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James W. Pennebaker, Chair The University of Texas at Austin, SEA 4.212, Austin, TX 78712 • (512) 475-7596

Raymond C Hawkins II

Lecturer Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania

Clinical Assistant Professor
Raymond C Hawkins II

Contact

  • Phone: (512) 232-3354
  • Office: SEA 6.108
  • Office Hours: MWF 3 - 4 PM
  • Campus Mail Code: A8000

Biography

Ray Hawkins, Ph.D., ABPP (Clinical Psychology), received his Ph.D. in clinical psychology from the University of Pennsylvania in 1975, after completing a one-year pre-doctoral internship at the Eastern Pennsylvania Psychiatric Institute. From 1975 to 1982 he was an assistant professor of clinical psychology at the University of Texas at Austin. In 1979 he co-founded the Austin Stress Clinic, the first private clinic in Austin to specialize in biofeedback and clinical health psychology.

In 1982, Ray joined the Austin Regional Clinic as a staff psychologist, where he provided practicum supervision to UT clinical psychology students and continued his clinical research on addictive behaviors, Jungian personality types, chaos theory, and other behavioral health issues, including eating disorders and chronic pain. From1998 to 2001 he served as the Director of the UT Clinical Psychology Training Clinic (UTCPTC). In 2011 he was appointed a Clinical Assistant Professor in the UT Psychology Dept., where he continues to conduct research, provide advanced clinical supervision, maintain the clinical database in the UTCPTC, as well as teach Psy. 194Q (“History and Professional Issues in Psychology”).

In 1998 Ray was appointed an adjunct professor in the Master of Counseling Program at the Episcopal Seminary of the Southwest. In 2004, he became a core faculty member in the School of Psychology at Fielding Graduate University, an APA approved doctoral program in clinical psychology. That same year he joined the New Life Institute where he currently serves as the Training Clinic Director and Chair of the Board of Directors.  Ray is also a founding board member of the Lone Star Psychology Residency Program, and serves on the board of the Jung Society of Austin, and is active in the Institute for Neurosciences and Consciousness Studies.

Ray's current clinical research interests are in individual differences in behavior and personality, including developing new measures for determining psychotherapy outcome. He has co-edited two books and published numerous articles on addictive behaviors, cognitive-behavior therapy, and Jungian psychological type applications.

Interests

General area of psychotherapy treatment, outcome effectiveness evaluation, specifically the interactions between personality dimensions and cognitive-behavioral interventions, also the study of addictive behaviors and their relationship to family of origin and psychological variables

PSY 194Q • Hist & Prof Iss In Clin Psy

43918 • Fall 2014
Meets M 400pm-500pm SEA 3.250
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Seminars in Clinical Psychology. One or three lecture hours a wekk for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

PSY 194Q • Hist & Professnl Iss In Psych

43470 • Fall 2012
Meets W 400pm-600pm SEA 3.250
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Seminars in Clinical Psychology. One or three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

PSY 194Q • Hist & Professnl Iss In Psych

43305 • Fall 2010
Meets W 500pm-600pm SEA 3.250
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Seminars in Clinical Psychology. One or three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

PSY 301 • Introduction To Psychology

43760 • Spring 2010
Meets MWF 200pm-300pm MEZ 1.306
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Basic problems and principles of human experience and behavior. Three lecture hours a week for one semester, or the equivalent in independent study.

PSY 301 • Introduction To Psychology

43945 • Fall 2009
Meets MWF 300pm-400pm MEZ 1.306
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Introduction to Psychology

PSY 301 (unique# 43945)

Fall 2009 (MWF 3 PM, MEZ 1.306)

 

Instructor:  Dr. Ray Hawkins                        Teaching Assistants: TBA

            Office:  SEA 2.208                                                Office:  TBA

Hours:  MWF 3 PM - 4 PM                                    Hours:            TBA

Phone:  232-3354                                                            Phone:            TBA                                   

e-mail: hawkins@psy.utexas.edu                                    e-mail            TBA

 

 

 

Date                        Lecture Topic                                                Chapter Readings

 

Aug 26                        "What" and "Why" of Psychology                        Chapter 1 (pp. 1-13)

 

Aug 28                        Scientific Method in Psychology                          Chapter 1 (pp. 14-33)

                                                                                                Appendix A

 

Aug 31                        Neuroscience, Behavior, & Development            Chapters 2, 3, 4

 

Sept 18 First Exam

 

Sept 21                        Sensation, Perception, & Consciousness            Chapter 5, 6

 

Oct 2                        Conditioning & Learning                                    Chapter 7

 

Oct 7                        Memory                                                            Chapter 8

 

Oct 14 Second Exam

 

Oct 16                        Thinking, Language, and Intelligence            Chapters 9

 

Oct 23                        Motivation, Stress, & Health                        Chapters 10, 11

 

Nov 2                        Personality                                                Chapter 12

 

Nov 9 Third Exam           

 

Nov 11                        Psychological Disorders and Therapy            Chapters 13, 14

 

Nov 23                        Social Psychology                                    Chapter 15

 

Dec 4 Fourth Exam

 

 

 

Course Grade

A total of four (4) exams will be given, all during regular class times. There will be no final exam. Each exam will be worth 100 points and will consist of 50 multiple choice, matching, and/or true and false questions.  Each exam will cover all of the reading materials assigned for that portion of the course and all of the lecture and video materials presented since the previous exam. Approximately one fourth of all exam questions will be taken from lecture and video materials and three-fourths from the text. Exams will not be returned, but you may review your exam by notifying the TA prior to her office hours. Makeup exams will be given only when written documentation of medical, psychiatric, or family emergencies are provided. A missed exam must be made up within two weeks of the scheduled test date, and must be taken during your T.A.'s office hours. Absolutely NO EXCEPTIONS will be made under any circumstances. Total Point Grade Equivalents: Below 240=F; 240-279=D; 280-319=C; 320-359=B; 360 or above=A

 

Extra Credit: Extra credit points can be earned by participation in classroom demonstrations.  Extra credit cannot be earned by outside papers or projects or by participating in more than the required number of experiments.

 

Required Textbook:  David G. Myers  Exploring Psychology (7th Edition)(print version or e-book); Optional text: Keirsey & Bates, Please Understand Me.

 

Research Requirement

As an important part of the educational experience of Introductory Psychology, you are required to participate in 5.0 hours of faculty-sponsored research or to write a 5-page research paper.  This requirement is explained on the first day of class and at http://www.psy.utexas.edu/psy/UNDERGRAD/courses/info/301.html. If you have questions, please contact Abby Black at 301research@psy.utexas.edu or stop in and see her at SEA 2.216 (telephone 232-4269).

 

Students with Disabilities

The University of Texas at Austin provides upon request appropriate academic accommodations for qualified students with disabilities.  For more information, contact the Office of the Dean of Students at 471-6259, 471-4641 TTY.

 

Important Tips for Doing Well in This Course

 

1.  Download and print a copy of the PowerPoint slides for the chapter(s) that will be covered in lectures and bring this copy to class for your additional notes. These slides make an excellent outline of the key points to study for each exam.

 

2.  Attend every lecture. Although there is considerable overlap between the lectures and the textbook, some of the lecture material is not discussed in the textbook and such material will be covered on exams.  Missing a single lecture may well be the difference between an A and a B on an exam.  Studying someone else’s class notes is a very poor substitute for getting the information first-hand.

 

3.  Stay attentive during the lectures and take detailed and comprehensive notes.  A main reason for poor test performance is failure to pay full attention during class and the corresponding failure to take adequate notes.

 

4.  Review your class notes at regular intervals.  The most effective strategy is to reread all the lecture notes since the beginning of the course (or at least since the previous exam) every 3-5 days.  By the time you study for an exam, you will have already learned most of the lecture material

 

3.  Study the appropriate chapters of the textbook as we progress through the various topics of the course.  About two thirds of the test questions are drawn from textbook material and much of this material is not covered in the lectures. We will begin each topic at approximately the date listed next to that topic on this syllabus.

 

4.  Use the SQ3R study aids and other learning tips described in the textbook preface and on pages 29-30 of Chapter 1. These aids have been proven to enhance learning and test performance significantly. A supplemental CD-ROM called PsychInquiry has been bundled with the Myers' textbook and is highly recommended to improve your critical thinking skills.

 

                                                                       

PSY 301 • Introduction To Psychology

42990 • Spring 2009
Meets MWF 200pm-300pm GRG 102
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Basic problems and principles of human experience and behavior. Three lecture hours a week for one semester, or the equivalent in independent study.

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