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James W. Pennebaker, Chair The University of Texas at Austin, SEA 4.212, Austin, TX 78712 • (512) 475-7596

Patrick J Carroll

Senior Lecturer Ph.D., University of Massachusetts

Patrick J Carroll

Contact

  • Phone: (512) 475-7007
  • Office: SEA 5.204
  • Office Hours: TTh 1-2:30
  • Campus Mail Code: A8000

Biography

Patrick Carroll received his Ph.D. from the University of Massachusetts. His research interests are psycholinguistics, cognition, reading, and discourse processing.

Interests

Psycholinguistics, cognition, reading, and discourse processing

PSY 305 • Intro To Cognitive Psychology

43565 • Fall 2014
Meets MWF 400pm-500pm NOA 1.124
show description

Introduction to the study of how people perceive, act, communicate, and reason. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C.

PSY 418 • Statistics And Research Design

43585-43590 • Fall 2014
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am NOA 1.116
show description

Students may not enroll in Psychology 418 more than twice. Survey of statistics, including central tendency, variability and inference, and scientific methodology used in psychological research. Three lecture hours and two discussion hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C and credit for one of the following: Mathematics 302, 303D, 403K, 305G, 408C, 408K, 316; or Statistics and Scientific Computation 302, 303, 304, 305, 306, 318.

PSY 305 • Intro To Cognitive Psychology

43905 • Spring 2014
Meets MWF 200pm-300pm NOA 1.126
show description

Introduction to the study of how people perceive, act, communicate, and reason. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C.

PSY 418 • Statistics And Research Design

43930-43935 • Spring 2014
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am NOA 1.116
show description

Students may not enroll in Psychology 418 more than twice. Survey of statistics, including central tendency, variability and inference, and scientific methodology used in psychological research. Three lecture hours and two discussion hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C and credit for one of the following: Mathematics 302, 303D, 403K, 305G, 408C, 408K, 316; or Statistics and Scientific Computation 302, 303, 304, 305, 306, 318.

PSY 418 • Statistics And Research Design

43940-43945 • Spring 2014
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm NOA 1.116
show description

Students may not enroll in Psychology 418 more than twice. Survey of statistics, including central tendency, variability and inference, and scientific methodology used in psychological research. Three lecture hours and two discussion hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C and credit for one of the following: Mathematics 302, 303D, 403K, 305G, 408C, 408K, 316; or Statistics and Scientific Computation 302, 303, 304, 305, 306, 318.

PSY 418 • Statistics And Research Design

43650 • Fall 2013
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am NOA 1.116
show description

Students may not enroll in Psychology 418 more than twice. Survey of statistics, including central tendency, variability and inference, and scientific methodology used in psychological research. Three lecture hours and two discussion hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C and credit for one of the following: Mathematics 302, 303D, 403K, 305G, 408C, 408K, 316; or Statistics and Scientific Computation 302, 303, 304, 305, 306, 318.

PSY 325K • Advanced Statistics

43715 • Fall 2013
Meets MWF 200pm-300pm SEA 2.114
show description

Advanced statistical theory and methods for analysis of behavioral sciences data; topics include analysis of variance and covariance, regression, and nonparametric techniques. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: For psychology majors, upper-division standing and Psychology 301 and 418 with a grade of at least C in each; for nonmajors, upper-division standing, Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C, and one of the following with a grade of at least C: Biology 318M, Civil Engineering 311S, Economics 329, Educational Psychology 371, Electrical Engineering 351K, Government 350K, Mathematics 316, 362K, Mechanical Engineering 335, Psychology 317, Sociology 317L, Social Work 318, Statistics 309, Statistics and Scientific Computation 302, 303, 304, 305, 306, 318.

PSY 355 • Cognition

43810 • Fall 2013
Meets MWF 400pm-500pm NOA 1.126
show description

Theoretical and critical analysis of the development, nature, and function of the thought process. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: For psychology majors, upper-division standing and Psychology 301 and 418 with a grade of at least C in each; for nonmajors, upper-division standing, Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C, and one of the following with a grade of at least C: Biology 318M, Civil Engineering 311S, Economics 329, Educational Psychology 371, Electrical Engineering 351K, Government 350K, Mathematics 316, 362K, Mechanical Engineering 335, Psychology 317, Sociology 317L, Social Work 318, Statistics 309, Statistics and Scientific Computation 302, 303, 304, 305, 306, 318.

PSY 418 • Statistics And Research Design

43290-43295 • Spring 2013
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm NOA 1.116
show description

Students may not enroll in Psychology 418 more than twice. Survey of statistics, including central tendency, variability and inference, and scientific methodology used in psychological research. Three lecture hours and two discussion hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C and credit for one of the following: Mathematics 302, 303D, 403K, 305G, 408C, 408K, 316; or Statistics and Scientific Computation 302, 303, 304, 305, 306, 318.

PSY 418 • Statistics And Research Design

43310-43315 • Spring 2013
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm NOA 1.116
show description

Students may not enroll in Psychology 418 more than twice. Survey of statistics, including central tendency, variability and inference, and scientific methodology used in psychological research. Three lecture hours and two discussion hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C and credit for one of the following: Mathematics 302, 303D, 403K, 305G, 408C, 408K, 316; or Statistics and Scientific Computation 302, 303, 304, 305, 306, 318.

PSY 418 • Statistics And Research Design

43195 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 930am-1100am NOA 1.116
show description

Psy418 is the single technical course required for majors in Psychology at UT. It is a required course, ideally taken early in your career as a psychology student, to give you preparation in statistics and research methodology. During this semester, you will learn to interpret and calculate many of the basic statistical tests used by psychologists in research, and you will study research design issues related to use and interpretation of statistical results. We will look at a variety of methodological issues that influence the design of studies and their interpretation. In lab, you will have the opportunity to apply some of your understanding of research in two major projects. In addition, the lab experience will allow you to learn about technical writing in psychology and about finding and using the research literature. You should leave Psy418 with a good technical foundation for taking upper division Psychology courses.

You should consider additional technical training if you are planning to go to graduate school in any area of Psychology (even counseling or clinical practice) or in other scientifically-grounded fields (e.g., medicine, business, etc.).

PSY 355 • Cognition

43365 • Fall 2012
Meets MWF 200pm-300pm NOA 1.124
show description

This course will introduce students to the theories and research on basic cognitive processes, including perception, attention, and memory. We will also explore complex phenomena, such as language and decision-making. We will focus on both theoretical ideas and their empirical foundation. Although we will emphasize the science of cognitive psychology, we will spend time practicing the application of these ideas in real life. We will assume that students enrolled in this class wish to learn about cognition as a scientific topic and they have the academic preparation to do so effectively. This is not a neurobiology course, but brain-based evidence is central to modern cognitive theories, and neuroscience techniques are a critical part of cognitive methodology. Students should be prepared to understand and learn relatively elementary neuroscience concepts as part of the class.

PSY S355 • Cognition

87738 • Summer 2012
Meets MTWTHF 1130am-100pm NOA 1.126
show description

This course will introduce students to the theories and research on basic cognitive processes, including perception, attention, and memory. We will also explore complex phenomena, such as language and decision-making. We will focus on both theoretical ideas and their empirical foundation. Although we will emphasize the science of cognitive psychology, we will spend time practicing the application of these ideas in real life. We will assume that students enrolled in this class wish to learn about cognition as a scientific topic and they have the academic preparation to do so effectively. This is not a neurobiology course, but brain-based evidence is central to modern cognitive theories, and neuroscience techniques are a critical part of cognitive methodology. Students should be prepared to understand and learn relatively elementary neuroscience concepts as part of the class.

PSY 301 • Introduction To Psychology

43102 • Spring 2012
Meets MWF 200pm-300pm NOA 1.124
show description

ntroduction to Psychology is a broad introduction to the field of psychology, with emphasis on the scientificcore of the field and the application of ideas coming from scientific psychology to understanding real life issues. General topic areas include our understanding of the brain, thought, and behavior, how we understand the world around us, how our basic thought processes develop, how we interact with and are influenced by our social world, and how disorders are understood and treated by psychologists.

PSY 305 • Intro To Cognitive Psychology

43115 • Spring 2012
Meets MWF 900am-1000am NOA 1.126
show description

This course will introduce students to the theories and research on basic cognitive processes, including perception, attention, and memory. We will also explore complex phenomena, such as language and decision-making. We will focus on both theoretical ideas and their empirical foundation. The course will emphasize the science of cognitive psychology. It is assumed that students enrolled in this class wish to learn about cognition as a scientific topic and they have the academic preparation to do so effectively. This is not a neurobiology course, but brain-based evidence is central to modern cognitive theories and neuroscience techniques are a critical part of cognitive methodology. Students should be prepared to understand and learn relatively elementary neuroscience concepts as part of the class.

PSY 337 • Psychology Of Language

43167 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm CPE 2.210
show description

This course is an introduction to the Psychology of Language (aka Psycholinguistics). Our focus will be on the cognitive level of language processing, but we will also cover related issues in neuropsychology and behavioral and cultural factors. The required text was chosen to emphasize a broad view of language as a topic open to exploration and as a platform for asking important questions about mind and human nature. However, the scientific study of language is technically sophisticated and grounded in detail. We will also explore this scientific foundation of the study of language.

PSY 355 • Cognition

43245 • Fall 2011
Meets MWF 200pm-300pm NOA 1.124
show description

This course will introduce students to the theories and research on basic cognitive processes, including perception, attention, and memory. We will also explore complex phenomena, such as language and decision-making. We will focus on both theoretical ideas and their empirical foundation. The course will emphasize the science of cognitive psychology. It is assumed that students enrolled in this class wish to learn about cognition as a scientific topic and they have the academic preparation to do so effectively. This is not a neurobiology course, but brain-based evidence is central to modern cognitive theories and neuroscience techniques are a critical part of cognitive methodology. Students should be prepared to understand and learn relatively elementary neuroscience concepts as part of the class.

PSY W418 • Statistics And Rsch Design-Wb

87600 • Summer 2011
Meets
show description

Statement of Purpose:

Psy 418 is the single technical course required for majors in Psychology at UT. It is a required course, ideally taken early in your career as a psychology student, to give you preparation in statistics and research methodology.During this semester, you will learn to interpret and calculate many of the basic statistical tests used by psychologists in research, and you will study research design issues related to use and interpretation of statistical results. We will look at a variety of methodological issues that influence the design of studies and their interpretation. In lab, you will have the opportunity to apply some of your understanding of research in two major projects. In addition, the lab experience will allow you to learn about technical writing in psychology and about finding and using the research literature. You should leave Psy418 with a good technical foundation for taking upper division Psychology courses. You should consider additional technical training if you are planning to go to graduate school in any area of Psychology (even counseling or clinical practice) or in other scientifically-grounded fields (e.g., medicine, business, etc.).

COURSE STRUCTURE

This course is on online version of Psy 418. You will cover the same material and develop the same skills as those associated with the classroom version of the course. However, this course has been created as a course for students who do not meet with the instructor on a daily basis, but instead are willing to work on their own to learn the material.The course will unfold on a weekly basis. Except for the first week, the assignments for the next week will be released on Sunday evening. Most assignments will be due by 11:00 PM on the following Monday (8 days later). There will be a few exceptions to the Monday evening due date, but students will have ample warning to prepare for those assignments. On the final week of classes, the due date for assignments will be Friday evening at 11:00 PM to keep within the official semester. The organizational center for the course will be the Blackboard website. Weekly assignments will be made available on Blackboard, and all necessary support materials and a variety of instructional materials will be made available through this Blackboard site. For the statistics component of the course, students will access a site called Aplia. Through Aplia, you will have the opportunity to work on nearly unlimited practice problems. In addition, for each chapter of the statistics textbook, you will take a graded quiz on the Aplia site, with problems consistent with the practice problems. Scores on these quizzes will be part of the final grade.The course is organized into three primary components:

•    Statistics

•    Research Design

•    Research Projects

Except for the first week of class, students will work in parallel on each of these areas every week. The content of the course is organized so that the material in the each component is coordinated with the others.

STATISTICS

The primary source of instruction will be the textbook Practice problems will be available through Aplia and video tutorials will be available through Blackboard. Statistics knowledge will be tested through quizzes on each chapter (one or two required each week) and they will be tested on the midterm and final exams. In addition, the use of statistics in research will be illustrated by the student’s participation as a research subject in Coglab experiments. After participating in Coglab studies, the student will be given a larger data set (from other classes Dr. Carroll has instructed where Coglab has been used) and you will apply statistics to these data.  During most weeks, a Coglab statistics problem, including analyses and written explanation, will be among the required assignments.

RESEARCH DESIGN

The primary source of instruction will be an online textbook made available through the Blackboard website. Understanding of the material will be assessed by assignments, typically in the form of papers. Every chapter will have an associated paper assignment, so there will typically be a research design paper due every week.

RESEARCH PROJECTS

There will be two major research projects. One will be due mid-semester and the other will be due at the end of the semester. For both projects, students will produce a full APA paper along with supplementary materials (e.g., full data sets and data analysis, copies of papers cited along with the student’s written summary of the research). Training in APA writing style will also fall under the Research Projects component of the course. This training will be concentrated in the early weeks of the course to prepare the student for the first paper.

EXAMS

In addition to the projects described above, each student will take a 2-hour midterm and a 3-hour final exam. Each student will be required to find an acceptable and verifiable proctored site to take exams, and the student will be responsible to taking care of all payments. Generally, community colleges and universities have such sites available. Students can arrange with Dr. Carroll to take the exams at the Austin campus without additional charges if they can come to Austin during the exam periods, but it is expected that this will not be feasible for most students. The exams will cover all assigned material in the Statistics and Research Design components of the course. They will consist of a variety of question types, probably including multiple choice, true/false, brief explanations, extended essays, and statistical problems with computations.

GRADING

The exact grading plan for the course is still under development, but the following table is a reasonable approximation to the final grading plan:

Statistics Aplia Quizzes and Application Assignments:    15%

Research Design Application Assignments            10%

APA Paper #1 (due mid-semester)                15%

APA Paper #2 (due near the end of the semester)        20%

Midterm Exam                        15%

Final Exam                        25%

Required Texts:   

o    Essentials of Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences  by Frederick J. Gravetter & Larry B. Wallnau (7th Edition, Copyright 2011) Wadsworth/CengageThis text is bundled with CogLab and Aplia.  It is recommended that you purchase them together. Students are required to have Coglab and Aplia access. Purchasing access separately will probably cost more than buying as a bundle.

o    Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (6th edition). Published by the American Psychological Association. Please do NOT purchase an earlier edition.

Other Supplies:

You will need a non-statistical calculator for the two exams. I recommend borrowing or purchasing a very inexpensive calculator that has only basic functions, including square root. Nothing else should be necessary. You must also have access to MS Word and MS Excel, Either the MAC or PC version is fine.

PSY 301 • Introduction To Psychology

43580 • Spring 2011
Meets MWF 300pm-400pm NOA 1.124
show description

Course Description

This class is an introduction to theories of psychology, research by psychological scientists, and the application of psychological principles in clinical and counseling psychology, as well as in areas of health, law, and business. We will discuss many different areas of psychology, from neuroscience to cognition and learning to social and clinical psychology.

Course Requirements

Class limited to Longhorn Scholars.All Psychology 301 students must complete a research requirement by either participating in experimental sessions within the Psychology Dept. or by writing a research paper.

Grading Policy

Grades will primarily be based on tests, but several brief papers and class participation will also affect your grade.There will be four tests, and all will have both multiple choice and essay components.

Texts

TBA

PSY 305 • Intro To Cognitive Psychology

43625 • Spring 2011
Meets MWF 900am-1000am NOA 1.126
show description

Course Description

This class is an introduction to cognitive psychology. We will start by discussing cognitive neuroscience—the relationship between brain and thought—and move through basic cognitive processes, such as memory and attention. Later in the semester, we will look at more complex cognitive activities, such as language processing, problem-solving, and decision-making.

Course Requirements

All Psychology 301 students must complete a research requirement by either participating in experimental sessions within the Psychology Dept. or by writing a research paper.

Grading Policy

Grades will primarily be based on tests, but several brief papers and class participation will also affect your grade. There will be three tests, and all will have both multiple choice and essay components.

Texts

TBA

PSY 325K • Advanced Statistics

43703 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm SEA 2.114
show description

Prerequisites

PREREQ: FOR PSY MAJS, PSY 301 & 418 WITH GRADE AT LEAST C IN EACH; FOR NONMAJS, PSY 301 WITH GRADE AT LEAST C, & 1 OF FOLLOWING WITH GRADE AT LEAST C: BIO 318M, C E 311S, ECO 329, EDP 371, GOV 350K, KIN 373, M 316, PSY 317, SOC 317L, S W 318, STA 309.

Course Description

This is intended as a second course in applied statistics for psychology, with the assumption that the first course has been Psy418. The class includes a review of introductory psychological statistics, with focus on application to research situations and understanding the underlying principles and logic of the studies. We will go beyond introductory statistics by going into further depth with varieties of analysis of variance and post-hoc tests, by extension of correlation approaches into multiple regression and, if time permits, logistic regression.

The class will go further into some topics than is typical for introductory statistics: power, post hoc testing, planned comparisons, preliminary and descriptive analysis and data trimming. If time permits, we will also look at some of the varieties of nonparametric tests used by researchers. We will work in both EXCEL and SPSS for computational problems.

Grading Policy

The grade will be split evenly between tests (2 tests, 25% each) and class projects, which require data collection and analysis. The data collection process will require you to write two APA-style papers as well as some briefer planning papers.

Texts

TBA

PSY 338K • Psychology Of Reading

43130 • Fall 2010
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm NOA 1.124
show description

Prerequisites

Upper division standing required. For PSY majors, PSY 301 & 418 with a grade of C or better in each; For non-PSY majors, PSY 301 with a grade of at least C, & 1 of the following with a grade of at least C: BIO 318M, C E 311S, ECO 329, EDP 371, GOV 350k, KIN 373, M 316, PSY 317, SOC 317L, S W 318, STA 309.

Course Description

This is primarily a lecture course in which we will somewhat unevenly survey the psychological research literature and scientific analyses of the process of reading. The perspective is centered in cognitive psychology, with strong influences from cognitive neuroscience and cognitive development.

Issues discussed in some depth include (among others) emergent literacy, linguistic factors (e.g., phonological awareness) influencing early development, characteristics of adult processing (perceptual, lexical, and discourse levels), brain systems involved in reading, and theory of dyslexia and other sources of reading problems. There is no textbook for this course, so we will use published review articles and research reports as our basic source of information.

Grading Policy

There will be three or four hour-long tests that together will account for the majority of the grade. These tests combine multiple choice and short answer questions in approximately equal proportion (in terms of impact on the grade).

Additional brief writing assignments will also influence the grade. Regular attendance is expected and poor attendance will have a significant impact on the final grade.

Texts

All reading material will be available for download from the class Blackboard site.

PSY 355 • Cognition

43205 • Fall 2010
Meets MWF 300pm-400pm NOA 1.102
show description

Description

We will survey basic issues in modern cognitive psychology. The first part of the semester will emphasize basic processes--perception, attention, memory systems, knowledge systems--and the later part of the semester will focus on more complex issues: language, problem solving, and decision making. We will make connections to cognitive neuroscience, which relies heavily on ideas from cognitive psychology, but also provides an important new platform for testing cognitive ideas. We will also relate cognitive ideas to their application in understanding social psychology (social cognition) and clinical psychology (cognitive behavioral therapy).

Grading Policy

TBA

Texts

TBA

PSY 458 • Experimental Psychology

43215 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 930am-1230pm SEA 2.116
show description

Prerequisites

A MAJOR IN PSYCHOLOGY, PSY 301 AND 418 WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C IN EACH, AND A GPA OF AT LEAST 3.0 IN PSYCHOLOGY COURSES TAKEN AT UT.

Course Description

Psy 458 provides advanced psychology students with an opportunity to carry out an empirical research project of their own devising, either individually or working with a small group of like-minded colleagues. The target audience is students who would like to explore psychology as an applied practice (rather than as a factual knowledge base) through hands-on exploration and interaction with others students and the instructors.

There will be some direct instruction to help you improve your knowledge of statistics and research methods, but the majority of the work will be individualized and self-directed (though supervised). The research project will follow the

Course Requirements

RESTRICTED TO PSYCHOLOGY MAJORS PLANNING GRADUATE WORK IN THE BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES.

Grading Policy

The majority of the grade will come from writing assignments of varying length, specificity, and formality. There will also be two or three statistics and research design tests that will focus on understanding and interpretation rather than computational accuracy.

Texts

TBA

PSY 355 • Cognition

87260 • Summer 2010
Meets MTWTHF 1130am-100pm NOA 1.124
show description

Description

We will survey basic issues in modern cognitive psychology. The first part of the semester will emphasize basic processes--perception, attention, memory systems, knowledge systems--and the later part of the semester will focus on more complex issues: language, problem solving, and decision making. We will make connections to cognitive neuroscience, which relies heavily on ideas from cognitive psychology, but also provides an important new platform for testing cognitive ideas. We will also relate cognitive ideas to their application in understanding social psychology (social cognition) and clinical psychology (cognitive behavioral therapy).

Grading Policy

TBA

Texts

TBA

PSY 301 • Introduction To Psychology

43715 • Spring 2010
Meets MWF 200pm-300pm NOA 1.102
show description

Introduction to Psychology        Psy 301 (Unique #43715)            SPRING 2010

Time & Place:    MWF 2:00-2:50 PM     NOA 1.102

Instructor:  Patrick Carroll, Ph.D.
email:              carroll@psy.utexas.edu
Office Telephone:     475-7007
Office Location:         SEA 5.204 (Seay Psychology Building)
Office Hours:         Tuesday & Thursday 1:00 – 2:30 PM and by appointment
Teaching Assistant:  Gili Freedman
email:             gili.freedman@gmail.com           
Office Location:          SEA 3.426A
Office Hours:         Tuesday & Wednesday: 10:00 – 11:30 AM

Class Homepage:     UT Blackboard         https://courses.utexas.edu/webapps/login/
Textbook Website:    PsychPortal           http://courses.bfwpub.com/schacter1e.php
Research Coordinator:    Abby Black        301research@psy.utexas.edu

Other useful homepages:
Psychology Department:     httpwww.psy.utexas.edu
American Psychological Association:  http://www.apa.org
Textbook: Psychology:1st Edition by Dan Schacter, Dan Gilbert, and Dan Wegner
This is a required text published by Worth Publishers.   http://www.worthpublishers.com

FACTORS INFLUENCING YOUR GRADE

Attendance: We will take attendance regularly. Good attendance is expected and will not be rewarded, but poor attendance will be penalized. Attendance of 80%, excluding tests and quizzes, will be used as an operational definition of “minimum reasonable attendance.” The consequence of poor attendance (in practical terms: less than 80%) will be a substantial reduction in grade, with the degree of impact related to level of attendance.  I will not give “excused absences” for regular classes, even for exceptionally good excuses. If you need to inform me about an emergency that will keep you out of class, do so by email and I can take account of that information if I wish to do so at the end of the semester. 

Participation:  There are no specific participation points in your grade, but, as college students, you are expected to participate actively in classes when the opportunity arises. Your participation in class may be taken into account when assigning grades, especially if you are below a cutoff.

Quizzes & Exams:  The primary source of your grade (90%) will be a series of quizzes. Each quiz will cover readings and associated lecture material from two chapters in the textbook. There will also be two optional comprehensive exams, one just before Spring Break and one during final exam period in May.
Quizzes:  Each full hour quiz will cover material studied since the last test only. These quizzes will be composed of both multiple choice and short answer questions.  Each quiz will be 15% of your grade.
Optional Exams:  There will be two comprehensive exams. The first exam (Friday, March 12) may be used to replace your lowest test grade from among the first three quizzes. The second test (Monday, May 17, during final exam period) may replace your lowest test grade from among the last three quizzes. The optional exams cannot hurt you. A test score will only be replaced by an optional exam score if it improves your grade.
    Each of the optional exams will take a full 50 minutes and they will be composed of new multiple-choice items only. Questions on the first exam will be taken from material covered during the period prior to Spring Break. Questions on the second exam will be taken from material covered between Spring Break and the end of the semester.
Missing a Quiz or Exam: If you miss a test, you must take the optional exam associated with that quiz (the March 12 exam for one of the first three quizzes or the May 17 exam for quizzes 4 to 6. This comprehensive exam will serve as the “makeup test.” This is ONLY possible for EXCUSED ABSENCES from the test. If you don’t have an excused absence, your grade will be zero.

Reading:  Chapters to be read and dates when the material in the chapters will be discussed is listed in the calendar on the next page. The lectures will be related to the material in the chapters, and there will be substantial overlap. However, the lectures are not intended as a substitute for the readings, and material from the readings not covered in lecture will regularly appear on tests. 





TENTATIVE READING SCHEDULE
MONDAY    WEDNESDAY    FRIDAY
18-Jan    20-Jan    22-Jan
MLK Holiday    Introductory Class    Ch.1  Introduction
25-Jan    27-Jan    29-Jan
Ch.1  Introduction    Ch.1  Introduction    Ch. 2 Research Methods
1-Feb    3-Feb    5-Feb
Ch. 2 Research Methods    Ch. 2 Research Methods    QUIZ 1
8-Feb    10-Feb    12-Feb
Ch. 3 Brain    Ch. 3 Brain    Ch. 3 Brain
15-Feb    17-Feb    19-Feb
Ch. 5 Memory    Ch. 5 Memory    Ch. 5 Memory
22-Feb    24-Feb    26-Feb
QUIZ 2    Ch. 6 Learning    Ch. 6 Learning
1-Mar    3-Mar    5-Mar
Ch. 6 Learning    Ch. 7.1 Language    Ch. 8.2 Sleep
8-Mar    10-Mar    12-Mar
Ch. 9.2&3 Intelligence    QUIZ 3    OPTIONAL EXAM 1
15-Mar    17-Mar    19-Mar
SPRING BREAK    SPRING BREAK    SPRING BREAK
22-Mar    24-Mar    26-Mar
Ch. 10 Emotion & Motivation    Ch. 10 Emotion & Motivation    Ch. 10 Emotion & Motivation
29-Mar    31-Mar    2-Apr
Ch. 11 Development    Ch. 11 Development    Ch. 11 Development
5-Apr    7-Apr    9-Apr
QUIZ 4    Ch. 12 Personality    Ch. 12 Personality
12-Apr    14-Apr    16-Apr
Ch. 12 Personality    Ch. 16 Social Psychology    Ch. 16 Social Psychology
19-Apr    21-Apr    23-Apr
Ch. 16 Social Psychology    QUIZ 5    Ch. 13 Disorders
26-Apr    28-Apr    30-Apr
Ch. 13 Disorders    Ch. 13 Disorders    Ch. 14 Treatment
3-May    5-May    7-May
Ch. 14 Treatment    Ch. 14 Treatment    QUIZ 6
10-May    12-May    14-May
           
17-May          
OPTIONAL EXAM 2          
 

Practice Quizzes:  PsychPortal contains two kinds of practice quizzes.  The PRE-LECTURE QUIZ for each chapter is relatively easy, but it helps you to be sure you have looked over the chapter. These quizzes will be due during the period we are studying the chapter and deadlines are posted on PsychPortal. The MASTERY QUIZ for each chapter is more difficult, and it gives you some idea of the level of difficulty to expect on the actual quiz in class. The MASTERY QUIZ is due by midnight the night before the associated in-class quiz. The specific deadlines are posted on PsychPortal. You must submit at least 90% of these quizzes prior to the deadline or your final grade will be reduced.

Homework:  There will be brief weekly written assignments. The assignments will be related to the content of the chapters being covered that week. Due dates and grading scales will be indicated with the assignments. All of these will be required and late papers will reduce your final grade. These written assignments together will constitute 10% of your grade.

Grade Scale:
A    92-100
A-    90-91
B+    88-89
B    82-87
B-    80-81
C+    78-79
C    72-77
C-    70-71
D+    68-69
D    62-67
D-    60-61
F    Below 60

    Grades merely reflect your performance on the tests. I cannot evaluate how hard you worked, how smart or motivated you are, how important the grade is to your future goals, how much you knew of untested material, how well you would have done with a different testing format, how good a human being you are, or a myriad of other factors. From prior experience, I believe that the tests are a reasonably valid indicator of knowledge of the course material.

Borderline Grades: Every semester, some students score just below the borderline of the next highest grade. Often students believe that a grade just below a cutoff guarantees them the higher score. This is not correct. Borderline grades, even 1/10 of a point below the cutoff, do NOT guarantee a higher grade. It is possible that I will raise grades above a borderline, but this will be my decision—a decision that I will not negotiate or even discuss. To guarantee a particular grade, be sure your average is in the range for that grade; otherwise, it is out of your hands. Please do not send emails at the end of the semester about your desire for the highest possible grade—I will assume you would rather have a borderline grade changed to the next highest grade and that you believe you have a substantial argument for why you deserve this special consideration.

Note on PowerPoint Slides:  Any PowerPoint slides from the lectures will be posted on the Blackboard website shortly AFTER each lecture. The slides are not intended to be a substitute for lectures. They are intended as organizers for the lecture to help you see what general points are being made. Typically, a strategy of simply reviewing the slides to prepare for a test will be a poor strategy, even for the lecture material. Merely knowing the slides themselves is a very shallow level of understanding and such a level of understanding will not be considered “mastery” of the material.

OTHER ISSUES

Academic dishonesty:  Cheating of any form will not be tolerated and will result in an immediate “F” for the entire course. Plagiarism is a form of cheating. Plagiarism is any unacknowledged use of other people’s language in your own writing. Plagiarism is not simple direct lifting of other people’s words, but also paraphrasing and paralleling their wording or discourse structure. Write your own papers. Do not copy from other students or other written sources. Plagiarism, like cheating, will result in an “F” for the entire course. Any case of academic dishonesty may be reported to the dean of your college and it can result in suspension or termination of your attendance at the university. 

 
Special Testing Arrangements:  Please note that The University of Texas at Austin provides, upon request, appropriate academic accommodations for qualified students with disabilities. For more information, contact the Office of the Dean of Students at 471-6259, 471-4641 TTY A.
If a student has a documented need for special testing arrangements, it is the responsibility of the student to arrange with the instructor for special testing prior to each exam.

Electronic Issues: 
•    Please silence all cell phones and other messaging devices during class.
•    If you bring a computer to class, multitask modestly and discreetly. Excessive searching, messaging, or typing is distracting to other students and rude to the instructor.
•    Turn off and securely put away any and all electronic devices during tests. Avoid even the appearance of impropriety.

Communication:
•    You may contact me by my office telephone or email. In general, I prefer email.
•    When sending emails, please assume a casually formal relationship. Identify yourself by name and indicate what class you are in: Psy 301 or “Intro Psych”. Unlike your “friends”, I cannot necessarily identify you by your email address or cell phone number.
•    I will return your messages as quickly as possible. However, please note the following:
o    I do not reroute my office emails or phone message to my home. When I leave for the day, I will not access these messages until the next workday when I am in my office.
o    I typically do not come to my office on the weekends, so a message sent after I leave on Friday will typically not be seen until the following Monday.
o    If you do not receive a reply to a message fairly promptly (by the end of the day for a message sent before noon or by noon for a message sent the previous afternoon) please resend. Occasionally messages can be inadvertently overlooked. I apologize in advance if this should happen to you. I will attempt to be attentive and responsive.

Receiving email: It is university policy that email is an official communication channel. You must keep your official email address accurate and up-to-date. Class email messages are generated using the university system and it is expected that you will receive these messages. Be sure that your “junk” filters do not exclude  university-related messages. In addition, a “full mailbox” will prevent email delivery. Keep your official mailbox functional.


Departmental Requirements: Experimental Participation or a Paper

Research Coordinator:    Abbey Black.
Her office is in SEA 2.216.        Email address: 301research@psy.utexas.edu.
Phone: 471-4410 (ask for Abbey Black)

The Psychology Department has a requirement that students in PSY 301 either participate in psychology experiments or write a paper.  No course credit is given for either the experiments or the paper.  However, you must complete this requirement in order to receive a grade in this class.  The details about this requirement will be described in class and you will be given a handout with the necessary information.

Experiment Option: Our department is an internationally recognized research center and psychological research of all sorts is taking place here all the time. Some of these studies benefit from student participation as research subjects. Furthermore, one of the best ways to learn about the real nature of scientific psychology is to participate in studies. If you choose the experimental participation option, you will need to take part in 5 hours of research during the course of the semester (Deadline: Friday, April 30 at 5:00 PM). Some of these studies may be done on-line and others require that you sign up for a live research session. The department has a convenient on-line system (called OPERA) to allow you to view your experiment options, sign up for convenient times and places, and cancel an appointment if a problem arises.  Failure to appear for a study for which you have signed up will lead to an additional hour of research participation to complete your requirement.
Paper Requirement: You may choose to write a paper on a topic related to the course. If you decide to write a paper, you must meet with Dr. Carroll about your planned topic and treatment prior to Spring Break. A substantial paper outline, reference list, and a copy of your primary reference article will be required by noon on Friday, April 2. Papers are due accompanied by copies of your reference articles by 5:00 PM on Friday, May 7.  These deadlines are IN ADDITION TO departmental requirements for the paper.
    Dr. Carroll will have input to the development of the paper and he may interview you about your paper and your knowledge of the information discussed before accepting it for credit.

PSY 355 • Cognition

43970 • Spring 2010
Meets TTH 1100-1230pm NOA 1.126
show description

PSY 355 (#43970)            COGNITION            SPRING 2010

Lecture Times:  Tuesday & Thursday, 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM    NOA 1.126

Instructor:    Patrick J. Carroll, Ph.D.
Office:  SEA 5.204
Contact:  (512) 475-7007      carroll@psy.utexas.edu
Office Hours:  Tuesday & Thursday  1:00 – 2:30 PM
                        and by appointment
T.A.:        Molly Ireland
Office:     SEA 3.426H
Contact:  (512) 471-0691    meireland@mail.utexas.edu
Office Hours: Monday & Friday  2:00 – 3:30 PM

Required text:  Cognition, 4th Edition by Daniel Reisberg. Norton. Copyright 2010
Also Required:  The Cognition Workbook by the same author, edition, & year
Access to ZAPS: The Norton Psychology Labs

This course will introduce students to the theories and research on basic cognitive processes, including attention, memory, and perception. We will also explore complex phenomena, such as language and decision-making. We will focus on both theoretical ideas and their empirical foundation. The course will emphasize the science of cognitive psychology, and it is assumed that students enrolled in this class wish to learn about cognition as a scientific topic and they have the academic preparation to do so effectively.

Assessment:        Tests            90% of grade (3 tests; 30% each test)
Workbook          5% of grade
ZAPS!              5% of grade
Attendance        Minimum attendance requirement

Tests:   There will be three tests. Each test will combine multiple choice items and questions requiring written responses: definitions, brief explanations, short answers. None of the tests will comprehensive, including the third test, which will be administered during the designated final exam time.

Test Dates:    Thursday, February 18
Tuesday, March 30
Saturday, May 15 (7-10 PM; during exam period)

Each of the tests will contribute equally (30%) to the final grade.
No early tests are possible, even for the Saturday test during exam period.
Makeup tests, if any are needed, will be given only for formally excused absences, and excused absences will be granted only by Dr. Carroll and only for thoroughly documented emergencies. It is your responsibility to supply documentation without being asked. The components and form of any makeup test will not necessarily match that of the original test. The time of the makeup will be at the mutual convenience of the instructor and student, and it will be giving as soon as possible after the general test.
Test questions will be based on all information sources: reading assignments, lectures, Workbook readings, and ZAPS.

ZAPS: One or two of the ZAPS demo-experiments will be assigned with each chapter. Excluding the introductory chapter (Chapter 1), we will cover 12 chapters in the textbook. You must complete a minimum of 10 of the 12 ZAPS chapter-assignments (a single assignment may include multiple ZAPS) prior to each deadline to receive credit. This is all-or-none credit. Class results will be posted and you are expected to understand the theoretical background, predicted results, and actual results. Questions about these theories and results may appear on tests. The instructors will designate specific ZAPS required for each chapter. Typically, these will correspond with those indicated in StudySpace, but that will not always be the case.
Password Access: www.wwnorton.com/gateway/logon.asp?site=zaps&page=
Class Code:    LQ3C5HD6
Workbook Exercises: Because the textbook focuses on basic research in cognition, the material can seem abstract, and it may be hard to see how it can be applied to real world issues. The Cognition Workbook helps you make this connection between basic theory and application by providing brief readings and easy demonstrations. The StudySpace website (see below) contains brief comprehension questions. You should answer assigned questions briefly, but clearly and thoughtfully. You must complete responses with credit to a minimum of 90% of the assigned readings (counted by readings, not chapters) prior to each deadline in order to receive credit for this 5% of the grade. This is all-or-none credit. The TA will check answers for credit. If you have questions, you should contact her. If you have difficulty accessing the site, contact on-site help and send the TA a message. Questions about this content may appear on tests.
StudySpace Access: www.wwnorton.com/college/psych/cognition4/welcome.aspx

NOTE ABOUT DEADLINES: The TA will post Deadlines for Workbook Exercises and ZAPS on Blackboard. Once we have established this notification system, you will be responsible for knowing and meeting deadlines.

Class Website: 
Blackboard will be used as the class website. Its functions will include (but not be limited to) the following:
o    Announcements
o    Lecture notes/slides
o    Test feedback and keys
o    Class documents (e.g., syllabus)
o    Grades

Attendance Policy:  A minimum of 80% attendance (excluding test days) of the entire class session will be considered acceptable attendance. There is no reward for attending classes beyond whatever knowledge you might acquire. Attendance below 80% will be considered unacceptable participation in the class and it will result in a lowering of your grade one or more full letter grades. Class starts at 11:00 and ends at 12:15. I will attempt to respect both of those time limits. Please treat me with courtesy and I will reciprocate with respectful flexibility.  If you intend to leave prior to the end of class, you should inform me before class and indicate your partial attendance with an asterisk next to your name on the roll sheet. Failure to indicate early departure will be considered a misrepresentation of your attendance and, as such, academic dishonesty. When you leave early, you will not be given credit for class attendance.

Lectures:  Class time will be dominated by lectures, but we will also take time for discussions, demonstrations, and other activities. It is expected that you will attend and attend to lectures and actively participate in any activities. Any formal lecture slides will be posted on Blackboard after the lecture. 

Reading Assignments:  The schedule on the last page of the syllabus shows the times we will be working on each chapter/topic.  It is expected that you will keep approximately current in your reading. The date shown in the schedule is the day we will begin discussing a particular topic. I will assume that you are doing a close, detailed, and integrative reading of the textbook and that you are sophisticated in your use of web-based resources to clarify and extend your knowledge.
Grading Scale:   
A    92-100
A-    90-91
B+    88-89
B    82-87
B-    80-81
C+    78-79
C    72-77
C-    70-71
D+    68-69
D    62-67
D-    60-61
F    Below 60

Borderline Grades: Every semester, some students score just below the borderline of the next highest grade. Often students believe that a grade just below a cutoff guarantees them the higher score. This is not correct. Borderline grades, even a fraction of a point below the cutoff, do NOT guarantee a higher grade. It is possible that I will raise grades above a borderline, but this will be my decision—a decision that I will not negotiate or even discuss. To guarantee a particular grade, be sure your average is in the range for that grade; otherwise, it is out of your hands. Please do not send emails at the end of the semester about your desire for the highest possible grade—I will assume you would rather have a borderline grade changed to the next highest grade and that you believe you have a substantial argument for why you deserve this special consideration.

Academic Dishonesty:  Students are expected to turn in their own work. As upper division students, it is expected that you are aware of the nature of cheating and plagiarism and that you will avoid even the hint of academic dishonesty.  This expectation that you do your own work also extends to the Cognition Workbook assignments and ZAPS activities. Please note that misrepresentation of attendance (see Attendance Policy above) will also be treated as academic dishonesty. Academic dishonesty will result in disciplinary penalties, including a possible failing grade in the course and/or dismissal from the University (Section 3.22, Chapter IV, Rules and Regulations of the Board of Regents of the University of Texas System; www.utesystem.edu/bor/tocrrr.htm)

Course Prerequisites:
1.    PSY 301, passed with a C or better.
2.    Psy 418 or an equivalent, passed with a C or better.
The Psychology undergraduate office determines “equivalence”.
3.    Upper-division standing: 60 hours completed.

Students with Disabilities Policy—University of Texas at Austin
The University of Texas at Austin provides upon request appropriate academic accommodations for qualified students with disabilities. For more information, contact the Office of the Dean of Students at 471-6259, TTY: 471-4641.

Electronics Issues: 
•    Please silence all cell phones and other messaging and warning devices during class.
•    If you bring a computer to class, multitask modestly and discreetly. Excessive searching, messaging, or typing is distracting to other students and rude to the instructor.
•    Turn off and securely put away any and all electronic devices during tests. Avoid even the appearance of impropriety.

Communication:
•    You may contact me by my office telephone (475-7007) or email (carroll@psy.utexas.edu).
In general, I prefer email.
•    When sending emails, please assume a casually formal relationship. Identify yourself by name and indicate what class you are in: Psy 355 or Cognition.
•    I will return your messages as quickly as possible. However, please note the following:
o    I do not reroute my office emails or phone message to my home. When I leave for the day, I will not access these messages until the next workday when I am in my office.
o    I typically do not come to my office on the weekends, so a message sent after I leave on Friday will typically not be seen until the following Monday.
o    If you do not receive a reply to a message fairly promptly (by the end of the day for a message sent before noon or by noon for a message sent the previous afternoon) please resend. Occasionally messages can be inadvertently overlooked. I apologize in advance if this should happen to you. I will attempt to be attentive and responsive.





 

WEEK    DAY    DATE    CHAPTER    TOPIC
Week 1    Monday    18-Jan    MLK Holiday    MLK Holiday
     Tuesday    19-Jan    Orientation Class    Orientation Class
     Thursday    21-Jan    Chapter 1    Science of Mind
Week 2    Tuesday    26-Jan         
     Thursday    28-Jan    Chapter 2    Neural Basis
Week 3    Tuesday    2-Feb         
     Thursday    4-Feb    Chapter 3    Object Recognition
Week 4    Tuesday    9-Feb         
     Thursday    11-Feb    Chapter 4    Attention
Week 5    Tuesday    16-Feb         
     Thursday    18-Feb    TEST 1    TEST 1
Week 6    Tuesday    23-Feb    Chapter 5    Working Memory
     Thursday    25-Feb         
Week 7    Tuesday    2-Mar    Chapter 6    Acquisition & Retrieval
     Thursday    4-Mar         
Week 8    Tuesday    9-Mar    Chapter 7    Remembering Complex Events
     Thursday    11-Mar         
BREAK    BREAK    BREAK    Spring Break    Spring Break
                     
Week 9    Tuesday    23-Mar    Chapter 9    Concepts & Knowledge
     Thursday    25-Mar         
Week 10    Tuesday    30-Mar    TEST 2    TEST 2
     Thursday    1-Apr    Chapter 10    Language
Week 11    Tuesday    6-Apr         
     Thursday    8-Apr    Chapter 11    Visual Knowledge
Week 12    Tuesday    13-Apr         
     Thursday    15-Apr    Chapter 12    Judgment
Week 13    Tuesday    20-Apr         
     Thursday    22-Apr    Chapter 13    Reasoning
Week 14    Tuesday    27-Apr         
     Thursday    29-Apr    Chapter 15    Conscious Thought
Week 15    Tuesday    4-May         
     Thursday    6-May    Final Class    Final Class
EXAMS    EXAMS    EXAMS    EXAM PERIOD    EXAM PERIOD
     Saturday    15-May    TEST 3    TEST 3



PSY 458 • Experimental Psychology-W

43995 • Spring 2010
Meets MWF 1100-100pm SEA 2.116
show description

Psy 458        EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY (unique 43995)        Spring  2010

Class Times & Location:        MWF  11:00 AM-12:45 PM        SEA 2.116

Instructor:     Patrick Carroll, Ph.D.
            SEA 5.204    (512) 475-7007         carroll@psy.utexas.edu
Office Hours:    Tuesday & Thursday     1:00-2:30 PM 

TA:        David Lewis
            SEA 3.324E    (512) 471-0111    david.lewis@mail.utexas.edu
Office Hours:     
       
Reading material:   
o    Discovering Statistics using SPSS, 3e by Andy Field.  Sage Publishers, © 2009
o    You should have a copy of the APA Publication Manual (6th Edition).
o    Recommendation: You should have a copy of an introductory statistics book available for reference. Any statistics book used for a Psy418 class (or the equivalent) will be fine. You might also find a good Research Methods book useful; most researchers have trustworthy reference materials for methodological issues.
o    Additional materials will be available for download in the CLASS DOCUMENTS folder on Blackboard. These will be posted as they become relevant.

Statement of Purpose:
Psy458 is intended as an opportunity for advanced majors in Psychology to refine their research-related skills beyond the level possible in Psy418.  The core of this course is hands-on work in conducting actual empirical research. To this end, we will work on a substantial research project during the semester. In addition, we will spend time on statistics and issues in research methods, with the goal of improving your skills and knowledge in these areas.

Assessment:
Papers:  Instructions for individual writing assignments will be provided at the appropriate time during the semester.  Major papers will be APA-style research reports.
Tests:  You will take two tests on the reading materials and related lectures. The tests will primarily be in essay format, though much of the content will be related to statistics.
Homework:  There will be a number of relatively brief writing assignments and some statistics homework problems.  Information will be provided at the appropriate time.
Presentation:  There will be individual presentations of your research at the end of the semester. These are modeled on professional presentations.



Conceptual    Weighting
Test 1    15%
Test 2    25%
Major Papers     
Paper 1     10%
Paper 2    10%
Final Paper    25%
Miscellaneous     
Homework    5%
Presentation    5%
Critique    5%


Paper Submission Policy:
Papers are due at the beginning of class. All papers must be submitted in the following way:
o    Two printed copies of the paper must be submitted in class.
o     An MSWord copy (.doc or .docx) of the paper should be sent to both instructors as an email attachment (carroll@psy.utexas.edu and david.lewis@mail.utexasa.edu)
Papers MAY NOT be printed during class time. They should be printed and double-checked for accuracy before submission.  Coming to class late with your paper means the paper is late.

Please submit a paper copy of each paper and send both of us an email copy.

Attendance and Professional Behavior:
Professional standards are assumed in this class. This means that it is expected that you will attend all sessions and participate actively. If you have a strong reason for missing a class, you must be sure that the instructors and your team members are informed in advance and that you have fulfilled any responsibilities (research materials, analyses, etc.).  Poor attendance (i.e., any unexcused absences) or failure to meet your responsibilities in a timely fashion will result in a significant reduction of grade. The exact grade penalty will be determined by the instructor depending on the issues involved.

Final Course Grades:
Final course grades will be based on the percentage of the total possible points that you receive., with the following ranges:
A    92-100
A-    90-91
B+    88-89
B    82-87
B-    80-81
C+    78-79
C    72-77
C-    70-71
D+    68-69
D    62-67
D-    60-61
F    Below 60
 
Grades merely reflect your performance on the tests, papers, and other activities. I cannot evaluate how hard you work, how smart or motivated you are, how important the grade is to your future goals, how much you know of untested material, how well you would have done with a different testing format, how good a human being you are, or myriad other factors. I don’t trivialize the importance of these other factors—I am simply not capable of fairly and meaningfully incorporating them into a grade.

Borderline Grades: Every semester, some students score just below the borderline of the next highest grade. Often students believe that a grade just below a cutoff guarantees them the higher score. This is not correct. Borderline grades, even 1/10 of a point below the cutoff, do NOT guarantee a higher grade. It is possible that I will raise grades above a borderline, but this will be my decision—a decision that I will not negotiate or even discuss. To guarantee a particular grade, be sure your average is in the range for that grade; otherwise, it is out of your hands. Please do not send emails at the end of the semester about your desire for the highest possible grade—I will assume you would rather have a borderline grade changed to the next highest grade and that you believe you have a substantial argument for why you deserve this special consideration.

 
Academic Honesty:
The highest standards of academic integrity are expected in this class. Professionals in every field—and most emphatically in scientific fields—rely on trust that their colleagues will offer only honest, accurate, and verifiable information. Without this trust, the enterprise of science collapses.  While collaborative work and team spirit are essential for this class, all writing (and related figures and tables) must be exclusively your own. Unless clearly and unambiguously otherwise specified, assume that every writing assignment in this class must be written by you alone. Similarly, take precautions to assure that you do not plagiarize from published articles you read. Plagiarism includes directly using material written by others, but also paraphrasing and paralleling of sentence and extended text.  Tests must also be entirely your own work.
     Any deviation from the highest standards are academic honesty will result in a failing grade.


Prerequisites:
    The Psychology Department will drop all students who do not meet the following prerequisites:
(a) a grade of C or better in PSY 301.
(b) a grade of C or better in PSY 418 for Psych. majors, or and equivalent statistics class for other majors.
(c) Current upper-division standing (60 or more credit-hours completed).
(d) A 3.0 gpa or better in psychology classes overall.

Students with Disabilities:
The University of Texas at Austin provides upon request appropriate academic accommodations for qualified students with disabilities.  For more information, contact the Office of the Dean of Students at 471-6259, 471-4641 TTY.

PSY 418 • Statistics & Research Design-W

44000-44005 • Fall 2009
Meets MWF 900-1000 NOA 1.116
show description

Psy 418                        Statistics and Research Design (unique #44000/44005)                        FALL  2009

 

Instructor:             Patrick Carroll, Ph. D.

                                    SEA 5.204            475-7007             carroll @ psy.utexas.edu

                                    Office Hours:            Monday, Wednesday, & Thursday   1:00 to 2:00 PM

Lecture:            Monday, Wednesday, & Friday            9:00 – 10:00 AM                        NOA 1.116 

 

Lab Instructors:                        André Souza                            andre.stats@andreluizsouza.com
                                                Office Hours:            SEA 2.122   Time to be announced

                                    Katherine Snyder                        ksnyder@mail.utexas.edu

Office Hours:             SEA 2.122   Time to be announced

 

LABS                         # 44000 (André Souza)                        Tuesday                 9:00 – 11:00 AM              SEA 2.114           

            # 44005 (Katherine Snyder)            Tuesday      9:00 – 11:00 AM            SEA 2.122
NOTE: Be sure you attend the lab to which you are assigned: 44000 or 44005.

 

Required Texts:           

  • Research Methods for the Behavioral Sciences by Frederick J. Gravetter & Lori-Ann B. Forzano
    (3rd Edition, Copyright 2009) Wadsworth/Cengage
  • Statistics Unplugged by Sally Caldwell (2nd Edition, Copyright 2007, Thomson/Wadsworth).
    • Additional materials will be available for download in the class “course documents” section on Blackboard.
    • A copy of important sections of the APA Publications Manual, along with related material, is available in the “Course Documents” section of Blackboard.

 

Other Supplies:

You will also need a calculator occasionally. You should bring it to class when we are working on statistics and you will need it for quizzes. Statistics calculators will not be allowed for quizzes. Adequate calculators (electronic adding machines) are very inexpensive and widely available.

You should have a USB flash/memory stick for lab work.

 

Statement of Purpose:

Psy418 is the single technical course required for majors in Psychology at UT. It is a required course, ideally taken early in your career as a psychology student, to give you preparation in statistics and research methodology.

During this semester, you will learn to interpret and calculate many of the basic statistical tests used by psychologists in research, and you will study research design issues related to use and interpretation of statistical results. We will look at a variety of methodological issues that influence the design of studies and their interpretation. In lab, you will have the opportunity to apply some of your understanding of research in two major projects. In addition, the lab experience will allow you to learn about technical writing in psychology and about finding and using the research literature. You should leave Psy418 with a good technical foundation for taking upper division Psychology courses.

You should consider additional technical training if you are planning to go to graduate school in any area of Psychology (even counseling or clinical practice) or in other scientifically-grounded fields (e.g., medicine, business, etc.).

 

Basic Requirements:

  • The lecture and lab components of the class will run somewhat independently, though both are under the direction of Dr. Carroll. The lecture portion of the class will be taught by Dr. Carroll. The labs will be led by graduate student lab instructors under Dr. Carroll’s supervision.
  • The course grade is determined by both components of the course, with nearly equal weight given to each. There will be many assignments, with some having only a small impact on your final grade. However, none of the assignments is optional and failure to complete assignments in a timely manner can have an impact on your grade greater than the simple numerical value of the grade. In simple terms, failure to submit an assignment in a timely manner can lead to a lower grade, even if the percentage influence of that assignment does not lower the grade.

 


Basic Requirements continued:

  • In the lecture component of the course, there will be 2 major tests, which will be primarily in essay format and will focus on conceptual issues. There will also be 6 quizzes, which will focus on statistical calculations and strict interpretation of statistical results. 
  • In the lab component of the class, there will be a major research project that will span much of the semester. For this project, you will work as a member of a research team or group.  More information will be provided about this project as we organize it in lab. In addition, there will be regular lab reports that involve writing. Lab reports are due at the beginning of lecture on the day following the lab (i.e., on Wednesdays).
  • CAUTION: There is not much that is seriously difficult in this class, but, as you can see from the class calendar, the assignments are relentless. Part of the challenge in the class is to stay on topic and to be productive on a regular basis.

 

Final Course Grades: Final course grades will be based on the percentage of the total possible points that you receive with the following ranges:

A

92-100

A-

90-91

B+

88-89

B

82-87

B-

80-81

C+

78-79

C

72-77

C-

70-71

D+

68-69

D

62-67

D-

60-61

F

Below 60

 
Grades merely reflect your performance on the tests, papers, and other activities. I cannot evaluate how hard you work, how smart or motivated you are, how important the grade is to your future goals, how much you know of untested material, how well you would have done with a different testing format, how good a human being you are, or myriad other factors. I don’t trivialize the importance of these other factors—I am simply not capable of fairly and meaningfully incorporating them into a grade.

 

Attendance:

  • You are expected to attend all lectures. Roll will be taken at every class. Attendance of 85% (exclusive of tests and quizzes) will be considered “minimum acceptable attendance” and I will not give excused absences for lecture or lab for any reason. If an emergency arises and you wish me to know about it, send information in an email and provide other documentation as soon as possible. At the end of the semester, I may (or may not) take this information into account in evaluating your attendance. Failure to meet the minimum attendance requirement can result in a significant (one or more full letter grades) reduction in your grade.
  • You are expected to attend 100% of labs (there are 14), to arrive on time, and to stay until the lab instructor has indicated that you may leave. Lab instructors will take roll and provide me with regular reports about attendance and participation. If an emergency prevents your attendance in lab or requires you to arrive late or leave early, you should contact Dr. Carroll by email and CC the lab instructor. You must then meet with the lab instructor during his or her office hours prior to the next lab to go over missed material or to report on status of your project. It is your responsibility to make these arrangements and fulfill these requirements. Attendance problems in lab can lead to a significantly lower final grade, depending on the seriousness of the problem.
  • Some time outside of lab will be needed for you to complete your research projects. Other students will be dependent on your conscientiousness and reliability. It is expected that everyone will be a dependable team member and significant problems in fulfilling your responsibilities can have a significant negative impact on your final grade.

 


Test Content:

  • The two major tests are intended to focus primarily on conceptual issues—explaining, defining, interpreting. Some calculation or use of statistical tables may be necessary, but the tests will emphasize non-computational aspects of the information we are studying, including statistical concepts and reasoning.
  • Tests will primarily involve writing. There may be some multiple-choice questions, but these will not predominate.
  • You will have the entire class session for the tests.

 

Quiz Grading:

  • There will be six statistics quizzes spread throughout the semester. The purpose of these quizzes is to assess your understanding and skill in statistical calculations and in basic interpretation of the results of statistical tests.  
  • These quizzes will be given with the assumption that you have practiced the various tests and that you are ready to demonstrate your facility. In general, you are expected to know the formulas and to be ready to apply them to example problems. You should bring and use a calculator for these quizzes. 
  • Practice problems can be found in your statistics book and additional practice problems will be made available on Blackboard. If you have problems learning the statistical calculations or interpretations, you should meet with Dr. Carroll. If you wish to have additional practice problems, you should contact Dr. Carroll (though not the night before a quiz).
  • You must pass all six quizzes with a minimum score on each of 70%.
    • If you pass the test on the first attempt, you will receive the score you have earned (70 to 100).
    • If you do not pass a quiz the first time with the minimum score, you must take a new version of the same quiz. Additional follow-up attempts will be made available until you achieve the minimum grade, but after the first follow-up you must meet with Dr. Carroll before arranging to take the quiz.
      • If you pass the quiz on the second attempt you will receive a score of 70% regardless of your actual score—with 70% as the minimum score for passing.
      • If you fail to pass on the first or second attempt, you will receive a score of 50% for your third attempt regardless of your actual score. However, you must still earn 70% to pass.
      • If you still have not passed the test, you must continue taking retests until you have passed with 70% correct.  The grade you receive will decline by 10% on each attempt (4th attempt: 40%, 5th attempt: 30%, etc.)
      • You must pass each quiz with the minimum score BEFORE the next scheduled quiz. For the final quiz, you will receive an incomplete until you have successfully passed the quiz.
      • You should not miss any quizzes. If an emergency prevents you from taking a quiz, you must send an email to Dr. Carroll immediately and then meet with him in his office (i.e., not in class). Whether or not you receive an excused absence, you must take and pass the quiz (minimum of 70) prior to the next quiz.
        • If you receive an excused absence, the quiz grade will not be part of your quiz average, but there will be no negative impact of the quiz on your grade, if you pass on the first attempt. If you do not pass the quiz on the first attempt, you will be under the original scoring system (see above).
        • If you do not receive an excused absence, you will receive a zero as your quiz grade, but you must still pass the quiz before the next quiz.

Paper Policy:  Papers are due at the beginning of class or lab on the day assigned and extensions are permitted only for exceptional and fully documented circumstances. Any requests for extensions must be made to Dr. Carroll or your lab instructor before the due date and a copy of the paper in its current state will be required.  Please do not assume you will receive the extension. Late papers will be penalized in terms of grade.

Note on readings:  You are responsible for ALL of the material in the assigned readings. The lecture is not planned as or intended as a substitute for or alternative to the readings.  Tests will be written with the assumption that you have learned all of the material from both sources,

 


NOTES ON OTHER IMPORTANT ISSUES

 

Academic Honesty:  Cheating or plagiarism in any part of the course—tests, papers, homework assignments, etc.—will result in an F for the course. In writing assignments, you should be very careful to assure that all writing is original, even when several team members have been working together on the same assignment. Share ideas, information, materials, and computations. DO NOT share writing and avoid serving as writing editors/advisors for others in your own research team. Furthermore, exact copying and close or even rough paraphrasing of source material is plagiarism. For testing involving statistical calculations, you may not use a calculator that has the capability of conducting tests without requiring a series of intermediate computational steps. If you believe your calculator may have capabilities that exceed this limiting condition, check with the instructor.

 

Electronics Policy:  Cell phones and many other electronic devices are disruptive in a class setting. Turn them off and put them away during lecture and during lab meetings. Electronic systems present increasing opportunities to cheat during tests. They must be turned off and put away completely during tests. Use of the lab computers for personal activities (emails, non-class related searching, use of non-psychology websites, among other related activities) should not take place during lab sessions. 
Exception: If you are expecting an emergency call during class or lecture, you should check with the instructor (Dr. Carroll in lecture/ your TA in lab) before class to make arrangements.

 

Course Prerequisites: The Psychology Department will drop all students who do not meet the following prerequisites: PSY 301 with a C or better; Math 302 or a higher-level mathematics course; and a major in Psychology.

 

University Policy—Students with Disabilities:  The University of Texas at Austin provides upon request appropriate academic accommodations for qualified students with disabilities. For more information, contact the Office of the Dean of Students at 471-6259, 471-4641 TTY.

 

Receiving email: It is university policy that email is an official communication channel. You must keep your official email address accurate and up-to-date. Be sure that junk filters do not exclude  university-related message type indicators (e.g., informational, operational, official, urgent). Class email messages are generated using the university system and it is expected that you will receive these messages. In addition, a “full mailbox” will prevent email delivery. Keep your official mailbox functional.

 

Email Etiquette: Please assume a friendly-but-formal relationship in emails. The instructor and TA are not part of your circle of friends and an email from cutebunny@youwho.com without additional identifying information asking “Do we have a paper due tomorrow?” is inappropriate and goofy (and sometimes hard to answer if I don’t know which class “cutebunny” is in). Give me a first and last name on your messages and indicate which of my classes you are in.

 

General Communication:  If you have a question or request needing a reply, please use email, not a phone message. I will reply as soon as possible; however, I only check my email a couple of times a day. I do not receive university-related email at my home (evenings and weekends). If you have not received a reply within 24 hours (or Monday morning for a message sent after noon on Friday), please send a follow-up message. If you need to send a follow-up message, I apologize in advance, but I may have missed your message from among the many I receive every day. I am not trying to ignore you.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

PSY 338K • Psychology Of Reading

44095 • Fall 2009
Meets MWF 1200-100pm NOA 1.126
show description

Fall 2009                          PSYCHOLOGY OF READING                         Psy 338K (Unique #44095)                        

 

Time & Location:            MWF 12:00 to 1:00 PM, NOA 1.116

 

Instructor:  Patrick Carroll, Ph.D.

Email:                                     carroll@psy.utexas.edu

Office Telephone:             (512) 475-7007

Office Location:                         SEA 5.204 (Seay Psychology Building)

Office Hours:                         Monday, Wednesday, and Thursday   1:00-2:00 PM  (and by appt.)

 

Teaching Assistant:   Danielle Eagan, M.A.

Email:                                     deagan@mail.utexas.edu                                   

Contact Telephone:             215-906-1071

Office Location:                         SEA 4.110 E (This is a suite of offices. Enter through the Business Office, SEA 4.110)

Office Hours:                         TBA

 

Class Homepage:  Blackboard

 

Readings:   Readings will be posted on Blackboard (Course Documents > Readings). The majority of these readings will be chapters from introductory-level textbooks in Human Cognition, Cognitive Development, and Cognitive Neuroscience.

 

Goals of Course:

Writing is one of the great human inventions, an invention that is not merely a tool, but a powerful, shaping force in our lives, and it is an invention with an impact that may actually be increasing in the technology-laden world of our information society. Literacy is built on an evolved innovation that may have been the single most important factor in distinguishing humans from our primate cousins—our elaborate and amazingly nuanced communication system called language. In turn, language and its child—literacy—are governed by a brain that defines, represents, and acts on the world using a rich, multi-layered system of symbols and processes these symbols using a vast array of cognitive resources.

This class is an exploration of our symbolic, linguistic mind and brain and the influence of what is arguably our greatest technology—writing. We will look at language to try to see how it works. We will explore how a “new” ability—literacy—appeared within historical time and became an important force in human psychology and continues to redefine itself in each generation. We will explore how literacy is acquired and why some have difficulty becoming literate, while others find it easy. We will look at influences on literate practices, from pathways in the brain to approaches to classroom instruction to social forces that determine the very meaning of being literate. Finally, we will study reading as one example of a set of complex, refined abilities (others include mathematics, music, and visual artistry)  that define the pathways of human achievement.

Tests: Your grade will be based on your performance on four (4) tests. The tests will contain a mixture of short essays, definitions, and multiple-choice items. The four tests will be equally weighted, each composing 25% of your grade.

Tests are scheduled for the following days:

Wednesday, September 23

Wednesday, October 14

Monday, November 9

Friday, December 4

Tests are not cumulative. Each test will concentrate on the material from that portion of the course—lectures and readings. Obviously, the material is interrelated, so basic knowledge of the previous parts of the course will be assumed on each test.

 

Attendance:

Good attendance is expected and will not be rewarded, but poor attendance can be penalized. Attendance of 80%, excluding tests, will be used as an operational definition of “minimum reasonable attendance.” The consequence of poor attendance (operationally: less than 80%) will be a reduction in grade, with the degree of impact related to level of attendance.  I will not give “excused absences” for regular classes, even for exceptionally good excuses. If you need to inform me about an emergency that will keep you out of class, do so by email and I can take account of that information if I wish to do so at the end of the semester.


Final Course Grades: Final course grades will be based on the percentage of the total possible points that you receive., with the following ranges:

A

92-100

A-

90-91

B+

88-89

B

82-87

B-

80-81

C+

78-79

C

72-77

C-

70-71

D+

68-69

D

62-67

D-

60-61

F

Below 60

 
Grades merely reflect your performance on the tests, papers, and other activities. I cannot evaluate how hard you work, how smart or motivated you are, how important the grade is to your future goals, how much you know of untested material, how well you would have done with a different testing format, how good a human being you are, or a myriad of other factors. I don’t trivialize the importance of these other factors—I am simply not capable of fairly and meaningfully incorporating them into a grade.

 

OTHER IMPORTANT ISSUES

 

Academic dishonesty:  Cheating—high tech or low—will not be tolerated and will result in an immediate “F” for the entire course. Plagiarism or any other failure to do your own work is also unacceptable and even a single instance may result in a failing grade for the course. Plagiarism is any not clearly acknowledged use of other people’s language in your own writing. Plagiarism is not simple direct lifting of other people’s language, but also paraphrasing and paralleling their wording or discourse structure.  

 

Missing a Test & Makeup Tests: If you miss a regular test AND receive an excused absence, you will need to take a makeup test. Makeup tests will be given as soon as possible after the student has returned to class, contingent on my having time to write a new test. 

     An excused absence for a test will be given only for fully documented medical or family emergencies. Please include contact information (name & telephone number) with the documentation you submit and arrange for legal release of verification information where there are restrictions.

Compiling and providing clear and verifiable documentation is your responsibility. 
Do not wait to be asked. Even if you have received verbal or emailed permission to miss a test, the absence does not become an officially excused absence until documentation is on file and has been received in a timely manner.

 

Borderline Grades: The formal grade ranges are in a table above. Every semester some students are just below some cutoffs, sometimes a point or two and sometimes just a fractional value short. My formal policy is that the cutoffs are those listed in the previous sentence. Any “rounding up” or other similar grade modifications are not open to discussion or debate. You may accurately assume that I know you would like to have the highest grade possible and that you would like me to push your grade over the borderline. I also believe that you can probably give me very good reasons for your grade being lower than it should be. Unfortunately, I am in no position to verify individual reasons, so such explanations really don’t change the grading problem for me. I will try to be fair and reasonable in assigning grades. If you achieve the minimum cutoff for a particular grade, then you are guaranteed that grade. If you are below that cutoff, it is out of your hands and you should hope for the best.

 

Special Testing Arrangements:  Please note that The University of Texas at Austin provides, upon request, appropriate academic accommodations for qualified students with disabilities. For more information, contact the Office of the Dean of Students at 471-6259, 471-4641 TTY A. If a student has a documented need for special testing arrangements, it is the responsibility of the student to arrange with the instructor for special testing prior to each exam.

 


Electronics policy: Cell phones and many other electronic devices are a relatively new phenomenon and proper etiquette for their use is still evolving. Here is my policy.

  • Use of cell phones and other messaging devices during class is rude and potentially disruptive in lecture. Please turn them off and put them away during class times.
  • You may, of course, use a laptop computer during class. Please refrain from multitasking. Use your computer for class purposes only.
  • Electronic systems present increasing opportunities to cheat during tests. Cell phones and other electronic devices must be turned off and put away completely during tests.
  • If you are expecting an emergency call during class or lecture, you should check with the instructor before class to make arrangements.

Receiving email: It is university policy that email is an official communication channel. You must keep your official email address accurate and up-to-date. Be sure that junk filters do not exclude university-related message-type indicators (e.g., informational, operational, official, urgent). Class email messages are generated using the university system and it is expected that you will receive these messages. In addition, a “full mailbox” will prevent email delivery. Keep your official mailbox functional.

 

Email Etiquette: Please assume a friendly-but-formal relationship in emails. The instructor and TA are not part of your circle of friends and an email from cutebunny@yipee.com without additional identifying information asking “Do we have a paper due tomorrow?” is inappropriate and goofy. A full name (not just “Ginger!” or “Timmy”) is reasonable for formal communication, though turning on your  “signature” line is probably most effective.

 

General Communication:  If you have a question or request needing a reply, please use email, not a phone message. I will reply as soon as possible; however, I only check my email a couple of times a day. I do not receive university-related email at my home (evenings and weekends). If you have not received a reply within 24 hours (or Monday morning for a message sent after noon on Friday), please send a follow-up message. If you need to send such a follow-up message, I apologize in advance, but I may have missed your message from among the many I receive every day. I am not trying to ignore you or be rude.

 

Departmental Prerequisites:

The Psychology Department will drop all students who do not meet the following prerequisites:

(a) PSY 301 with a C or better

(b) PSY 418 (or an equivalent listed in the course schedule) with a C or better

(c) Upper-Division standing (60 hours completed)

 

 

 

 

PSY 458 • Experimental Psychology-W

44195 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 930-1230pm SEA 2.116
show description

Psy 458                        EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY (unique 44195)                        FALL  2009

 

Class Times & Location:                        TuTh  9:30 AM-12:30 PM                        SEA 2.116

 

Instructor:             Patrick Carroll, Ph.D.

                                    SEA 5.204            (512) 475-7007                         carroll @ psy.utexas.edu

                                    Office Hours:            Tuesday, Wednesday, & Thursday     1:00-2:00 PM 

 

TA:                        David Lewis
                                    SEA 3.324E            (512) 471-0111                        david.lewis @ mail.utexas.edu

                                    Office Hours:            Tuesday & Thursday  2:00-3:30   

 

Reading material:           

  • Discovering Statistics using SPSS, 2e by Andy Field.  Sage Publishers, © 2005.
  • You should have a copy of an introductory statistics book available for reference. Any statistics book used for a Psy418 class (or the equivalent) will be fine. You might also find a good Research Methods book useful; most researchers have trustworthy reference materials for methodological issues.
  • Additional materials will be available for download in the class “course documents” section on Blackboard. These will be posted as they become relevant.
    • A copy of important sections of the APA Publication Manual, along with related material, is available in the “Course Documents” section of Blackboard. If you plan to go to graduate school in psychology or a related area, you should go online and purchase a copy of the APA Publication Manual from APA or an online bookstore.

 

Statement of Purpose:

Psy458 is intended as an opportunity for advanced majors in Psychology to refine their research-related skills beyond the level possible in Psy418.  The core of this course is hands-on work in conducting actual empirical research. To this end, we will work on a substantial research project during the semester. In addition, we will spend time on statistics and issues in research methods, with the goal of improving your skills and knowledge in these areas.

 

Assessment:
Papers: 
Instructions for individual writing assignments will be provided at the appropriate time during the semester.  Major papers will be APA-style research reports.
Tests:  You will take two tests on the reading materials and related lectures. The tests will primarily be in essay format, though much of the content will be related to statistics.
Homework:  There will be a number of relatively brief writing assignments and some statistics homework problems.  Information will be provided at the appropriate time.

SPSS Quiz:  Your knowledge of SPSS will be tested at the computers. This quiz assures that everyone is learning how to use the SPSS application beyond simply following detailed instructions.
Presentation:  There will be individual presentations of your research at the end of the semester. These are modeled on professional presentations.

 

Paper Submission Policy:

Papers are due at the beginning of class. All papers must be submitted in the following way:

Papers MAY NOT be printed during class time. They should be printed and double-checked for accuracy before submission.  Coming to class late with your paper means the paper is late.

 


Attendance and Professional Behavior:

Professional standards are assumed in this class. This means that it is expected that you will attend all sessions and participate actively. If you have a strong reason for missing a class, you must be sure that the instructors and your team members are informed in advance and that you have fulfilled any responsibilities (research materials, analyses, etc.).  Poor attendance (i.e., any unexcused absences) or failure to meet your responsibilities in a timely fashion will result in a significant reduction of grade. The exact grade penalty will be determined by the instructor depending on the issues involved.

 

Final Course Grades:

Final course grades will be based on the percentage of the total possible points that you receive., with the following ranges:

A

92-100

A-

90-91

B+

88-89

B

82-87

B-

80-81

C+

78-79

C

72-77

C-

70-71

D+

68-69

D

62-67

D-

60-61

F

Below 60

 
Grades merely reflect your performance on the tests, papers, and other activities. I cannot evaluate how hard you work, how smart or motivated you are, how important the grade is to your future goals, how much you know of untested material, how well you would have done with a different testing format, how good a human being you are, or myriad other factors. I don’t trivialize the importance of these other factors—I am simply not capable of fairly and meaningfully incorporating them into a grade.

 

Borderline Grades: Every semester, some students score just below the borderline of the next highest grade. Often students believe that a grade just below a cutoff guarantees them the higher score. This is not correct. Borderline grades, even 1/10 of a point below the cutoff, do NOT guarantee a higher grade. It is possible that I will raise grades above a borderline, but this will be my decision—a decision that I will not negotiate or even discuss. To guarantee a particular grade, be sure your average is in the range for that grade; otherwise, it is out of your hands. Please do not send emails at the end of the semester about your desire for the highest possible grade—I will assume you would rather have a borderline grade changed to the next highest grade and that you believe you have a substantial argument for why you deserve this special consideration.

 

Academic Honesty:
The highest standards of academic integrity are expected in this class. Professionals in every field—and most emphatically in scientific fields—rely on trust that their colleagues will offer only honest, accurate, and verifiable information. Without this trust, the enterprise of science collapses.  While collaborative work and team spirit are essential for this class, all writing (and related figures and tables) must be exclusively your own. Unless clearly and unambiguously otherwise specified, assume that every writing assignment in this class must be written by you alone. Similarly, take precautions to assure that you do not plagiarize from published articles you read. Plagiarism includes directly using material written by others, but also paraphrasing and paralleling of sentence and extended text.  Tests must also be entirely your own work.
     Any deviation from the highest standards are academic honesty will result in a failing grade.

 

 

Prerequisites:

The Psychology Department will drop all students who do not meet the following prerequisites:
(a) a grade of C or better in PSY 301.
(b) a grade of C or better in PSY 418 for Psych. majors, or and equivalent statistics class for other majors.
(c) Current upper-division standing (60 or more credit-hours completed).
(d) A 3.0 gpa or better in psychology classes overall.

 

Students with Disabilities:
The University of Texas at Austin provides upon request appropriate academic accommodations for qualified students with disabilities.  For more information, contact the Office of the Dean of Students at 471-6259, 471-4641 TTY.

 

 

 

 

PSY 305 • Intro To Cognitive Psychology

86835 • Summer 2009
Meets MTWTHF 1000-1130 CPE 2.204
show description

Introduction to the study of how people perceive, act, communicate, and reason. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C.

PSY 355 • Cognition

86860 • Summer 2009
Meets MTWTHF 1000-1130 CPE 2.204
show description

Psychology 317, Sociology 317L, Social Work 318, Statistics 309.Educational Psychology 371, Government 350K, Mathematics 316,of at least C: Biology 318M, Civil Engineering 311S, Economics 329,301 with a grade of at least C, and one of the following with a gradeleast C in each; for nonmajors, upper-division standing, Psychologyupper-division standing and Psychology 301 and 418 with a grade of atweek for one semester. Prerequisite: For psychology majors,nature, and function of the thought process. Three lecture hours aTheoretical and critical analysis of the development,

PSY 301 • Introduction To Psychology

43005 • Spring 2009
Meets MWF 900-1000 GRG 424
show description

Basic problems and principles of human experience and behavior. Three lecture hours a week for one semester, or the equivalent in independent study.

PSY 325K • Advanced Statistics

43103 • Spring 2009
Meets TTH 930-1100 SEA 2.116
show description

Advanced statistical theory and methods for analysis of behavioral sciences data; topics include analysis of variance and covariance, regression, and nonparametric techniques. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: For psychology majors, upper-division standing and Psychology 301 and 418 with a grade of at least C in each; for nonmajors, upper-division standing, Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C: Biology 318M, Civil Engineering 311S, Economics 329, Education Psychology 371, Government 350K, Mathematics 316, Psychology 317, Sociology 317L, Social Work 318, Statistics 309.

PSY 338K • Psychology Of Reading

43140 • Spring 2009
Meets MWF 300pm-400pm NOA 1.116
show description

Theory and research on the reading process and its acquisition. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: For psychology majors, upper-division standing and Psychology 301 and 418 with a grade of at least C in each; for nonmajors, upper-divison standing, Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C, and one of the following with a grade of at least C: Biology 318M, Civil Engineering 311S, Economics 329, Educational Psychology 371, Government 350K, Mathematics 316, Psychology 317, Sociology 317L, Social Work 318, Statistics 309.

 

PSY 458 • Experimental Psychology-W

43235 • Spring 2009
Meets MWF 1100-100pm SEA 2.116
show description

Techniques of psychological research illustrated in a series of laboratory experiments. Two lecture hours and four laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing, a major in psychology, Psychology 301 and 418 with a grade of at least C in each, and a University grade point average of at least 3.25.

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