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James W. Pennebaker, Chair The University of Texas at Austin, SEA 4.212, Austin, TX 78712 • (512) 475-7596

Juan A Salinas

Lecturer Ph.D., University of California, Irvine

Juan A Salinas

Contact

  • Phone: (512) 232-4643
  • Office: SEA 3.214
  • Office Hours: MWF 11-12, & 2–3
  • Campus Mail Code: A8000

Biography

Dr. Salinas obtained his Ph.D. in Biological Sciences from the Department of Psychobiology in 1994 at University of California - Irvine. The focus of his research over the last seven years has been the neurobiology and neuropharmacology of learning and memory in general, with a particular interest in the neural basis of learning about failed expectations of reward as a model system for studying how multiple memory systems in the mammalian brain interact to guide and direct behavior.

Selected Publications

Salinas, J.A. & White, N.M. (in press). Contributions of the hippocampus, amygdala and dorsal striatum to the response elicited by reward reduction. Behavioral Neuroscience.

White, N.M. & Salinas, J.A. (1998). Pharmacological Approaches to the study of learning and memory. In J. Martinez & R. Kesner, (Eds.), Neurobiology of Learning and Memory, San Diego: Academic Press.

Salinas, J.A., Introini-Collison, I. B., Dalmaz, C., & McGaugh, J.L. (1997). Posttraining Intraamygdala infusions of oxotremorine and propranolol modulate storage of memory for reductions in reward magnitude. Neurobiology of Learning & Memory68, 51-59

Salinas, J.A., Parent, M.B., & McGaugh, J.L. (1996). Ibotenic acid lesions of the amygdala basolateral complex or central nucleus differentially affect the response to reductions in reward. Brain Research742, 283-293,

Salinas, JA. & McGaugh, J.L. (1996). The amygdala modulates memory for changes in reward magnitude: Involvement of the amygdaloid GABAergic system. Behavioural Brain Research80, 87-98.

Coleman-Mesches, K., Salinas, J.A., & McGaugh, J.L. (1996). Unilateral amygdala inactivation after training attenuates memory for reduced reward. Behavioural Brain Research77, 175-180.

Salinas, J.A., Williams, C.L., & McGaugh, J.L. (1996). Peripheral post-training administration of 4-OH amphetamine enhances

Retention of a reduction in reward magnitude. Neurobiology of Learning & Memory65, 192-195.

Interests

Neurobiology of learning & memory, hormonal modulation of memory storage, and behavioral pharmacology

PSY 301 • Introduction To Psychology

43890 • Spring 2014
Meets MWF 400pm-500pm BUR 106
show description

Basic problems and principles of human experience and behavior. Three lecture hours a week for one semester, or the equivalent in independent study.

 

FOR PENNEBAKER/GOSLING'S ONLINE COURSE SEE http://www.laits.utexas.edu/tower/psy301 FOR MORE INFORMATON!!

PSY 301 • Introduction To Psychology

43230 • Spring 2013
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am BUR 106
show description

Basic problems and principles of human experience and behavior. Three lecture hours a week for one semester, or the equivalent in independent study.

 

FOR PENNEBAKER/GOSLING'S ONLINE COURSE SEE http://www.laits.utexas.edu/tower/psy301 FOR MORE INFORMATON!!

PSY 301 • Introduction To Psychology

43240-43242 • Spring 2013
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm BUR 106
show description

Basic problems and principles of human experience and behavior. Three lecture hours a week for one semester, or the equivalent in independent study.

 

FOR PENNEBAKER/GOSLING'S ONLINE COURSE SEE http://www.laits.utexas.edu/tower/psy301 FOR MORE INFORMATON!!

PSY S308 • Biopsychology

87715 • Summer 2012
Meets MTWTHF 100pm-230pm NOA 1.102
show description

This course is intended to discuss at a general level a wide range of topics on the biological underpinnings of psychology in particular and science in general. The course is also intended to provide you with a sufficient general background for critically evaluating statements about the biological bases of human behavior.

The lectures will supplement the textbook readings and overlap with them, but not completely duplicate them. To the extent that lectures cover text material, they will do so to underline central issues and clarify difficult points. Undergraduate courses, by necessity, often treat complex issues (such as the neuroscience underlying psychological phenomena) in a simplified format. Therefore, conflicts may arise between the contents of the lectures and the text. In such conflicts, the lecture content has priority.

PSY 301 • Introduction To Psychology

43080 • Spring 2012
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm BUR 106
show description

This course is intended to introduce a wide range of topics in modern psychology in particular and science in general. The course is also intended to provide you with a sufficient general background for critically evaluating statements about human behavior as well as for upper division courses in psychology. This section of Psychology 301 will emphasize biological aspects of psychology, but not to the exclusion of other perspectives. The lectures will focus on issues of human development, behavioral genetics, personality theory, behavior disorders, social psychology, language, memory and cognitive and sensory processes. The lectures will supplement the textbook readings, not duplicate them. To the extent that that lectures cover text material, they will do so to underline central issues and clarify difficult points. Introductory courses, by necessity, often treat complex issues in a simplified format. Therefore, conflicts may arise between the contents of the lectures and the text. In such conflicts, the lecture content has priority. Several of the individual lectures cover a great deal of information. In order to assist students in preparation for lectures, notetaking and studying for exams, a general outline of each lecture and images of the overheads presented in class, as well as a copy of this syllabus, are available on the Psychology Department’s WWW HomePage server. Contemporary psychology is a very broad and diverse area. By necessity, then, the course will not be able to pursue many topics in great depth. If you develop an interest in a particular area or topic in psychology, I encourage you to sign up for one of the more specialized courses.

PSY 301 • Introduction To Psychology

43100 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm BUR 106
show description

This course is intended to introduce a wide range of topics in modern psychology in particular and science in general. The course is also intended to provide you with a sufficient general background for critically evaluating statements about human behavior as well as for upper division courses in psychology. This section of Psychology 301 will emphasize biological aspects of psychology, but not to the exclusion of other perspectives. The lectures will focus on issues of human development, behavioral genetics, personality theory, behavior disorders, social psychology, language, memory and cognitive and sensory processes. The lectures will supplement the textbook readings, not duplicate them. To the extent that that lectures cover text material, they will do so to underline central issues and clarify difficult points. Introductory courses, by necessity, often treat complex issues in a simplified format. Therefore, conflicts may arise between the contents of the lectures and the text. In such conflicts, the lecture content has priority. Several of the individual lectures cover a great deal of information. In order to assist students in preparation for lectures, notetaking and studying for exams, a general outline of each lecture and images of the overheads presented in class, as well as a copy of this syllabus, are available on the Psychology Department’s WWW HomePage server. Contemporary psychology is a very broad and diverse area. By necessity, then, the course will not be able to pursue many topics in great depth. If you develop an interest in a particular area or topic in psychology, I encourage you to sign up for one of the more specialized courses.

PSY 301 • Introduction To Psychology

43025-43027 • Fall 2011
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm BUR 106
show description

This course is intended to introduce a wide range of topics in modern psychology in particular and science in general. The course is also intended to provide you with a sufficient general background for critically evaluating statements about human behavior as well as for upper division courses in psychology. This section of Psychology 301 will emphasize biological aspects of psychology, but not to the exclusion of other perspectives. The lectures will focus on issues of human development, behavioral genetics, personality theory, behavior disorders, social psychology, language, memory and cognitive and sensory processes. The lectures will supplement the textbook readings, not duplicate them. To the extent that that lectures cover text material, they will do so to underline central issues and clarify difficult points. Introductory courses, by necessity, often treat complex issues in a simplified format. Therefore, conflicts may arise between the contents of the lectures and the text. In such conflicts, the lecture content has priority. Several of the individual lectures cover a great deal of information. In order to assist students in preparation for lectures, notetaking and studying for exams, a general outline of each lecture and images of the overheads presented in class, as well as a copy of this syllabus, are available on the Psychology Department’s WWW HomePage server. Contemporary psychology is a very broad and diverse area. By necessity, then, the course will not be able to pursue many topics in great depth. If you develop an interest in a particular area or topic in psychology, I encourage you to sign up for one of the more specialized courses.

PSY S308 • Biopsychology

87755 • Summer 2011
Meets MTWTHF 100pm-230pm NOA 1.126
show description

 COURSE WEBSITE

There's a very rudimentary website for this class to provide announcements, course syllabus and updates to

the syllabus, lecture outlines and copies of the overheads. To access the web page, log onto

http://HomePage.psy.utexas.edu/homepage/Class/Psy308/Salinas/index.html.

A note to the wise, if you print out the overheads for yourself, you don't HAVE to print them out in color

just because they're in color in class or on the web. Printing in color usually costs extra and the information reads

the same in black and white.

You can email questions directly to me if you forgot while in class or were too shy or I just didn't see you

or I had to move on. The address is salinas@psy.utexas.edu. I'll answer each person's question and if it's a good one

or several people ask the same one, I'll post it on the "Q&A" section of the class webpage.

COURSE DESCRIPTION & OBJECTIVES:

This course is intended to discuss at a general level a wide range of topics on the biological underpinnings

of psychology in particular and science in general. The course is also intended to provide you with a sufficient

general background for critically evaluating statements about the biological bases of human behavior.

The lectures will supplement the textbook readings and overlap with them, but not completely duplicate

them. To the extent that lectures cover text material, they will do so to underline central issues and clarify difficult

points.  Undergraduate courses, by necessity, often treat complex issues (such as the neuroscience underlying

psychological phenomena) in a simplified format. Therefore, conflicts may arise between the contents of the

lectures and the text.  In such conflicts, the lecture content has priority.

PSY 301 • Introduction To Psychology

43600 • Spring 2011
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm UTC 2.102A
show description

COURSE DESCRIPTION & OBJECTIVES:

This course is intended to introduce a wide range of topics in modern psychology in particular and

science in general. The course is also intended to provide you with a sufficient general background for

critically evaluating statements about human behavior as well as for upper division courses in psychology. This

section of Psychology 301 will emphasize biological aspects of psychology, but not to the exclusion of other

perspectives. The lectures will focus on issues of human development, behavioral genetics, personality theory,

behavior disorders, social psychology, language, memory and cognitive and sensory processes. The lectures

will supplement the textbook readings, not duplicate them. To the extent that that lectures cover text material,

they will do so to underline central issues and clarify difficult points. Introductory courses, by necessity, often

treat complex issues in a simplified format. Therefore, conflicts may arise between the contents of the lectures

and the text. In such conflicts, the lecture content has priority. Several of the individual lectures cover a great

deal of information. In order to assist students in preparation for lectures, notetaking and studying for exams, a

general outline of each lecture and images of the overheads presented in class, as well as a copy of this syllabus,

are available on the Psychology Department’s WWW HomePage server. Contemporary psychology is a very

broad and diverse area. By necessity, then, the course will not be able to pursue many topics in great depth. If

you develop an interest in a particular area or topic in psychology, I encourage you to sign up for one of the

more specialized courses.

PSY 301 • Introduction To Psychology

43610 • Spring 2011
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm UTC 2.102A
show description

COURSE DESCRIPTION & OBJECTIVES:

This course is intended to introduce a wide range of topics in modern psychology in particular and

science in general. The course is also intended to provide you with a sufficient general background for

critically evaluating statements about human behavior as well as for upper division courses in psychology. This

section of Psychology 301 will emphasize biological aspects of psychology, but not to the exclusion of other

perspectives. The lectures will focus on issues of human development, behavioral genetics, personality theory,

behavior disorders, social psychology, language, memory and cognitive and sensory processes. The lectures

will supplement the textbook readings, not duplicate them. To the extent that that lectures cover text material,

they will do so to underline central issues and clarify difficult points. Introductory courses, by necessity, often

treat complex issues in a simplified format. Therefore, conflicts may arise between the contents of the lectures

and the text. In such conflicts, the lecture content has priority. Several of the individual lectures cover a great

deal of information. In order to assist students in preparation for lectures, notetaking and studying for exams, a

general outline of each lecture and images of the overheads presented in class, as well as a copy of this syllabus,

are available on the Psychology Department’s WWW HomePage server. Contemporary psychology is a very

broad and diverse area. By necessity, then, the course will not be able to pursue many topics in great depth. If

you develop an interest in a particular area or topic in psychology, I encourage you to sign up for one of the

more specialized courses.

PSY 301 • Introduction To Psychology

42990-42991 • Fall 2010
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm BUR 106
show description

Course Description

Basic problems and principles of human experience and behavior.

Course Requirements

DESIGNED TO ACCOMMODATE 100 OR MORE STUDENTS.

All Psychology 301 students must complete a research requirement by either participating in experimental sessions within the Psychology Dept. or by writing a research paper.

Grading Policy

Your grade is based on best four grades from four midterm exams and one final exam, all multiple choice.

Texts

Schacter, Gilbert & Wegner Psychology (1st edition).

Additional optional readings to be posted online.

PSY 301 • Introduction To Psychology

42993 • Fall 2010
Meets MWF 200pm-300pm WEL 3.502
show description

This course is intended to introduce a wide range of topics in modern psychology in particular

and science in general. The course is also intended to provide you with a sufficient general background

for critically evaluating statements about human behavior as well as for upper division courses in

psychology. This section of Psychology 301 will emphasize biological aspects of psychology, but not to

the exclusion of other perspectives. The lectures will focus on issues of human development, behavioral

genetics, personality theory, behavior disorders, social psychology, language, memory and cognitive and

sensory processes. The lectures will supplement the textbook readings, not duplicate them. To the

extent that that lectures cover text material, they will do so to underline central issues and clarify

difficult points. Introductory courses, by necessity, often treat complex issues in a simplified format.

Therefore, conflicts may arise between the contents of the lectures and the text. In such conflicts, the

lecture content has priority. Several of the individual lectures cover a great deal of information. In

order to assist students in preparation for lectures, notetaking and studying for exams, a general outline

of each lecture and images of the overheads presented in class, as well as a copy of this syllabus, are

available on the Psychology Department’s WWW HomePage server. Contemporary psychology is a

very broad and diverse area. By necessity, then, the course will not be able to pursue many topics in

great depth. If you develop an interest in a particular area or topic in psychology, I encourage you to

sign up for one of the more specialized courses.

PSY 332 • Behavioral Neuroscience

87245 • Summer 2010
Meets MTWTHF 100pm-230pm NOA 1.126
show description

Prerequisites

PSY 308 OR 6 SEMESTER HOURS OF COURSEWORK IN BIOLOGY STRONGLY RECOMMENDED.

Course Description

Neuroscientific study of behavioral functions, including: fundamental structure and function of human nervous system; sensory systems and perception; motor systems and behavior; motivation and learning; brain disorders and maladaptive behavior.

Grading Policy

Exams: 4 in class mid-term exams and a noncomprehensive final. Grade determined from the best 4 out of 5 grades. All Exams and Final are multiple choice: 1/2 from lecture, 1/2 from text. You will be responsible for lecture material even if it is not covered in text; you will be responsible for assigned chapters even if they are not discussed in lecture. Class webpage will have online versions of the slides and a brief lecture outline.

Texts

Foundations Of Physiological Psychology (TXT & CD), Carlson

PSY 301 • Introduction To Psychology

43740 • Spring 2010
Meets MWF 1200-100pm UTC 3.110
show description

Basic problems and principles of human experience and behavior. Three lecture hours a week for one semester, or the equivalent in independent study.

PSY 301 • Introduction To Psychology

43755 • Spring 2010
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm UTC 2.102A
show description

SPRING 2010
GENERAL INFORMATION
Instructor: Juan Salinas
email: salinas@psy.utexas.edu
Office: 3.210 Seay (SEA) Psychology Building, but come in by the door in the graduate Office, Rm 3.214
Office Hours: MWF 11:00 am - noon, 2:00 – 3:00 pm or by appointment

Section: 43740
Time: MWF 12:00 p.m. - 12:50 p.m. Classroom: University Teaching Center (UTC), Rm 3.110

Teaching Assistant: TBA
email: TBA
Office: TBA
Office Hours: TBA
 
Section: 43755
Time: MWF 1:00 p.m. - 12:50 p.m. Classroom: University Teaching Center (UTC), Rm 2.102A

Teaching Assistants: TBA
email: TBA
Office: TBA
Office Hours: TBA


 


COURSE WEBSITE & EMAIL:
    There's a rudimentary website for this class to provide announcements, course syllabus and updates to the syllabus, lecture outlines and copies of the overheads.  Log onto http://HomePage.psy.utexas.edu/homepage/Class/Psy301/Salinas/index.html
    A note to the wise, if you print out the overheads for yourself, you don't HAVE to print them out in color just because they're in color in class or on the web.  Printing in color usually costs extra and the information reads the same in black and white
    You can email me to ask questions directly to me if you forgot while in class or were too shy or I just didn't see you or I had to move on.  I'll answer each person's question and if it's a good one or several people ask the same one, I'll post it on the "Q&A" section of the class webpage.


COURSE DESCRIPTION & OBJECTIVES:
    This course is intended to introduce a wide range of topics in modern psychology in particular and science in general.  The course is also intended to provide you with a sufficient general background for critically evaluating statements about human behavior as well as for upper division courses in psychology.
    This section of Psychology 301 will emphasize biological aspects of psychology, but not to the exclusion of other perspectives.  The lectures will focus on issues of human development, behavioral genetics, personality theory, behavior disorders, social psychology, language, memory and cognitive and sensory processes.  The lectures will supplement the textbook readings, not duplicate them.  To the extent that that lectures cover text material, they will do so to underline central issues and clarify difficult points.  Introductory courses, by necessity, often treat complex issues in a simplified format.  Therefore, conflicts may arise between the contents of the lectures and the text.  In such conflicts, the lecture content has priority.
    Several of the individual lectures cover a great deal of information.  In order to assist students in preparation for lectures, notetaking and studying for exams, a general outline of each lecture and images of the overheads presented in class, as well as a copy of this syllabus, are available on the Psychology Department’s WWW HomePage server.
    Contemporary psychology is a very broad and diverse area.  By necessity, then, the course will not be able to pursue many topics in great depth.  If you develop an interest in a particular area or topic in psychology, I encourage you to sign up for one of the more specialized courses.


TESTS & GRADING:
    Course grades will be assigned according to averages of four exams as follows:  100-92 = A, 91-90 = A-, 89-88 = B+, 87-82 = B, 81-80 = B-, 79-78 = C+, 77-72 = C, 71-70 = C-, 69-68 = D+ 67-62 = D, 61-60 = D-, 59-below = F.  There will be no grading on a curve.  A grade of at least C in Psychology 301 is required before enrollment in any other Psychology course.  There will be a total of five tests during this course: four in-class during the semester and the final exam.  The mid-semester exams are tentatively set for Wednesday, Feb. 10th, Monday, Mar. 8th Wednesday, Mar. 31st and Wednesday, April 14th. The final exam time and location will be announced later.  The last scheduled class period prior to an exam will be used for review of test material.  The best 4 out of 5 exam grades will be used to determine the course grade.   Exams will begin AFTER all papers have been distributed and ALL exams must be turned in at the instructor’s direction or the exam will not be accepted and will be treated as a missed exam.  After the fourth mid-semester exam, if you are satisfied with your grade average, you can elect to eliminate the final exam.  However, for purposes of course management, you MUST email me that you will not be taking the final exam.  If an exam during the semester is missed, then the final exam is obligatory.  If two exams are missed and only three exams are on record, then the average will still be calculated as if there were four scores.  The exams will consist of 50 multiple-choice questions covering the lectures.  The material covered on the exams will be non-overlapping.  You will need a number 2 pencil for each exam.  BECAUSE ONLY 4 OUT OF 5 EXAMS DETERMINE THE COURSE GRADE, MAKE-UP EXAMS WILL NOT BE ADMINISTERED.  For students with disabilities, I am available to discuss any appropriate academic accommodations that might be necessary for this course.  Before course accommodations are made, a student may be required to provide documentation to the Office of the Dean of Students--Services for Students with Disabilities.

COMPORTMENT
    Rude behavior such as talking, reading a newspaper, or other disruptive or distracting behavior will not be tolerated in class.


SCHOLASTIC DISHONESTY:
    The University defines academic dishonesty as cheating, plagiarism, unauthorized collaboration, falsifying academic records, and any act designed to avoid participating honestly in the learning process.  Scholastic dishonesty also includes, but is not limited to, providing false or misleading information to receive a postponement or an extension on a test, quiz or other assignment.  By accepting this syllabus, you have agreed to these guidelines and must adhere to them.  ANY INCIDENTS OF SCOLASTIC DISHONESTY WILL BE REFERRED TO THE DEAN OF STUDENTS’ OFFICE.  For more information on scholastic dishonesty, please visit the Student Judicial Services website at http://www.utexas.edu/depts/dos/sjs.


TEXTBOOK:
    Schacter, Gilbert and Wegner. Psychology (2008). 1st ed., Worth Publishers.
Is NO LONGER REQUIRED. It is only suggested. It has been replaced by readings on the class webpage.


ADDITIONAL RESOURCES:
    If a student has academic problems in this class (or in other classes for that matter) that persist despite help from the Instructor or the T.A., students are encouraged to turn to the Learning Skills Center in Jester Center for help.  The Learning Skills Center offers a variety of counseling and tutorial services, either free or for a low, low, fee such as: tutoring, test-taking skills, study skills and writing classes.  To learn more about their services and how they can help you, contact them at 471-3614 or visit their web site at http://www.utexas.edu/student/utlc.


EXPERIMENTAL RESEARCH REQUIREMENT:
    There is a mandatory research requirement in the Department of Psychology intended to impart Psychology 301 students with a familiarity and appreciation of the aims, methods, problems and results of psychological research.  There are two options: the Research Paper or Experiment Participation.  A student can choose either option to fulfill the mandatory research requirement.  The details of the procedures for both options can be found in the handout entitled "THE PSYCHOLOGY 301 RESEARCH REQUIREMENT" that will be handed out on one of the first days of class or can be obtained in the Psychology Undergraduate Office in Room 2.218 of the Seay Psychology Building.  Failure to complete the research requirement at the end of the semester by either not turning in a research paper or not completing the required number of 5 experimental credit hours will result in an incomplete grade for the course.  The grade will be released when the requirement is fulfilled.  If the requirement is left unfulfilled by the end of the next long semester (in this case, Fall 2010) the incomplete will automatically revert to an F.
    It is important to note that the research requirement DOES NOT influence the calculation of the course grade.  The research requirement is only a condition of the release of the course grade.  Extra credit CANNOT be obtained by writing research papers or participating in experiments.  The course grade is based on exam performance ONLY.

 
COURSE SCHEDULE
Su    M    Tu    W    Th    F    Sa
January
Week 1    18
MLK DAY         20
Syllabus & General Information
Introduction to Psychological Science
Ch 1   
    *22
End of Free Add/Drops
Introduction to Psychological Science
(cont’d.)   
Week 2    25
Introduction to Psychological Science
(cont’d.)
        27
Introduction to Psychological Science
(cont’d.)
        29
Research methodology
Ch 2   
Week 3
    February 1
Research methodology;
(cont’d.)        * 3
Research methodology (cont’d.)
Last day to add; 12th class day.        5
Evolution & Genetics
Ch. 3, pp 104-107   
Week 4    8
Evolution & Genetics
 (cont’d.)
        10
Exam 1
        12
Brain and behavior
Ch 3   
Week 5    *15
Brain and behavior
(cont’d.)        17
Brain and behavior
(cont’d.)        19
Brain and behavior
(cont’d.)   
Week 6    22
Brain and behavior
(cont’d.)        24
Learning & Behavior/Memory
Ch 6        26
Learning & Behavior/Memory (cont’d)   
Week 7
    March 1
Learning & Behavior/Memory
Ch 5 (cont’d)        3
Learning & Behavior/Memory (cont’d)        5
Learning & Behavior/Memory (cont’d)   
Week 8    8
Exam 2        10
Mental Disorders
Ch 13        12
Mental Disorders (cont’d.)   
Spring Break
Week 9
Spring Break    15
Spring Break   
Spring Break    17
Spring Break   
Spring Break    19
Spring Break   
Spring Break
Week 10
Spring Break    22
Mental Disorders (cont’d.)        24
Treatment
Ch 14        26
Treatment (cont’d.)
   
Week 11    *29
Treatment (cont’d.)
Q drop deadline        31
Exam 3
    April    2
Language and thought
Ch 7   

Week 12
    5
Intelligence;
Ch 9        7
Consciousness
Ch 8
        9
Motivation & Emotion
Ch 10   
Week 13    12
Motivation & Emotion (cont’d)
        14
Exam 4        16
Personality
Ch 12   
Week 14    19
Personality; (cont’d)
        21
Sensation & Perception
Ch 4        23
Sensation & Perception
(cont’d)   
Week 15    26
Biological Basis of Behavior Disorders
        28
Biological Basis of Behavior Disorders (cont’d)
        30
Human Development;
Ch 11    May
Week 16
    3
Human Development (cont’d.)
        5
Human Development (cont’d.)
        7
Human Development (cont’d.)
   
*You can add/drop freely through the 12th class day (1/23.  After that you can only drop until 2/15. After that you can drop but you must bring me a drop form through 3/29 After that, it's a major hassle (for you) and you can only drop for substantiated non-academic reasons.

PSY 301 • Introduction To Psychology

43940 • Fall 2009
Meets MWF 200pm-300pm BUR 116
show description

Basic problems and principles of human experience and behavior. Three lecture hours a week for one semester, or the equivalent in independent study.

PSY 301 • Introduction To Psychology

43950-43965 • Fall 2009
Meets MWF 1100-1200 WEL 1.308
show description

Basic problems and principles of human experience and behavior. Three lecture hours a week for one semester, or the equivalent in independent study.

PSY 301 • Introduction To Psychology

86805 • Summer 2009
Meets MTWTH 1130-1245pm NOA 1.102
show description

Basic problems and principles of human experience and behavior. Three lecture hours a week for one semester, or the equivalent in independent study.

PSY 308 • Biopsychology

86837 • Summer 2009
Meets MTWTHF 1130-100pm CPE 2.210
show description

Introduction to the biological bases of psychological processes and behavior. Overview of the physiology and anatomy of the nervous system, followed by a survey of brain mechanisms of perception, cognition, learning, and emotion; biological perspectives on drug action and mental disease. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C.

PSY 301 • Introduction To Psychology

42975 • Spring 2009
Meets MWF 1200-100pm UTC 3.110
show description

Basic problems and principles of human experience and behavior. Three lecture hours a week for one semester, or the equivalent in independent study.

PSY 301 • Introduction To Psychology

42985 • Spring 2009
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm UTC 2.102A
show description

Basic problems and principles of human experience and behavior. Three lecture hours a week for one semester, or the equivalent in independent study.

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