark F. Bear, Ph.D., Barry W. Connors, Ph.D., Michael A. Paradiso, Ph.D.  ISBN: 0-781-76003-8

Interactive CD-ROM- packaged with every copy of the book and on the Student Resource Center of the book website: http://connection.lww.com/products/bear/src.asp

Evaluation:

Sixty percent of the total grade will come from two partial exams. Three partial exams will be given and the lowest grade will be deleted. If you miss an exam, that exam will be the exam deleted; no make-ups will be given. A comprehensive final exam will account for the other 40% of the total grade. No make-up will be given for the final. Grades: A 100-93, A- 92-90, B+ 89-86, B 85-83, B- 82-80, C+ 79-76, C 75-73, C- 72-70, D+ 69-66, D 65-63, D- 62-60, F below 60%.

Exams will consist of multiple-choice questions. Half of the questions will come from material presented in lectures, and half will come from the chapters assigned in the textbook. You will be responsible for lecture material even if it is not in the text, and you will be responsible for assigned chapters even if they are not discussed in the lectures.

No communication will be allowed during the exams. All institutional rules on Student Services and Activities (UT publication No. 9009) will be enforced; in particular, the rules on Scholastic Dishonesty (Appendix C). Failure to follow these rules, as determined by the professor, will be sufficient cause to assign an F grade.

The University of Texas at Austin provides upon request appropriate academic accommodations for qualified students with disabilities. For more information, contact the Office of the Dean of Students at 471-6259, 471-4641 TTY.

DESCRIPTION

 

PART I: Fundamentals of Neuroscience

Introduction to behavioral neuroscience concepts and methods

Basic structure of the human nervous system

Cells of the nervous system and neural networks

 

FIRST EXAM (30%)

 

PART II: Sensory Systems and Perception

Visual system and perception

Auditory system and audiovocal communication

Somatosensory systems and pain

 

SECOND EXAM (30%)

 

PART III: Sensorimotor Integration and Behavioral Control

Reflex and voluntary movements

Arousal and activity-sleep cycles

Hormones and sexual behavior

 

THIRD EXAM (30%)

 

PART IV: Adaptive Behavior and Brain Disorders

Thirst, hunger and reinforcement

Learning and memory

Brain disorders

FINAL EXAM (40%)     All Topics

 

 

PSY 332 • Behavioral Neuroscience

43205 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm NOA 1.124
show description

Professor: 

F. Gonzalez-Lima, Ph.D.

George I. Sanchez Centennial Professor, Behavioral Neuroscience Area, Department of Psychology (College of Liberal Arts), Division of Pharmacology and Toxicology (College of Pharmacy), Institute for Neuroscience and Center for Behavioral Neuroendocrinology (College of Natural Sciences)

Textbook/Resources:

Neuroscience - Exploring the Brain, 3rd Edition
Mark F. Bear, Ph.D., Barry W. Connors, Ph.D., Michael A. Paradiso, Ph.D.  ISBN: 0-781-76003-8

Interactive CD-ROM- packaged with every copy of the book and on the Student Resource Center of the book website: http://connection.lww.com/products/bear/src.asp

Evaluation:

Sixty percent of the total grade will come from two partial exams. Three partial exams will be given and the lowest grade will be deleted. If you miss an exam, that exam will be the exam deleted; no make-ups will be given. A comprehensive final exam will account for the other 40% of the total grade. No make-up will be given for the final. Grades: A 100-93, A- 92-90, B+ 89-86, B 85-83, B- 82-80, C+ 79-76, C 75-73, C- 72-70, D+ 69-66, D 65-63, D- 62-60, F below 60%.

Exams will consist of multiple-choice questions. Half of the questions will come from material presented in lectures, and half will come from the chapters assigned in the textbook. You will be responsible for lecture material even if it is not in the text, and you will be responsible for assigned chapters even if they are not discussed in the lectures.

No communication will be allowed during the exams. All institutional rules on Student Services and Activities (UT publication No. 9009) will be enforced; in particular, the rules on Scholastic Dishonesty (Appendix C). Failure to follow these rules, as determined by the professor, will be sufficient cause to assign an F grade.

The University of Texas at Austin provides upon request appropriate academic accommodations for qualified students with disabilities. For more information, contact the Office of the Dean of Students at 471-6259, 471-4641 TTY.

DESCRIPTION

 

PART I: Fundamentals of Neuroscience

Introduction to behavioral neuroscience concepts and methods

Basic structure of the human nervous system

Cells of the nervous system and neural networks

 

FIRST EXAM (30%)

 

PART II: Sensory Systems and Perception

Visual system and perception

Auditory system and audiovocal communication

Somatosensory systems and pain

 

SECOND EXAM (30%)

 

PART III: Sensorimotor Integration and Behavioral Control

Reflex and voluntary movements

Arousal and activity-sleep cycles

Hormones and sexual behavior

 

THIRD EXAM (30%)

 

PART IV: Adaptive Behavior and Brain Disorders

Thirst, hunger and reinforcement

Learning and memory

Brain disorders

FINAL EXAM (40%)     All Topics

 

 

PSY 394P • Neurobiol Of Learning/Memory

43445 • Spring 2012
Meets F 200pm-500pm ARC 2.204
show description

Spring 2012                       Psych/ Neu 394P

 

394P. Topic 3: Neurobiology of Learning and Memory 

 

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.  

 

Professor:          F. Gonzalez-Lima, Ph.D.  Tel. 471-5895, gonzalez-lima@mail.utexas.edu

 

Date, time:        Fridays 2-5 P.M. at ARC seminar room 2.204.  Office hours on Fridays 12-2 P.M. at ARC 3.110.  Students are encouraged to meet with the professor to prepare for class presentations.

 

Objective:         In this advanced research seminar we will discuss the neuroanatomical systems and metabolic processes that are functionally related to basic forms of learning and memory in mammals and how they relate to mental disorders.  Topics will include ongoing doctoral dissertation research and the most recent journal articles of assigned research topics.

 

Evaluation:        Students will be responsible for studying the reading assignments before class meetings, class attendance, participation in discussions and professional conduct at all times (25% of grade).  Each student will select a paper and lead the discussion on it in an oral presentation reviewing studies in one of the topics in the books listed below.  This presentation should be well rehearsed before class, illustrated with audiovisual aids as handouts and scholarly conducted (25% of grade). One week ahead of the presentation time, the student will hand copies of an outline of the paper to the professor and to the students. Following the presentation the student is expected to provide a revised version of the paper based on the class feedback and comments.  The revised student's paper will be 50% of grade.  There is no curve. Grades: A 100-93, A- 92-90, B+ 89-86, B 85-83, B- 82-80, C+ 79-76, C 75-73, C- 72-70, D+ 69-66, D 65-63, D- 62-60, F below 60%.

 

Background books recommended:       

Martinez Jr., J. L. & Kesner, R. P. (eds.) Neurobiology of Learning and Memory, Academic Press, San Diego, 600 pp., 2007.  

 

Gonzalez-Lima, F., Finkenstädt, Th., & Scheich, H. (eds.)  Advances in Metabolic Mapping Techniques for Brain Imaging of Behavioral and Learning Functions, Dordrecht/Boston/London:  NATO ASI Series D:  Vol. 68, Kluwer Academic Publishers, 527 pp., 1992.

 

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and consent of instructor. One course in neuroscience and one course in learning, or approval of equivalent background by professor.

PSY 383C • Functional Neuroanatomy

43295 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm SEA 2.116
show description

An examination of the anatomy of the brain and spinal cord, emphasizing connections and functions of neural systems. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Neuroscience 383C and Psychology 383C may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

PSY S332 • Behavioral Neuroscience

87765 • Summer 2011
Meets MTWTHF 1130am-100pm SEA 2.108
show description

Evaluation: Sixty percent of the total grade will come from two

partial exams. Three partial exams will be given and the

lowest grade will be deleted. If you miss an exam, that exam

will be the exam deleted; no make-ups will be given. A

comprehensive final exam will account for the other 40% of

the total grade. No make-up will be given for the final. Grades:

A 100-93, A- 92-90, B+ 89-86, B 85-83, B- 82-80, C+ 79-76, C

75-73, C- 72-70, D+ 69-66, D 65-63, D- 62-60, F below 60%.

Exams will consist of multiple-choice questions. Half of

the questions will come from material presented in lectures,

and half will come from the chapters assigned in the textbook.

You will be responsible for lecture material even if it is not in

the text, and you will be responsible for assigned chapters

even if they are not discussed in the lectures.

No communication will be allowed during the exams. All

institutional rules on Student Services and Activities (UT

publication No. 9009) will be enforced; in particular, the rules

on Scholastic Dishonesty (Appendix C). Failure to follow these

rules, as determined by the professor, will be sufficient cause

to assign an F grade.

PSY 332 • Behavioral Neuroscience

43710 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm NOA 1.124
show description

Evaluation: Sixty percent of the total grade will come from two

partial exams. Three partial exams will be given and the

lowest grade will be deleted. If you miss an exam, that exam

will be the exam deleted; no make-ups will be given. A

comprehensive final exam will account for the other 40% of

the total grade. No make-up will be given for the final.

Exams will consist of multiple-choice questions. Half of

the questions will come from material presented in lectures,

and half will come from the chapters assigned in the textbook.

You will be responsible for lecture material even if it is not in

the text, and you will be responsible for assigned chapters

even if they are not discussed in the lectures.

No communication will be allowed during the exams. All

institutional rules on Student Services and Activities (UT

publication No. 9009) will be enforced; in particular, the rules

on Scholastic Dishonesty (Appendix C). Failure to follow these

rules, as determined by the professor, will be sufficient cause

to assign an F grade.

The University of Texas at Austin provides upon request

appropriate academic accommodations for qualified students

with disabilities. For more information, contact the Office of the

Dean of Students at 471-6259, 471-4641 TTY.

PSY 394P • Neurobiol Of Learning/Memory

43945 • Spring 2011
Meets F 200pm-500pm ARC 2.204
show description

Seminars in Behavioral Neuroscience and Biopsychology. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

PSY 383C • Functional Neuroanatomy

43255 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm SEA 2.116
show description

An examination of the anatomy of the brain and spinal cord, emphasizing connections and functions of neural systems. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Neuroscience 383C and Psychology 383C may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

PSY 332 • Behavioral Neuroscience

43860 • Spring 2010
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm PHR 2.110
show description

 1
Course: PSY 332, BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE 
(Spring 2010, 43860)                    
 
Professor:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Francisco Gonzalez-Lima, Ph.D.
George I. Sanchez Centennial Professorship in Liberal Arts 
Director, Texas Consortium in Behavioral Neuroscience 
Departments of Psychology, Pharmacology and Toxicology
Professor, Institute for Neuroscience, Center for Behavioral
Neuroendocrinology and Imaging Research Center
Office Hours: T TH 2-3:15 PM; Office: SEA 3.236
Teaching Assistant:  Christel C. Bastida
Office Hours: W 9:00-11:00  Office: SW7 room 201 
Email:  christelceleste@mail.utexas.edu
Place & Time: PHR 2.110; T TH 3:30-5:00 
 Textbook/Resources: Neuroscience - Exploring the Brain, 3rd Edition 
Mark F. Bear, Ph.D., Barry W. Connors, Ph.D., Michael A.
Paradiso, Ph.D.  ISBN: 0-781-76003-8
Interactive CD-ROM- packaged with every copy of the book
and on the Student Resource Center of the book website:
http://connection.lww.com/products/bear/src.asp 
Evaluation: Sixty percent of the total grade will come from two
partial exams. Three partial exams will be given and the
lowest grade will be deleted. If you miss an exam, that exam
will be the exam deleted; no make-ups will be given. A
comprehensive final exam will account for the other 40% of
the total grade. No make-up will be given for the final. 
Exams will consist of multiple-choice questions. Half of
the questions will come from material presented in lectures,
and half will come from the chapters assigned in the textbook.
You will be responsible for lecture material even if it is not in
the text, and you will be responsible for assigned chapters
even if they are not discussed in the lectures.
No communication will be allowed during the exams. All
institutional rules on Student Services and Activities (UT
publication No. 9009) will be enforced, in particular, the rules
on Scholastic Dishonesty (Appendix C). Failure to follow these
rules, as determined by the professor, will be sufficient cause
to assign an F grade. 
The University of Texas at Austin provides upon request
appropriate academic accommodations for qualified students
with disabilities. For more information, contact the Office of the
Dean of Students at 471-6259, 471-4641 TTY. 
 2
PSY 332, BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE
 SCHEDULE, SPRING 2010
 
TOPIC DATE DESCRIPTION CHAPTER
   
 
1
 
 
Jan. 19, 21
PART I: Fundamentals of Neuroscience
Introduction to behavioral neuroscience
concepts and methods
 
1
2 Jan. 26, 28, Feb. 2 Basic structure of the human nervous system 7
3 Feb 4, 9 Cells of the nervous system and neural
networks
      2, 23   
 
Feb. 11
 
FIRST EXAM (30%)
 
Topics 1-3
   
  PART II: Sensory Systems and Perception 
4 Feb. 16, 18 Visual system and perception 9, 10
5  Feb. 23, 25; March 2 Auditory system and audiovocal
communication
11, 20
6 March 4, 9 Somatosensory systems and pain 12
 
March 11
 
SECOND EXAM (30%)
 
Topics 4-6
   
  PART III: Sensorimotor Integration and
Behavioral Control
 
7 March 23, 25 Reflex and voluntary movements 13, 14
8 March 30; April 1 Arousal and activity-sleep cycles 19, 21
9 April 6, 8 Hormones and sexual behavior 15, 17
 
April 13
 
THIRD EXAM (30%)
 
Topics 7-9
   
  PART IV: Adaptive Behavior and 
Brain Disorders
 
10 April 15, 20 Thirst, hunger and reinforcement 16, 18
11 April 22, 27 Learning and memory 24, 25
12  April 29; May 4, 6
 
Brain disorders 22
    
Tuesday, May 18, 9:00–12:00 noon            FINAL EXAM (40%)                  All Topics 
 
 
 3
What advice would you give to a Behavioral Neuroscience student?
 Behavioral Neuroscience students need to understand that this class really
differs from most other classes in the Psychology department. It is similar to
Biopsychology in content but it goes in more depth. Students at this upper-level class
have to assume more responsibility for their own learning. That means paying attention
to course syllabi, reading class policy statements carefully, attending class faithfully and
keeping up with reading assignments even when instructors do not remind students to
do the work.
 Serious students will quickly discover this class is not necessarily harder than the
best courses they have taken at The University of Texas, but there is likely a faster pace
and less room for slippage. A student who gets off to a good start will face a more
enjoyable learning experience in this class, both academically and intellectually. A
student who falls behind early will spend many days playing catch up and will never feel
entirely at home in this class.
 
How can students academically succeed in an upper-level course such as
Behavioral Neuroscience?
First, check out the advice offered by former students enrolled in these classes:
“Get started on course readings early; choose interesting questions to ask during
class; manage your time well.” I would add the suggestion that students form small study
groups and review the material on the interactive CD-ROM packaged with every copy of
the book (this can also be accessed on the book Web site). Also review the course
images posted in my Web site: 
http://homepage.psy.utexas.edu/homepage/group/gonzalezlimalab/psy332.htm.
 Finally, I would advise any students to get to know their professor and TA. The
professor has over twenty years of experience teaching Neuroscience to students at
various levels (undergraduate, medical, graduate, and postdoctoral students); and the
TA is a fifth-year Ph.D. student in Neuroscience. Take advantage of office hours to ask
pertinent questions about course material or reading assignments. 
 
How can students maximize their Behavioral Neuroscience experience?
 A school the size of The University of Texas at Austin offers endless
opportunities for learning and growing. Seek out and welcome those opportunities.
Attend lectures and presentations related to Behavioral Neuroscience. For example,
NEU 394P - Current Topics in Behavioral Neuroscience, which runs Wednesdays, 3-5
PM, is made of seminars by UT and invited speakers talking about their current research
topics in the behavioral neuroscience area. Some seminars overlap with the Institute for
Neuroscience seminar series. A list of seminar topics and speakers is not available until
the start of each semester. I will advertise the topic each week to all interested. You are
welcome to join us. Browse the Web to learn about what other students and scientists
are doing in Behavioral Neuroscience, and join research labs and organizations that will
stretch your talents and help you explore your interests. 
 
The Psychology Department will drop all students who do not meet the following
prerequisites:
(a) PSY 301 with a C or better
(b) PSY 418 (or an equivalent listed in the course schedule) with a C or better
(c) Upper-Division standing (60 hours completed)

PSY 394P • Neurobiol Of Learning/Memory

44105 • Spring 2010
Meets F 200pm-500pm ARC 2.204
(also listed as NEU 394P )
show description

Seminars in Behavioral Neuroscience and Biopsychology. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

PSY 383C • Functional Neuroanatomy

44235 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm SEA 2.116
(also listed as NEU 383C )
show description

Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.Neuroscience 383C and Psychology 383C may not both be counted.neural systems. Three lecture hours a week for one semester.brain and spinal cord, emphasizing connections and functions ofAn examination of the anatomy of the

PSY 332 • Behavioral Neuroscience

43110 • Spring 2009
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm PHR 2.110
show description

Neuroscientific study of behavioral functions: fundamental structure and function of the human nervous system, sensory systems and perception, motor systems and behavior, motivation and learning, brain disorders and maladaptive behavior. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: For psychology majors, upper-dvision standing and Psychology 301 and 418 with a grade of at least C in each; for nonmajors, upper-divsion standing, Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C, and one of the following with a grade of at least C: Biology 318M, Civil Engineering 311S, Economics 329, Educational Psychology 371, Government 350K, Mathematics 316, Psychology 317, Sociology 317L, Social Work 318, Statistics 309.

PSY 394P • Neurobiol Of Learning/Memory

43360 • Spring 2009
Meets F 200pm-500pm ARC 2.204
(also listed as NEU 394P )
show description

Current Topics in Behavioral Neuroscience. Brain-behavior relationships, particularly recent research in behavioral neuroscience, including the anatomical and neurochemical mechanisms of behavioral events, and behavioral influences on the brain. Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Neuroscience 394P (Topic 1: Current Topics in Behavioral Neuroscience) and Psychology 394P (Topic 1) may not both be counted.

bottom border