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Jacqueline Woolley, Chair The University of Texas at Austin, SEA 4.212, Austin, TX 78712 • (512) 475-7596

W. Todd Maddox

Professor PhD, University of California, Santa Barbara

W. Todd Maddox

Contact

Biography

Dr. Maddox is on leave for Fall 2012.

Wayne Holtzman Chair & Professor of Psychology
Department of Psychology
Member of the Institute for Neuroscience
Member of the Center for Perceptual Systems
Office:  5.226 Seay, 512.475.8494
Contact maddox@psy.utexas.edu
Fax 512.471.6175
Lab:  4.120 Seay, 512.232.2883

Degrees and Positions: 

Ph. D., University of California, Santa Barbara (1993). Mentor: Dr. F. Gregory Ashby
Post Doc, Harvard University (1993-1994) Under Dr. William K. Estes 
Assistant Professor, Arizona State University (1994-1997), University of Texas, Austin (1997-2001) 
Associate Professor, University of Texas, Austin (2001-2006)
Professor, University of Texas, Austin (2006-present) 

Honors and Awards: 

Associate Editor, Perception & Psychophysics, 2003-2008
Editorial Board, Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, & Cognition, 2000-
Charter Member Cognition/Perception Grant Panel, NIH, 2010-2014

See Lab site for full list of publications with PDF downloads

Interests

Cognitive neuroscience of classification, decision-making and attention; translational applications to normal aging, neurological and clinical disorders

PSY 394U • Curr Tpcs In Cognitiv Neurosci

42914 • Spring 2015
Meets F 1200pm-300pm SEA 4.244
show description

Seminars in Cognitive or Perceptual Systems. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

PSY 394U • Topics In Learning II

43973 • Fall 2014
Meets F 900am-1200pm SEA 4.242
show description

Seminars in Cognitive or Perceptual Systems. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

PSY 418 • Statistics And Research Design

43920-43925 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 930am-1100am NOA 1.116
show description

Students may not enroll in Psychology 418 more than twice. Survey of statistics, including central tendency, variability and inference, and scientific methodology used in psychological research. Three lecture hours and two discussion hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C and credit for one of the following: Mathematics 302, 303D, 403K, 305G, 408C, 408K, 316; or Statistics and Scientific Computation 302, 303, 304, 305, 306, 318.

PSY 394U • Topics In Learning III

44340 • Spring 2014
Meets M 430pm-730pm SEA 5.106
show description

Seminars in Cognitive or Perceptual Systems. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

PSY 394U • Topics In Learning II

44000 • Fall 2013
Meets F 900am-1200pm SEA 4.242
show description

Seminars in Cognitive or Perceptual Systems. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

PSY 394U • Current Topics In Learning

43660 • Spring 2013
Meets M 900am-1200pm SEA 5.106
show description

Seminars in Cognitive or Perceptual Systems. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

PSY 418 • Statistics And Research Design

43130-43135 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 800am-930am NOA 1.116
show description

Psychology 418 offers an introduction and broad survey of statistics and experimental methods in psychology. The overall goal is to teach you the skills needed to design, conduct, analyze, and present quality scientific research. This course examines the philosophy behind the scientific method, the basics of experimental design, the logic of hypothesis testing, the techniques necessary for data analyses and interpretation, and the framework for presentation of research results. Psychology 418 is composed of a lecture and a laboratory. The lecture and lab complement each other. There will be some overlap between the lecture and lab material, but attendance in both is essential for success.

Psychology 418 is a probably the most important course you will take as a psychology undergraduate, and it is certainly one of the most intellectually demanding and time-consuming courses you will take. We will spend quite a bit of time investigating the field of statistics. You will be expected to learn and apply many mathematical formulas. You will be performing lots of computations by hand and on the computer. The course moves at a fast pace. If you are not "up" for the challenge this semester, you are strongly urged to (a) take the course at a later date, or (b) adjust your schedule and thinking to accommodate the demands of the course. Waiting until the last minute, and "cramming" for the exams or writing your research reports the night before they are due is a sure recipe for disaster. If you keep up with the material and ask questions when you are unclear about something you will find this to be a very rewarding course. The skills you learn will allow you to test rigorously interesting hypotheses about human (and animal) behavior, and will allow you to critically evaluate the plethora of so called "facts" and "proof" you are bombarded with everyday.

PSY 418 • Statistics And Research Design

43150-43155 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 930am-1100am NOA 1.116
show description

Psychology 418 offers an introduction and broad survey of statistics and experimental methods in psychology. The overall goal is to teach you the skills needed to design, conduct, analyze, and present quality scientific research. This course examines the philosophy behind the scientific method, the basics of experimental design, the logic of hypothesis testing, the techniques necessary for data analyses and interpretation, and the framework for presentation of research results. Psychology 418 is composed of a lecture and a laboratory. The lecture and lab complement each other. There will be some overlap between the lecture and lab material, but attendance in both is essential for success.

Psychology 418 is a probably the most important course you will take as a psychology undergraduate, and it is certainly one of the most intellectually demanding and time-consuming courses you will take. We will spend quite a bit of time investigating the field of statistics. You will be expected to learn and apply many mathematical formulas. You will be performing lots of computations by hand and on the computer. The course moves at a fast pace. If you are not "up" for the challenge this semester, you are strongly urged to (a) take the course at a later date, or (b) adjust your schedule and thinking to accommodate the demands of the course. Waiting until the last minute, and "cramming" for the exams or writing your research reports the night before they are due is a sure recipe for disaster. If you keep up with the material and ask questions when you are unclear about something you will find this to be a very rewarding course. The skills you learn will allow you to test rigorously interesting hypotheses about human (and animal) behavior, and will allow you to critically evaluate the plethora of so called "facts" and "proof" you are bombarded with everyday.

PSY 394U • Current Topics In Learning

43503 • Spring 2012
Meets M 1100am-200pm SEA 3.250
show description

Seminars in Cognitive or Perceptual Systems. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

PSY 418 • Statistics And Research Design

43640-43645 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 800am-930am NOA 1.116
show description

Course Description: Psychology 418 offers an introduction and broad survey of statistics and experimental methods in

psychology. The overall goal is to teach you the skills needed to design, conduct, analyze, and present quality scientific

research. This course examines the philosophy behind the scientific method, the basics of experimental design, the

logic of hypothesis testing, the techniques necessary for data analyses and interpretation, and the framework for

presentation of research results. Psychology 418 is composed of a lecture and a laboratory. The lecture and lab

complement each other. There will be some overlap between the lecture and lab material, but attendance in both is

essential for success.

Psychology 418 is a probably the most important course you will take as a psychology undergraduate, and it is

certainly one of the most intellectually demanding and time-consuming courses you will take. We will spend quite a

bit of time investigating the field of statistics. You will be expected to learn and apply many mathematical formulas.

You will be performing lots of computations by hand and on the computer. The course moves at a fast pace. If you are

not "up" for the challenge this semester, you are strongly urged to (a) take the course at a later date, or (b) adjust your

schedule and thinking to accommodate the demands of the course. Waiting until the last minute, and "cramming" for

the exams or writing your research reports the night before they are due is a sure recipe for disaster. If you keep up with

the material and ask questions when you are unclear about something you will find this to be a very rewarding course.

The skills you learn will allow you to test rigorously interesting hypotheses about human (and animal) behavior, and

will allow you to critically evaluate the plethora of so called "facts" and "proof" you are bombarded with everyday.

PSY 418 • Statistics And Research Design

43650-43655 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 930am-1100am NOA 1.116
show description

Course Description: Psychology 418 offers an introduction and broad survey of statistics and experimental methods in

psychology. The overall goal is to teach you the skills needed to design, conduct, analyze, and present quality scientific

research. This course examines the philosophy behind the scientific method, the basics of experimental design, the

logic of hypothesis testing, the techniques necessary for data analyses and interpretation, and the framework for

presentation of research results. Psychology 418 is composed of a lecture and a laboratory. The lecture and lab

complement each other. There will be some overlap between the lecture and lab material, but attendance in both is

essential for success.

Psychology 418 is a probably the most important course you will take as a psychology undergraduate, and it is

certainly one of the most intellectually demanding and time-consuming courses you will take. We will spend quite a

bit of time investigating the field of statistics. You will be expected to learn and apply many mathematical formulas.

You will be performing lots of computations by hand and on the computer. The course moves at a fast pace. If you are

not "up" for the challenge this semester, you are strongly urged to (a) take the course at a later date, or (b) adjust your

schedule and thinking to accommodate the demands of the course. Waiting until the last minute, and "cramming" for

the exams or writing your research reports the night before they are due is a sure recipe for disaster. If you keep up with

the material and ask questions when you are unclear about something you will find this to be a very rewarding course.

The skills you learn will allow you to test rigorously interesting hypotheses about human (and animal) behavior, and

will allow you to critically evaluate the plethora of so called "facts" and "proof" you are bombarded with everyday.

PSY 394U • Curr Tpcs In Cognitv Systems

43395 • Fall 2010
Meets F 200pm-500pm SEA 3.250
show description

Seminars in Cognitive and Perceptual Systems. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

PSY 418 • Statistics & Research Design-W

43795-43800 • Spring 2010
Meets TTH 800-930 NOA 1.116
show description

    Psychology 418 – Statistics and Research Design – Spring 2010
Instructor: Dr. Maddox (maddox@psy.utexas.edu)    Office: Seay 5.226    Office Hours: T/Th 9:15-10:15

Required Materials: Cozby, P.C. Methods in Behavioral Research (tenth edition); Statistics Handouts (available at Paradigm; Calculator)
Course Prerequisites: (a) Psy 301 with C or better, (b) credit for Math 302 or higher-level math, and (c) major in Psych.  Computer will drop any students who do not meet these requirements.
Students with Disabilities: The University of Texas at Austin provides upon request appropriate academic accommodations for qualified students with disabilities.  For more information, contact the Office of the Dean of Students at 471-6259, 471-4641 TTY.
     
Course Description: Psychology 418 offers an introduction and broad survey of statistics and experimental methods in psychology.  The overall goal is to teach you the skills needed to design, conduct, analyze, and present quality scientific research.  This course examines the philosophy behind the scientific method, the basics of experimental design, the logic of hypothesis testing, the techniques necessary for data analyses and interpretation, and the framework for presentation of research results.  Psychology 418 is composed of a lecture and a laboratory.  The lecture and lab complement each other.  There will be some overlap between the lecture and lab material, but attendance in both is essential for success. 
Psychology 418 is a probably the most important course you will take as a psychology undergraduate, and it is certainly one of the most intellectually demanding and time-consuming courses you will take.  We will spend quite a bit of time investigating the field of statistics.  You will be expected to learn and apply many mathematical formulas.  You will be performing lots of computations by hand and on the computer.   The course moves at a fast pace.  If you are not "up" for the challenge this semester, you are strongly urged to (a) take the course at a later date, or (b) adjust your schedule and thinking to accommodate the demands of the course.  Waiting until the last minute, and "cramming" for the exams or writing your research reports the night before they are due is a sure recipe for disaster.  If you keep up with the material and ask questions when you are unclear about something you will find this to be a very rewarding course.  The skills you learn will allow you to test rigorously interesting hypotheses about human (and animal) behavior, and will allow you to critically evaluate the plethora of so called "facts" and "proof" you are bombarded with everyday.

Exams: There will be four exams. Each exam is worth 100 points.  Your lowest exam score will count less (see Grading Policy outlined below).  Thus, no make-up exams will be given.  The exams will cover both the lecture and textbook material.  The exams will consist of multiple choice and matching type questions. Calculators will be provided.
Papers: There will be two papers.  Each paper is worth 75 points.  The papers will be reports of research studies conducted by you and your fellow students.  You will be graded on content, writing style, and APA style.  The due dates for the two papers are provided below.  The papers are due to your lab instructor by 5:00 pm on that date.  Each day that a paper is late will result in a 10-point deduction. You are strongly urged to hand you paper to your TA. “I put my paper in the TA’s mailbox and then it must have gotten lost”, is not acceptable.
Laboratory Assignments: In the laboratory sections you will be using computers for word processing, data collection, and data analysis.  You will learn to use Microsoft Word, Excel and some additional statistical package(s).  There will be 11 laboratory assignments.  You can drop one, so no make ups will be given.  These will be due generally at the beginning of lab, but some are due on “off” days.  Each is worth 10 points. Each day that an assignment is late will result in a 2-point deduction. Again, you are strongly urged to hand you paper to your TA. The laboratory sections are an integral part of the course and you are expected to attend. Attendance in labs will be taken.
Grading Policy: You will receive points for the exams, papers, lab assignments, and lab attendance and participation.  Final grades will be determined using the following scale A =  92-100; A- = 90-91.9; B+ = 88-89.9; B   = 82-87.9; B- = 80-81.9; C+ = 78-79.9; C = 72-77.9; C- = 70-71.9; D+ = 68-69.9; D = 62- 67.9; D- = 60-61.9; F = 0 -59.9. You must pass both the lecture and the lab to pass the course.  The points are as follows:

Exams                best 3 of 4 (3@100)*.90 plus worst 1 of 4   (100)*.30      = 300
Papers                2 @ 75                                       = 150
Lab assignments                    best 10 of 11 (10 @ 10)                   = 100
Lab attendance and participation                                =   50
Total                                                        600



A Few Extremely Important Points:

1) My Basic Philosophy: In short, my philosophy is to treat every student in the class equally, fairly, and as a responsible, mature adult whose goal is to learn the material presented in the course.  I realize people have bad testing days occasionally, or an emergency occurs that results in poor exam performance.  To accommodate this possibility I have devised a grading scheme that gives less weight to your lowest test score, and allows you to drop one lab assignment.  Even so, when you register for this course, you are making a commitment to the course.  In light of this commitment, I expect you to attend class, arrive on time, be attentive, and behave in an honest, responsible, and mature manner.

2) No Makeup Exams: Set two alarms if you need to in order to make sure that you attend each exam. Late arrivals will be noted and points deducted.

3) Arrive On Time: If you plan to attend class, it is your responsibility to arrive early and to be prepared to start sharply at the start of class.  If you are unable to fulfill this responsibility, then withdraw from the course now.  Arriving late disrupt the class, and the instructor.  Too many late arrivals will be dealt with accordingly.  I have been known to reduce a student’s grade who consistently arrives late.  If you can not arrive on time, then do not attend class.

4) Read the assigned material prior to class: You must read the assigned material prior to the class period in which that material will be presented.  A frequent comment I receive from students is that the material was covered too quickly for them to understand.  Ironically, when asked whether they read and studied the material prior to class, the answer is generally "no".  Students who study the material prior to class find the lectures interesting and informative, and comment that the lecture "filled in the gaps" in their knowledge.  The lectures supplement the knowledge gained from reading and introduce new material not covered in the text.  A student who does not read and study the material prior to class will find the lectures difficult.

5) Cheating on Exams and Plagiarism: Talking or other forms of communication or viewing another’s exam will be construed as evidence of cheating.  A student found cheating will receive a zero, and will not be allowed to use that as their low exam score.  There have been problems in the recent past with students plagiarizing published research articles.  Any student found plagiarizing a paper will receive an "F" in the course, and will be reported to the appropriate University authorities.  Plagiarism is a very serious offense that can result in expulsion from UT.

6) Cell phones, etc are to be OFF and left to themselves during class. If you interact with your phone, you will be asked to leave. In short, don’t come to class unless you plan to focus 100% on the lectures.

7) Policy on Withdrawals and Incompletes: I will be glad to sign a withdrawal form for any student interested in withdrawal.   However, it is the student's responsibility to be familiar with withdrawal deadlines, etc.  It is University policy that an Incomplete be given only if a student has completed at least 90% of the course work.  Incompletes cannot be given to a student who fails (or is failing) the course and wishes to retake the course.

    Tentative Schedule for Psychology 418

Tues, Jan 19 – Thurs, Feb 4    Intro to Research and Basic Statistics
Tues, Feb 9            Exam #1 (Chapters 1 - 7, Chapters. 12: 226-235)

Thurs, Feb 11 – Tues, March 2    Experimental Design and Hypothesis Testing
Thurs, Mar 4            Exam #2 (Chapters 8-9, Chapter 11: 210-216; Ch. 13: except F test, Effect Size)

Tues, Mar 9 – Tues, Apr 6    More Design, Measurement/Statistics
Thurs, Apr 8            Exam #3 (Chapters 10 – 14 (expect pgs. 235-241: Appendix B to pg. 343)

Tues, Apr 13 – Tues, May 4    More Design/ANOVA
Thurs, May 6            Exam #4 (ANOVA Handout; Appendix B: 343-358)

Weds Mar 24            Paper 1 Due by 5:00pm to Lab instructor
Weds, May 12            Paper 2 Due by 5:00pm to Lab instructor

PSY 394U • Smnr In Cognition And Perceptn

43450 • Spring 2009
Meets F 200pm-500pm SEA 3.250
show description

Seminars in Cognition and Perception. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

Courses

Semester         Course       Unique No.       Title

2014 Fall        PSY 394U        43973           Topics in Learnkng II

Publications

Maddox, W.T. & Zeithamova, D. (2006) Dual task interference in perceptual category learning. Memory & Cognition, 34(2), 387-398.

Markman, A., Maddox, W.T. & Worthy, D. (2006) Choking and excelling under pressure. Psychological Science, 17(11), 944-948. 

Maddox, W.T. & Ashby, F. (2005) Human category learning. Annual Review of Psychology, 56:149-78.

Filoteo, J., Maddox, W.T.,  Salmon, D. & Song, D. (2005) Information-integration Category Learning in Patients with Striatal Dysfunction. Neuropsychology. 19(2), 212-222.

Maddox, W.T. & Ing, A. (2005) Delayed feedback disrupts information-integration but not rule-based category learning. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory & Cognition. 31(1), 100-107.

Maddox, W.T., Aparicio, P., Marchant, N. & Ivry, R. (2005) Rule-based category learning is impaired in patients with Parkinson's disease but not patients with cerebellar disorders. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience. 17(5), 707-723.

Filoteo, J., Maddox, W.T., Simmons, A., Ing, A., Cagigas, X., Matthews, S. & Paulus, M.P. (2005) Cortical and subcortical brain regions involved in rule-based category learning. Neuroreport. 16(2), 111-115.

Filoteo, J., Maddox, W.T., Ing, A., Zizak, V. & Song, D. (2005) The Impact of Irrelevant Dimensional Variation on Rule-Based Category Learning in Patients with Parkinson's Disease. Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society. 11, 503-513.

Filoteo, J. & Maddox, W.T.  (2004) A quantitative model-based approach to examining aging effects on information-integration category learning. Psychology and Aging. 19(1), 171-182.

Maddox, W.T. & Ashby, F. (2004) Dissociating explicit and procedural-learning based systems of perceptual category learning. Behavioral Processes. 66, 309-332.

Maddox, W.T., Ashby, F., Ing, A. & Pickering, A. (2004) Disrupting feedback processing interferes with rule-based but not information-integration category learning. Memory & Cognition. 32(4), 582-591.

Maddox, W.T. & Bohil, C. (2004) Probability matching, accuracy maximizing and a test of the optimal classifier's independence asumption in perceptual categorization. Perception & Psychophysics . 66(1), 104-118.

Maddox, W.T., Filoteo, J., Hejl, K. & Ing, A. (2004) Category Number Impacts Rule-Based but not Information-Integration Category Learning: Further Evidence for Dissociable Category Learning Systems. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory & Cognition. 30, 227-235.

Bohil, C. & Maddox, W.T.  (2003) A test of the optimal classifier's independence assumption in perceptual categorization. Perception & Psychophysics, 65, 478-493.

Maddox, W.T. & Bohil, C. (2003) A theoretical framework for understanding the effects of simultaneous base-rate and payoff manipulations on decision criterion learning in perceptual categorization. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory & Cognition, 29, 307-320.

Maddox, W.T., Bohil, C. & Dodd, J. (2003) Linear transformations of the payoff matrix and decision criterion learning in perceptual categorization. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory & Cognition. 29, 1174-1193.

Maddox, W.T. & Dodd, J. (2003) Separating perceptual and decisional attention processes in the identification and categorization of integral-dimension stimuli. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory & Cognition, 29(3), 467-480.

Ashby, F., Maddox, W.T. & Bohil, C. (2002) Observational versus feedback training in rule-based and information-integration category learning. Memory & Cognition, 30, 666-677.

Estes, W. & Maddox, W.T. (2002) On the processes underlying stimulus-familiarity effects on recognition of words and nonwords. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory & Cognition, 28, 1003-1018.

Maddox, W.T. (2002) Learning and attention in multidimensional identification, and categorization: Separating low-level perceptual processes and high-level decisional processesJournal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory & Cognition, 28, 99-115.

Maddox, W.T., Ashby, F. & Waldron, E. (2002) Multiple attention systems in perceptual categorization. Memory & Cognition, 30, 325-339.

Markman, A. & Maddox, W.T. (2002) Classification of exemplars with single and multiple feature manifestations: The case of relevant dimension variation. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory & Cognition, 29, 107-117.

Bohil, C. & Maddox, W.T. (2001) Category discriminability, base-rate, and payoff effects in perceptual categorization. Perception & Psychophysics, 63, 361-376.

Filoteo, J, Maddox, W.T. & Davis, J. (2001) A possible role of the striatum in linear and nonlinear categorization rule learning: Evidence from patients with Huntington's disease. Behavioral Neuroscience, 115, 786-798.

Filoteo, J., Maddox, W.T. & Davis, J. (2001) Quantitative modeling of category learning in amnesiac patients. Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society, 7, 1-19.

Maddox, W.T. (2001) Separating perceptual processes from decisional processes in identification and categorization. Perception & Psychophysics, 63, 1183-1200.

Maddox, W.T. & Bohil, C. (2001) Feedback effects on cost-benefit learning in perceptual categorization. Memory & Cognition, 29, 598-615.

Maddox, W.T. & Dodd, J. (2001) On the relation between base-rate and cost-benefit learning in simulated medical diagnosis. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory & Cognition, 27, 1367-1384.

Maddox, W.T. & Filoteo, J. (2001) Striatal contribution to category learning: Quantitative modeling of simple linear and complex non-linear rule learning in patients with Parkinson's disease. Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society, 7, 710-727.

Maddox, W.T., Molis, M. & Diehl, R. (2001) Generalizing a neuropsychological model of visual categorization to auditory categorization of vowels. Perception & Psychophysics, 64, 584-597.

Maddox, W.T. & Bogdanov, S. (2000) On the relation between decision rules and perceptual representation in multidimensional perceptual categorization. Perception & Psychophysics, 62, 984-997.

Maddox, W.T. & Bohil, C. (2000) Costs and benefits in perceptual categorization. Memory & Cognition, 28, 597-615.

Filoteo, J. & Maddox, W.T. (1999) Quantitative modeling of visual attention processes in patients with Parkinson's Disease: Effects of stimulus integrality on selective attention and dimensional integration. Neuropsychology, 13, 206-222.

Maddox, W.T. (1999) On the dangers of averaging across observers when comparing decision-bound models and generalized context models of categorization. Perception & Psychophysics, 61, 354-374.

Maddox, W.T. & Ashby, F. (1998) Selective attention and the formation of linear decision bounds: Commentary on McKinley and Nosofsky. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 24, 301-321.

Maddox, W.T., Ashby, F. & Gottlob, L.R. (1998) Response time distributions in multidimensional perceptual categorization. Perception & Psychophysics, 60, 620-637.

Maddox, W.T. & Bohil, C. (1998) Base-rate and payoff effects in multidimensional perceptual categorization. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 24, 1459-1482.

Maddox, W.T. & Bohil, C. (1998) Overestimation of base-rate differences in complex perceptual categories. Perception & Psychophysics, 60, 575-592.

Maddox, W.T. & Filoteo, J. (1998) Effects of stimulus integrality on visual attention in older and younger adults: A quantitative model-based analysis. Psychology and Aging, 13, 472-485.

Maddox, W.T. & Ashby, F. (1998) Stimulus categorization. Academic Press (pgs. 251-301).

Maddox, W.T. & Estes, W. (1997) Direct and indirect stimulus-frequency effects in recognition. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 23, 539-559.

Ashby, F., Prinzmetal, W. & Ivry, R. & Maddox, W.T, (1996) A formal theory of feature binding in object perception. Psychological Review, 103, 165-192.

Maddox, W.T. & Ashby, F. (1996) Perceptual separability, decisional separability, and the identification-speeded classification relationship. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 22, 795-817.

Maddox, W.T., Filoteo, J., Delis, D. & Salmon, D. (1996) Visual selective attention deficits in patients with Parkinson's disease: A quantitative model-based approach. Neuropsychology, 10, 197-218.

Estes, W & Maddox, W.T. (1995) Interactions of stimulus attributes, base rate, and feedback in recognition. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 21, 1075-1095.

Maddox, W.T. (1995) Base-rate effects in multidimensional perceptual categorization. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 21, 288-301.

Ashby, F. & Maddox, W.T. (1994) A response time theory of separability and integrality in speeded classification. Journal of Mathematical Psychology, 38, 423-466.

Ashby, F., Maddox, W.T. & Lee, W. (1994) On the dangers of averaging across subjects when using multidimensional scaling or the similarity-choice model. Psychological Science, 5, 144-151.

Maddox, W.T., Prinzmetal, W., Ivry, R. & Ashby, F. (1994) A probabilistic multidimensional model of location information. Psychological Research, 56, 66-77.

Ashby, F. & Maddox, W.T. (1993) Relations between prototype, exemplar, and decision bound models of categorization. Journal of Mathematical Psychology, 37, 372-400.

Maddox, W.T. & Ashby, F. (1993) Comparing decision bound and exemplar models of categorization. Perception & Psychophysics, 53, 49-70.

Ashby, F. & Maddox, W.T. (1992) Complex decision rules in categorization: Contrasting novice and experienced performance. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 18, 50-71.

Maddox, W.T. (1992) Perceptual and decisional separability.  In F.G. Ashby (Ed.), Multidimensional Models of Perception and Cognition. (pgs. 147-180). Erlbaum: Hillsdale, NJ.

Ashby, F. & Maddox, W.T. (1991) A response time theory of perceptual independence. In J.P. Doignon and J.C. Falmagne (Eds.) Mathematical psychology: Current developments. (pgs. 389-413). Springer-Verlag.

Ashby, F. & Maddox, W.T. (1990) Integrating information from separable psychological dimensions. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 16, 598-612.

Publications

Selected Publications

Go to this link for a complete list of publications with links to downloadble PDF files:

http://homepage.psy.utexas.edu/homepage/Group/MaddoxLAB/2010-2014.htm

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