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Jacqueline Woolley, Chair The University of Texas at Austin, SEA 4.212, Austin, TX 78712 • (512) 475-7596

Ann M. Repp

Senior Lecturer Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin

Contact

PSY 304 • Intro To Child Psychology

43560 • Fall 2014
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm NOA 1.124
show description

General introduction to physical, social, and cognitive development from conception onward. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Psychology 304 and 333D may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C.

PSY 341K • Development Of Attachment

43705 • Fall 2014
Meets MWF 200pm-300pm NOA 1.124
show description

Topics of contemporary interest that may vary from semester to semester. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: For psychology majors, upper-division standing and Psychology 301 and 418 with a grade of at least C in each; for nonmajors, upper-division standing, Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C, and one of the following with a grade of at least C: Biology 318M, Civil Engineering 311S, Economics 329, Educational Psychology 371, Electrical Engineering 351K, Government 350K, Mathematics 316, 362K, Mechanical Engineering 335, Psychology 317, Sociology 317L, Social Work 318, Statistics 309, Statistics and Scientific Computation 302, 303, 304, 305, 306, 318.

PSY 304 • Intro To Child Psychology

43900 • Spring 2014
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm NOA 1.124
show description

General introduction to physical, social, and cognitive development from conception onward. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Psychology 304 and 333D may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C.

PSY 341K • Dev Of Attachment Relationship

44051 • Spring 2014
Meets MWF 200pm-300pm NOA 1.124
show description

Topics of contemporary interest that may vary from semester to semester. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: For psychology majors, upper-division standing and Psychology 301 and 418 with a grade of at least C in each; for nonmajors, upper-division standing, Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C, and one of the following with a grade of at least C: Biology 318M, Civil Engineering 311S, Economics 329, Educational Psychology 371, Electrical Engineering 351K, Government 350K, Mathematics 316, 362K, Mechanical Engineering 335, Psychology 317, Sociology 317L, Social Work 318, Statistics 309, Statistics and Scientific Computation 302, 303, 304, 305, 306, 318.

PSY 304 • Intro To Child Psychology

43615 • Fall 2013
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm NOA 1.124
show description

General introduction to physical, social, and cognitive development from conception onward. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Psychology 304 and 333D may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C.

PSY 341K • The Development Of Attachment

43775 • Fall 2013
Meets MWF 900am-1000am NOA 1.126
show description

Topics of contemporary interest that may vary from semester to semester. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: For psychology majors, upper-division standing and Psychology 301 and 418 with a grade of at least C in each; for nonmajors, upper-division standing, Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C, and one of the following with a grade of at least C: Biology 318M, Civil Engineering 311S, Economics 329, Educational Psychology 371, Electrical Engineering 351K, Government 350K, Mathematics 316, 362K, Mechanical Engineering 335, Psychology 317, Sociology 317L, Social Work 318, Statistics 309, Statistics and Scientific Computation 302, 303, 304, 305, 306, 318.

PSY 418 • Statistics And Research Design

43270-43275 • Spring 2013
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm RLM 6.116
show description

Students may not enroll in Psychology 418 more than twice. Survey of statistics, including central tendency, variability and inference, and scientific methodology used in psychological research. Three lecture hours and two discussion hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C and credit for one of the following: Mathematics 302, 303D, 403K, 305G, 408C, 408K, 316; or Statistics and Scientific Computation 302, 303, 304, 305, 306, 318.

PSY 418 • Statistics And Research Design

43320-43325 • Spring 2013
Meets MWF 200pm-300pm NOA 1.116
show description

Students may not enroll in Psychology 418 more than twice. Survey of statistics, including central tendency, variability and inference, and scientific methodology used in psychological research. Three lecture hours and two discussion hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C and credit for one of the following: Mathematics 302, 303D, 403K, 305G, 408C, 408K, 316; or Statistics and Scientific Computation 302, 303, 304, 305, 306, 318.

PSY 333D • Intro To Developmental Psych

43265 • Fall 2012
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm NOA 1.124
show description

In this course we will be studying changes that begin in infancy and continue through adulthood. Current theoretical perspectives and research methods will serve as starting points for discussions for both physiological and behavioral change. We will also consider the special "tasks" of the developing human: perceptual and conceptual development, language acquisition, attachment relationships, self-awareness, gender identity, and moral development.

PSY 333D • Intro To Developmental Psych

43270 • Fall 2012
Meets MWF 200pm-300pm NOA 1.126
show description

In this course we will be studying changes that begin in infancy and continue through adulthood. Current theoretical perspectives and research methods will serve as starting points for discussions for both physiological and behavioral change. We will also consider the special "tasks" of the developing human: perceptual and conceptual development, language acquisition, attachment relationships, self-awareness, gender identity, and moral development

PSY F333C • Controversial Issues In Devel

87565 • Summer 2012
Meets MTWTHF 1130am-100pm SEA 3.250
show description

This course explores questions in developmental psychology that are currently under dispute. Rather than memorizing a set of facts about development, students will become familiar with opposing viewpoints on controversial topics through student class presentations. The issues under investigation have no “right” answer to memorize. Instead, students will examine the evidence that opposing “camps” offer for their positions. In the course of this analysis students should also become more familiar with the many ways that developmental psychologists go about answering basic questions such as: “Is nature or nurture more important for developmental outcome?”

PSY 304 • Intro To Child Psychology

43110 • Spring 2012
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm WCH 1.120
show description

In this course we will be studying changes that begin in infancy and continue through adulthood. Current theoretical perspectives and research methods will serve as starting points for discussions for both physiological and behavioral change. We will also consider the special "tasks" of the developing human: language acquisition, self development, interpreting others' behavior, etc.

PSY 333D • Intro To Developmental Psych

43210 • Spring 2012
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm WEL 2.304
show description

In this course we will be studying changes that begin in infancy and continue through adulthood. Current theoretical perspectives and research methods will serve as starting points for discussions for both physiological and behavioral change. We will also consider the special "tasks" of the developing human: perceptual and conceptual development, language acquisition, attachment relationships, self-awareness, gender identity, and moral development.

PSY 333W • Moral Development

43225 • Spring 2012
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am SEA 3.250
show description

This course will examine the development of features that underlie moral action. We will begin with some attention to what morality comprises and how morality has historically been conceptualized via the contributions of emotion, learning, and cognition. Next we will examine ideas about the ‘knowing’ and the ‘feeling’ that influence the ‘doing’ or moral action. We will also consider issues of gender differences, family characteristics, and cultural relativity as they relate to moral development. Special attention will be devoted to methods for assessing morality.

PSY 304 • Intro To Child Psychology

43060 • Fall 2011
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm NOA 1.126
show description

In this course we will be studying changes that begin in infancy and continue through adulthood. Current theoretical perspectives and research methods will serve as starting points for discussions for both physiological and behavioral change. We will also consider the special "tasks" of the developing human: language acquisition, self development, interpreting others' behavior, etc.

PSY 333D • Intro To Developmental Psych

43155 • Fall 2011
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm BUR 216
show description

In this course we will be studying changes that begin in infancy and continue through adulthood. Current theoretical perspectives and research methods will serve as starting points for discussions for both physiological and behavioral change. We will also consider the special "tasks" of the developing human: perceptual and conceptual development, language acquisition, attachment relationships, self-awareness, gender identity, and moral development

PSY F333C • Controversial Issues In Devel

87605 • Summer 2011
Meets MTWTHF 1000am-1130am SEA 3.250
show description

Course Description

This course explores a set of questions in developmental psychology that are currently under dispute. Rather than memorizing a set of facts about development, students will encounter opposing viewpoints. This is not a lecture-format course.

Grading Policy

Students' performance will be evaluated via quizzes worth 40% of the total course grade, class participation worth 16% of the total course grade (including small group discussion, discussion questions, online discussion board), class presentations worth 16% of the total course grade, and written work worth 28% of the total course grade (including summary of class presentation topic and 3 worksheets on course topics).

Texts

Readings will be posted on Blackboard.

PSY 304 • Intro To Child Psychology

43615 • Spring 2011
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm PAI 3.02
show description

I. Course Overview

In this course we will be studying changes that begin in infancy and continue through adulthood. Current

theoretical perspectives and research methods will serve as starting points for discussions for both

physiological and behavioral change. We will also consider the special "tasks" of the developing human:

language acquisition, self development, interpreting others' behavior, etc.

II. Course Requirements

A.The Psychology Department will drop all students who do not meet the prerequisite: PSY 301

with a C or better.

Course credit can be earned for PSY 304 OR PSY 333D, not both.

B. Texts:

Shaffer, D.R. & Kipp, K.(2010). Developmental Psychology. 8th edition. CA: Wadsworth.

• IMPORTANT: YOU MUST GET THE 8TH EDITION OF THIS BOOK. CHAPTERS VARY ACROSS

EDITIONS.

C. Evaluation of Student Performance

Exams: Grades will be based, in part, on your performance on 4 objective (multiple-choice) exams. The

first and fourth exams will each have 25 questions, and will each account for about 17% of your course

grade. The second and third exams will each have 35 questions, and so, will each account for 25% of your

course grade. There is no final exam.

Out-of-class activities: Five out-of-class exercises will be assigned during the semester. Each assignment

will be worth 3 points toward your course total. These 5 assignments together account for about 11% of

your course grade. The assignments ask you to read and respond to articles or websites. Worksheets and

articles are posted in the “Course Documents” area of our class Blackboard (https://courses.utexas.edu).

Instructions for submitting these completed worksheets via Blackboard “Journals” can also be found with

the worksheets and articles.

In-class exercises: On five occasions, questions, comments, and/or evidence of participation in a class

activity will be collected from those who are in class. Two of these in-class-activities are listed in the

schedule of dates and topics found in this syllabus. Three of these in-class-activities will not be

announced in advance. If you are in class, you get credit; if you are not in class, you do not. Each activity

will contribute 1 point toward your total grade. The five activities comprise about 4% of your course

grade.

PSY 333D • Intro To Developmental Psych

43716 • Spring 2011
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm WEL 2.304
show description

I. Course Overview

In this course we will be studying changes that begin in infancy and continue through adulthood. Current

theoretical perspectives and research methods will serve as starting points for discussions for both

physiological and behavioral change. We will also consider the special "tasks" of the developing human:

perceptual and conceptual development, language acquisition, attachment relationships, self-awareness,

gender identity, and moral development

PSY 333T • Adolescent Development

43735 • Spring 2011
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am SEA 3.250
show description

Prerequisites

UPPER-DIVISION STANDING REQUIRED. PREREQ: FOR PSY MAJS, PSY 301 & 418 WITH GRADE AT LEAST C IN EACH, & PSY 304 OR 333D; FOR NONMAJS, PSY 301 WITH GRADE AT LEAST C, PSY 304 OR 333D, & 1 OF FOLLOWING WITH GRADE AT LEAST C: BIO 318M, C E 311S, ECO 329, EDP 371, GOV 350K, KIN 373, M 316, PSY 317, SOC 317L, S W 318, STA 309.

Course Description

This course surveys the developmental events that distinguish the transition from childhood to adulthood as a unique period in the life span. For example, we explore the issues of: puberty, the onset of intimate relationships, and identity formation. We also examine how the adolescent's heightened capacity for abstract thinking impacts not only academic problem solving, but also reasoning about interpersonal experiences. These 'special' issues of adolescence are considered within the contexts of family, peers, school, and the media.

Grading Policy

Three writing assignments; a semester-long group project;  weekly quizzes, journal entries and discussion board contributions exploring course readings; class presentations

Texts

No text.  Readings are posted online

PSY 304 • Intro To Child Psychology

43010 • Fall 2010
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm NOA 1.126
show description

Prerequisites

PSY 301 with a grade of at least a C.

Course Description

In this course the changes that begin in infancy and continue through adolescence will be studied. Current theoretical perspectives and research methods will serve as starting points for the special tasks of the developing human, e.g., perceiving the world, forming concepts, acquiring language, forming emotional attachments, etc.

Grading Policy

Grades are based on 3 objective multiple choice exams. Four exams will be offered during the course. Of the first three you may drop your lowest grade. Or, you may choose not to take one of the first three exams. Each of these exams will include 40 questions from the lectures and the textbooks. The fourth exam is comprehensive and is required. This final will have 80 questions each worth .5 point.

Additionally, there are five short assignments to be completed outside of class. The assignments ask you to read and respond to 5 reading selections.

Texts

Shaffer & Kipp: Developmental Psychology.

PSY 333D • Intro To Developmental Psych

43110 • Fall 2010
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm BUR 216
show description

Prerequisites

UPPER-DIVISION STANDING REQUIRED. PREREQUISITE: FOR PSYCHOLOGY MAJORS, PSY 301 AND 418 WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C IN EACH; FOR NONMAJORS, PSY 301 WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C, AND 1 OF THE FOLLOWING WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C: BIO 318M, C E 311S, ECO 329, EDP 371, GOV 350K, KIN 373, M 316, PSY 317, SOC 317L, S W 318, STA 309.

Course Description

This course is meant to provide advanced introduction to the study of developmental psychology from conception through adolescence. Emphasis will be on normal physical, social, cognitive, and language development. In addition to learning basic developmental concepts, students are expected to become familiar with various research designs and procedures that have been used in the research literature. Students are also made aware of existing controversies in the literature, and as such are encouraged to view developmental psychology as an exciting, evolving discipline.

Grading Policy

Three objective, multiple choice exams; out-of-class activities; in-class activities.

Texts

Sigleman & Rider: Life Span Human Development. 4th Edition

Sattler et al.: Lifespan Development in Context

 

PSY 333D • Intro To Developmental Psych

87250 • Summer 2010
Meets MTWTHF 100pm-230pm NOA 1.124
show description

Prerequisites

UPPER-DIVISION STANDING REQUIRED. PREREQUISITE: FOR PSYCHOLOGY MAJORS, PSY 301 AND 418 WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C IN EACH; FOR NONMAJORS, PSY 301 WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C, AND 1 OF THE FOLLOWING WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C: BIO 318M, C E 311S, ECO 329, EDP 371, GOV 350K, KIN 373, M 316, PSY 317, SOC 317L, S W 318, STA 309.

Course Description

This course is meant to provide advanced introduction to the study of developmental psychology from conception through adolescence. Emphasis will be on normal physical, social, cognitive, and language development. In addition to learning basic developmental concepts, students are expected to become familiar with various research designs and procedures that have been used in the research literature. Students are also made aware of existing controversies in the literature, and as such are encouraged to view developmental psychology as an exciting, evolving discipline.

Grading Policy

Three objective, multiple choice exams; out-of-class activities; in-class activities.

Texts

Sigleman & Rider: Life Span Human Development. 4th Edition

Sattler et al.: Lifespan Development in Context

PSY 304 • Intro To Child Psychology

43775 • Spring 2010
Meets MWF 200pm-300pm NOA 1.126
show description

    Introduction to Child Psychology
    PSY 304 #43775 (MWF 1-2)
NOA 1.126
Spring, 2010

 
Instructor: Dr. Ann Repp        Teaching Assistant:  Chelsea Cornelius
       
Office: Seay   5.200MA (through double doors at end of bldg closest to Speedway/Dean Keaton intersection)        Office:  Seay 2.122
       
Office Hours: Mon 3-4; Wed 11-12; Fri 1-2        Office Hours:  Mon 1-2; Tues 1-3
       
Phone #': 471-3858         Phone #:
Email: repp@mail.utexas.edu        Email:  chelseacornelius@mail.utexas.edu
 
I. Course Overview
In this course we will be studying changes that begin in infancy and continue through adulthood.  Current theoretical perspectives and research methods will serve as starting points for discussions for both physiological and behavioral change.  We will also consider the special "tasks" of the developing human: language acquisition, self development, interpreting others' behavior, etc.

II. Course Requirements
A.The Psychology Department will drop all students who do not meet the
prerequisite:  PSY 301 with a C or better.
Course credit can be earned for PSY 304 OR PSY 333D, not both.
B. Texts:
Shaffer, D.R. & Kipp, K.(2010). Developmental Psychology. 8th  edition. CA: Wadsworth.
•    IMPORTANT: YOU MUST GET THE 8TH EDITION OF THIS BOOK.  CHAPTERS VARY ACROSS  EDITIONS.
 C. Evaluation of Student Performance
Exams: Grades will be based on your performance on 3 objective (multiple-choice) exams.  Four exams will be offered during the course.  Of the first three you may drop your lowest grade. Or, you may choose not to take one of the first three exams.  Each of these first 3 exams will include 40 questions from the lectures and the textbook.  The fourth exam is comprehensive and is required. This final will have 80 questions each worth .5 point.
Out-of-class activities: Five out-of-class exercises will be assigned during the semester. Each assignment will be worth 3 points toward your course total. The assignments ask you to read and respond to 5 readings posted in the “Assignments” area of our class Blackboard (https://courses.utexas.edu).
1.  Read the selections.
2.  Download the worksheets posted on our Blackboard in “Assignments” area.
3. Upload completed worksheets to Blackboard.
Here are the readings for each worksheet:
•    Worksheet #1 Three brief articles in “ART” folder
•    Worksheet #2 The Weapon Focus Effect in Child Eyewitnesses
•    Worksheet #3 Voices of Youth: Supporting Adolescents in Foster Care
o    (This video is at the Annie E. Casey Foundation website: http://www.kidscount.org/kidscount/video/videos.html.  Scroll down to find it)
•    Worksheet #4 Gender Variant Youth & A Gender Identity Development Service (both in same pdf)
•    Worksheet #5 Mortified (This is a website: http://www.getmortified.com/)

In-class exercises: On five occasions, questions, comments, and/or evidence of participation in a class activity will be collected from those who are in class.  Two of these in-class-activities are listed in the schedule of dates and topics found in this syllabus.  Three of these in-class-activities will not be announced in advance.  If you are in class, you get credit; if you are not in class, you do not. Each activity will contribute 1 point toward your total grade. 

Discussion Board:  Five discussion board topics will be posted on our Blackboard throughout the semester.  You will be notified when a board becomes available for your contribution.  You must post your contribution during the assigned time for each board in order to receive credit.  Your contribution to a discussion board will earn you 1 point.

Letter grades for the course will be assigned based on the percentage of the total points (out of a possible 145 points) you earn on your 4 exams (maximum possible exam points = 120), your out-of-class exercises (maximum possible points = 15), your in-class activities (maximum possible points = 5 and your discussion board posts (maximum possible points = 5).
Course Grade        Per Cent of Course Points
A                 93-100           
A-                 90-92           
B+                 87-89           
B                 83-86           
B-                 80-82           
C+                 77-79           
C                 73-76           
C-                 70-72           
D+                 67-69           
D                63-66           
D-                60-62           
F                 less than 60%       
       
Points are recorded in eGradebook, accessible through the Class Information Pages (CLIPS) for our class or through a link in Blackboard.

D. Make ups will be given with the following stipulations:
 
(1) You must notify me (via email, phone call or phone message) no later than the day of the exam or due date of the assignment that you will be unable to attend class. 
(2) You must have a legitimate reason for missing an exam or due date and be prepared to show proof.
(3) You must take the make-up exam within 2 weeks of the original exam and/or turn in late assignments within 1 week of the due date.
(4) If you know of something that might keep you from taking an exam (other than the final) at the scheduled time, let me know early in the semester.

E. Policy on Scholastic Dishonesty: Cheating on exams will be handled in accordance with U.T guidelines.

F.  Students with Disabilities: The University of Texas at Austin provides upon request appropriate academic accommodations for qualified students with disabilities.  For more information, contact the Office of the Dean of Students at 471-6259, 471-4641 TTY.

G. Important Dates
Exam dates            Out-of-class assignment due dates    In-class exercise dates
Exam 1  2/12            Worksheet #1  2/3            Activity #1  1/29
Exam 2  3/26            Worksheet #2  2/24            Activity #5 5/7
Exam 3  4/26            Worksheet #3  3/24
Exam 4  5/17            Worksheet #4  4/12
                Worksheet #5  4/30
III. Class Meeting Dates, Topics, Assignments
 

DATE   
TOPIC    READING
ASSIGNMENTS
1/20    Business/Introduction   
       
1/22    What is development?    Ch.1
       
1/25    Biological foundations    Ch. 3 & 4
1/27    “
    “

1/29    Prenatal complications
In-class exercise #1    “

2/1   
Birth   


2/3   
The competent infant
Worksheet #1 Due   

       
2/5
2/8
2/10    Form Perception

“    Ch. 5



2/12   
EXAM ONE   
Chapters 1, 3, 4, 5
       
 
2/15    Piaget’s Approach to Cognitive Development    Ch. 7
 
2/17    “    “
2/19    “    “

2/22
2/24


2/26
3/1
3/3

3/5


3/8

3/10

3/12-3/19

3/22
3/24


3/26   
Building a Self: Memory for Personal Events

Worksheet #2 Due

Sharing knowledge: language development



Understanding Social Development: Emotions




Forming Emotional Ties

Spring Break: No Classes

 Emotional Ties Continued

Worksheet #3 Due

EXAM TWO
   
Ch. 8
 “


Ch. 10



Ch. 11












Ch. 7, 8, 10, 11
3/29    Defining the self
“    Ch. 12


3/31
4/2
4/5   
Building an identity

“   
 “


 
4/7

4/9
4/12

4/14    “

The gendered self
 “
Worksheet #4 Due

    “

 Ch. 13


4/16    What one ‘ought’ to do: Thinking about it and doing it    Ch. 14

4/19
4/21
4/23

4/26    “
 “


EXAM THREE
     “



Ch. 12, 13, 14

4/28
4/30

5/3
5/5    Contexts For Development
 “
Worksheet #5 Due

“    Ch. 15



5/7

Monday, 5/17
2-5 p.m.    In-class exercise #5

FINAL EXAM    “

CUMULATIVE

PSY 333D • Intro To Developmental Psych

43865 • Spring 2010
Meets MWF 1200-100pm NOA 1.126
show description

    Introduction to Developmental Psychology
    PSY 333D #43865 (MWF 12-1)
NOA 1.126
Spring, 2010
Instructor: Dr. Ann Repp        Teaching Assistant: Dorian Colbert
Office: Seay 5.200MA (through double doors at end of bldg closest to Speedway/Dean Keaton intersection)        Office:  
Office Hours: Mon 3-4; Wed 11-12; Fri 1-2         Office Hours: 
Phone #'s: 471-3858         Phone #:
Email: repp@mail.utexas.edu        Email: dcolbert@mail.utexas.edu
 
I. Course Overview
In this course we will be studying changes that begin in infancy and continue through adulthood.  Current theoretical perspectives and research methods will serve as starting points for discussions for both physiological and behavioral change.  We will also consider the special "tasks" of the developing human: perceptual and conceptual development, language acquisition, attachment relationships, self-awareness, gender identity, and moral development
II. Course Prerequisites
A.  The Psychology Department will drop all students who do not meet the following prerequisites:
(1)  PSY 301 with a C or better
(2)    Upper Division standing (60 hours completed)
(3)  PSY 418 (or an equivalent listed in the course schedule) with a C or better
Be aware that you can receive credit for PSY 304 or PSY 333D.  NOT BOTH.
B. Text:
Sigelman, C.K. & Rider, E.A. (2009). Life-Span Human Development. 6th Edition. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth.
C. Evaluation of Student Performance: Exams, exercises, attendance, discussion board
Exams: Three objective exams will be given during the semester.    Each exam will include 40 questions from the lectures and text
Out-of-class Exercises: Five out-of-class exercises will be assigned during the semester. Each assignment will be worth 3 points toward your course total. The assignments ask you to read and respond to 5 readings posted in the “Assignments” area of our class Blackboard (https://courses.utexas.edu)..
1.  Read the selections.
2.  Download the worksheets posted on our Blackboard in “Assignments” area.
3. Upload completed worksheets to Blackboard.
Here are the readings for each worksheet:
•    Worksheet #1 Three brief articles in “ART” folder
•    Worksheet #2 Drilling Sounds Are Used By Surgeons….
•    Worksheet #3 Morality Play
•    Worksheet #4  Mortified (This is a website: http://www.getmortified.com/)
•    Worksheet #5 Last Rights
In-Class Activities:  On five occasions, questions, comments, and/or evidence of participation in a class activity will be collected from those who are in class.  Three of these occasions will be announced in advance in the syllabus. The other two will not be announced in advance. If you are in class, you receive credit.  Each contribution will be worth 2 points toward your total grade.
Discussion Board:  Five discussion board topics will be posted on our Blackboard throughout the semester.  You will be notified when a board becomes available for your contribution.  You must post your contribution during the assigned time for each board in order to receive credit.  Your contribution to a discussion board will earn you 1 point.


Course grades will be assigned on the basis of the percentage of the total possible points (150) that you earn.
Course Grade        Per Cent of Course Points
A                 93-100           
A-                 90-92           
B+                 87-89           
B                 83-86           
B-                 80-82           
C+                 77-79           
C                 73-76           
C-                 70-72           
D+                 67-69           
D                63-66           
D-                60-62           
F                 less than 60%       
       
Points are recorded in eGradebook, accessible through the Class Information Pages (CLIPS) for our class or through a link in Blackboard.
D. Make up exams or late assignments will be given with the following stipulations:
 
(1) You must notify me (via email, phone call or phone message) no later than the day of the exam or the due date of an assignment that you will be unable to take the exam. 
(2) You must have a legitimate reason for missing an exam or turning in an assignment late and be prepared to show proof.
(3) You must take the make-up exam or turn in the assignment within 2 weeks of the original exam

If you know of something that might keep you from taking an exam at the scheduled time, let me know early in the semester.

E. Policy on Scholastic Dishonesty: Cheating on exams will be handled in accordance with U.T guidelines.

F.  Students with Disabilities: The University of Texas at Austin provides upon request appropriate academic accommodations for qualified students with disabilities.  For more information, contact the Office of the Dean of Students at 471-6259, 471-4641 TTY.


G. Important Dates
Exam Dates:        Out-of-class Assignment Due Dates:        In-class Activity Dates:
Exam I    2/17        AE #1   2/3                    Stem Cell Research  2/1
Exam II   3/29        AE #2   2/24                    Juvenile Justice  4/12
Exam III  4/30        AE  #3  4/5                    Psych. of Happiness  5/5
            AE #4   4/21
            AE #5   5/3

III. Class Meeting Dates, Topics, Assignments
 

DATE   
TOPIC    READING
ASSIGNMENTS
1/20    Business/Introduction    Ch.1 & Ch. 2 (exclude: all sections following ‘Developmental Theories and the Issues They Raise,’  pp. 34-57)
1/22    “    “

1/25   
Biological Foundations: Stem cells   
Ch. 3
1/27
1/29
    “

    “

2/1

2/3



2/5    In-class Activity: Stem-cell research controversy

Birth
Worksheet #1 due


Perception as a Demonstration of Competency    “

Ch. 4 (exclude: All sections following ‘Prenatal Environment: The Father’s State,’  pp. 108-121)

Chapter 6
2/8
    “    “
2/10

2/12
2/15    Piaget’s Theory: What does the ability to conserve tell us about cognition?

“    Ch. 7 (exclude all sections following ‘Piaget in Perspective: Challenges to Piaget,’  pp. 210-215)

 

2/17


2/19

2/22
2/24
   
EXAM ONE


Memory: How reliable is memory when it comes to courtroom testimony?


Worksheet #2 Due
   
Ch. 1- 4, 6, 7 (omitting sections noted above)

Ch 8




 
2/26

3/1
3/3
3/5

3/8
3/10

3/12-3/19

3/22
3/24
3/26    Intelligence

Language Development



Defining the Self: Knowing that we are


Spring Break

Defining the self: Knowing who we are


    Ch. 9

Ch. 10 (exclude all sections following Mastering Language:  A critical period for Language?, pp-287-307)

Ch. 11
 “







3/29


3/31
4/2
    EXAM TWO


Gender Roles: How shall we raise our boys?

    Ch. 8-11 (omitting sections mentioned above)

Ch. 12 (exclude all sections following The Adult: Is androgyny advantageous?, pp. 363-371)

4/5

4/7
4/9
   
The moral self
Worksheet #3 Due

“   
Ch. 13 

 “

 
4/12

4/14
4/16
4/19

4/21

4/23    In-class Activity: Juvenile Justice Controversy

Origins  & Significance of Attachment Theory



Parenting: The attachment relationship grows up
Worksheet #4 Due

   

Ch. 14



Ch. 15 (exclude The Infant sections, pp 441-442; exclude The Adult sections, pp. 450-456)

4/26
4/28
    What are the effects of a divorce?
“    “

4/30
    EXAM THREE    Ch. 12-15 (omitting sections mentioned above)

5/3


5/5

5/7    Dying with Dignity
Worksheet #5 Due

In-class Activity: The Psychology of Happiness

Wrap-up    Ch. 17

 

PSY 304 • Intro To Child Psychology

43970 • Fall 2009
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm NOA 1.102
show description

            Introduction to Child Psychology

            PSY 304 (MWF 1-2)

Unique # 43970

NOA 1.102

Fall, 2009

 

 

Instructor: Dr. Ann Repp

 

Teaching Assistant:  Sarah McKenney

 

 

 

Office: Seay   5.200MA

 

Office: 

 

 

 

Office Hours: MWF 2-3

 

Office Hours: 

 

 

 

Phone #': 471-3858

 

Phone #'s:

Email: repp@mail.utexas.edu

 

Email:  mckenney@mail.utexas.edu

 

I. Course Overview

In this course we will be studying changes that begin in infancy and continue through adulthood.  Current theoretical perspectives and research methods will serve as starting points for discussions for both physiological and behavioral change.  We will also consider the special "tasks" of the developing human: language acquisition, self development, interpreting others' behavior, etc.

 

II. Course Requirements

A.The Psychology Department will drop all students who do not meet the

prerequisite:  PSY 301 with a C or better.

Course credit can be earned for PSY 304 OR PSY 333D, not both.

B. Texts:

Shaffer, D.R. & Kipp, K.(2010). Developmental Psychology. 8th  edition. CA: Wadsworth.

  • Important: You must get the 8th edition of this book.  Chapters vary across  editions.

 C. Evaluation of Student Performance

Exams: Grades will be based, in part, on your performance on 4 objective (multiple-choice) exams.  The first and fourth exams will each have 25 questions, and will each account for about 17% of your course grade. The second and third exams will each have 35 questions, and so, will each account for 25% of your course grade. There is no final exam. 

Out-of-class activities: Five out-of-class exercises will be assigned during the semester. Each assignment will be worth 3 points toward your course total. These 5 assignments together account for about 11% of your course grade. The assignments ask you to read and respond to 5 readings posted in the “Assignments” area of our class Blackboard (https://courses.utexas.edu).

1.  Read the selections.

2.  Download the worksheets posted on our Blackboard in “Assignments” area.

3. Upload completed worksheets to Blackboard.

Here are the readings for each worksheet:

  • Worksheet #1 More Than a Village: Meeting the Health Care Needs of Multiples
  • Worksheet #2 Mortified (This is a website: http://www.getmortified.com/)
  • Worksheet #3 Voices of Youth: Supporting Adolescents in Foster Care
  • Worksheet #4 Parents Struggling With Their Child’s Gender Issues 
  • Worksheet #5 Socially Wired

 

In-class exercises: On five occasions, questions, comments, and/or evidence of participation in a class activity will be collected from those who are in class.  Two of these in-class-activities are listed in the schedule of dates and topics found in this syllabus.  Three of these in-class-activities will not be announced in advance.  If you are in class, you get credit; if you are not in class, you do not. Each activity will contribute 1 point toward your total grade.  The five activities comprise about 4% of your course grade. 

 

Extra Credit Discussion Board:  Five discussion board topics will be posted on our Blackboard throughout the semester.  You will be notified when a board becomes available for your contribution.  You must post your contribution during the assigned time for each board in order to receive credit.  Your contribution to a discussion board will earn you 1 point. So, you have the opportunity to accumulate 5 extra credit points.

 

Letter grades for the course will be assigned based on the percentage of the total points (out of a possible 140 points) you earn on your 4 exams (maximum possible exam points = 120), your out-of-class activities (maximum possible points = 15), and your in-class exercises (maximum possible points = 5).

Course Grade                        Per Cent of Course Points

A                                                 93-100                                   

A-                                                 90-92                                   

B+                                                 87-89                                   

B                                                 83-86                                   

B-                                                 80-82                                   

C+                                                 77-79                                   

C                                                 73-76                                   

C-                                                 70-72                                   

D+                                                 67-69                                   

D                                                63-66                                   

D-                                                60-62                                   

F                                                 less than 60%                         

 

Points are recorded in eGradebook, accessible through the Class Information Pages (CLIPS) for our class or through a link in Blackboard.

 

D. Make ups will be given with the following stipulations:

 

(1) You must notify me (via email, phone call or phone message) no later than the day of the exam or due date of the assignment that you will be unable to attend class. 

(2) You must have a legitimate reason for missing an exam or due date and be prepared to show proof.

(3) You must take the make-up exam within 2 weeks of the original exam and/or turn in late assignments within 1 week of the due date.

(4) If you know of something that might keep you from taking an exam (other than the final) at the scheduled time, let me know early in the semester.

 

E. Policy on Scholastic Dishonesty: Cheating on exams will be handled in accordance with U.T guidelines.

 

F.  Students with Disabilities: The University of Texas at Austin provides upon request appropriate academic accommodations for qualified students with disabilities.  For more information, contact the Office of the Dean of Students at 471-6259, 471-4641 TTY. 

 

G. Important Dates

Exam dates                                    Out-of-class assignment due dates            In-class exercise dates

Exam 1  9/14                                    Worksheet #1  9/11                                    Activity #1  9/4

Exam 2  10/12                                    Worksheet #2  9/28                                    Activity #5 12/4

Exam 3  11/11                                    Worksheet #3  10/21

Exam 4  12/2                                    Worksheet #4  11/6

                                                Worksheet #5  11/23

III. Class Meeting Dates, Topics, Assignments

 

 

DATE

 

TOPIC

READING

ASSIGNMENTS

8/26

Business/Introduction

 

 

 

 

8/28

What is development?

Ch.1

 

 

 

8/31

Biological foundations

Ch. 3 & 4

9/2

 

 

9/4

Prenatal complications

In-class exercise #1

 

9/7

 

Labor Day Holiday

 

 

9/9

 

Birth 

 

 

 

 

9/11

The competent infant

Worksheet #1 Due

 

 

9/14

 

EXAM ONE

 

 

 

Chapters 1, 3, 4

 

9/16

Form Perception

Ch. 5

 

9/18

9/21

 

 

9/23

 

Piaget’s Approach to Cognitive Development

 

Ch. 7

9/25

9/28

 

 

9/30

10/2

 

10/5

10/7

10/9

 

10/12

 

10/14

10/16

 

10/19

10/21

 

 

10/23

Worksheet #2 Due

 

Building a Self: Memory for Personal Events

 

Sharing knowledge: language development

 

EXAM TWO

 

Understanding Social Development: Emotions

 

Forming Emotional Ties

Worksheet #3 Due

 

 

 

 

Ch. 8

 “

 

Ch. 10

 

Ch. 5, 7, 8, 10

 

Ch. 11

 

 

10/26

Defining the self

Ch. 12

10/28

 

10/30

 “

 

Building an identity

 “

 

 

11/2

11/4

 

11/6

 

 

11/9

 

 “

 

The gendered self

Worksheet #4 Due

 

 

 “

 

 

Ch. 13

 

 

11/11

EXAM THREE

Ch. 11, 12, 13

 

11/13

 

What one ‘ought’ to do: Thinking about it and doing it

 

 

Ch. 14

 

11/16

11/18

11/20

 

11/23

 

 

Contexts for Development

Worksheet #5 Due

 “

 

Ch. 15

 

11/25-11/27

 

11/30

 

Thanksgiving Holiday

 

 

 Contexts for Development

 

 

 

 

 

12/2

 

EXAM FOUR

 

 

Ch. 14 & 15

12/4

In-class exercise #5

 

 

PSY 304 • Intro To Child Psychology

43975 • Fall 2009
Meets MWF 300pm-400pm NOA 1.126
show description

General introduction to physical, social, and cognitive development from conception onward. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Psychology 304 and 333D may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C.

PSY 333E • Identity Formation-W

44080 • Fall 2009
Meets MWF 1100-1200 SEA 3.250
show description

                  Identity Formation

                  Psy 333E (MWF 11-12)

SEA 3.250

Unique # 44080

Fall, 2009

 

 

Instructor: Dr. Ann Repp

 

Teaching Assistant:

 

 

 

Office: Seay 5.200MA

 

Office: 

 

 

 

Office Hours: MWF 2-3

 

Office Hours:  

 

 

 

Phone #'s: 471-3858

 

 

Phone #'s:

Email: repp@mail.utexas.edu

 

 

Email: 

 

Course Overview

This course examines what is commonly seen as the major task of adolescence—identity formation.  We will begin at this topic’s roots—philosophy and then Erikson’s view of identity.  After this historical introduction to identity, we will look into the research-based work that spans the last 30 years.  In particular, the developmental paths for “chosen” identity domains such as occupation, religion, and politics as well as “assigned” identity domains such as gender and ethnicity will be explored.  We will also explore the approach to this topic that narrative psychology takes.

 

Course Requirements

The Psychology Department will drop all students who do not meet the following prerequisites:

(1)  PSY 301 with a C or better

(2)     Upper?Division standing (60 hours completed)

(3)  PSY 418 (or an equivalent listed in the course schedule) with a C or better

Readings: The readings are posted in the “Course Documents” area of our class Blackboard.  To access Blackboard, go to www.courses.utexas.edu, log on with your EID & password to see a list of your courses.  Click on our course.  You should see links in he left margin.

 

Evaluation of Student Performance:

There are two primary components to our evaluation of your progress in this course.

Component 1How well are you keeping up with the reading?  How critically are you reading this complicated material and how carefully are you processing our class discussions? The three measures of this component are:

Quizzes:  Twelve 1-question quizzes will be given at the beginning of class each Wednesday.  The purpose of the quiz is to encourage you to keep up with the reading and to encourage you to attend class and be a part of class discussion. Each quiz will be worth 2 points.

 

Journal Discussion: This course is structured like a graduate seminar As such, your out-of-class preparation will make or break the success of our discussion. You will be reading primary sources (rather than a textbook author’s description of these sources), and you will be expected to read the material in sufficient depth to be able to participate in class discussion.  To motivate you to do so, you will post an entry (a comment or a question about the week’s reading) in the “Journals” area of Blackboard each Monday (by midnight) for the articles assigned for that week.  To access the “Journals” area within Blackboard, click the “Communication” link.  Then, click on the “Journals” link.

 

Ground Rules for Journal Discussion:

  1. Since one of the purposes of the journal is to encourage you to keep up with the reading, the questions/comments must clearly be related to the reading (Example of a poor question from a paper entitled, “Parental contributions to identity development”: ‘How do parents affect identity development anyway?’  You could have come up with this question simply by reading the title of a paper.)  To ensure that we know where your question is coming from, include a page number from the reading.  For example, ‘On page 294 Erikson talks about the importance of mutual recognition b/w mother and infant.  Did Erikson ever talk about the father as a caregiver?  How might daycare affect Erikson’s plan for the development of trust?’ 

 

  1. Personal reflections are fine as long as it’s clear that the reflections were stimulated by the reading. (“When I read the divorce experience of one of the women in Josselson’s chapter, it reminded me of my aunt….”)

 

  1. Clarification questions (“What in the world is Jerome Bruner talking about on page ….”)  are OK, but questions/comments that are designed to stimulate discussion are preferred. (“How does what Jerome Bruner says about memory relate to what we know about self concepts?”)

 

  1. You need only post 1 question/comment on 1 of the assigned readings each week (even though more than one reading may be assigned for discussion).  You will receive 1 point for your question/comment if it follows the above ground rules.

 

  1. On weeks when we have more than 1 reading assigned, you may decide to write questions/comments for more than one reading.  For each question beyond the 1 described in #4 above, you earn an extra .5 point.  This is an extra credit opportunity.  You can earn no more than 4 extra question/comment points during the semester. 

 

  1. There are 12 Mondays when a question or comment will be due.  So, this part of your grade is worth 12 points (with the option to earn up to a total of sixteen points with extra questions/comments).

 

Discussion Board: To encourage you to interact w/your classmates about course material, we’ll post some discussion questions maybe yours, maybe ours--in weekly Discussion Boards accessible via our class Blackboard.  The “Discussion Board” link is found in the left margin.  A new board will be activated each Monday and closed the following Friday by 5pm.  For the 12 weeks that the board is up and running, you are required to offer comments/responses to posted questions.  Your 12 comments must be made on 12 different weeks—not 2 on week 1’s discussion board,  and 3 on week 4’s board, etc.  Each week’s comment earns you a point. Of course, you are encouraged to read this discussion board regularly and to make comments whenever you like.   In addition to offering a chance to make observations, this discussion forum also ‘prods’ you to keep up w/course topics.   This component contributes a maximum of 12 points to your total grade.

 

So, the combination of the 12 weekly discussion journals plus the 12 discussion board comments earn you 24 pts with the option to earn an extra 4 pts. 

 

In-Class Activities (“Labs”):  Twelve Mondays will be devoted to small group activities.  These small groups give all a chance to collaborate with classmates and give a voice to those of you who feel uncomfortable talking in big groups. Each time you participate in one of these activities you earn 1 point.

 

Component 2. Can you apply what you are learning in the course?  Six types of projects (each with its own folder in the “Assignments” area of our class Blackboard) will measure this component:

Short Writing Exercises: These 2 brief writing assignments will ask you to explore the issues that we read about and discuss in class.  In order to receive a grade on these assignments, you must turn in a rough draft.  Each of the 2 assignments will be worth 16 points.

 

Identity Status Interview (ISI):  You will administer the Identity Status Interview to a willing acquaintance and then code it. Once coded, you will turn in a paper summarizing responses to the questions. This assignment is worth 20 points.

 

Personal Narrative (PN): Using McAdams’s procedure, you will collect an acquaintance’s life story, interpret it, and then write a paper summarizing this narrative.  This assignment is worth 30 points.

 

Group Study: Up Series: During the semester we will consider the development of identity using the documentaries from the Up Series.  This series chronicles the lives of 14 British individuals from age 7 to 49.  Six small groups will be assigned to study 6 subjects from the film as we proceed through the course.  On designated Fridays, all groups will turn in completed worksheets that examine connections between the course material and their Up subjects, and one group will present the results of its worksheet analysis as part of our class meeting.  Attendance will be taken for these presentation days.  The 6 completed worksheets will be worth 4 points each (1 point will be deducted for absence); the group presentation will be worth 4 points, making this component worth 28 points of your grade

 

Group Presentation: How film portrays identity: In the last week of classes you will present as part of a small group a scene from a film that illustrates some aspect of identity that we have discussed in the course. Attendance will be taken for these presentations. This presentation will be worth 10 points. 

 

You should be familiar with our CLIPS since we’ll be posting course points there in eGRadebook.  To locate our CLIPS, go to your UTDirect page (My Home), scroll down until you see your course listing.  If you see no course listing, click  “Choose Content” and make sure “CLIPS Inline Menu” is checked.  In the listing of your courses, click on our unique #.  In the left margin of the Class Information Page for our class, you’ll see several links. One is “eGradebook”.   

 

Course Grade                                    Per Cent of Course Points

A                                                                         93-100                                                     

A-                                                                         90-92                                                     

B+                                                                         87-89                                                     

B                                                                         83-86                                                     

B-                                                                         80-82                                                     

C+                                                                         77-79                                                     

C                                                                         73-76                                                     

C-                                                                         70-72                                                     

D+                                                                         67-69                                                     

D                                                                        63-66                                                     

D-                                                                        60-62                                                     

F                                                                         less than 60%                                   

 

Make up quizzes or late work will be given/accepted with the following stipulations:

 

(1) You must notify me (via email, phone call or phone message) no later than the day of the exam/due date. 

(2) You must have a legitimate reason for missing an exam/due date and be prepared to show proof.

(3) You must take the make-up quiz within 5 days of the original date

(4) You may turn in late work (without any excuse) for ½ credit.

 

Policy on Scholastic Dishonesty: Cheating on course work will be handled in accordance with U.T guidelines.

 

Important Dates

Short Writing Exercise Due Dates:                 

Writing Exercise 1:  Rough Draft—9/14                  Final Draft—9/28                                    ISI Due Date:                  10/16

Writing Exercise 2:  Rough Draft—10/26 Final Draft—11/9                                    PN Due Date:                  11/23

 

42 Up Worksheet Due Dates:                                                     

Worksheet/Presentation One:  9/11                                   

Worksheet/Presentation Two:  9/25                                   

Worksheet/Presentation Three:  10/9

Worksheet/Presentation Four:  10/23

Worksheet/Presentation Five:  11/6

Worksheet Presentation Six:  11/20

 

III. Class Meeting Dates, Topics, Assignments

 

 

DATE

 

 

TOPIC

 

READING

ASSIGNMENTS

8/26

 

Introduction/Business

Discussion Board #1 open

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

8/28

 

8/31

 

9/2

 

Consciousness, Selfhood  & Identity

 

Lab #1

 

Consciousness, Selfhood  & Identity continued

Quiz #1 (Reading Set #1)

 

 

Reading Set #1

 

 

9/4

 

 

 

9/7

 

 

9/9

 

 

 

9/11

 

Consciousness, Selfhood  & Identity continued

Reading Set #1 Question Due

Discussion Board #1 closes at 5 p.m.

 

Labor Day Holiday

Discussion Board #2 open

 

What is Erikson saying about identity?

Quiz #2 (Reading Set #2)

Reading Set #2 Question Due

 

Up Worksheet One due

Up Group Presentation

Discussion Board #2 closes at 5 p.m.

 

 

 

 

 

Reading Set #2

 

 

 

 

 

9/14

 

 

 

 

9/16

 

 

9/18

 

 

Lab #2

Reading Set #3 Question Due

Discussion Board #3 open

Writing Exercise #1 Rough Draft Due

 

Marcia’s Assessment of Identity

Quiz #3 (Reading Set #3)

 

Marcia’s Assessment of Identity continued

Discussion Board #3 closes at 5 p.m.

 

 

Reading Set #3

 

 

 

 

 

 

9/21

 

Lab # 3:

Reading Set #4 Question due

Discussion Board #3 open

 

Reading Set #4

 



9/23

 

Subjectivity and identity

Quiz #4 (Reading Set #4)

 

 

 

9/25

 

 

Up Worksheet Two due

Up Group Presentation

Discussion Board #4 closes at 5 p.m.

 

 

 

 

 

9/28

 

 

 

 

9/30

 

 

10/2

 

 

10/5

 

 

 

10/7

 

 

10/9

 

 

 

 

10/12

 

 

 

10/14

 

 

10/16

 

 

 

10/19

 

 

 

10/21

 

 

10/23

 

 

 

 

10/26

 

 

 

 

10/28

 

*********ISI should be recorded by now**********

Lab #4:

Reading Set #5 Question due

Discussion Board #5 open

Writing Exercise #1 Final Draft Due

 

Narrative Approaches 

Quiz #5 (Reading Set #5)

 

Discussion Board #5 closes at 5 p.m.

 

Lab #5

Reading Set #6 Question due

Discussion Board #6 open

 

Fame & Occupational Identity

Quiz #6 (Reading Set #6)

 

Up Worksheet Three due

Up Group Presentation

Discussion Board #6 closes at 5 p.m.

 

Lab #6:

Reading  Set #7 Question due

Discussion Board #7 open

 

Religious Identity

Quiz #7 (Reading Set #7)

 

Discussion Board #7 closes at 5 p.m.

ISI Summary Paper Due

 

Lab # 7:

Reading Set #8 Question due

Discussion Board #8 open

 

Political ideology & moral identity

Quiz #8 (Reading Set #8)

 

Up Worksheet Four due

Up Group Presentation

Discussion Board #8 closes at 5 p.m.

 

 

Lab # 8

Reading Set #9 Question due

Discussion Board #9 open

Writing Exercise #2 Rough Draft Due

 

Gender Identity

Quiz # 9 (Reading Set #9)

 

 

Reading Set #5

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reading Set #6

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reading Set #7

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reading Set #8

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reading Set #9

 

 

 

 

10/30

 

 “

Discussion Board #9 closes at 5 p.m.

 

 

11/2

 

 

 

11/4

 

 

11/6

 

Lab #9

 Reading Set #10 Question due

Discussion Board #10 open 

 

Ethnic Identity

Quiz # 10 (Reading Set #10)

 

 Up Worksheet Five due

Up Group Presentation

Discussion Board #10 closes at 5 p.m.

 

 

Reading Set #10

 

 

 

 

 

 

11/9

 

 

Lab # 10

Reading Set #11 Question due

Discussion Board #11 open

Writing Exercise #2 Final Draft Due

 

 

Reading Set #11

 

11/11

 

 

11/13

 

 

11/16

 

 

 

11/18

 

 

11/20

 

 

 

11/23

 

 

11/25-11/27

 

11/30

 

12/2

 

12/4

 

 

 

Other Assigned Identities

Quiz # 11 (Reading Set #11)

 

 “

Discussion Board #11 closes at 5 p.m.

 

Lab #12

Reading Set #12 Question due

Discussion Board #12 open

 

Other Identities

Quiz # 12 (Reading Set #12)

 

Up Worksheet Six due

Up Group Presentation

Discussion Board #12 closes at 5 p.m. 

 

Lab #13

PN Summary Paper Due

 

Thanksgiving Holiday

 

Group presentations

 

Group presentations

 

Group presentations

 

 

 

 

 

Reading Set #12

 

 

 

 

PSY 333C • Controversial Issues In Devel

86850 • Summer 2009
Meets MTWTHF 100pm-230pm NOA 1.102
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An exploration of questions in developmental psychology that are currently in dispute. Topics may include stem cell research, treatment of juveniles in the legal system, physician-assisted suicide, and methods of sex education. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Psychology 333C and 341K (Topic: Controversial Issues in Development) may not both be counted. Prerequisite: For psychology majors, upper-division standing and Psychology 301 and 418 with a grade of at least C in each; for nonmajors, upper-division standing, Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C, and one of the following with a grade of at least C: Biology 318M, Civil Engineering 311S, Economics 329, Educational Psychology 371, Government 350K, Mathematics 316, Psychology 317, Sociology 317L, Social Work 318, Statistics 309.

PSY 304 • Intro To Child Psychology

43015 • Spring 2009
Meets MWF 200pm-300pm NOA 1.126
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General introduction to physical, social, and cognitive development from conception onward. Three lecture hours a week for one semester.  Psychology 304 an 333D may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C.

PSY 333D • Intro To Developmental Psych

43115 • Spring 2009
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm NOA 1.126
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Physical, social, and cognitive development in humans. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Psychology 304 and 333D may not both be counted. Psychology 333D and Women's and Gender Studies 345 (Topic 6: Introduction to Developmental Psychology) may not both be counted. Prerequisite: For psychology majors, upper-division standing and psychology 301 and 418 eith a grade of at least C in each; for nonmajors, upper-division standing, Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C: Biology 318M, Civil Engineering 311S, Economics 329, Educational Psychology 371, Government 350K, Mathematics 316, Psychology 317, Sociology 317L, Social Work 318, Statistics 309.

PSY 333D • Intro To Developmental Psych

43117 • Spring 2009
Meets MWF 200pm-300pm NOA 1.126
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Physical, social, and cognitive development in humans. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Psychology 304 and 333D may not both be counted. Psychology 333D and Women's and Gender Studies 345 (Topic 6: Introduction to Developmental Psychology) may not both be counted. Prerequisite: For psychology majors, upper-division standing and psychology 301 and 418 eith a grade of at least C in each; for nonmajors, upper-division standing, Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C: Biology 318M, Civil Engineering 311S, Economics 329, Educational Psychology 371, Government 350K, Mathematics 316, Psychology 317, Sociology 317L, Social Work 318, Statistics 309.

PSY 377P • Undergraduate Practicum

43270 • Spring 2009
Meets
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Field experience in applied psychology. Students are supervised by faculty members and by practitioners in community agencies. One lecture hour and ten or twenty hours of fieldwork a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit. Offered on the pass/fail basis only. May not be counted toward a major in psychology. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing and consent of the practicum supervisor.

 

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