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James W. Pennebaker, Chair The University of Texas at Austin, SEA 4.212, Austin, TX 78712 • (512) 475-7596

Charles J Holahan

Professor Ph.D., University of Massachusetts, Amherst

Professor and Graduate Advisor
Charles J Holahan

Contact

Biography

Dr. Holahan does not plan to accept a new graduate student for Fall 2014.

Charles (Josh) Holahan received a Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst. He has been a visiting faculty member at the Center for Health Care Evaluation at the Stanford University School of Medicine. His area of interest is health psychology, with a specialization in stress and coping. His research focuses on "stress resistance," which examines factors that discriminate between individuals who remain healthy versus those who become emotionally or physically ill in the context of life stressors. He also studies the interrelationships among depression, health risk behaviors, and physical illness. He has been awarded the Jeanne Holloway, President's Associates, Dad’s Association, Raymond Dickson, and Regents' teaching awards and is a member of the Academy of Distinguished Teachers.

Selected Publications

Holahan, C. J., Moos, R. H., Holahan, C. K., Brennan, P. L., & Schutte, K. K.  (2005).  Stress generation, avoidance coping, and depressive symptoms: A 10-year model.  Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology,73, 658-666.

Kenney, B. A., Holahan, C. J., North, R., J., & Holahan, C. K.  (2006).  Depressive symptoms and cigarette smoking in American workers. American Journal of Health Promotion20, 179-182.

Holahan, C. J., Moos, R. H., Moerkbak, M. L., Cronkite, R. C., Holahan, C. K., & Kenney, B. A.  (2007).  Depressive symptom similarity between spouses over 10 years: The underlying role of coping.  Journal of Family Psychology21, 551-559.

North, R. J., Holahan, C. J., Moos, R. H., & Cronkite, R. C.  (2008).  Family support, family income, and happiness: A 10-year perspective.  Journal of Family Psychology22, 475-483.

Kenney, B. A., Holahan, C. J., Holahan, C. K., Brennan, P. L., Schutte, K. K., & Moos, R. H.  (2009).  Depressive Symptoms, Drinking Problems, and Cigarette Smoking in Older Adults.  Addictive Behaviors34, 548-553.

Holahan, C. J., Pahl, S. A., Cronkite, R. C., Holahan, C. K., North, R. J., & Moos, R. H.  (2010).  Depression and Vulnerability to Incident Physical Illness Across 10 Years. Journal of Affective Disorders123, 222-229.

Holahan, C. J., Schutte, K. K., Brennan, P. L., Holahan, C. K., Moos, B. S., & Moos, R. H.  (2010).  Late-Life Alcohol Consumption and 20-Year Mortality.  Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research34, 1961-1971.

Holahan, C. K., Holahan, C. J., Powers, D. A., Ockene, J. K., Marti, C. N., & Hays, R. B.  (2011).  Depressive symptoms and smoking in middle-aged and older women.  Nicotine & Tobacco Research, 13, 722-731.

Holahan, C. J., Brennan, P. L., Schutte, K. K, North, R. J., Holahan, C. K., Moos, B. S., & Moos, R. H.  (in press).  Wine consumption and 20-year mortality among late-life moderate drinkers.  Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs.

Holahan, C. J., North, R. J., Holahan, C. K., Hayes, R. B., Powers, D. A., & Ockene, J. K.  (in press).  Social influences on smoking in middle-aged and older women.  Psychology of Addictive Behaviors.

Interests

Health Psychology, Stress and Coping, Occupational Stress, Coping with Cardiovascular Illness

PSY 379H • Honors Research II

43810 • Fall 2014
Meets W 100pm-400pm SEA 4.242
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Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing, Psychology 301 and 418 with a grade of at least C in each, Psychology 458 and 359H, and consent of the honors adviser.

PSY 359H • Honors Research I

44135 • Spring 2014
Meets W 100pm-400pm SEA 3.250
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Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing, Psychology 301 and 418 with a grade of at least C in each, six semester hours of upper-division coursework in psychology, a grade point average of at least 3.50 in psychology courses taken at the University, a University grade point average of at least 3.25, and consent of the honors adviser.

PSY 341K • Health Psychology

43780 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm SEA 2.108
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Topics of contemporary interest that may vary from semester to semester. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: For psychology majors, upper-division standing and Psychology 301 and 418 with a grade of at least C in each; for nonmajors, upper-division standing, Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C, and one of the following with a grade of at least C: Biology 318M, Civil Engineering 311S, Economics 329, Educational Psychology 371, Electrical Engineering 351K, Government 350K, Mathematics 316, 362K, Mechanical Engineering 335, Psychology 317, Sociology 317L, Social Work 318, Statistics 309, Statistics and Scientific Computation 302, 303, 304, 305, 306, 318.

PSY 341K • Health Psychology

43440 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm SEA 2.108
show description

Topics of contemporary interest that may vary from semester to semester. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: For psychology majors, upper-division standing and Psychology 301 and 418 with a grade of at least C in each; for nonmajors, upper-division standing, Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C, and one of the following with a grade of at least C: Biology 318M, Civil Engineering 311S, Economics 329, Educational Psychology 371, Electrical Engineering 351K, Government 350K, Mathematics 316, 362K, Mechanical Engineering 335, Psychology 317, Sociology 317L, Social Work 318, Statistics 309, Statistics and Scientific Computation 302, 303, 304, 305, 306, 318.

PSY 379H • Honors Research II

43405 • Fall 2012
Meets W 100pm-400pm SEA 4.242
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PSY 379H is reserved for students enrolled in the Department of Psychology Honors Program. The Department of Psychology Honors Program is designed to give outstanding students who plan a career in psychology, another science, or a professional field an intensive exposure to research in psychology by designing, conducting, and writing up an independent research project. The Honors Program consists of three formal courses. PSY 359H (Honors Research I), which is completed the first semester. PSY 379H (Honors Research II) and PSY 158H (Honors Research Tutorial) are completed the following semester. PSY 379H is a seminar course, which provides opportunity for in-depth discussion of the process of completing and writing up an independent research study, including: conducting an independent research study; collecting, scoring, and analyzing data; and preparing Results and Discussion sections presenting and interpreting research findings.

PSY 359H • Honors Research I

43350 • Spring 2012
Meets W 100pm-400pm SEA 3.250
show description

PSY 359H is reserved for students enrolled in the Department of Psychology Honors Program. The Department of Psychology Honors Program is designed to give outstanding students who plan a career in psychology, another science, or a professional field an intensive exposure to research in psychology by designing, conducting, and writing up an independent research project. The Honors Program consists of three formal courses. PSY 359H (Honors Research I), which is completed the first semester. PSY 379H (Honors Research II) and PSY 158H (Honors Research Tutorial) are completed the following semester. PSY 359H is a seminar course, which provides opportunity for in-depth discussion of the research process, including: selecting and developing of a research problem; research design and measurement; and writing a supporting literature review, problem statement, and methods section.

PSY 379H • Honors Research II

43240 • Fall 2010
Meets W 100pm-400pm SEA 2.108
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Prerequisites

PSY 301 with a grade of at least C, and PSY 418 or an equivalent statistics course with a grade of at least C, PSY 458, 359H, and consent of the Honors Adviser. Upper-division standing required.

Course Description

Department of Psychology Honors Program is designed to give outstanding students who plan a career in psychology intensive exposure to research in psychology. PSY 379H is a seminar course in a two-course sequence (following PSY 359H) with an associated lab which provides opportunity for discussion of various areas of psychology and current research in these areas. Explore areas of interest. Review previous research.

Grading Policy

Quality of the final thesis (90%).

Quality of poster presentation of study findings (10%).

Texts

APA Publication Manual

Pyrczak and Bruce, Writing Empirical Research Reports

Cronk, How to Use SPSS (5th edition)

PSY 359H • Honors Research I

44010 • Spring 2010
Meets W 100pm-400pm SEA 2.224
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Spring 2010

Syllabus

PSY 359H
Honors Research I
 (Unique No. 44010)

Room: Seay 2.224
Time: Wed 1:00-4:00

Instructor: C. J. Holahan

Office hours: Tuesday and Thursday: 2:30 to 4:00; and by appointment
Office: Seay 3.202               
E-mail: holahan@psy.utexas.edu       

Teaching Assistant: Amy Robison

Office hours: Monday and Tuesday: 9:30 to 11:00; and by appointment   
Office: Seay 2.122
E-mail: amyroberson@mail.utexas.edu

Overview of Class:

PSY 359H is reserved for students enrolled in the Department of Psychology Honors Program. The Department of Psychology Honors Program is designed to give outstanding students who plan a career in psychology, another science, or a professional field an intensive exposure to research in psychology by designing, conducting, and writing up an independent research project. The Honors Program consists of three formal courses. PSY 359H (Honors Research I), which is completed the first semester. PSY 379H (Honors Research II) and PSY 158H (Honors Research Tutorial) are completed the following semester. PSY 359H is a seminar course, which provides opportunity for in-depth discussion of the research process, including: selecting and developing of a research problem; research design and measurement; and writing a supporting literature review, problem statement, and methods section.

Texts:    Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (6th edition)
    Writing Empirical Research Reports (6th edition) by Pyrczak and Bruce

Basis for Evaluation:

Two papers, each counting for one-half of the grade.  The two papers will encompass the Introduction and Method sections of a proposed independent research study.

The first paper (Introduction, 50% of grade) will be due on Wednesday, March 10th and will consist of a literature review, statement of the research problem, and hypotheses.

The second paper (Method, 50% of grade) will be due on Wednesday, May 5th and will consist of specifying an experimental design and detailing the research measures and procedure, as well as a substantial rewrite of the first paper based on the feedback you receive at the mid-semester point. 

Next semester, in Psy 379H and Psy 158H, you will conduct the research study and write up your findings, adding the Results and Discussion sections to comprise your final honors thesis.

Course Grade:

The course grade will be based on the total of your grades for the two papers.

Cut-offs for the course grade are: 
    A = 92 and above
    A- = 90 to 91 and above
    B+ = 88 to 89
    B = 82-87
    B- = 80-81
    C+ = 78-79
    C = 72-77
    C- = 70-71
    D+ = 68-69
    D = 62-67
    D- = 60-61
    F = 59 and below

Attendance:

Students are expected to attend all classes. However, attendance is not part of the grade.

Students with Disabilities

The University of Texas at Austin provides upon request appropriate academic accommodations for qualified students with disabilities. For more information, contact the Division of Diversity and Community Engagement, Services for Students with Disabilities, 471-6259.

 

Course Schedule

Date    Lecture Topic*/Assignment
January 20    general research problem and initial sources
January 27    narrowing of problem (conceptual model), additional sources, paradigm article, and faculty advisor
February 3     statement of purpose, hypotheses, and further sources
February 10    refine statement of purpose, hypotheses, and more sources
February 17    outline of paper1 and most of final sources
February 24    rough draft of paper1
March 3    more refined draft of paper 1
March 10    completed Paper 1 due, introduce general methods issues
March 17    no class (Spring Break)
March 24    outline methods and identify potential problems/delays; begin thinking about measures and procedures
March 31    finalize design and sample size and characteristics
April 7    finalize measures and procedures (e.g., stimuli and instructions); review feedback on introduction and begin ongoing revision
April 14    draft design, participants, and measures/apparatus/stimuli
April 21    draft procedure (including brief note on statistics)
April 28    draft IRB for faculty advisor's review
May5    completed Paper 2 due (revised introduction plus methods), discuss summer and fall schedule for completing thesis

*Dates for lecture topics may be readjusted slightly to enhance class learning.

PSY 301 • Intro To Psychology-Honors-W

43915 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm SEA 2.108
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Fall 2009

 

Syllabus

 

PSY 301H

Introductory Psychology: Honors

 (Unique No. 43915)

 

Room: Seay 2.108

Time: T-TH 2:00-3:15 

 

Instructor: C. J. Holahan         

 

Office hours: T-TH 3:15-4:00, W 2:30-4:00; and by appointment   

Office: Seay 3.202                                               

E-mail: holahan@psy.utexas.edu                       

 

TA: Amy Roberson            

 

Office hours: M-W 9:00-10:30; and by appointment   

Office: Seay 2.122

E-mail: amyroberson@mail.utexas.edu

 

Overview of Class:

 

This is a broad survey course that covers the scope of psychology as a science. Topics encompass: the nature of psychology, adaptive functioning, individual differences and social behavior, development and learning, and mind and brain. Students will write and substantially revise a paper based on scientific sources and write a paper applying these scientific findings to a case study. Objectives include learning about research findings across the breadth of psychology, learning to understand a particular psychological topic in depth, and learning to integrate knowledge across diverse areas of psychology.

 

Texts: 

 

Psychology: Themes and Variations (8th edition) by Wayne Weiten

Forty Studies That Changed Psychology (6th edition) by Roger Hock

 

 

Basis for Evaluation:

 

I.  Four Tests (30% of grade): Each test will have 40 multiple-choice questions.  Half of the test questions will be based on class lectures and half will be based on the Weiten text. You are expected to take all of the tests; however, your lowest test will be dropped. Using your three highest tests, each test question is worth 1/4 point in the final course grade. There will be no make-up tests.

 

            First Test            Tuesday, September 22nd   

Second Test            Thursday, October 15th              

            Third Test            Tuesday, November 17th                

            Fourth Test            Thursday, December 3rd            

 

II.  Three Papers (50% of grade):

 

            First Paper              Due Thursday, October 1st  (20% of grade)

            Second Paper              Due Tuesday, October 20th  (10% of grade)

            Third Paper              Due Tuesday, November 10th  (20% of grade)

 

The first paper is a literature review based broadly on any of the topic areas covered in Forty Studies That Changed Psychology. Your paper should pose a question, integrate and critique research findings relevant to your question, and reach a conclusion. Be creative—a topic that is fun for you will make it easier to write an exciting and interesting paper. The first paper should be approximately 6 double-spaced pages with a minimum of 4 references. At least 2 references must be empirical studies published in peer-reviewed scientific journals. Additional references may be from books, anthology chapters, or review articles that review empirical studies in the topic area and that are written by researchers who are authorities in the field.

 

The second paper is a substantial rewrite of the first paper based on feedback you receive on your first paper. Like your first paper, the second paper should be approximately 6 double-spaced pages. 

 

The third paper is an application of your topic in the context of a case history. The case history may be an interview by you of an individual who has dealt personally with your topic.  Alternatively, the case history may come from biography, autobiography, literature, or even the mass media. The third paper should be approximately 6 double-spaced pages. To insure the complete freedom of individuals in agreeing to be interviewed, no person under eighteen may be interviewed and no person in a confining environment, such as a nursing home or prison, may be interviewed. Also, to respect the privacy of interviewees, all personally identifying material should be concealed. 

 

III.  Final Exam (20% of grade): The final exam is essay format and involves integrative questions covering the assigned chapters in Hock's Forty Studies That Changed Psychology. The final exam is at the UT scheduled time on Saturday, December 12th, from 7:00 PM–10:00 PM (no exceptions).

 

Course Grade:

 

The course grade (possible 100 points) will be computed as the total of: 

(a)   your three highest test scores (summed and divided by 4),

(b)  the three papers, and

(c)   the final exam. 

 

Cut-offs for the course grade are: 

            A = 92 and above

            A- = 90 to 91 and above

            B+ = 88 to 89

            B = 82-87

            B- = 80-81

            C+ = 78-79

            C = 72-77

            C- = 70-71

            D+ = 68-69

            D = 62-67

            D- = 60-61

            F = 59 and below

 

Attendance:

 

Students are expected to attend all classes. However, attendance is not part of the grade.

 

Research Requirement:

 

Students enrolled in PSY 301 must fulfill a research requirement consisting of either participation in psychological research studies as a subject or writing a paper on psychological research, in addition to class work. This requirement will be explained on the first day of classes and a research packet will be distributed. If you do not complete the research requirement by Wednesday, November 25th, you will receive an incomplete for the course. The research requirement will not be used in determining your grade in the course; however, you will not receive a final course grade until the research requirement is completed. 

 

Students with Disabilities

 

The University of Texas at Austin provides upon request appropriate academic accommodations for qualified students with disabilities. For more information, contact the Division of Diversity and Community Engagement, Services for Students with Disabilities, 471-6259.

 

 

Assigned Readings from Weiten's Psychology for Four Tests

 

For the First Test

            Chapters  1                  Evolution of Psychology

            Chapters  2                  Research in Psychology

            Chapter  13                    Stress, Coping, and Health

            Chapter  14                    Psychological Disorders

 

For the Second Test

            Chapter  15                    Treatment  

            Chapter  12                    Personality

            Chapter   5                      Consciousness

            Chapter  16                    Social Behavior

 

For the Third Test

            Chapter  11                    Human Development

            Chapter   9                      Intelligence

            Chapter   6                      Learning

            Chapter   7                      Memory

 

For the Fourth Test

            Chapter   8                      Language and Thought  

            Chapter   3                      Biological Bases of Behavior

            Chapter   4                      Sensation and Perception

            Chapter  10                    Motivation and Emotion

 

 

 

Assigned Readings from Hock's Forty Studies for Final Exam

 

            Stress, Coping, and Health

                        Holmes & Rahe (p. 175)

                        Friedman & Rosenman (p. 210)

            Psychological Disorders

                        Bouchard et al. (p. 19)

            Treatment

                        Seligman (p. 242)*

                        Wolpe (p. 264)* 

Personality

                        Rotter (p. 192)*

                        Triandis et al. (p. 217)

            Consciousness

                        Aserinsky & Kleitman; Dement (p. 42)

                        Hobson & McCarley (p. 49)

            Social Behavior

                        Zimbardo (p. 287)

                        Darley & Latane (p. 300)*

                        Milgram (p. 308)*

            Human Development

                        Frantz p. 36)*

                        Piaget (p. 134)

                        Kohlberg (p. 143)

            Intelligence

                        Rosenthal (p. 93)

                        Gardner (p. 100)

            Learning

                        Pavlov (p. 65)*

                        Skinner (p. 78)*

                        Bandura (p. 85)*

            Memory

                        Loftus (p. 117)

            Biological Bases of Behavior

                        Gazzaniga (p. 1)

                        Rosenzweig et al. (p. 11)

 

Bold text = on final exam

Asterisk = highly recommended but not on final exam

 

 

Integrative Course Schedule

 

Date 

Lecture Topic*/Assignment

Required Reading

Aug. 27

Evolution of Psychology

Weiten Chapter 1

Sept. 1

Research in Psychology

Weiten Chapter 2

Sept. 3

Research in Psychology

Weiten Chapter 2

Sept. 8

Stress, Coping, and Health

Weiten Chapter 13

Sept. 10

Stress, Coping, and Health

Weiten Chapter 13

Sept. 15

Psychological Disorders

Weiten Chapter 14

Sept. 17

Psychological Disorders

Weiten Chapter 14

Sept. 22

Test 1

 

Sept. 24

Treatment

Weiten Chapter 15

Sept. 29

Treatment

Weiten Chapter 15

Oct. 1

Personality (Paper 1 due)

Weiten Chapter 12

Oct. 6

Consciousness

Weiten Chapter 5

Oct. 8

Consciousness/ Social Behavior

Weiten Chapters 5 & 16

Oct. 13

Social Behavior

Weiten Chapter 16

Oct. 15

Test 2

 

Oct. 20

Human Development (Paper 2 due)

Weiten Chapter 11

Oct. 22

Intelligence

Weiten Chapter 9

Oct. 27

Intelligence

Weiten Chapter 9

Oct. 29

Learning

Weiten Chapter  6

Nov. 3

Memory

Weiten Chapter  7

Nov. 5

Memory

Weiten Chapter  7

Nov. 10

Test 3

 

Nov. 12

Language and Thought

Weiten Chapter  8

Nov. 17

Biol Bases of Behav (Paper 3 due)

Weiten Chapter  3

Nov. 19

Biol Bases of Behav

Weiten Chapter  3

Nov. 24

Sensation and Perception

Weiten Chapter  4

Dec. 1

Motivation and Emotion

Weiten Chapter  10

Dec. 3

Test 4

 

Dec. 12

Final Exam

Hock chapters in bold

 

*Dates for lecture topics may be readjusted slightly to enhance class learning.

 

PSY 341K • Health Psychology

86970 • Summer 2009
Meets MTWTHF 230pm-400pm NOA 1.126
show description

Topics of contemporary interest that may vary from semester to semester. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: For psychology majors, upper-division standing and Psychology 301 and 418 with a grade of at least C in each; for nonmajors, upper-division standing, Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C, and one of the following with a grade of at least C: Biology 318M, Civil Engineering 311S, Economics 329, Educational Psychology 371, Government 350K, Mathematics 316, Psychology 317, Sociology 317L, Social Work 318, Statistics 309.

PSY 301 • Intro To Psychology-Honors-W

42940 • Spring 2009
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm SEA 2.108
show description

Basic problems and principles of human experience and behavior. Three lecture hours a week for one semester, or the equivalent in independent study.

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