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James W. Pennebaker, Chair The University of Texas at Austin, SEA 4.212, Austin, TX 78712 • (512) 475-7596

Marlone D Henderson

Associate Professor Ph.D., New York University

Marlone D Henderson

Contact

Biography

Education and Positions

I received my B.S. from Michigan State University in 1999, Ph.D. from New York University in 2006, and joined the faculty at University of Chicago in 2006 before arriving at UT in 2008.

Program of Research

Broadly speaking, my program of research has one major objective: to understand the role that basic cognitive processes play in promoting social harmony. Specifically, most of my research explores how situational factors that shift individuals’ thinking to a lower (more concrete) or higher (more abstract) level can have important consequences in the domains of 1) social conflict, 2) social judgments, and 3) prosocial behavior. My work employs a combination of laboratory and field designs, both of which emphasize experimental procedures that allow for causal interpretation of data. A second, defining feature of my research is that most of it seeks to have an immediate, practical impact on society, while staying grounded in a strong theoretical foundation. Indeed, I subscribe wholeheartedly to Kurt Lewin’s suggestion that “There is nothing so practical as a good theory”. Much of my research draws on social-cognitive theory, which posits that individuals can think about or construe objects and events at different levels of abstraction. Throughout my career, my research has explored how individuals’ construal level can change when they mentally go beyond the “here and now” to form judgments and regulate their behaviors. Below I offer three representative publications from my three main lines of research.

Social Conflict

Henderson, M.D. (2011). Mere physical distance and integrative agreements: When more space improves negotiation outcomes. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 47, 7-15.PDF

Henderson, M.D., & Trope, Y. (2009). The effects of abstraction on integrative agreements: When seeing the forest helps avoid getting tangled in the trees. Social Cognition, 27, 402-417. PDF

Henderson, M.D., Trope, Y., & Carnevale, P.J. (2006). Negotiation from a near and distant time perspective. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 91, 712-729. PDF

Social Judgments:

Burgoon, E.M., Henderson, M.D., & Wakslak, C.J. (2013). How do we want others to decide? Geographical distance influences evaluations of decision-makers. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 6, 826-838. PDF

Henderson, M.D., & Wakslak, C.J. (2010). Over the hills and faraway: The link between physical distance and abstraction. Current Directions in Psychological Science, 19(6), 390-394. PDF

Henderson, M.D., Fujita, K., Trope, Y., & Liberman, N. (2006). Transcending the “here”: The effect of spatial distance on social judgment. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 91, 845-856. PDF

Prosocial Behavior:

Fishbach, A, Henderson, M.D., &. Koo, M. (2011). Pursuing goals with others: Group identification and motivation resulting from things done versus things left undone. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, 140-520-534. PDF

Henderson, M.D. (2013). When seeing the forest reduces the need for trees:  The role of construal level in attraction to choice. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 49, 676-683.  PDF

Henderson, M. D., Huang, S., & Chang, C. (2012). When others cross psychological distance to help: Highlighting prosocial actions toward outgroups encourages philanthropy. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 48, 220-225.PDF


I am currently exploring exciting new directions in each of the topic areas mentioned above, and if you are interested in learning more, receiving a copy of one my papers, collaborating, or working in my lab, feel free to contact me.

PSY 319K • Social Psychology

43655 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 500pm-630pm NOA 1.126
show description

Theory and research on the analysis of human conduct in social settings. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C.

PSY 301 • Introduction To Psychology

43885-43887 • Spring 2014
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm BUR 106
show description

Basic problems and principles of human experience and behavior. Three lecture hours a week for one semester, or the equivalent in independent study.

 

FOR PENNEBAKER/GOSLING'S ONLINE COURSE SEE http://www.laits.utexas.edu/tower/psy301 FOR MORE INFORMATON!!

PSY 319K • Social Psychology

43705 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 500pm-630pm NOA 1.126
show description

Theory and research on the analysis of human conduct in social settings. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C.

PSY 319K • Social Psychology

43330 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm NOA 1.126
show description

Theory and research on the analysis of human conduct in social settings. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C.

PSY 319K • Social Psychology

43250 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm NOA 1.124
show description

The purpose of this course is to introduce you to research within the field of social psychology. Topics include: prejudice, stereotyping, attraction, attitudes, the self, self-esteem, prosocial behavior, persuasion, and others. The textbook is broad and general, while the lectures will tend to cover more specific issues, especially recent experimental and theoretical approaches.

PSY 394V • Curr Tpcs In Social-Pers Psy

43560 • Fall 2012
Meets W 400pm-700pm SEA 1.332
show description

Seminars in Social and Personality Psychology. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

PSY 319K • Social Psychology

43190 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm NOA 1.126
show description

The purpose of this course is to introduce you to research within the field of social psychology. Topics include: prejudice, stereotyping, attraction, attitudes, the self, self-esteem, prosocial behavior, persuasion, and others. The textbook is broad and general, while the lectures will tend to cover more specific issues, especially recent experimental and theoretical approaches.

PSY 319K • Social Psychology

43140 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm NOA 1.124
show description

The purpose of this course is to introduce you to research within the field of social psychology. Topics include: prejudice, stereotyping, attraction, attitudes, the self, self-esteem, prosocial behavior, persuasion, and others. The textbook is broad and general, while the lectures will tend to cover more specific issues, especially recent experimental and theoretical approaches.

PSY 394V • Smnr In Socl & Personality Psy

43455 • Fall 2011
Meets W 400pm-700pm SEA 1.332
show description

Seminars in Social and Personality Psychology. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

PSY S319K • Social Psychology

87760 • Summer 2011
Meets MTWTHF 1130am-100pm NOA 1.102
show description

Course Overview: The purpose of this course is to introduce you to research within the field of

social psychology. Topics include: prejudice, stereotyping, attraction, attitudes, the self, self-esteem,

prosocial behavior, persuasion, and others. The textbook is broad and general, while the lectures

will tend to cover more specific issues, especially recent experimental and theoretical approaches.

Exams & Grading: Your grade will be based on three or four exams. These exams will cover

material (slides, videos) that was reviewed in class and chapter readings. The exams are cumulative

and will include 30 to 50 questions. Exams will include a combination of multiple-choice, truefalse,

and open-ended questions. Extra credit opportunities may become available throughout the

semester. Once assigned, all end of the semester grades are final.

PSY 319K • Social Psychology

43698 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm NOA 1.126
show description

 

 Course Overview: The purpose of this course is to introduce you to research within the field of social psychology. Topics include: prejudice, stereotyping, attraction, attitudes, the self, self-esteem, prosocial behavior, persuasion, and others. The textbook is broad and general, while the lectures will tend to cover more specific issues, especially recent experimental and theoretical approaches. 

Exams & Grading: Your grade will be based on three exams. These exams will cover material (slides, videos) that was reviewed in class and chapter readings. The exams are cumulative and will include 30 to 50 questions. Exams will include a combination of multiple-choice, true-false, and open-ended questions. Extra credit opportunities may become available throughout the semester. Once assigned, all end of the semester grades are final. 

PSY 319K • Social Psychology

43095 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm NOA 1.124
show description

Prerequisites

PSY 301 with a grade of at least C.

Course Description

Social psychology deals with the psychology of "normal," everyday social situations. In this class, students will learn to think more objectively about why people behave, think, and feel the way they do.

Grading Policy

Three cumulative exams that will be based on lecture material and chapter readings. Exams will include a combination of multiple-choice, true-false, and short-answer. End of the semester grades may be curved, depending on the distribution of the grades.

Texts

Social Psychology (ISBN#  0073370592)

PSY 319k • Social Psychology

87105 • Summer 2010
Meets MTWTHF 1130am-100pm NOA 1.102
show description

Course Description

Social psychology deals with the psychology of "normal," everyday social situations. In this class, students will learn to think more objectively about why people behave, think, and feel the way they do.

Grading Policy

Daily short quizzes and 3 brief exams. Short quizzes given at the start of each class, will cover lecture material and chapter reading that was relevant to the previous class.

Three cumulative exams of 10 questions each will be given throughout the semester. Quizzes and exams will include a combination of multiple-choice and true-false. End of the semester grades may be curved, depending on the distribution of the grades.

Texts

Social Psychology, 5th edition, by Stephen Franzoi (ISBN-978-0-07-337059-0)

PSY 319K • Social Psychology

87105 • Summer 2010
Meets MTWTHF 1130am-100pm NOA 1.102
show description

Prerequisites

PSY 301 with a grade of at least C.

Course Description

Social psychology deals with the psychology of "normal," everyday social situations. In this class, students will learn to think more objectively about why people behave, think, and feel the way they do.

Grading Policy

Three cumulative exams that will be based on lecture material and chapter readings. Exams will include a combination of multiple-choice, true-false, and short-answer. End of the semester grades may be curved, depending on the distribution of the grades.

Texts

Social Psychology (ISBN#  0073370592)

PSY 394V • Socl Psy Time/Space/Similarity

44215 • Spring 2010
Meets W 900-1200 SEA 2.224
show description

Seminars in Social and Personality Psychology. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

PSY 319K • Social Psychology

44060 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm BUR 130
show description

Social Psychology

Psychology 319K, Fall 2009

Tuesdays & Thursdays 3:30 – 5:00pm (dismissal at 4:45pm)

CPE 2.214

Professor: Professor Marlone Henderson

Office: Seay 4.224

Office Hours: Tuesdays & Thursdays 2:30 - 3:30pm and by appointment

 

Teaching Assistant: Meg Cason, mjcason@mail.utexas.edu,

Office: 3.414 Seay and Office Hours: Wednesday 10am-1pm.

 

Prerequisite: For lower division courses (except Intro) the Psychology Department will drop all students who do not meet the prerequisite PSY 301 with a C or better. 

 

Text: Social Psychology ISBN#  0073370592

 

Course Overview: The purpose of this course is to introduce you to research within the field of social psychology. Topics include: prejudice, stereotyping, attraction, attitudes, the self, self-esteem, prosocial behavior, persuasion, and others. The textbook is broad and general, while the lectures will tend to cover more specific issues, especially recent experimental and theoretical approaches.

 

Exams & Grading: Your grade will be based on three exams and occasional (extra credit) pop quizzes. These exams and pop quizzes will cover material (slides, videos) that was reviewed in class and chapter readings. The exams are cumulative and will include 30 to 50 questions. Exams will include a combination of multiple-choice, true-false, and open-ended questions. Once assigned, all end of the semester grades are final.  See missing exam policy below.

 

Grading scale:

 

A  = 93-100
A-  = 90-92
B+ = 87-89
B  = 83 - 86
B-  = 80-82                       

C+ = 77-79

C = 73-76

C- = 70-72

D+ = 67-69

D = 63-67

D- = 60-62

F < 60

 

Notices/Policies:

1) Class Website: Please check blackboard regularly. I will post announcements, grades, lecture notes etc.

2) Attendance: I believe for students to succeed, they must attend all lectures. I will present a great deal of material not covered in your textbook and expand on important points in the text. It is in your best interests to attend class regularly.

3) Missing exams: If you miss an exam, it will be scored as a zero. Students may take make-up exams at a later date if they have verifiable evidence of a death in the family (copy of death certificate). Without copy of death certificate, a missed exam will be scored as a zero (no exceptions!).

4) Note on avoidance of academic offences:  All students registered in this course are expected to know what constitutes academic integrity, to avoid committing scholastic dishonesty, and to take responsibility for their actions. Scholastic dishonesty includes, but is not limited to, cheating, plagiarism, collusion, using, buying, stealing, and/or divulging the contents of an examination, removing a test from the examination room, substituting for another person, having someone take a test for you, misplacing or damaging property of the University or destroying information so another student may not have materials, falsifying research data, misrepresenting facts including providing false grades or resumes, presenting someone else’s work as one’s own academic work and falsifying academic records. The Student Judicial Services office in the Office of the Dean of Students has the responsibility for following up and making the final determination. If you need further help in learning what constitutes an academic offence, ask your TA and/or your course instructor for guidance.  

5) University of Texas Honor Code:  The core values of The University of Texas at Austin are learning, discovery, freedom, leadership, individual opportunity, and responsibility. Each member of the university is expected to uphold these values through integrity, honesty, trust, fairness, and respect toward peers and community.

6)  Use of E-Mail for Official Correspondence:  Email is recognized as an official mode of university correspondence; therefore, you are responsible for reading your email for university and course-related information and announcements. You are responsible to keep the university (including me) informed about changes to your e-mail address. You should check your e-mail regularly and frequently—I recommend daily, but at minimum twice a week—to stay current with university-related communications, some of which may be time-critical. You can find UT Austin’s policies and instructions for updating your e-mail address at http://www.utexas.edu/its/policies/emailnotify.php.

7)  Documented Disability Statement: If you require special accommodations, you must obtain a letter that documents your disability from the Services for Students with Disabilities area of the Division of Diversity and Community Engagement (471-6259 voice or 471-4641 TTY for users who are deaf or hard of hearing). Present the letter to me at the beginning of the semester so we can discuss the accommodations you need. No later than five business days before an exam, you should remind me of any testing accommodations you will need. For more information, visit http://www.utexas.edu/diversity/ddce/ssd/.

8) Religious Holidays:  By UT Austin policy, you must notify me of your pending absence at least fourteen days prior to the date of observance of a religious holy day. If you must miss a class, quiz, or examination, to observe a religious holy day, I will give you an opportunity to complete the missed work within a reasonable time after the absence.

9)  Behavior Concerns Advice Line (BCAL): If you are worried about someone who is acting differently, you may use the Behavior Concerns Advice Line to discuss by phone your concerns about another individual’s behavior. This service is provided through a partnership among the Office of the Dean of Students, the Counseling and Mental Health Center (CMHC), the Employee Assistance Program (EAP), and The University of Texas Police Department (UTPD). Call 512-232-5050 or visit http://www.utexas.edu/safety/bcal.

10)  Emergency Evacuation Policy:  Occupants of buildings on the UT Austin campus are required to evacuate and assemble outside when a fire alarm is activated or an announcement is made.  Please familiarize yourself with all exit doors of the classroom and the building. Remember that the nearest exit door may not be the one you used when you entered the building. If you require assistance to evacuate, inform me in writing during the first week of class. In the event of an evacuation, follow my instructions or those of class instructors. Do not re-enter a building unless you’re given instructions by the Austin Fire Department, the UT Austin Police Department, or the Fire Prevention Services office.

11) Dropping Courses, Rules for Undergraduate Students:

Subject to the conditions below, an undergraduate may drop a course through the midsemester deadline in a long-session semester or the last class day in a summer term; these dates and the dates of other deadlines discussed below are given in the academic calendar. The student must remain in conformity with the quantity of work rule and must obtain all required approvals.

International students must obtain written permission from the International Office, in addition to other required approvals, to drop a course.

On the recommendation of the instructor, and with the approval of the student's academic dean, a student may be required to drop a course at any time because of neglect or for lack of preparation.

Dropping a course through the twelfth class day. The following rules apply from the first class day through the twelfth class day of a long-session semester and from the first class day through the fourth class day of a summer term: To drop a course during this period, the student must have the approval of the chair of the department offering the course. In some colleges and schools, the student must also have the approval of his or her adviser and dean; each student must consult the regulations of his or her college or school. If the student is allowed to drop the course, the course is deleted from his or her academic record. Normally, the approval of the chair of the department during this period is routine, and the student may initiate the drop through the registration system. However, in some circumstances, a department may disapprove requests to drop certain courses. If a drop request is not accepted by the registration system, the student should consult the department that offers the course for more information.

Dropping a course through the fourth week of classes. The following rules apply from the thirteenth class day through the twentieth class day of a long-session semester and from the fifth class day through the tenth class day of a summer term: To drop a course during this period, the student must have the approval of his or her dean. In some colleges and schools, the approval of the student's adviser is also required; each student must consult the regulations of his or her college or school. If the student is allowed to drop the course, the symbol Q appears on his or her academic record to indicate a drop without academic penalty.

Dropping a course after the fourth week of classes. The following rules apply from the twenty-first class day through the midsemester deadline in a long-session semester and from the eleventh class day through the last class day of a summer term: To drop a course during this period, the student must have the approval of the instructor, the student's adviser, and the student's dean. If the instructor approves the drop, he or she will assign the symbol Q or a grade of F. The symbol Q indicates that the student has a grade of at least C in the course, that no final grade has yet been assigned, or that no academic penalty is in order because of the student's performance and the nature of the course. In compelling circumstances, the student's dean may assign the symbol Q for nonacademic reasons.

Dropping a course after midsemester. After the midsemester deadline for dropping courses in a long-session semester, an undergraduate may not drop a course except with the approval of his or her dean, and then only for urgent and substantiated, nonacademic reasons.

 

 

Proposed Schedule of Classes*   

 

Date

Topic

Textbook

Aug. 27

L1: Course Overview

Ch 1

Sep. 1

L2: Introduction & Research Methods

Ch 2

Sep. 3

L3: Social Perception 1

Ch 4 (pgs. 116-143)

Sep. 8

L4: Social Perception 2

Ch 4 (pgs. 116-143)

Sep. 15

L5: Self 1

Ch 3; Ch. 8 (pgs. 304-312)

Sep. 17

L6: Self 2

Ch 3

Sep. 22

L7: Social Cognition and the Unconscious

Ch 4 (pgs. 99-115)

Sep. 24

Review Session

 

Sep. 29

Test 1

---

Oct. 1

L8: Dissonance & Self-Justification 1

 

Ch 5, 162-169

Oct. 6

L9: Dissonance & Self-Justification 2

 

Ch 5, 162-169

Oct. 8

L10: Self-perception

Ch 5, 170-171

Oct. 13

L1 & 12: Attitudes and Attitude Change 2

Remaining parts of Ch. 5

Oct. 15

L13: Conformity, Obedience, & Influence 1

Ch 7; Ch. 8 (pgs. 320-325)

Oct. 20

L14: Conformity, Obedience, & Influence 2

Ch 7; Ch. 8 (pgs. 320-325)

Oct. 22

Review Session

 

Oct. 27

Test 2

 

Oct. 29

L15: Violence & Aggression 1

Ch 11

Nov. 3

L16: Violence & Aggression 2

Ch 11

Nov. 5

L17: Prosocial Behavior and Helping

Ch 12; Ch. 8 (326-330)

Nov. 10

L18: Stereotyping, Prejudice, & Discrimination 1

Ch .6

Nov. 12

L19: Stereotyping, Prejudice, & Discrimination 2

Ch. 6

Nov. 17

L20: Stereotyping, Prejudice, & Discrimination 3

Ch. 6

Nov. 19

L21:  Attraction & Close Relationships 1

Ch. 9

Nov. 24

L22:  Attraction & Close Relationships 2

Ch. 9

Nov. 26

No class (Thanksgiving)

 

Dec. 1

Review Session

 

Dec. 3

Test 3

 

 

*Tentative schedule that may change depending on progression 

PSY 394V • Socl Psy Time/Space/Similarity

44380 • Fall 2009
Meets M 200pm-500pm SEA 2.224
show description

Seminars in Social and Personality Psychology. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

PSY 319K • Social Psychology

86971 • Summer 2009
Meets MTWTHF 1130-100pm NOA 1.126
show description

Theory and research on the analysis of human conduct in social settings. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C.

PSY 319K • Social Psychology

43095 • Spring 2009
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm CPE 2.214
show description

Theory and research on the analysis of human conduct in social settings.  Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Perequiste: Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C.

 

 

Lab

Henderson Lab

Dr. Henderson will be presenting a new lab web page soon. Stay tuned!

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