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Jacqueline Woolley, Chair The University of Texas at Austin, SEA 4.212, Austin, TX 78712 • (512) 475-7596

Hongjoo (Joanne) Lee

Assistant Professor Ph.D., Yale University

Hongjoo (Joanne) Lee

Contact

  • Phone: (512) 232-8055
  • Office: SEA 4.222
  • Office Hours: W 2-3, F 11-12
  • Campus Mail Code: A8000

Biography

I received my Ph.D. in Psychology with a Behavioral Neuroscience emphasis from Yale University.  My doctoral research was focused on the role of the amygdala in fear learning and how stress modulates learning and memory.  For my postdoctoral training, I worked in the Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences at the Johns Hopkins University.  My primary research goal has been to use a multidisciplinary approach to understand amygdala-dopamine systems in learning and memory, and applying this knowledge to better understand the nature of emotional and cognitive problems seen among people with neurological disorders.  In particular, my current research focuses on examining the nature of cognitive functions (e.g. attention) in which the amygdala central nucleus and substantia nigra circuits are involved.  This line of research is especially relevant for the understanding and treatment of cognitive problems associated with Parkinson’s disease.

Selected Publications (See lab site for full iist of publications)

Lee, H.J., Choi, J-S., Brown, T.H., & Kim, J.J. (2001). Amygdala N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors are critical for the expression of multiple conditioned fear responses. Journal of Neuroscience. 21: 4116-4124.

Kim, J.J., Lee, H.J., Han, J.S., & Packard, M.G. (2001). Amygdala is critical for stress-induced modulation of hippocampal Long-Term Potentiation and learning. Journal of Neuroscience. 21: 5222-5228.

Lee, H.J., Groshek, F., Petrovich, G.D., Cantalini, J.P., Gallagher, M., & Holland, P.C. (2005). Role of amygdalo-nigral circuitry in conditioning of a visual stimulus paired with food. Journal of Neuroscience. 25: 3881-3888.

Lee, H.J., Youn, J.M., O, M.J., Gallagher, M., & Holland, P.C. (2006).  Role of substantia nigra-amygdala connections in surprise-induced enhancement of attention. Journal of Neuroscience. 26:6077-6081.

Kim, J.J., Lee, H.J., Welday, A.C., Song, E.Y., Cho, J., Sharp, P.E., Jung, M.W., & Blair, H.T. (2007). Stress-induced alterations in hippocampal plasticity, place cells, and spatial memory. PNAS. 104:18297-18302.

Kosten, T.A., Lee, H.J., & Kim, J.J. (2007). Neonatal handling alters learning in adult male and female rats in a task-specific manner. Brain Research1154:144-153.

Lee, H.J., Youn, J.M., Gallagher, M., & Holland, P.C.  (2008) Temporally-limited role of substantia nigra-central amygdala connections in surprise-induced enhancement of learning. European Journal of Neuroscience. 27: 3043-3049.

Haberman, R.P., Lee, H.J., Colantuoni, C., Koh, M.T., & Gallagher, M. (2008). Rapid encoding of new information alters the profile of plasticity-related mRNA transcripts in the hippocampal CA3 region. PNAS. 105:10601-10606.

Graham, L.K., Yoon, T., Lee, H.J., & Kim, J.J. (2009) Strain and sex differences in fear conditioning: 22 kHz ultrasonice vocalizations and freezing in rats. Psychology & Neuroscience. 2:219-225

Lee, H.J., Gallagher, M., & Holland, P.C. (2010). The central amygdala projection to the substantia nigra reflects prediction error information in appetitive conditioning. Learning & Memory. 17:531-538. 
* selected as the editor’s pick of the month and for the journal cover art
* selected as faculty of 1000 article

Lee, H.J., Wheeler D.S., Holland, P.C.(2011). Interactions between amygdala central nucleus and the ventral tegmental area in the acquisition of conditioned cue-directed behavior in rats. European Journal of Neuroscience. 33(10). 1876-1884

Interests

Roles of amygdala-dopamine systems in learning and memory

PSY 353K • Psychopharmacology

42720 • Spring 2015
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am NOA 1.124
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The pharmacology and the neurochemical, neurophysiological, and psychological effects of psychoactive drugs, with regard to their use as therapeutic and behavioral research tools. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: For psychology majors, upper-division standing and Psychology 301 and 418 with a grade of at least C in each; for nonmajors, upper-division standing, Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C, and one of the following with a grade of at least C: Biology 318M, Civil Engineering 311S, Economics 329, Educational Psychology 371, Electrical Engineering 351K, Government 350K, Mathematics 316, 362K, Mechanical Engineering 335, Psychology 317, Sociology 317L, Social Work 318, Statistics 309, Statistics and Scientific Computation 302, 303, 304, 305, 306, 318.

PSY 394P • Func Anatomy Of Amygdala

43895 • Fall 2014
Meets F 200pm-500pm SEA 2.108
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Current Topics in Behavioral Neuroscience. Brain-behavior relationships, particularly recent research in behavioral neuroscience, including the anatomical and neurochemical mechanisms of behavioral events, and behavioral influences on the brain. Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Neuroscience 394P (Topic 1: Current Topics in Behavioral Neuroscience) and Psychology 394P (Topic 1) may not both be counted.

PSY 308 • Biopsychology

43910 • Spring 2014
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am NOA 1.124
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Introduction to the biological bases of psychological processes and behavior. Overview of the physiology and anatomy of the nervous system, followed by a survey of brain mechanisms of perception, cognition, learning, and emotion;biological perspectives on drug action and mental disease. Three lecture hours a wekk for one semester. Prerequisite: Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C.

PSY 341K • Neurobiology Of Attention

43770 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm SEA 3.250
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Topics of contemporary interest that may vary from semester to semester. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: For psychology majors, upper-division standing and Psychology 301 and 418 with a grade of at least C in each; for nonmajors, upper-division standing, Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C, and one of the following with a grade of at least C: Biology 318M, Civil Engineering 311S, Economics 329, Educational Psychology 371, Electrical Engineering 351K, Government 350K, Mathematics 316, 362K, Mechanical Engineering 335, Psychology 317, Sociology 317L, Social Work 318, Statistics 309, Statistics and Scientific Computation 302, 303, 304, 305, 306, 318.

PSY 308 • Biopsychology

43260 • Spring 2013
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am NOA 1.126
show description

Introduction to the biological bases of psychological processes and behavior. Overview of the physiology and anatomy of the nervous system, followed by a survey of brain mechanisms of perception, cognition, learning, and emotion;biological perspectives on drug action and mental disease. Three lecture hours a wekk for one semester. Prerequisite: Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C.

PSY 394P • Amygdala And Learning

43575 • Spring 2013
Meets M 300pm-600pm SEA 4.242
show description

Current Topics in Behavioral Neuroscience. Brain-behavior relationships, particularly recent research in behavioral neuroscience, including the anatomical and neurochemical mechanisms of behavioral events, and behavioral influences on the brain. Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Neuroscience 394P (Topic 1: Current Topics in Behavioral Neuroscience) and Psychology 394P (Topic 1) may not both be counted.

PSY 308 • Biopsychology

43120 • Spring 2012
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am NOA 1.126
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This course is an introduction to the biological basis of psychological processes and behavior. We will first cover the basic foundations of the nervous system, such as anatomy and physiology. Then, we will study how the nervous system underlies our perception, motor skills, basic needs such as eating and sleeping, emotions, memory and many basic behaviors involved in daily life. We will also talk about various brain disorders. This course also covers other basic concepts, findings and research in the field of Biopsychology.

PSY 341K • Neurobiology Of Attention

43195 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm SEA 2.108
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This course will examine brain mechanisms of attention in humans and other animals. The goal is to understand how attention is studied at the behavioral, neural system, cellular, synaptic, and genetic levels. This course is intended to encourage you to think critically, give constructive feedback to peers, and improve your scientific presentation and writing skills.

PSY 394P • Amygdala And Learning

43340 • Fall 2011
Meets M 200pm-500pm SEA 4.242
show description

Current Topics in Behavioral Neuroscience. Brain-behavior relationships, particularly recent research in behavioral neuroscience, including the anatomical and neurochemical mechanisms of behavioral events, and behavioral influences on the brain. Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Neuroscience 394P (Topic 1: Current Topics in Behavioral Neuroscience) and Psychology 394P (Topic 1) may not both be counted.

PSY 341k • Neurobiology Of Attention

43155 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm SEA 3.250
show description

Course Description

This course will examine behavioral and brain mechanisms of attention in humans and other animals.  The goal is to understand how attention is studied at the cognitive, neurosystem, cellular, synaptic, and genetic levels.  This course is intended to allow you to think critically, give constructive feedback to peers, and improve your presentation and writing skills.  Class session will include lectures, student presentations and discussions of the reading materials and relevant journal articles assigned weekly.


Grading Policy

Oral presentation:    10%
Article summaries:   40%
Peer critique:          10%
Midterm exam:        20%
Final exam:            20%

Text

TBA

PSY 308 • Biopsychology

43790 • Spring 2010
Meets MWF 1000-1100 NOA 1.126
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SYLLABUS
 
 
PSY308 Biopsychology  
Spring 2010
Unique: 43790
 
 
Time: MWF 10-11 AM
Location: NOA 1.126
 
 
Instructor: Hongjoo Joanne Lee, Ph.D.
Email: leehj@psy.utexas.edu
Phone: 232-8055
Office: SEA 4.222
Office Hours: Wed 2-3, Fri 11-12, or by appointment
 
 
Teaching Assistant: Megan Thompson
Email: megant124@gmail.com
Phone: 232-8055
Office: SEA 4.222
Office Hours: Mon and Wed 11-12, or by appointment
 
 
Content
This course is an introduction to the biological basis of psychological processes and
behavior.  We will first cover the basic foundations of the nervous system, such as anatomy and
physiology.  Then, we will study how the nervous system underlies our perception, motor skills,
basic needs such as eating and sleeping, emotions, memory and many basic behaviors involved
in daily life.  We will also talk about various brain disorders.  This course also covers other basic
concepts, findings and research in the field of Biopsychology.
 
 
Textbook
Biological Psychology by James Kalat
 
 
Grading Policy
The course grade will be based on four examinations, each covering about one-fourth of
the course material and a cumulative final examination.  The exams will include material from
lectures, readings, and points brought up in discussion during class.  Each test will consist of
multiple choice and short answers.  The best 4 out of 5 grades will be used in calculating the
course grade, in which each exam grade will count 25% towards to the final course grade.  Thus,
you have the option of not taking one of the four tests during the semester or the final test.  There
are no make-up tests unless you have a written doctor’s or coach’s note.  Letter grade cutoffs are
as following:
 
93-100     =    A     
90-92.9    =    A-
87-89.9    =    B+
83-86.9    =    B
80-82.9    =    B-
77-79.9    =    C+
73-76.9    =    C
70-72.9    =    C-
67-69.9    =    D+
63-66.9    =    D
60-62.9    =    D-
< 60         =    F
 
 
Prerequisites
PSY301 with a C or better
 
 
Special Needs
The University of Texas at Austin provides upon request appropriate academic
accommodations for qualified students with disabilities.  To determine if you qualify, contact the
Office of the Dean of Students at 471-6259, 471-4641 TTY.  If they certify your needs, I will
work with you to make appropriate arrangements.
 
 
University policy
      Please read the policy listed in your Blackboard.
 
 
My assumption
A. I use Blackboard to distribute course materials, to communicate, and to post grades.  In
particular, I will post the PowerPoint lecture material 24 hours prior to each lecture.  It is
expected that you bring it to the class to take notes.  If you are not familiar with the use of
Blackboard, please go to the HELP desk located in the Flawn Academic Center.
B. Use of E-mail is the University’s official correspondence.  Thus, you are encouraged to
check your e-mail at least twice a week.  I will periodically communicate with you via e-
mail.   
C. I will not take attendance, but you are responsible for the materials that we talk about in
the class.   
D. Use of a laptop is permitted as long as it is not disruptive to the class.  However, I hold
the right to regulate the use of laptops at anytime during the lecture.
 
 
Course outline
 The following schedule is only approximate, and subject to change during the semester.   
 
Date                 Topic Readings
Unit 1: Foundations
Jan 20, 22 Introduction to Biopsychology   Chapter 1
Jan 25, 27, 29 The anatomy of the nervous system Chapter 4
Feb 1, 3, 5 Neural physiology Chapters 2,3
Feb 8, 10 Drug actions on the nervous system Chapter 3
Feb 12 TEST 1   
Unit 2: Sensory and Motor Systems
Feb 15, 17, 19 Visual system Chapter 6
Feb 22, 24, 26 Auditory, chemical, & somatosensory systems Chapter 7
Mar 1, 3, 5 Motor system Chapter 8
Mar 8 TEST 2   
Unit 3: Innate Behaviors and Cognition
Mar 10, 12 Ingestive behavior Chapter 10
Mar 22, 24, 26 Reproductive behavior Chapter 11
Mar 29, 31 Apr 2 Sleep and dreaming Chapter 9
April 5, 7, 9 Learning and memory Chapter 13
Apr 12 TEST 3  
Unit 4: Plasticity and Disorders
Apr 14, 16, 19 Neural plasticity and brain damage Chapter 5
Apr 21, 23 Cognitive functions Chapter 14
Apr 26, 28 Stress and emotion Chapter 12
Apr 30, May 3, 5 Mental disorders Chapter 15
May 7 TEST 4  
 FINAL EXAM   

 

 

PSY 308 • Biopsychology

43030 • Spring 2009
Meets MWF 1000-1100 NOA 1.126
show description

Introduction to the biological bases of psychological processes and behavior.  Overview of the physiology and anatomy of the nervous system, followed by a survey of brain mechanisms of perception, cognition, learning, and emotion; biological perspectives on drug action and mental disease.  Three lecture hours a week for one semester.  Prerequisite: Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C.

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