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Jacqueline Woolley, Chair The University of Texas at Austin, SEA 4.212, Austin, TX 78712 • (512) 475-7596

Kirsten E Bradbury

Lecturer Ph.D., Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA

Contact

Interests

Parenting, parenting stress, family adjustment, assessment and treatment of child and adolescent behavioral and emotional problems, cognitive-behavioral therapies, psycho-physiological stress reduction, intergenerational transmission of health-related attitudes and behaviors, firearms and firearm safety, firearm-related parenting

PSY 301 • Intro To Psychology-Honors

43540 • Fall 2014
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am SEA 2.108
show description

Basic problems and principles of human experience and behavior. Three lecture hours a week for one semester, or the equivalent in independent study.

 

FOR PENNEBAKER/GOSLING'S ONLINE COURSE SEE http://www.laits.utexas.edu/tower/psy301 FOR MORE INFORMATON!!

PSY 364 • Intro To Clinical Psychology

43780 • Fall 2014
Meets MWF 900am-1000am NOA 1.124
show description

Introduction to techniques of assessment and treatment of psychopathology. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: For psychology majors, upper-division standing and Psychology 301 and 418 with a grade of at least C in each; for nonmajors, upper-division standing, Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C, and one of the following with a grade of at least C: Biology 318M, Civil Engineering 311S, Economics 329, Educational Psychology 371, Electrical Engineering 351K, Government 350K, Mathematics 316, 362K, Mechanical Engineering 335, Psychology 317, Sociology 317L, Social Work 318, Statistics 309, Statistics and Scientific Computation 302, 303, 304, 305, 306, 318.

PSY 364 • Intro To Clinical Psychology

44140 • Spring 2014
Meets MWF 900am-1000am NOA 1.124
show description

Introduction to techniques of assessment and treatment of psychopathology. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: For psychology majors, upper-division standing and Psychology 301 and 418 with a grade of at least C in each; for nonmajors, upper-division standing, Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C, and one of the following with a grade of at least C: Biology 318M, Civil Engineering 311S, Economics 329, Educational Psychology 371, Electrical Engineering 351K, Government 350K, Mathematics 316, 362K, Mechanical Engineering 335, Psychology 317, Sociology 317L, Social Work 318, Statistics 309, Statistics and Scientific Computation 302, 303, 304, 305, 306, 318.

PSY 301 • Intro To Psychology-Honors

43585 • Fall 2013
Meets MWF 900am-1000am SEA 2.108
show description

Basic problems and principles of human experience and behavior. Three lecture hours a week for one semester, or the equivalent in independent study.

 

FOR PENNEBAKER/GOSLING'S ONLINE COURSE SEE http://www.laits.utexas.edu/tower/psy301 FOR MORE INFORMATON!!

PSY 364 • Intro To Clinical Psychology

43840 • Fall 2013
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am NOA 1.124
show description

Introduction to techniques of assessment and treatment of psychopathology. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: For psychology majors, upper-division standing and Psychology 301 and 418 with a grade of at least C in each; for nonmajors, upper-division standing, Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C, and one of the following with a grade of at least C: Biology 318M, Civil Engineering 311S, Economics 329, Educational Psychology 371, Electrical Engineering 351K, Government 350K, Mathematics 316, 362K, Mechanical Engineering 335, Psychology 317, Sociology 317L, Social Work 318, Statistics 309, Statistics and Scientific Computation 302, 303, 304, 305, 306, 318.

PSY 364 • Intro To Clinical Psychology

43480 • Spring 2013
Meets MWF 900am-1000am NOA 1.124
show description

Introduction to techniques of assessment and treatment of psychopathology. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: For psychology majors, upper-division standing and Psychology 301 and 418 with a grade of at least C in each; for nonmajors, upper-division standing, Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C, and one of the following with a grade of at least C: Biology 318M, Civil Engineering 311S, Economics 329, Educational Psychology 371, Electrical Engineering 351K, Government 350K, Mathematics 316, 362K, Mechanical Engineering 335, Psychology 317, Sociology 317L, Social Work 318, Statistics 309, Statistics and Scientific Computation 302, 303, 304, 305, 306, 318.

PSY 301 • Intro To Psychology-Honors

43120 • Fall 2012
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am SEA 2.108
show description

Introduction to Psychology. Basic problems and principles of human experience and behavior. Three lecture hours a week for one semester, or the equivalent in independent study. Restricted to students in the Liberal Arts Honors Program.

 

30% – 3 exams worth 10% each

25% – Big Project

20% – 4 papers worth 5% each

10% – Brain Games Day

10% – Science Power Shot (Presentation)

5% – Psychology in the News (Weekly Discussions)

PSY 364 • Intro To Clinical Psychology

43395 • Fall 2012
Meets MWF 900am-1000am NOA 1.126
show description

The major objective of the course is to provide an overview of the field of clinical psychology and introduce students to fundamental clinical skills. Major topic areas to be covered include:

1. Theories and conceptual models of clinical helping 2. Career development in the helping professions 3. Professional issues in clinical practice 4. Assessment and therapy techniques used in clinical psychology

PSY 364 • Intro To Clinical Psychology

43355 • Spring 2012
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm NOA 1.124
show description

The major objective of the course is to provide an overview of the field of clinical psychology and introduce students to fundamental clinical skills. Major topic areas to be covered include:

1. Theories and conceptual models of clinical helping 2. Career development in the helping professions 3. Professional issues in clinical practice 4. Assessment and therapy techniques used in clinical psychology

PSY 301 • Intro To Psychology-Honors

43020 • Fall 2011
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am SEA 2.108
show description

Graded Work:

1. Exams (80%): There will be four exams, each worth 20% of your course grade. Exams will be comprised of both multiple-choice items and open-ended items that require written responses. The first three exams will be given during regular class times (see Course Calendar). The fourth exam will be given at the official final exam time for the course, during finals week (see Course Calendar), but is otherwise the same as the first three (e.g., format, value). The emphasis of each exam will be on the readings and class material covered since the previous exam. However, all exams are cumulative, in that you are expected to learn the course material meaningfully, not just memorize facts for retrieval soon afterward. Some exam items will require you to integrate and/or apply material from previous sections of the course. You are responsible for readings whether or not they are covered in class and for lecture material whether or not it is covered in the readings. Make-up exams are given only in cases of documented need (see below for more on make-ups). Information about any curve, dropped items, etc., will be provided following each exam. We do not drop your lowest exam grade.

2. Written Assignments (10%): You will complete five written assignments, each worth 2% of your course grade. These assignments will vary in format, but generally will require generating 500-word (about one double-spaced page) responses to specific writing prompts. Some written assignments may entail responding to assigned readings, while others may require students to engage in an activity and then describe their experience. Written assignments may require students to contemplate, introspect, critically examine, empathize, or persuasively opine. Specific instructions for each assignment will be provided in class and posted to Blackboard. See Course Calendar for due dates.

3. Connect Assignments (5%): Connect is an electronic learning system that is designed to complement and extend your primary textbook (King). You will complete 10 on-line homework exercises, each worth .5% (1⁄2 a percentage point) of your course grade. Details on these assignments, as well as more information on how to use the Connect system, will be provided in class. See the Course Calendar for due dates.

4. Attendance and Participation (5%): This class is a small learning community and you are expected to contribute actively and appropriately. Numerous participatory exercises will be conducted in class, with at least 10 opportunities (each worth .5% (1⁄2 a percentage point) of your course grade, up to 5% total) to earn credit for being present and engaged, being a good teammate or cooperative colleague, and/or completing some quiz or experiential exercise. Typically, these activities will not be announced in advance. I expect you to attend class unless you are ill or engaged in documentable, unavoidable activities. If you miss an attendance/participation day and want to make up the points, the same policies apply as for make-up exams.

No extra credit is planned. There is enough work for you to do as it is!!

PSY 364 • Intro To Clinical Psychology

43275 • Fall 2011
Meets MWF 900am-1000am NOA 1.126
show description

The major objective of the course is to provide an overview of the field of clinical psychology and introduce students to fundamental clinical skills. Major topic areas to be covered include:

1. Theories and conceptual models of clinical helping 2. Career development in the helping professions 3. Professional issues in clinical practice 4. Assessment and therapy techniques used in clinical psychology

PSY 364 • Intro To Clinical Psychology

43850 • Spring 2011
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm NOA 1.124
show description

Course Objectives:

The major objective of the course is to provide an overview of the field of clinical psychology and

introduce students to fundamental clinical skills. Major topic areas to be covered include:

1. Theories and conceptual models of clinical helping

2. Career development in the helping professions

3. Professional issues in clinical practice

4. Assessment and therapy techniques used in clinical psychology

PSY 301 • Introduction To Psychology

42985 • Fall 2010
Meets MWF 900am-1000am NOA 1.126
show description

Prerequisites

A passing score on the reading section of the TASP test.

Course Description

An introductory review of the major subdisciplines and methods of psychological science. Students learn about a variety of problems and topics studied by psychologists, such as stress and health, lifespan development, mental health and therapy, social psychology, sensation and perception, multicultural perspectives, and ethics. An emphasis is placed on real-world examples, and applying psychology to one's own life. The hope is that the students will come away from the class with a more developed understanding of themselves and their world.

Course Requirements

All Psychology 301 students must complete a research requirement by either participating in experimental sessions within the Psychology Dept. or by writing a research paper.

Grading Policy

Four in-class multiple-choice exams, all of which will be non-cumulative. There will not be a final exam in this class. There will be some extra-credit opportunities, mostly based on attendance.

Texts

Myers, Exploring Psychology, 7th ed.

PSY 339 • Behavior Problems Of Children

43133 • Fall 2010
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm NOA 1.124
show description

Course Description

This course will cover the epidemiology, diagnosis, etiology, associated features, and developmental course of childhood and adolescent behavior disorders. In addition, relevant empirical data and specific assessment and treatment procedures involved in the implementation of evidence-based treatments for child and adolescent behavior disorders will be reviewed.

Specific disorders discussed will include the disruptive behavior disorders (i.e., attention deficit- hyperactivity disorder, conduct disorder, oppositional defiant disorder), internalizing disorders (i.e., depression, anxiety disorders), and developmental disorders (i.e., autism, learning disorders). Specific interventions covered include parent management training, classroom behavior management programs, and cognitive-behavioral interventions.

PSY 301 • Introduction To Psychology

43725 • Spring 2010
Meets MWF 1100-1200 NOA 1.124
show description

Welcome to PSY 301!
Introduction to Psychology
Spring 2010 Unique # 43725
MWF 11:00-11:50 a.m., NOA 1.124

Instructor:    Kirsten Bradbury, Ph.D.
Office (Hours):    SEAY 4.316 (M 1-3 PM and WF 9:30-10 AM)
Email:     bradbury@psy.utexas.edu

TA:     Tracy Kwang
Office (Hours):    SEAY 3.414 (T/Th 3-4:30p)   
Email:       tkwang@mail.utexas.edu   
We are here to help you – please take advantage of our office hours. Come see us!!

Required Text:    Myers, D. M. (2007). Exploring Psychology  (7th ed). ISBN:9780716771418

Exams:
There will be four multiple-choice exams, each with 50 items (worth 2 points per item). All exams will be given during regular class times. There is no exam during finals week.
M  2/15             Exam 1:   Chapters   1, 2, 5
F   3/12            Exam 2:   Chapters    4, 7, 10
M  4/12            Exam 3:   Chapters   6, 11
F   5/7             Exam 4:   Chapters   13, 14, 15
Each exam will cover the chapters indicated as well as all class material since the previous exam. You are responsible for text material whether or not it is covered in class and for lecture material whether or not it is covered in the text. Make-up exams are given only in cases of documented urgent need (contact Tracy). Information about any curve, dropped items, etc., will be provided following each exam. Each 100-point exam is worth 25% of your grade in the course. We do not drop your lowest test grade. There is NO EXTRA CREDIT.

Attendance & Make-Up Exams:
I expect you to attend class unless you are ill or engaged in activities the university would consider more important than attending class. Class attendance is crucial for doing well in this course (a lot of the exam material comes from my lectures!!). However, attending class is up to your judgment; we do not routinely take attendance. If you hope to reschedule an exam ahead of time, or you hope to take a make-up exam, you MUST show Tracy documentation supporting your request. In most cases of legitimate need to reschedule an exam, documentation is very simple to obtain.

Research Requirement:
All students enrolled in any section of PSY 301 must fulfill a departmental research requirement consisting of either participation in 5 hours of psychological research or writing a paper on psychological research, in addition to class work. If you fail to complete the research requirement, you will receive an (X) Incomplete in the course (and you will still need to complete the requirement later). Go to this website— soon!!!! —for information on this requirement:
http://www.psy.utexas.edu/psy/undergrad/courses/info/301experiment.html
If you have questions, please contact Abby Black, at 301research@psy.utexas.edu or stop in and see her at Seay 2.216.


Grades:
Your course grade is based on your total points score for the four exams. We add together all the points you earned on the exams (up to 400 points). Then we divide by 4 to yield a percentage score. This percentage score is represented as a letter grade for the course using the following grade distribution:
A = 92 and up              C+ = 78-79
A- = 90-91                    C = 72-77
B+ = 88-89                   C- = 70-71
B = 82-87                      D = 60-69
B- = 80-81                    F =59 and down
Percentage course grades are calculated to two decimal places and rounded to the nearest whole number, such that, for example, the lowest A- is 89.50 (rounds to 90).

Borderline Grades Stay Borderline: Every semester, some students score just below the borderline of the next highest grade. I have great sympathy for people who find themselves in that position, but I have also found that raising those grades simply uncovers a new group of people whose grades are near the new borderline. This situation makes everybody edgy. Therefore, my policy must be that borderline grades stay as they are. Thus, for example, an 89.49 is a B+. 
 
IMPORTANT NOTICE:
The University of Texas at Austin provides upon request appropriate academic accommodations for qualified students with disabilities. For more information, contact the Office of the Dean of Students at 471-6259, 471-4641 TTY.



**********************************************************************************************
Order of Lecture Topics and Readings:
Critical Thinking & the Scientific Method in Psychology (Ch. 1; approximately 2 classes)
Neuroscience & Behavior (Ch. 2; approximately 3 classes)
Sensation & Perception (Ch. 5; approximately 3 classes)
M February 15 - EXAM 1
Development (Ch. 4; approximately 4 classes)
Learning (Ch. 7; approximately 2 classes)
Motivation (Ch. 10; approximately 2 classes)
F March 12- EXAM 2
Consciousness (Ch. 6; approximately 4 classes)
Emotions, Stress, & Health (Ch. 11; approximately 4 classes)
M April 12 - EXAM 3
Psychological Disorders (Ch. 13; approximately 4 classes)
Therapy (Ch. 14; approximately 1 class)
Social Psychology (Ch. 15; approximately 3 classes)
F May 7 - EXAM 4

PSY 352 • Behavior Problems Of Children

43890 • Spring 2010
Meets MWF 1000-1100 NOA 1.124
show description

Welcome to PSY 339!
Behavior Problems of Children
Spring 2010 Unique # 43890
MWF 10:00-10:50 a.m., NOA 1.124

Instructor:    Kirsten Bradbury, Ph.D.
Office (Hours):    SEAY 4.316 (M 1-3 PM and WF 9:30-10 AM)
Email:     bradbury@psy.utexas.edu

  TA:                Arianna Stefanatos
Office (Hours):    SEAY 3.304 (T 1:30-3 PM and F 11:30 AM-1 PM)   
Email:      akstefanatos@gmail.com

We are here to help you – please take advantage of our office hours. Come see us!!

Required Texts:   
Mash & Wolfe (2010). Abnormal Child Psychology (4th ed).    ISBN-10:    0-495-50627-3

Dodge, K. A. (Ed.) (2010). Current Directions in Child Psychopathology.  ISBN-10:    0-205-68013-5

Additional readings may be assigned.
Exams:
There will be five multiple-choice exams. The first four exams will be given during regular class times. Exam 5 is given only during the assigned final exam time for this course. All exams are cumulative (cover all previous material from lectures and assigned readings). You are responsible for text material whether or not it is covered in class and for lecture material whether or not it is covered in the text. Information about any curve, dropped items, etc., will be provided following each exam. The top four exam scores are counted, such that we drop your lowest exam grade and each of the remaining four exams is worth 25% of your grade in the course. There is NO EXTRA CREDIT.

Make-Up Exams: If you miss an exam, you cannot make it up – this simply becomes your dropped exam grade. The same system goes for needing to reschedule an exam ahead of time. However, if you are unfortunate enough to miss (or need to reschedule) TWO exams this semester, and you hope to be allowed to take a make-up exam, you MUST show Arianna documentation supporting your request. In most cases of legitimate need to reschedule an exam, documentation is very simple to obtain.

Attendance
I expect you to attend class unless you are ill or engaged in activities the university would consider more important than attending class. Class attendance is crucial for doing well in this course (a lot of the exam material comes from my lectures!!). However, attending class is up to your judgment; we do not routinely take attendance.

If you must miss class, we will do everything we can to help you catch up (really!!) – please do not come to class sick!



Grades:
Your course grade is based on your total points score for the four exams on which you did the best. We drop your lowest exam grade. We add together all the points you earned on the remaining four exams, then we divide by 4 to yield a percentage score. This percentage score is represented as a letter grade for the course using the following grade distribution:
A = 92 and up              C+ = 78-79
A- = 90-91                    C = 72-77
B+ = 88-89                   C- = 70-71
B = 82-87                      D = 60-69
B- = 80-81                    F =59 and down
Percentage course grades are calculated to two decimal places and rounded to the nearest whole number, such that, for example, the lowest A- is 89.50 (rounds to 90).

Borderline Grades Stay Borderline: Every semester, some students score just below the borderline of the next highest grade. I have great sympathy for people who find themselves in that position, but I have also found that raising those grades simply uncovers a new group of people whose grades are near the new borderline. This situation makes everybody edgy. Therefore, my policy must be that borderline grades stay as they are. Thus, for example, an 89.49 is a B+. 
 
THERE IS NO EXTRA CREDIT!!!!

IMPORTANT NOTICE:
The University of Texas at Austin provides upon request appropriate academic accommodations for qualified students with disabilities. For more information, contact the Office of the Dean of Students at 471-6259, 471-4641 TTY.


See the Course Calendar for exam dates, lecture topics, and specific reading assignments. In addition to being distributed in class, this syllabus and the course calendar are posted on the class Blackboard page. I typically post lecture slides and exam review notes to Blackboard also.

PSY 301 • Introduction To Psychology

43925 • Fall 2009
Meets MWF 900-1000 NOA 1.126
show description

Basic problems and principles of human experience and behavior. Three lecture hours a week for one semester, or the equivalent in independent study.

PSY 352 • Abnormal Psychology

44165 • Fall 2009
Meets MWF 1000-1100 NOA 1.126
show description

Abnormal Psychology

  • Fall 2009

PSY 352 

  • Unique #44165 MWF 10-11AM NOA 1.126

 
Instructor: Kirsten Bradbury, Ph.D.

  • bradbury@psy.utexas.edu SEAY 4.316 M 12-2, W 11-12

TA: Anushka Pai 

  • apai@mail.utexas.edu SEAY 3.112E 471-3722

Required Text: Sue, D., Sue, D. W., & Sue, S. (2007). Understanding abnormal behavior (8th ed.). 
Boston, MA: Houghton Mifflin Company. 
 
Course Description 
In this survey course on the science and practice of Abnormal Psychology, we will review major
models and definitions of abnormality, methods of assessment and treatment, many DSM disorders,
and ethics. Prerequisites: Upper-division standing, PSY 301 and PSY 418 (or equivalent) with
grades of C or better.  
 
Exams 
Three multiple-choice exams worth 100 points each will be administered during regular class times
throughout the semester (see course calendar). The course is CUMULATIVE. Although each exam
focuses on a particular section of the course, I expect you to retain knowledge as you go along. A
comprehensive final exam (multiple-choice), worth 100 points, will be administered during the
prescheduled official final examination time for this course, which is set by the Registrar. Questions
on the final exam will be drawn from across the semester, and will require students to integrate and
apply information from the entire course. 
 
Four essay assignments will be administered during regular class times throughout the semester (see
course calendar). These writing tasks will be focused on "big questions" I want to be sure you
understand, and are designed to help ensure that you are learning as you go along rather than
studying in bursts for the exams. Essay assignments should be thought of as essay tests (no
reference materials may be used, you need to prepare for them, etc.). However, these essays are
each worth ! an exam grade (25 points); the four essays you complete in class are like a 5th exam in
terms of their contribution to your course grade (100 points all together). Please note that essays take
much longer to grade than multiple-choice tests; students will need to be patient with this process. 
 
You may review (look at) your exams and essays in your TA"s office hours. No work will be returned
to you. Please do not attempt to engage us in interactions in which you question our grading or lobby
for scoring adjustments; this is a waste of your precious time on this planet.
 
Missed Work/Make-up Policy
Exams and in-class essays must be completed with the class at the time scheduled. There are very
few exceptions: 1. Students for whom prior arrangements for disability accommodations have been
made; 2. Students for whom the University has sanctioned absences on a particular exam day (e.g.,
athletes); 3. Students for whom a scheduled exam would interfere with religious practices or
observance of holy days, or would preclude participation in a major family event. If your situation falls
under one of these 3 categories, please provide the TA with your documentation and schedule your
exam(s) on an individual basis with her as needed. If you miss an exam or an in-class essay
unexpectedly, you may schedule a make-up exam or essay administration ONLY as follows: Present
your TA with documentation of an unavoidable reason for having missed the exam or essay. Words to
the wise: If you have a health condition that can cause significant interference from symptoms or
treatment (e.g., cause you to miss class) but does not require you to see a doctor every time you"re
affected, obtain a letter from your health care provider attesting to this fact-or see the Dean of
Students Office for help with documentation. 
 
Extra Credit 
The ONLY extra credit available in this course REQUIRES that you be in class when I award the extra
credit. I will award between 10 and 15 points of extra credit (2 to 3%!!) over the course of the
semester. SHOW UP. I do not announce extra-credit points ahead of time, and extra-credit points
cannot be "made up" or excused for any reason. They are EXTRA (see grade calculations below.) 
 
Course Grades 
Your course grade is based on tallying the points you earn on all the exams and essays, adding your
extra credit, and dividing by 5 to yield a percentage score. We add together all the points you earned
on the exams (4 exams at 100 points each, for up to 400 points) and the in-class essays (4 essays at
25 points each, for up to 100 points), for a total of 500 points. Then we add your extra credit points
(bringing the maximum total to between 510 and 515 points). Then we divide by 5 to yield a
percentage score. This percentage score is represented as a letter grade for the course using the
following grade distribution:
A = 92 and up               C+ = 78-79
A- = 90-91                    C = 72-77
B+ = 88-89                   C- = 70-71
B = 82-87                      D = 60-69
B- = 80-81                    F =59 and down
Percentage course grades are calculated to two decimal places and rounded to the nearest whole
number, such that the lowest A- is 89.50 (which rounds to 90) and the lowest B- is 79.50 (which
rounds to 80), etc.
Borderline Grades Stay Borderline: Every semester, some students score just below the borderline
of the next highest grade. I have great sympathy for people who find themselves in that position, but I
have also found that raising those grades simply uncovers a new group of people whose grades are
near the new borderline. This situation makes everybody edgy. Therefore, my policy must be that
borderline grades stay borderline. Thus, for example, an 89.49 is a B+.  
 
Student Responsibilities 
As a student in this course, you have several responsibilities: 1) attend class, 2) keep up with the
reading, 3) engage yourself actively in your learning (put in the time and effort needed to learn), 4)
complete exams as scheduled, 5) uphold the academic honor code, 6) take advantage of helping
resources available to you if and when you need them, and 7) behave politely and respectfully toward
your classmates, your TA, and your Instructor. 
 
When in class, please silence your cell phone and keep it put away. You are welcome to use a laptop
to take notes in class ONLY IF you can resist the enormous temptation to engage in off-task behavior
that having a laptop in class entails. Please note that during lectures I can see you; it distracts me
when students engage in off-task behavior involving electronic devices, and I consider it to be socially
inappropriate and disrespectful. Talking in class is welcome, but only one voice is allowed in my
classroom at a time - if I"m talking (or if one of your classmates is talking, or if your TA is talking) and
you have something to say, please do raise your hand and wait to be acknowledged. DO NOT make
side comments to your neighbors that you are unwilling to share with the rest of us. 
 
Your TA and I hope to make attending class a pleasant and interesting experience for you, and we
provide in-class extra-credit opportunities to help motivate you on days when your intrinsic motivation
wanes. Class attendance is very important for doing well in this course!! However, you are adults and
how you manage your time is your business - we do not routinely take attendance, and you are not
required to tell us you"ve missed class UNLESS you are an athlete following special rules OR you
miss an EXAM or IN CLASS ESSAY.  
 
Your TA and I are here to help you. Please let us know if there is anything we can do to help you to
thrive in this class and truly enjoy it. Never hesitate to ask us questions. If you get a sense that you
are struggling in the course, please talk to us so we can help. Even if you aren"t struggling, it"s a good
idea to come to our office hours every now and then! You don!t need a special reason to come to
office hours; whenever you show up to our office hours, we will be happy to see you. 
 
IMPORTANT MESSAGE ABOUT DISABILITY ACCOMMODATIONS ********************************* 
The University of Texas at Austin provides upon request appropriate academic accommodations for
qualified students with disabilities. For more information, contact the Office of the Dean of Students at
471-6259, 471-4641 TTY.  
******************************************************************************************************************

 

PSY 352 • Abnormal Psychology

44170 • Fall 2009
Meets MWF 1100-1200 BUR 112
show description

Topics of contemporary interest that may vary from semester to semester. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: For psychology majors, upper-division standing and Psychology 301 and 418 with a grade of at least C in each; for nonmajors, upper-division standing, Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C, and one of the following with a grade of at least C: Biology 318M, Civil Engineering 311S, Economics 329, Educational Psychology 371, Government 350K, Mathematics 316, Psychology 317, Sociology 317L, Social Work 318, Statistics 309.

PSY 301 • Introduction To Psychology

42960 • Spring 2009
Meets MWF 1100-1200 NOA 1.124
show description

Basic problems and principles of human experience and behavior. Three lecture hours a week for one semester, or the equivalent in independent study.

PSY 352 • Abnormal Psychology

43215 • Spring 2009
Meets MWF 1000-1100 NOA 1.124
show description

Biological and social factors in the development and treatment of psychopathology. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: For psychology majors, upper-divison standing and Psychology 301 and 418 with a grade of at least C in each; for nonmajors, upper-division standing, Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C, and one of the following with a grade of at least C: Biology 318M, Civil Engineerin 311S, Economics 329, Educational Psychology 371, Government 350, Mathematics 316, Psychology 317, Sociology 317L, Social Work 318, Statistics 309.

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