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James W. Pennebaker, Chair The University of Texas at Austin, SEA 4.212, Austin, TX 78712 • (512) 475-7596

Marie H Monfils

Associate Professor Ph.D., University of Lethbridge

Marie H Monfils

Contact

Biography

Marie Monfils received her Ph.D. in behavioral neuroscience from the Canadian Centre for Behavioural Neuroscience, under the supervision of Bryan Kolb and Jeffrey Kleim, and her Master’s degree from the University of Calgary with Cam Teskey.  She conducted a postdoctoral fellowship at New York University in Joseph LeDoux’s lab.   She is currently pursuing 3 research streams:  (1) examining the role of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in synaptic and structural plasticity associated with fear memory consolidation, (2) investigating different post-consolidation manipulations that can persistently attenuate fear memories, and (3) uncovering the adaptive purpose of fear memory reconsolidation.

Representative Publications

Quirk G, Pare D, Richardson R, Herry C, Monfils MH, Schiller D, & Vicentic A (2010)  Erasing fear memories with extinction training.  Journal of Neuroscience

Bruchey AK, Jones CE, & Monfils MH (2010) Fear conditioning by proxy: social transmission of fear during memory retrieval.Behavioral Brain Research

Johansen JP, Hamanaka H, Monfils MH, Behnia R, & LeDoux JE (2010) Optical activation of lateral amygdala pyramidal cells produces associative fear learning.  The Proceedings of the National Academy of Science

K.K. Cowansage, J.E. LeDoux, Monfils M.H. (2010)  Brain-derived neurotrophic factor:  from learning to memory and synaptic consolidation.  Current molecular pharmacology.

Schiller D, MH Monfils, CM Raio, DC Johnson & EA Phelps (2010) Preventing the return of fear- a non-invasive technique in humans. Nature. 463(7277):49-53

Monfils M.H., K.K. Cowansage, E. Klann & J.E. LeDoux (2009) Extinction-reconsolidation boundaries: key to persistent attenuation of fear memories.  Science, EPUB ahead of print,  PMID: 19342552. 

Monfils MH, I Driscoll, R Vavrek, B Kolb & K Fouad (2008) FGF-2-induced functional improvement from neonatal motor cortex injury via corticospinal projections.  Experimental Brain Research, 185(3):453-60.

Monfils MH, KK Cowansage & JE LeDoux (2007) BDNF: linking fear learning to memory consolidation.  Molecular Pharmacology, 72(2): 235-237. 

 

Doyere V, J Debiec, MH Monfils, GE Schafe & JE LeDoux (2007)  Synapse-specific reconsolidation of distinct fear memories in the lateral amygdala.  Nature Neuroscience, 10(4): 414-416. 

Monfils MH, I Driscoll, NR Melvin & B Kolb (2006).  Developmental expression of FGF-2 in the rat brain. Neuroscience, 141(1): 213-21. 

Monfils MH, E Plautz & JA Kleim  (2005)  In search of the motor engram:  Motor plasticity as a mechanism for encoding motor experience.  (Review) The Neuroscientist, 11(5): 471-483.

 

Interests

Fear conditioning, learning, memory, consolidation, extinction, reconsolidation, synaptic plasticity, and long-term potentiation

PSY 418 • Statistics And Research Design

43575-43580 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm SEA 2.108
show description

Students may not enroll in Psychology 418 more than twice. Survey of statistics, including central tendency, variability and inference, and scientific methodology used in psychological research. Three lecture hours and two discussion hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C and credit for one of the following: Mathematics 302, 303D, 403K, 305G, 408C, 408K, 316; or Statistics and Scientific Computation 302, 303, 304, 305, 306, 318.

PSY 418 • Statistics And Research Design

43960-43965 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm RLM 5.118
show description

Students may not enroll in Psychology 418 more than twice. Survey of statistics, including central tendency, variability and inference, and scientific methodology used in psychological research. Three lecture hours and two discussion hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C and credit for one of the following: Mathematics 302, 303D, 403K, 305G, 408C, 408K, 316; or Statistics and Scientific Computation 302, 303, 304, 305, 306, 318.

PSY 418 • Statistics And Research Design

43703-43704 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm BUR 214
show description

Students may not enroll in Psychology 418 more than twice. Survey of statistics, including central tendency, variability and inference, and scientific methodology used in psychological research. Three lecture hours and two discussion hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C and credit for one of the following: Mathematics 302, 303D, 403K, 305G, 408C, 408K, 316; or Statistics and Scientific Computation 302, 303, 304, 305, 306, 318.

PSY 418 • Statistics And Research Design

43300-43305 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm NOA 1.116
show description

Students may not enroll in Psychology 418 more than twice. Survey of statistics, including central tendency, variability and inference, and scientific methodology used in psychological research. Three lecture hours and two discussion hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C and credit for one of the following: Mathematics 302, 303D, 403K, 305G, 408C, 408K, 316; or Statistics and Scientific Computation 302, 303, 304, 305, 306, 318.

PSY 371 • Learning And Memory

43400 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm SEA 2.108
show description

This course will examine behavioral and brain mechanisms of learning and memory in humans and other animals. We will read scientific articles on different learning and memory systems/current topics. Specific topics will also include: behavioral approaches to studying learning and memory, a survey of techniques used to analyzed changes that occur in different brain areas in the course of learning, as well as principles of memory acquisition, consolidation, extinction, persistence, retrieval, forgetting, reconsolidation, emotional learning and memory, and the role of sleep in memory. This course is intended to allow you to think critically, give constructive feedback to peers, and improve your presentation and writing skills.

PSY 394P • Advs In Fear Learng Mechanisms

43435 • Spring 2012
Meets T 930am-1230pm SEA 4.242
show description

Current Topics in Behavioral Neuroscience. Brain-behavior relationships, particularly recent research in behavioral neuroscience, including the anatomical and neurochemical mechanisms of behavioral events, and behavioral influences on the brain. Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Neuroscience 394P (Topic 1: Current Topics in Behavioral Neuroscience) and Psychology 394P (Topic 1) may not both be counted.

PSY 418 • Statistics And Research Design

43120-43125 • Fall 2011
Meets MWF 200pm-300pm NOA 1.116
show description

Psychology 418 is an introduction to the scientific methods and statistical techniques commonly employed in psychological research. This course was designed to help you understand the theoretical foundation and practical applications of a number of statistical tests based on the General Linear Model (GLM). You will see how to use these principles to better understand data presented in psychological research, as well as other fields such as education and health care. Throughout the course you will learn to critically analyze statements about the nature of things to identify whether or not there is sufficient evidence to accept these statements.

This is not a computer course, however, the use of computers is essential in the analysis and presentation of the results of experiments. In the lab portion of this course, we will familiarize you with a number of software applications, including Excel, Word, PowerPoint, and SPSS.

PSY 371 • Learning And Memory

43855 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 930am-1100am SEA 2.108
show description

Course Description

This course will examine behavioral and brain mechanisms of learning and memory in humans and other animals. We will read scientific articles on different learning and memory systems (invertebrate learning, episodic and semantic encoding, motor skills acquisition, fear memory, classical and instrumental conditioning). Specific topics will also include: behavioral approaches to studying learning and memory, a survey of techniques used to analyzed changes that occur in different brain areas in the course of learning, as well as principles of memory acquisition, consolidation, extinction, persistence, retrieval, forgetting, and reconsolidation. This course is intended to allow you to think critically, give constructive feedback to peers, and improve your presentation and writing skills. 

Grading policy

Oral presentation:                             15%

Article summaries (~9):                         20%

Midterm exam:                              15%

News and views essay:                             20%       

News and views peer critique:                         10%

Final exam:                                  20%

Grading:

Oral Presentations:Oral presentations will be a (10-15 min) summary of one research article corresponding to the day’s topic.  You should choose from the list of articles provided.  I strongly encourage you to use powerpoint, overheads and/or other visual aids.   Grading will be based on the content and clarity of your presentation as well as your ability to demonstrate depth of knowledge of the covered material.  A general guide of what should be included in your presentation will be provided.  Article summaries:Every week, you will hand in a research article summary.  On the day that you give a presentation, you will not be required to hand in an article summary.  On the day that you have an exam, you will not be asked to hand it an article summary. A general guide of what should be included in your article summary will be provided.  News and views article:This assignment will require you to write an article for a non-specialist audience about a new scientific advance (a recently published article of interest).  You will select your own article (to be approved by the professor) from a number of topics pertinent to the class.  You will hand in 2 versions of this article.  Your first version will be reviewed by 2 students in the class (and likewise, you will provide written feedback to 2 students).  All assignments will be blindly reviewed.  Once you receive feedback, you will revise your article and address the reviewers’ comments.  The reviewers will not assign you a grade.  The professor will assign the grade based on (1) the initial submission, (2) the final submission, and (3) your response to the reviewers’ comments.  NOTE: Hard copies of the assignments (article summaries and news and news articles) are to be handed in at the beginning of class on the due date.  Assignments may not be emailed.  Late assignments will NOT be accepted.

Exams

You will have 2 exams (a midterm and a final) that will consist of multiple choice, fill in the blanks, and short answer and essay questions.  You will be responsible for the material covered in the textbook, the class lectures, as well as the assigned articles.  The midterm will include questions drawn from material discussed up until that exam, and the final will focus on what will be covered the rest of the semester.  Both exams will be open-book, meaning that you will be allowed to use your textbook, the articles covered in class, and your class notes.  Electronic devices, and communication with your classmates will be prohibited during exams.  Make-up exams will not be permitted, unless a valid and documented reason is provided.  You are welcome, within reason, to dispute the grading on exams by providing written justifications to the instructor. 

Text

No textbook will be required.  Students will be provided with scientific articles relevant to the material covered each week.  

PSY 418 • Statistics And Research Design

43075-43080 • Fall 2010
Meets MWF 200pm-300pm NOA 1.116
show description

Meets with 43080

Course Description
Psychology 418 is an introduction to the scientific methods and statistical techniques commonly employed in psychological research. This course was designed to help you understand the theoretical foundation and practical applications of a number of statistical tests based on the General Linear Model (GLM).  You will see how to use these principles to better understand data presented in psychological research, as well as other fields such as education and health care.  Throughout the course you will learn to critically analyze statements about the nature of things to identify whether or not there is sufficient evidence to accept these statements.
 

Course Requirements
STUDENTS MAY NOT ENROLL IN PSY 418 MORE THAN TWICE.
PRIOR TO THE FIRST DAY OF CLASS, RESTRICTED TO PSYCHOLOGY MAJORS.
Attendance of lecture and lab is required and expected.


Grading Policy
Grades will be based on 2 exams, and 5 assignments.  Specifically, the grade breakdown will be as follows:

    Exam 1…………………………….30%
    Exam 2…………………………….30%
    Term assignment…………….…..20%
    Lab assignments (4)……….........20%

For the Term assignment, students will be expected to design a research project, and write a research paper in APA format.


Required Text
Jackson, Sherri, L. Research Methods and Statistics: A Critical Thinking Approach.

PSY 341k • Brain Mechs Of Learn/Memory-W

43900 • Spring 2010
Meets TTH 930-1100 SEA 2.108
show description


PSY 341K
 Brain mechanisms of Learning and Memory
Spring 2010


Instructor:  Prof. Marie-H. Monfils
Office:  SEA 6.104
Office hours: TBA, and by appointment
e-mail: monfils@mail.utexas.edu


Course Description: 

This course will examine behavioral and brain mechanisms of learning and memory in humans and other animals. Specific topics include: behavioral approaches to studying learning and memory, a survey of techniques used to analyzed changes that occur in different brain areas in the course of learning, as well as principles of memory acquisition, consolidation, extinction, persistence, retrieval, forgetting, and reconsolidation. This course is intended to allow you to think critically, give constructive feedback to peers, and improve your presentation and writing skills. 


Reference text:

MA Gluck, E Mercado, and CE Myers (2007) Learning and Memory: from Brain to Behavior.  Worth publishers.  

Weekly assigned readings


Class format: 

Class session will include lectures, as well as student presentations and discussions of relevant journal articles assigned weekly. 


Course requirements and grading policy:

Oral presentation:                             15%
Article summaries (~9):                         20%
Midterm exam:                              15%
News and views essay:                             20%               
News and views peer critique:                         10%
Final exam:                                  20%







Grading:

Oral Presentations:
Oral presentations will be a (10-15 min) summary of one research article corresponding to the day’s topic.  You should choose from the list of articles provided.  I strongly encourage you to use powerpoint, overheads and/or other visual aids.   Grading will be based on the content and clarity of your presentation as well as your ability to demonstrate depth of knowledge of the covered material.  A general guide of what should be included in your presentation will be provided. 


Article summaries:
Every Tuesday (with a couple of exceptions, noted below), you will hand in a research article summary.  On the day that you give a presentation, you will not be required to hand in an article summary.  On the day that you have an exam, you will not be asked to hand it an article summary. A general guide of what should be included in your article summary will be provided. 


News and views article:
This assignment will require you to write an article for a non specialist audience about a new scientific advance (a recently published article of interest).  You will select your own article (to be approved by the professor) from a number of topics pertinent to the class.  You will hand in 2 versions of this article.  Your first version will be reviewed by 2 students in the class (and likewise, you will provide written feedback to 2 students).  All assignments will be blindly reviewed.  Once you receive feedback, you will revise your article and address the reviewers’ comments.  The reviewers will not assign you a grade.  The professor will assign the grade based on (1) the initial submission, (2) the final submission, and (3) your response to the reviewers’ comments. 

NOTE: Hard copies of the assignments (article summaries and news and news articles) are to be handed in at the beginning of class on the due date.  Assignments may not be emailed.  Late assignments will NOT be accepted.


Exams:
You will have 2 exams (a midterm and a final) that will consist of multiple choice, fill in the blanks, and short answer and essay questions.  You will be responsible for the material covered in the textbook, the class lectures, as well as the assigned articles.  The midterm will include questions drawn from material discussed up until that exam, and the final will focus on what will be covered the rest of the semester.  Both exams will be open-book, meaning that you will be allowed to use your textbook, the articles covered in class, and your class notes.  Electronic devices, and communication with your classmates will be prohibited during exams.  Make-up exams will not be permitted, unless a valid and documented reason is provided.  You are welcome, within reason, to dispute the grading on exams by providing written justifications to the instructor. 


Class Participation:
You are strongly encouraged to attend all classes, to ask questions, and discuss, especially during the paper presentations.  2% bonus points may be granted, at the Professor’s discretion, to individuals who attend every class, and are actively engaged in discussions.  



Class schedule:

Date            Topic                        Readings

Jan 19, 21        Introduction to course           
   
Jan 26            Psychology and Neuroscience        Ch. 1 & 2
                of Learning and Memory   

Jan 28            Episodic and Semantic Memory        Ch. 3 + assigned articles
   
Feb 4            Skill Memory                    Ch. 4 +     assigned articles   

Feb 11            Working Memory and Exec. Control        Ch. 5 +     assigned articles

Feb 18            Non-Associative Learning            Ch. 6 +     assigned articles

Feb 25            Classical Conditioning            Ch. 7 +     assigned articles

Mar 9            Instrumental Conditioning            Ch. 8 (no assigned articles)

Mar  11         MIDTERM EXAM

----------------------------------------Spring Break----------------------------------------------------------

Mar 25            Memory across the lifespan            Ch. 12 + assigned articles
   
Apr 1            Emotional Learning and Memory        Ch. 10 + assigned articles

Apr 8            Emotional Learning and Memory        Ch. 10 + assigned articles

Apr 15            Observational Learning            Ch. 11 + assigned articles

Apr 22            Language Learning                Ch. 13 + assigned articles

Apr 29            Generalization, discrimination,        Ch. 9 (no assigned articles)
            and representation of similarity           

May 4            Synthesis and Review                No required readings

May 6            FINAL EXAM   


Due dates for articles summaries and class presentations:


Feb 2            Episodic and Semantic Memory        Ch. 3 + assigned articles
   
Feb 9            Skill Memory                    Ch. 4 +     assigned articles   

Feb 16            Working Memory and Exec. Control        Ch. 5 +     assigned articles

Feb 23            Non-Associative Learning            Ch. 6 +     assigned articles

Mar 2            Classical Conditioning            Ch. 7 +     assigned articles



----------------------------------------Spring Break----------------------------------------------------------



Mar 30            Memory across the lifespan            Ch. 12 + assigned articles
   
Apr 6            Emotional Learning and Memory        Ch. 10 + assigned articles
            *News and views first draft due

Apr 13            Emotional Learning and Memory        Ch. 10 + assigned articles

Apr 20            Observational Learning            Ch. 11 + assigned articles
            *News and Views corrected draft due

Apr 27            Language Learning                Ch. 13 + assigned articles

May 4            *News and Views final draft due                       

           







Computation of grades:

Your final grade will be determined by adding the scores from the research articles summaries, oral presentation, and exams.  The total score will be rounded to the nearest decimal, e.g., 89.5% = 90%, 89.4% = 89%.  Letter grade cutoffs are as follows: 91.5-100=A, 89.5-91.4= A-, 87.5-89.4=B+, 81.5-87.4=B, 79.5-81.4=B-, 77.5-79.4=C+, 71.5-77.4=C, 69.5-71.4=C-, 67.5-69.4=D+, 61.5-67.4=D, 60-61.4=D-, Less than 60 =F. 


Pre-requisite information:

The Psychology Department will drop all students who do not meet the following prerequisites:
(a) PSY 301 with a C or better
(b) PSY 418 (or an equivalent listed in the course schedule) with a C or better
(c) Upper-Division standing (60 hours completed)
--

The University of Texas at Austin provides upon request appropriate academic accommodations for qualified students with disabilities.  For more information, contact the Office of the Dean of Students at 471-6259, 471-4641 TTY.
Scholastic dishonesty is a very serious offense, and will result in disciplinary proceedings (and could result in your dismissal from the Unkiversity). For the University’s official definition of scholastic dishonesty, see Section 11-802, Institutional Rules on Student Services and Activities of the University Catalog.

PSY 341K • Brain Mechs Of Learning/Memory

44105 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm PAR 203
show description

 

PSY 341K

 Brain mechanisms of Learning and Memory

Fall 2009

 

 

Instructor:  Marie-H. Monfils, Assistant Professor

Office:  SEA 6.104

Office hours: TBA, and by appointment

e-mail: monfils@mail.utexas.edu

 

Teaching Assistant: Dong-oh Seo

Office: TBA

Office hours: N/A

 

 

 

Course Description: 

 

This course will examine behavioral and brain mechanisms of learning and memory in humans and other animals. Specific topics include: behavioral approaches to studying learning and memory, a survey of techniques used to analyzed changes that occur in different brain areas in the course of learning, as well as principles of memory acquisition, consolidation, extinction, persistence, retrieval, forgetting, and reconsolidation. This course is intended to allow you to think critically, and improve your presentation and writing skills. 

 

 

Reference text:

 

MA Gluck, E Mercado, and CE Myers (2007) Learning and Memory: from Brain to Behavior.  Worth publishers.  

 

 

Class format: 

 

Class session will include lectures, as well as student presentations and discussions of relevant journal articles assigned weekly. 

 

 

Course requirements and grading policy:

 

Oral presentation:             25%

Article summaries:             25%

Midterm exam:                20%

Final exam:                  30%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grading:

 

Oral Presentations:

 

Oral presentations will be a (~20 min) summary of a research article corresponding to the day’s topic.  You should choose from the list of articles provided.  I strongly encourage you to use powerpoint, overheads and/or other visual aids.   Grading will be based on the content and clarity of your presentation as well as your ability to relate the research to material covered in class and in the assigned textbook.  A general guide of what should be included in your presentation will be provided. 

 

 

Article summaries:

 

Every Thursday (with a couple of exceptions, noted below), you will hand in a research article summary.  On the day that you give a presentation, you will not be required to hand in a journal summary.  On the day that you have an exam, you will not be asked to hand it an article summary. A general guide of what should be included in your article summary will be provided. 

 

 

Exams:

 

You will have 2 exams (a midterm and a final) that will consist of multiple choice, fill in the blanks, and short answer questions.  You will be responsible for the material covered in the textbook, the class lectures, as well as the assigned articles.  The midterm will include questions drawn from material discussed up until that exam, and the final will focus on what will be covered the rest of the semester.  Both exams will be open-book, meaning that you will be allowed to use your textbook, the articles covered in class, and your class notes.  Electronic devices, and communication with your classmates will be prohibited during exams.  Make-up exams will not be permitted, unless a valid and documented reason is provided.  You are welcome, within reason, to dispute the grading on exams by providing written justifications to the instructor. 

 

 

Class Participation:

 

You will not be formally graded on class participation, but I strongly encourage you to ask questions, and discuss, especially during the paper presentations. 

 

 

Computation of grades:

 

Your final grade will be determined by adding the scores from the research articles summaries, oral presentation, and exams.  The total score will be rounded to the nearest decimal, e.g., 89.5% = 90%, 89.4% = 89%.  Letter grade cutoffs are as follows: 91.5-100=A, 89.5-91.4= A-, 87.5-89.4=B+, 81.5-87.4=B, 79.5-81.4=B-, 77.5-79.4=C+, 71.5-77.4=C, 69.5-71.4=C-, 67.5-69.4=D+, 61.5-67.4=D, 60-61.4=D-, Less than 60 =F. 

 

Class schedule:

 

Date      Topic            Readings

(TBA)

            Introduction to course

 

            Psychology and Neuroscience Ch. 1 & 2

of Learning and Memory

 

            Episodic and Semantic Memory Ch. 3 + assigned articles

 

            Skill Memory Ch. 4 + assigned articles

 

            Working Memory and Exec. Control Ch. 5 + assigned articles

 

Non-Associative Learning Ch. 6 + assigned articles

 

            TBA TBA

 

            MIDTERM EXAM

 

            Classical Conditioning Ch. 7 + assigned articles

 

            Instrumental Conditioning Ch. 8 + assigned articles

 

            Generalization, Discrimination, Ch. 9 + assigned articles

and Representation of Similarity

 

            Emotional Learning and Memory Ch. 10 + assigned articles

 

            Emotional Learning and Memory Ch. 10 + assigned articles

 

            Observational Learning Ch. 11 + assigned articles

 

            Language Learning Ch. 13 + assigned articles

 

            Synthesis and Review No required readings

 

FINAL EXAM

 

 

 

Pre-requisite information:

 

for PSY 301:

Students enrolled in PSY 301 must fulfill a research requirement consisting of either participation in psychological research studies as a subject or writing a paper on psychological research, in addition to class work.

--

for lower division courses (except Intro):

The Psychology Department will drop all students who do not meet the prerequisite:  PSY 301 with a C or better.

--

for PSY 418:

The Psychology Department will drop all students who do not meet the following prerequisites: PSY 301 with a C or better; Math 302 or a higher level mathematics course; and a major in Psychology.

--

for upper division courses:

The Psychology Department will drop all students who do not meet the following prerequisites:

(a) PSY 301 with a C or better

(b) PSY 418 (or an equivalent listed in the course schedule) with a C or better

(c) Upper-Division standing (60 hours completed)

--

 

 

The University of Texas at Austin provides upon request appropriate academic accommodations for qualified students with disabilities.  For more information, contact the Office of the Dean of Students at 471-6259, 471-4641 TTY.

 

 

 

PSY 341K • Brain Mechs Of Learning/Memory

43152 • Spring 2009
Meets MW 300pm-430pm BUR 108
show description

Topics of contemporary interest that may vary from semester to semester. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: For psychology majors, upper-division standing and Psychology 301 and 418 with a grade of at least C in each; for nonmajors, upper-division standing, Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C, and one of the following with a grade of at least C: Biology 318M, Civil Engineering 311S, Economics 329, Educational Psychology 371, Government 350K, Mathematics 316, Psychology 317, Sociology 317L, Social Work 318, Statistics 309.

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