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Jacqueline Woolley, Chair The University of Texas at Austin, SEA 4.212, Austin, TX 78712 • (512) 475-7596

Lauretta Reeves

Lecturer Ph.D., Temple University

Contact

  • Phone: (512) 471-1206
  • Office: SEA 5.202
  • Office Hours: T 11:30-12:30, W 10-11
  • Campus Mail Code: A8000

Interests

Mathematical problem solving & use of analogies in problem solving, reasoning, and cognitive development (especially lexical acquisition, and children's early counting & mathematical development)

PSY 333D • Intro To Developmental Psych

43680 • Fall 2014
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am NOA 1.124
show description

Physical, social, and cognitive development in humans. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Psychology 304 and 333D may not both be counted. Psychology 333D and Women's and Gender Studies 345 (Topic 6: Introduction to Developmental Psychology) may not both be counted. Prerequisite: For psychology majors, upper-division standing and Psychology 301 and 418 with a grade of at least C in each; for nonmajors, upper-division standing, Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C, and one of the following with a grade of at least C: Biology 318M, Civil Engineering 311S, Economics 329, Educational Psychology 371, Electrical Engineering 351K, Government 350K, Mathematics 316, 362K, Mechanical Engineering 335, Psychology 317, Sociology 317L, Social Work 318, Statistics 309, Statistics and Scientific Computation 302, 303, 304, 305, 306, 318.

PSY 355 • Cognition

43745 • Fall 2014
Meets MWF 200pm-300pm NOA 1.126
show description

Theoretical and critical analysis of the development, nature, and function of the thought process. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: For psychology majors, upper-division standing and Psychology 301 and 418 with a grade of at least C in each; for nonmajors, upper-division standing, Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C, and one of the following with a grade of at least C: Biology 318M, Civil Engineering 311S, Economics 329, Educational Psychology 371, Electrical Engineering 351K, Government 350K, Mathematics 316, 362K, Mechanical Engineering 335, Psychology 317, Sociology 317L, Social Work 318, Statistics 309, Statistics and Scientific Computation 302, 303, 304, 305, 306, 318.

PSY 333D • Intro To Developmental Psych

44005 • Spring 2014
Meets MWF 300pm-400pm NOA 1.124
show description

Physical, social, and cognitive development in humans. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Psychology 304 and 333D may not both be counted. Psychology 333D and Women's and Gender Studies 345 (Topic 6: Introduction to Developmental Psychology) may not both be counted. Prerequisite: For psychology majors, upper-division standing and Psychology 301 and 418 with a grade of at least C in each; for nonmajors, upper-division standing, Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C, and one of the following with a grade of at least C: Biology 318M, Civil Engineering 311S, Economics 329, Educational Psychology 371, Electrical Engineering 351K, Government 350K, Mathematics 316, 362K, Mechanical Engineering 335, Psychology 317, Sociology 317L, Social Work 318, Statistics 309, Statistics and Scientific Computation 302, 303, 304, 305, 306, 318.

PSY 341K • Categories And Concepts

44045 • Spring 2014
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm SEA 2.108
show description

Topics of contemporary interest that may vary from semester to semester. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: For psychology majors, upper-division standing and Psychology 301 and 418 with a grade of at least C in each; for nonmajors, upper-division standing, Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C, and one of the following with a grade of at least C: Biology 318M, Civil Engineering 311S, Economics 329, Educational Psychology 371, Electrical Engineering 351K, Government 350K, Mathematics 316, 362K, Mechanical Engineering 335, Psychology 317, Sociology 317L, Social Work 318, Statistics 309, Statistics and Scientific Computation 302, 303, 304, 305, 306, 318.

PSY 305 • Intro To Cognitive Psychology

43625 • Fall 2013
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am BUR 116
show description

Introduction to the study of how people perceive, act, communicate, and reason. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C.

PSY 333D • Intro To Developmental Psych

43730 • Fall 2013
Meets MWF 200pm-300pm NOA 1.124
show description

Physical, social, and cognitive development in humans. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Psychology 304 and 333D may not both be counted. Psychology 333D and Women's and Gender Studies 345 (Topic 6: Introduction to Developmental Psychology) may not both be counted. Prerequisite: For psychology majors, upper-division standing and Psychology 301 and 418 with a grade of at least C in each; for nonmajors, upper-division standing, Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C, and one of the following with a grade of at least C: Biology 318M, Civil Engineering 311S, Economics 329, Educational Psychology 371, Electrical Engineering 351K, Government 350K, Mathematics 316, 362K, Mechanical Engineering 335, Psychology 317, Sociology 317L, Social Work 318, Statistics 309, Statistics and Scientific Computation 302, 303, 304, 305, 306, 318.

PSY 305 • Intro To Cognitive Psychology

43255 • Spring 2013
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm NOA 1.126
show description

Introduction to the study of how people perceive, act, communicate, and reason. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C.

PSY 304 • Intro To Child Psychology

43155 • Fall 2012
Meets MWF 900am-1000am WEL 1.316
show description

 

 This course will introduce students to the physical, social, emotional, perceptual, and cognitive development of children from conception to pre-adolescence. Both relevant theories, and empirical evidence used to assess these theories, will be emphasized. Assignments will provide students with direct experience with children. 

PSY 305 • Intro To Cognitive Psychology

43165 • Fall 2012
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm NOA 1.126
show description

This course will expose students to theories and research on a multitude of cognitive processes, including memory, language, attention, and pattern recognition. Emphasis is on attainment of content knowledge within cognitive psychology, and the development of critical thinking skills. Students are expected to learn how and why research findings support (or disconfirm) the relevant theories about each cognitive process.

PSY 341K • Categories And Concepts

43295 • Fall 2012
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm SEA 2.108
show description

This course will focus on how people learn about concepts, including the how and why of knowledge development about natural kind categories, artifactual objects, abstract and fictional concepts, numbers, and causation. In addition, the course will focus on how people use category knowledge to draw inferences about new items. We will address historical and contemporary issues (e.g., nature vs. nurture; modularity of knowledge structures), and theories of how children (and adults) develop increasingly complex information about basic and abstract concepts. The interface between language and concepts will also be explored.

PSY 304 • Intro To Child Psychology

43105 • Spring 2012
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm NOA 1.126
show description

his course will introduce students to the physical, social, emotional, perceptual, and cognitive development of children from conception to pre-adolescence. Both relevant theories, and empirical evidence used to assess these theories, will be emphasized. Assignments will provide students with direct experience with children.

PSY 333M • Infant Development

43220 • Spring 2012
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm SEA 2.108
show description

This course will introduce students to the physical, social, emotional, perceptual, and cognitive development of children from conception to the toddler years. Both relevant theories, and empirical evidence used to support or disconfirm these theories, will be emphasized.

PSY 355 • Cognition

43320 • Spring 2012
Meets MWF 900am-1000am NOA 1.124
show description

This course will expose students to theories and research on a multitude of cognitive processes, including memory, language, attention, and pattern recognition. Emphasis is on attainment of content knowledge within cognitive psychology, and the development of critical thinking skills. Students are expected to learn how and why research findings support (or disconfirm) the relevant theories about each cognitive process.

PSY 304 • Intro To Child Psychology

43050 • Fall 2011
Meets MWF 900am-1000am WEL 1.308
show description

This course will introduce students to the physical, social, emotional, perceptual, and cognitive development of children from conception to pre-adolescence. Both relevant theories, and empirical evidence used to assess these theories, will be emphasized. Assignments will provide students with direct experience with children.

PSY 305 • Intro To Cognitive Psychology

43065 • Fall 2011
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm NOA 1.126
show description

This course will expose students to theories and research on a multitude of cognitive processes, including memory, language, attention, and pattern recognition. Emphasis is on attainment of content knowledge within cognitive psychology, and the development of critical thinking skills. Students are expected to learn how and why research findings support (or disconfirm) the relevant theories about each cognitive process.

PSY 341K • Categories And Concepts

43175 • Fall 2011
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm SEA 2.108
show description

Description:

This course will focus on how people learn about concepts, including the how and why of knowledge development about natural kind categories, artifactual objects, abstract and fictional concepts, numbers, and causation.  In addition, the course will focus on how people use category knowledge to draw inferences about new items.  We will address historical and contemporary issues (e.g., nature vs. nurture; modularity of knowledge structures), and theories of how children (and adults) develop increasingly complex information about basic and abstract concepts.  The interface between language and concepts will also be explored.

Readings:

The Origin of Concepts (2009), by Susan Carey (Oxford University Press) Various primary source journal articles on-line (in pdf format).

Course Requirements and Grading:

Because this is a Writing-Intensive seminar, over 90% of the points will be based on students’ written work.  Eight response papers to weekly readings are required, plus one analysis paper on a specific issue (provided by the Instructor).  A research paper (8-12 pages) on a specific sub-topic within the development of concepts is required, and a draft of that research paper will be turned in so that students can make improvements.  In addition, students will give a class presentation on their research paper, and will be asked to engage in two peer reviews of other people’s analysis paper and/or research paper.  Attendance is mandatory, and factored into the grading scale. 

PSY 333D • Intro To Developmental Psych

43715 • Spring 2011
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm NOA 1.126
show description

 

 Prerequisite: PREREQUISITE: FOR PSYCHOLOGY MAJORS, PSY 301 AND 418 WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C IN EACH, and UPPER DIVISION STANDING; FOR NONMAJORS, PSY 301 WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C, AND 1 OF THE FOLLOWING WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C: BIO 318M, C E 311S, ECO 329, EDP 371, GOV 350K, KIN 373, M 316, PSY 317, SOC 317L, S W 318, STA 309. 

PSY 304 (Child Psychology) AND 333D MAY NOT BOTH BE COUNTED. ONLY 1 OF THE FOLLOWING MAY BE COUNTED: PSY 333D, WGS 345 (TOPIC 6), W S 345 (TOPIC 6). 

Requirements: Exam questions may include any material from lecture, textbook echapters, the Taking Sides book, or supplemental readings. Study guides will be made available on the course page in Blackboard at least one week prior to each exam so that students may better organize the material. 

3 Exams (100 points each x 3) 300 

Nine (of 12) on-line Quizzes 90 

Attendance 

Issue Analysis 60 

450 

Late exams or papers require both a documented reason (e.g., doctor's note or funeral slip) AND approval of instructor. Please contact Dr. Reeves when extenuating circumstances FIRST occur, or BEFORE the relevant exam or assignment due date to make alternate arrangements. 

PSY 333M • Infant Development

43725 • Spring 2011
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm SEA 2.108
show description

 

 This course will introduce students to the physical, social, emotional, perceptual, and cognitive development of children from conception to the toddler years. Both relevant theories, and empirical evidence used to support or disconfirm these theories, will be emphasized. 

PSY 355 • Cognition

43810 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm NOA 1.126
show description

 

 This course will expose students to theories and research on a multitude of cognitive processes, including memory, language, attention, and pattern recognition. Emphasis is on attainment of content knowledge within cognitive psychology, and the development of critical thinking skills. Students are expected to learn how and why research findings support (or disconfirm) the relevant theories about each cognitive process. 

Prerequisites: For Psychology Majors, PSY 301 & 418 with grade of at least C in each, and upper division standing. For Non-majors, PSY 301 with grade of at least C, & 1 of the following with grade of at least C: BIO 318M, C E 311S, ECO 329, EDP 371, GOV 350K, KIN 373, M 316, PSY 317, SOC 317L, S W 318, STA 309. 

**The University of Texas at Austin provides upon request appropriate academic accommodations for qualified students with disabilities. For more information, contact the Office of the Dean of Students at 471-6259, 471-4641 TTY. 

Requirements

Exams (3 x 100) 300 

Research Paper 100 

Lab Report 40 

ZAP Experiments (12 x 3 pts.) 36 

Attendance ____ 

TOTAL 476 

PSY 304 • Intro To Child Psychology

43005 • Fall 2010
Meets MWF 900am-1000am NOA 1.124
show description

Prerequisites

PSY 301 with a grade of at least C.

Course Description

This course will cover physical, perceptual, cognitive, linguistic, and social development from the prenatal months to pre-adolescence. 

Grading Policy

Grades will be based on performance on 3 exams (100 pts. each) and 2 research activities (50 pts. each, several options provided). Attendance is mandatory and tied to the grading scale.

Texts

Shaffer, R.S., & Kipp, K. (2010). Developmental Psychology: Childhood & Adolescence (8th edition). Belmont, CA: Cengage Publishing.

PSY 304 • Intro To Child Psychology

43015 • Fall 2010
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm NOA 1.126
show description

Prerequisites

PSY 301 with a grade of at least C.

Course Description

This course will cover physical, perceptual, cognitive, linguistic, and social development from the prenatal months to pre-adolescence. 

Grading Policy

Grades will be based on performance on 3 exams (100 pts. each) and 2 research activities (50 pts. each, several options provided). Attendance is mandatory and tied to the grading scale.

Texts

Shaffer, R.S., & Kipp, K. (2010). Developmental Psychology: Childhood & Adolescence (8th edition). Belmont, CA: Cengage Publishing.

PSY 305 • Intro To Cognitive Psychology

43020 • Fall 2010
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am NOA 1.124
show description

Prerequisites

PSY 301 with a grade of at least C.

Course Description

This course will focus on humans as information processors within the realms of memory, attention, language, problem solving & reasoning, pattern recognition, mental imagery, and neuropsychology. Both psychological theories and research on each of these topics will be covered, with effort made to link empirical findings to real-world applications (such as eyewitness testimony, the hazards of cell phones while driving, etc.).

Grading Policy

There will be 3 exams (multiple choice + essays) and one research paper due. In addition, students will be expected to participate in simulations of multiple experiments (both computer simulations and in class experiments).

Texts

Weisberg, R.W. & Reeves, L.R. (manuscript). Cognition: From Memory to Creativity. Wiley Publishing

PSY 304 • Intro To Child Psychology

43770 • Spring 2010
Meets MWF 1100-1200 NOA 1.126
show description

UT-Austin, Spring 2010

Dr. Lauretta Reeves    T.A.:  Ms. Brooke Schepp
reeves@psy.utexas.edu    brooke.schepp@gmail.com
Phone: 471-1206    Office:  Seay 1.214A
Office:  Seay 4.220     Office Hrs:  
Office Hrs:   Tuesday 11:30 am-12:30 pm
                      Wed 10-11 a.m.               
                               
    INTRODUCTION TO CHILD PSYCHOLOGY (Psy 304)
MWF, 11 a.m- 12 p.m., NOA 1.126  (43770)

This course will introduce students to the physical, social, emotional, perceptual, and cognitive development of children from conception to pre-adolescence.  Both relevant theories, and empirical evidence used to assess these theories, will be emphasized.  Assignments will provide students with direct experience with children.

The University of Texas at Austin provides, upon request, appropriate academic accommodations for qualified students with disabilities.  For more information, contact the Office of the Dean of Students at 471-6259, or 471-4641 TTY.


Prerequisite:  Having passed Introduction to Psychology (PSY 301) with a grade of C or higher.

Requirements:  Exam questions may include any material from lecture, the textbook, or information in required Annual Editions articles.  Study guides will be made available on the course page in Blackboard at least one week prior to each exam so that students may better organize the material. 

3 Exams (MC + Short Answer, 100 pts. each)        300
Two of Following (50 pts. x 2)                  100
    Observational Study
    Day Care Essay                 
           Experimental Study  (1 of 3)                  ____
                                        400

Late exams or papers require both a documented reason (e.g., doctor's note or funeral slip) AND approval of instructor.  Please contact Dr. Reeves when extenuating circumstances FIRST occur, or BEFORE the relevant exam or assignment due date to make alternate arrangements.
 
Grading:  A total of 400 points may be accrued throughout the semester.  Attendance & class participation may contribute to raising the grades of students within a few points of the cutoff (but this is not guaranteed).   Individual letter grades per exam or assignment will NOT be recorded, only points earned are recorded.

Points needed for Final Grades
    A    (94-100%)     376-400  AND at least 90% attendance record
A-   (90-93.5%)    360-375  AND at least 90% attendance record
B+  (87.5-89.5%)    350-359  AND at least 85% attendance record
B    (84-87%)        336-349  AND at least 80% attendance record
B-   (80-83.5%)    320-335  AND at least 80% attendance record
C+  (77.5-79.5%)    310-319  AND at least 80% attendance record
C    (74-77%)        296-309  AND at least 75% attendance record
C-   (70-73.5%)    280-295  AND at least 75% attendance record
D+   (67.5-69.5%)    270-279  AND at least 75% attendance record
D     (64-67%)    256-269  AND at least 70% attendance record
D-    (60-63.5%)    240-255  AND at least 70% attendance record
    F      (0-59.5%)    0-239   AND/OR less than 60% attendance


Class Policies:
1)  Late exams or assignments require both a documented reason (e.g., doctor's note  or funeral slip) AND approval of instructor.  Please contact Dr. Reeves when extenuating circumstances FIRST occur, or BEFORE the relevant exam or assignment due date. 

Assignments are considered late if they are not turned in during class of the day on which they are due.  NO ASSIGNMENTS will be accepted by email.


2)  ALL ASSIGNMENTS MUST BE COMPLETED FOR A FINAL GRADE TO BE ISSUED.   (Having earned enough points for a C does not mean a student is exempt from the written assignments or any Exam.) 

Credit/No Credit or Pass/Fail option:  You may opt out of one major requirement
(1 Exam OR 1 written assignment) AS LONG as you meet the following
requirements:  (a) at least 70% of possible points (TOTAL – missed
exam/assignment), (b) attendance of at least 75% for EACH Exam section (i.e.,
75% before Exam I; 75% between Exam I and II, and 75% between Exam II and
III).

*************************************************************************************************
Text:    Shaffer, D. R., & Kipp, K. (2007/09).  Developmental Psychology (7th or 8th edition).  Belmont, CA:  Thomson-Wadsworth Publishers.

 + Articles & readings available in Blackboard system
 
Class Expectations: 
    1.  Mandatory Attendance:  attendance will be taken regularly. Much academic benefit is gained from participating in a community of learners.   Less than 70% documented attendance may result in failure of the class.


    2.  Stay up to date:  Read the relevant textbook chapters after we have begun coverage of that topic in class.  Lecture outlines will be provided in Blackboard, but are NOT intended as a substitution for class attendance or the textbook.
    Experts advise that students spend 2-3 hours studying out-of-class, per hour of in-class time, in order to earn a passing grade.  This means students should spend an additional 6-9 hours studying Child Psychology EACH week of class (not including the time spent in class). 


    3.  Keep a current email address in UTDirect  as important class-related messages will be sent out regularly.  The instructor and TAs cannot be responsible for missed messages due to full mailboxes, etc.


    4.  Please keep instructor apprised of any extenuating circumstances before they interfere with your work.  I am sympathetic if I know you’re trying.


    5.  No Plagiarism in Any Form:  Students are expected to turn in their own work.  Plagiarism or scholastic dishonesty in any form will result in disciplinary penalties, including possible failure in the course and/or dismissal from the University (Section 3.22, Chapter IV, Rules and Regulations of the Board of Regents of the University of Texas System; www.utesystem.edu/bor/tocrrr.htm). 

Plagiarism includes all of the following: 
    a.  Copying an answer from a classmate or other source during an exam.

    b. Borrowing or copying part of another person’s paper during out-of-class     assignments.

    c.  Citing an author’s or researchers’ IDEAS, paper organization, exact wording,
or graphs/figures without giving that person proper credit through an APA-style     citation or footnote.

    d.  Borrowing from, or using outright, papers obtained on-line or through other
    sources which you yourself have not written.


    **See http://www.indiana.edu/~wts/wts/plagiarism.html or http://www.georgetown.edu/honor/plagiarism.htmlfor useful information and examples.]
 
 
SCHEDULE OF TOPICS
*Required textbook chapter/s per topic are listed in parentheses.  Required articles can be found in Blackboard Course Documents in folders labeled by topic. 

Section 1:  Research Methods, Social & Emotional Development
JAN        20        Introduction
        22        Views of Childhood                            (Chapter 1; Lecture outlines available in Blackboard)

        25-Feb 1    Research Methods  (1)
                --Observational Study due Monday February 8th
               

FEB         3--8        Genetics & Prenatal Testing  (3; + articles)   


        10-17        Prenatal Development, Teratogens  & Birth  (4; + articles)
                [NOTE:  brief lecture outline available; notes based on software]


         19-26        The Neonate--Reflexes  (5, select pages only), and
                  Brain & Body Development  (6, select pages; + articles)


MAR     1        EXAM I  (chapters 1, 3, 4, + select pages in 5 & 6, +
                supplemental articles in Blackboard)



Section 2:  Genetics, Prenatal Development, & Physical Growth

MARCH     3-8         Family—Maternal Employment (11 (select pages); + articles)
                --Day Care Essay due Wednesday, March 24th


        10-12, 22-24    Attachment & the Maternal Deprivation Hypothesis (11)


    [March 15-19    Spring Break:  No classes]




        26-APR 5    Family—Parenting & Family Structure (15; + articles)

APRIL        7        EXAM II  (Chapters 11, 15, + articles in Blackboard)
       

   
Section 3:  Cognitive & Linguistic Development
*Experimental Study due this Section; Choice of 3 topics with variable due dates

APRIL        5, 9-12        Infant Perception  (5; select pages; + articles)
       

        14-21        Language Development   (10; + articles)
                 Experimental Assignments:  Variable Due Dates


        23-30        Theories of Cognitive. Development.: Information Processing
                &Approach &  Core Knowledge Approach
    —Memory, Attention, Problem Solving, Conceptual     Development  (8; + articles)


MAY        3-7        Theories of Cognitive Development:  Piaget & Vygotsky,
                    abbreviated (7)
       
   
     
EXAM III:      Friday, May 14, 9 a.m. (Chapters 7, 8, 10 & select pages in 5;
                + supplemental articles in Blackboard)
 
Grades & Assignments for PSY 304, Child Psychology
Dr. Reeves (43770), Spring 2010

NAME:  ______________________________
       

______    Exam I  (March 1st)
        ______/        Multiple Choice
        ______/        Short Answer       

______    Exam II  (April 5th)       
        ______/        Multiple Choice
        ______/        Short Answer       


______    Exam III  (May 14th, 9 a.m.)
        ______/        Multiple Choice
        ______/        Short Answer       



______    Written Assignment #1 
        [Observational (Feb. 8th) OR Day Care Essay (Mar. 24th)]


______    Written Assignment #2   
        [Day Care Essay (Mar. 24th) OR Experimental:  Language OR                 Memory OR Piaget—variable due dates in April/May)


______    TOTAL



Keep track of absences:
___________    Excused / Unexcused
___________    Excused / Unexcused
___________    Excused / Unexcused
___________    Excused / Unexcused
 
HOW TO SUCCEED** IN CLASS

**please note that success is defined as learning, rather than earning a high grade.  I will provide you with ALL the tools necessary for learning, but you have to supply the effort to fully process the information.


1.  Take Thorough notes: Even though lecture outlines are provided for you in the Blackboard  system of UTDirect, you should take notes on any additional information from lecture/class (including examples, film clips, discussion, etc.).  You’ll be amazed at how useful examples are to helping you remember key information (but how quickly those examples are forgotten if not written down).


2.  Re-read notes every day after lecture/discussion.  As you read the corresponding text or articles, take notes from the text into your notes (in a different color ink, preferably), so that all information is integrated & in one place.


3.  TIME MANAGEMENT!!  All available research points to the advantage of Distributed Practice over Mass Practice (cramming).  Furthermore, for each 3 credit hour class you are taking, you should be spending an additional 6-9 hours studying for that class.  Thus, if you have 15 credit hours, you’ll need a minimum additional 30 hours of studying (15 + 30 = 45 hours).  College is a full-time job. 


4.  Flashcards:  There is a LOT of terminology to learn in cognitive psychology.  Use flashcards with a TERM on one side; a DEFINITION + EXAMPLE on the other.  Then quiz yourself by reading a definition & trying to recall the term (similar to short answer questions on the exam), and by reading the term & trying to recall the definition.
    Hint:  Flashcards are most useful as an ongoing endeavor.


5.  Active Learning: 
    a.  Try to actively process information as you hear it—ask questions if you don’t understand something.  Relate the material to examples from your own life.

    b.  Discuss interesting things from class or the readings with friends or classmates or parents.

    c.  Watch for news that relates to developmental issues on cnn.com, etc.  Search google.com for topics that interest you (or that you don’t understand fully).  Some radio programs (e.g., on NPR) often have information relevant to class.

PSY 305 • Intro To Cognitive Psychology

43785 • Spring 2010
Meets MWF 900-1000 NOA 1.126
show description

Introduction to the study of how people perceive, act, communicate, and reason. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C.

PSY 333M • Infant Development-W

43870 • Spring 2010
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm SEA 2.108
show description


UT—Austin, Spring 2010

Dr. Lauretta Reeves                T.A.:  Ms. Maliki Ghossainy
reeves@psy.utexas.edu                malikig@mail.utexas.edu
Phone: 471-1206                    Office:  2.122 Seay
Office:  4.220 Seay                    Office Hrs:    Mondays 2-3 p.m.
Office Hrs.:   Tuesday 11:30 am-12:30 pm            Tuesdays 1-3 p.m.
         Wed. 10-11 a.m.
           

    INFANT DEVELOPMENT - W (PSY 333M)
MWF  1-2 p.m.  (43870), Seay 2.108

This course will introduce students to the physical, social, emotional, perceptual, and cognitive development of children from conception to the toddler years.  Both relevant theories, and empirical evidence used to support or disconfirm these theories, will be emphasized. 

The University of Texas at Austin provides, upon request, appropriate academic accommodations for qualified students with disabilities.  For more information, contact the Office of the Dean of Students at 471-6259, or 471-4641 TTY.


Prerequisites:  Upper Division standing, + Having passed Introduction to Psychology (PSY 301) with a grade of C or higher.  Psychology majors need to have passed PSY 418 with a grade of C or higher.  Non-majors need PSY 304 or 333D, & 1 of the following with a grade if at least C:  BIO 318M, C E 311S, ECO 329, EDP 371, GOV 350K, KIN 373, M 316, PSY 317, SOC 317L, S W 318, STA 309.   

Requirements:  Because this is a writing-intensive course, assignments will emphasize writing skills and critical thinking.  Requirements consist of a research paper (+ draft), two analysis papers, per-class questions/on-line quizzes (x 10), and a class presentation.  Attendance and participation are factored into the grading system.

2 Analysis Papers (2 x 50 each)*         100
10 on-line Quizzes/Questions (x 10 pts.)     100
Research Paper Draft               40
Presentation                       10
Research Paper                 100
                                 350

There is no guarantee that late assignments will be accepted without a documented reason (e.g., doctor's note or funeral slip).  Please contact Dr. Reeves BEFORE the relevant due date to make alternate arrangements.
 
Grading:  A total of 350 points may be accrued throughout the semester.  Attendance & class participation will contribute to determining the grades of students near the point boundaries of final grades. 
ALL  ASSIGNMENTS and Attendance Requirements MUST be completed for a final grade to be issued.  Students taking the course Pass/Fail may opt out of one analysis paper and 3 reading questions.

Points needed for Final Grades   
    A    (94-100%)     329-350  AND at least 90% attendance record
A-   (90-93.5%)    315-328  AND at least 90% attendance record
B+  (87.5-89.5%)    306-314  AND at least 85% attendance record
B    (84-87%)        294-305  AND at least 80% attendance record
B-   (80-83.5%)    280-293  AND at least 80% attendance record
C+  (77.5-79.5%)    271-279  AND at least 80% attendance record
C    (74-77%)        259-270  AND at least 75% attendance record
C-   (70-73.5%)    245-258  AND at least 75% attendance record
D+   (67.5-69.5%)    236-244  AND at least 75% attendance recor
D     (64-67%)        224-235  AND at least 70% attendance record
D-    (60-63.5%)    210-223  AND at least 70% attendance record
    F      (0-59.5%)    0-209   AND/OR less than 60% attendance           
   
Required Readings:   
*Articles & links in Blackboard.  Students who have not taken a Child Development class are strongly encouraged to use a Child Development textbook as a supplement to required course readings.   

Writing Assignments & Due Dates:
*Students will choose their paper topics first; they then must write issue analyses from the two sections that do NOT encompass their research paper topic.  E.g., if a student chooses “The Effects of Maternal Depression on Attachment,” as a research paper topic (Section III:  Social & Emotional Development), he or she must choose issue analyses from Section 1 (Genetics, Prenatal, Physical Development) and Section 2 (Cognitive & Language Development).

*Issue Analysis papers have VARIABLE due dates

Research Paper due dates:
January 27th:  Topics for Research Papers
February 1st:  PsycINFO search due (first round)

Section 1:  Genetics, Prenatal Development, & Physical Development
        February 15th:  Draft due
        March 8th:  Paper due

Section 2:  Cognitive & Language Development
        March 26th:  Draft due
        April 12th:  Paper due

Section 3:  Social & Emotional Development, The Family
        April 19th:  Draft due
        May 3rd:  Paper due
 
Class Expectations: 
    1.  Mandatory Attendance:  attendance will be taken regularly. Much academic benefit is gained from participating in a community of learners.   Less than 70% documented attendance may result in failure of the class.


    2.  Stay up to date:  Read the relevant textbook chapters after we have begun coverage of that topic in class.  Lecture outlines will be provided in Blackboard, but are NOT intended as a substitution for class attendance or the textbook.
    Experts advise that students spend 2-3 hours studying out-of-class, per hour of in-class time, in order to earn a passing grade.  This means students should spend an additional 6-9 hours studying Cognitive Psychology EACH week of class (not including the time spent in class). 


    3.  Keep a current email address in UTDirect as important class-related messages will be sent out regularly.  The instructor and TAs cannot be responsible for missed messages due to full mailboxes, etc.


    4.  Please keep instructor apprised of any extenuating circumstances before they interfere with your work.  I am sympathetic if I know you’re trying.


    5.  No Plagiarism in Any Form:  Students are expected to turn in their own work.  Plagiarism or scholastic dishonesty in any form will result in disciplinary penalties, including possible failure in the course and/or dismissal from the University (Section 3.22, Chapter IV, Rules and Regulations of the Board of Regents of the University of Texas System; www.utesystem.edu/bor/tocrrr.htm). 

Plagiarism includes all of the following: 
    a.  Copying an answer from a classmate or other source during an exam.

    b. Borrowing or copying part of another person’s paper during out-of-class     assignments.

    c.  Citing an author’s or researchers’ IDEAS, paper organization, exact wording, or
    graphs/figures without giving that person proper credit through an APA-style citation
or footnote.

    d.  Borrowing from, or using outright, papers obtained on-line or through other
    sources which I myself have not written or supplied the background research.


    **See http://www.indiana.edu/~wts/wts/plagiarism.html or
http://www.georgetown.edu/honor/plagiarism.html for useful information and examples.]
 
SCHEDULE OF TOPICS
**Two Analysis Papers + Research Paper are due.  Research Paper must be on a different topic from a student’s Analysis Papers

Section 1:  Genetics, Research Methods, Prenatal Development, & Physical Growth
   
JAN         20-22        Introduction &  Review of Research Methods

_____________________________________________________________________
           
         25-29        Genetic Disorders & Prenatal Testing 
               
What Nurses Need to Know about Genetics, Dale Halsey Lea, Dimensions in Critical Care Nursing, 2002, 21(2), pp. 50-61.

    Genetics of Cognitive Abilities and Disabilities, Robert Plomin & John C. DeFries,     Scientific American, May 1998, pp. 62-69.
   
    Prenatal Purgatory, Donna Haupt, Child, June/July 1991

¬¬¬¬¬¬¬¬¬¬¬¬______________________________________________________________________

FEBRUARY 1-8        Prenatal Development & Birth 

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prenatal_development

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Teratogen

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stem_cell

    Sperm Under Siege, Anne Merewood, Health, April 1991

    Making Time for a Baby, Nancy Gibbs, Time, April 15, 2002, pp. 48-54.

Multiplying the Risks, Geoffrey Cowley & Karen Springen, Newsweek, December 1, 1997, p. 61. 

    Putting a New Spin on the Birth of Human Birth, Joshua Fischman, Science,
    May 20, 1994


_____________________________________________________________________

 
FEB        10-15        Brain & Body Development  (4, pp. 117-134; 141-153)

    Infant Reflexes, www.mamashealth.com

    Fertile Minds, J. Madeleine Nash, Time, February 3, 1997

    http://faculty.washington.edu/chudler/dev.html

    The Importance of Mother’s Milk, Graham Carpenter, Natural History, 1981, Volume
    90(8).

    Cosleeping (Bed Sharing) among Infants and Toddlers, Journal of Developmental
    Behavioral Pediatrics, 1997, 18(6)  [reprinted in Pediatrics, 2001]

    Circumcision:  Weighing the Pros and Cons, MayoClinic.com

    Making the Cut, Jennine Lee-St. John, Time, 11/12/2007 (Volume 20).

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Female_genital_cutting

_____________________________________________________________________
Section 2:  Cognitive and Linguistic Development

FEB         17-22        Perception and Perceptual Preferences
      Infant Visual Development becoming better understood, Cheryl Guttman,
    Opthamology Times, 6/1/98, Volume 3 (11).

    The Science of Scrumptious (on taste development), Kathleen McGowan,
    Psychology Today, Sept/Oct. 2003, pp. 54-60.

    Baby Face-off:  The Roots of Attraction, Bruce Bower, Science News,   
    May 16, 1987, Vol. 131(20).



        24-MAR 1    Core Knowledge Theory & its Critics:  Object & Causal
                 Knowledge
    Core Knowledge, Elizabeth Spelke, The American Psychologist, 2000, Vol. 55(11),
    pp. 1233-1243.

    Shape, Not Color, Helps Babies Tell Objects Apart, USA Today, April 2000, p. 4.

    How do Infants Learn About the Physical World?  Renee Baillargeon, Current     Directions in Psychological Science, October 1994

    Representation of Objects and Events:  Why do Infants Look so Smart and Toddlers
    Look So Dumb?  Rachel Keen, Current Directions in Psychological Science, June
    2003
 
MARCH    3-8        Critical Periods, and the Hurried Child
    Early Rule Structure:  The Case of “Peekaboo,” Jerome S. Bruner & V. Sherwood     (1976).  Life Sentences.  London:  John Wiley & Sons

    The Amazing Mind of Infants, Lisa Grunwald & Jeff Goldberg, Life, 1993, pp. 48-54.

    Your Child’s Brain, Sharon Begley, Newsweek, February 19, 1996.


        10-12        Infant Memory
    Remembering Early Childhood:  How Much, How, and Why (or Why Not), Nora S.
    Newcombe, Crummey, Fox, Lie & Ottinger-Alberts, Current Directions in
    Psychological Science, 2000, Volume 9(2), pp.55-58.

    Memories from the Cradle, Mark L. Howe, Current Directions in Psychological
    Science, 2003, Volume 12(2), pp. 62-65.

    Long-Term Recall Memory:  Behavioral and Neuro-Developmental Changes in the     First 2 years of Life, Patricia J. Bauer, Current Directions in Psychological Science,     August 2002, pp. 137-141.

    The Development of Infant Memory, Carolyn Rovee-Collier, Current Directions in
    Psychological Science, 1999, Volume 8(3), pp. 80-85.

[MARCH 15-19:    Spring Break, no classes]


MAR        22-24:        Infant Numeracy
    Detection of Intermodal Numerical Correspondences by Human Infants, Prentice
    Starkey, Elizabeth Spelke, Rochel Gelman, Science, 1983, Vol. 222 (4620),
    pp. 179-181.

    Detection of Number or Numerousness by Human Infants, Hank Davis et al.,     Science, 1985, Vol. 228 (4704), p. 122.

    Addition and Subtraction by Human Infants, Karen Wynn, Science, 1992, Vol. 358,     pp. 749-750.


MAR        26        PRESENTATIONS    [Mandatory Attendance]


MAR        29-31        Categorization & Pictorial Competence
    Category Representation in Young Infants, Paul C. Quinn, 2002, Current Directions
    in Psychological Science, Volume 11(2)

    When a Rose is Just a Rose:  The Illusion of Taxonomies in Infant Categorization,     David H. Rakison, Infancy, 2000, Vol. 1(1), pp. 77-90.

    The Origins of Pictorial Competence, Judy S. DeLoache, Sophia L. Pierroutsakos, &
    David H. Uttal, Current Directions in Psychological Science, 2003, Volume 12(4),
    pp. 66-70

    Scale Errors Offer Evidence for a Perception-Action Dissociation Early in Life,
    Judy S. DeLoache, David H. Uttal, Karl S. Rosengren, Science, May 14, 2004,
    Vol. 304, pp. 1027-1029.


APRIL        2-12        Phonological, Lexical, & Syntactic Development in
                Language 
    The Language Explosion, Geoffrey Cowley and Donna Foote, Newsweek,
    Spring/Summer 1997

    Statistical Language Learning:  Mechanisms and Constraints, Jenny R. Saffran,
    Current Directions in Psychological Science, 2003, Volume 12(4), pp. 110-114.

    Baby’s First Phonemes, Science News, 1992, Vol. 141(6).

    Baby Talk, Shannon Brownlee, U.S. News & World Report, June 15, 1998

    Starting Point, George Butterworth, Natural History, May 1997



Section 3:  Social and Emotional Development   

APR        14-19        Attachment  & Temperament
    The Eight Ideals of Attachment Parenting  (from Attachment Parenting International)

Postnatal Depression and Infant Development, Lynne Murray, Peter J. Cooper, &
Alan Stein, British Medical Journal, April 27, 1991, Vol. 302(6783), p. 978--.

Mothering Malnutrition, Bruce Bower, Science News, Sept. 18, 2004, Vol. 166 (12).

    Resilence in Development, Emmy E. Warner, Current Directions in Psychological     Science, June 199.
 

        21        Temperament & Emotional Development
    Emotions:  The Shy and the Lively, Lisa Grunwald & Jeff Goldberg, Life, Vol. 16 (8).

    The Role of Parents in Children’s Psychological Development, Jerome Kagan,
    Pediatrics, 1999, Volume 104(1), pp. 164-167.   

    Repeat After Me, Bruce Bower, Science News, May 24, 2003, Volume 163(21).
 
        23-26        Maternal Employment & Infancy
               
    The Realities of Day Care, Gwen J. Broude, Public Interest, Fall 1996, Issue 125.

    Childcare Patterns, Pediatrics for Parents, March 1989, Vol. 10(3), p. 4.

    Maternal Employment Does Not Harm Infants’ Development, Research Shows
    (Handout from www.utexas.edu News).

    The Day Care Generation, Pat Wingert & Barbara Kantrowitz, Newsweek, Winter
    1990/Spring 1991.

Quality Day-care and Social Growth, Bruce Bower, Science News, 1987, Vol. 132.

Daycare Poses Enormous Medical Dangers, Robert Mendelsohn, The Doctor’s People Newsletter, January 1989, Vol. 2(1).

Mothers’ Jobs Have Modest Effect on Children, Linda Jacobson, Education Week,
1999, Vol. 18(26).

APRIL     26-MAY 3        Presentations  (MANDATORY ATTENDANCE)


 MAY        3-5        Infant Play 

        (articles to be announced)


MAY        7        Social Policy related to Infants OR Emotional Development

        (articles to be announced)



Thursday, MAY 13th, 2 p.m.:  Presentations (MANDATORY ATTENDANCE)
 
Potential Paper Topics                    Dr. Reeves
                                Infant Development
Requirements:  6-10 page paper using at least 4 primary sources.  Double-spaced, APA style citations.  3-4 page draft due before paper. 

Section 1:
Genetic Basis of personality traits (also Temperament)
Genetic Disorders—physical, cognitive, behavioral consequences
Genetic & Pre/Postnatal Causes of Autism**
Cross Cultural comparison of Birthing & Parenting practices
Pros/Cons of Delaying Parenthood
Risks and Developmental Outcomes of Premature Infants
Co-sleeping debate

Section 2: 
Intermodal perception
Object Knowledge
Do Infants understand Numeracy?
Do Infants understand Causality?
Changes in Play Styles
Pros/cons of Television for infants & toddlers 

Bilingual Development
Critical Period for Language Learning?
Importance of Motherese/Parentese
Factors in Word Learning (Lexical Acquisition)
        (Pointing, joint attention, etc.)
Sex Differences in Language Acquisition
Phonological Difficulties in Children

Section 3: 
Maternal Deprivation, and the proposed Critical Period for Attachment
The Day Care Debate for Infants
        (focus on attachment or cognition/language)
Is Temperament stable across the Life-span?
Analysis of Discipline Techniques:  Reasoning, Consequences,
            Spanking
Single Parenthood
Father’s Contributions to Child Development
Development Consequences of Poverty
Mixed-Race Adoptions
Cross-Cultural Differences in Family Structure

PSY 305 • Intro To Cognitive Psychology

43985 • Fall 2009
Meets MWF 1000-1100 NOA 1.124
show description

UT-Austin, Fall 2009

 

Dr. Lauretta Reeves        T.A.:  Mr. Frank Roberts

reeves@psy.utexas.edu        f.w.roberts@mail.utexas.edu

Phone: 471-1206          Office:  Seay 2.122

Office:  Seay 4.220          Office Hrs:   Mon  11 am.-12 pm

Office Hrs:    Wed. 11-12          Fri 1-3 pm., + by appt.

        Thurs 12-1 p.m.        

 

INTRODUCTION to COGNITIVE PSYCHOLOGY (PSY 305) 

MWF  10-11 a.m., NOA 1.124  (43985) 

This course will expose students to theories and research on a multitude of cognitive processes, including memory, language, attention, and pattern recognition.  Emphasis is on attainment of content knowledge within cognitive psychology, and the development of critical thinking skills. Students are expected to learn how and why research findings support (or disconfirm) the relevant theories about each cognitive process. 

 

Prerequisites:  PSY 301 with grade of at least C. 

 

**The University of Texas at Austin provides upon request appropriate academic accommodations for qualified students with disabilities.  For more information, contact the Office of the Dean of Students at 471-6259, 471-4641 TTY.

 

 

Requirements

Exams (3 x 100) 300

Research Paper 100

ZAP Experiments (12 x 3 pts.)   36

Attendance ____

TOTAL 436

 

Grading Grading

A    (94-100%) 410-436  AND at least 90% attendance record

A-   (90-93.5%) 392-409  AND at least 90% attendance record

B+  (87.5-89.5%) 382-391  AND at least 85% attendance record

B    (84-87%) 366-381 AND at least 80% attendance record

B-   (80-83.5%) 349-365  AND at least 80% attendance record

C+  (77.5-79.5%) 338-349  AND at least 75% attendance record

C    (74-77%) 322-337  AND at least 75% attendance record

C-   (70-73.5%) 305-321  AND at least 75% attendance record

D+   (67.5-69.5%) 293-304  AND at least 70% attendance record

D     (64-67%) 279-292  AND at least 70% attendance record

D-    (60-63.5%) 262-278  AND at least 65% attendance record

F      (0-59.5%) 0-261   AND/OR less than 60% attendance


 Grading Policy 

1)  Late exams or assignments require both a documented reason (e.g., doctor's note

 or funeral slip) AND approval of instructor.  Please contact Dr. Reeves when

extenuating circumstances FIRST occur, or BEFORE the relevant exam or

assignment due date. 

 

Assignments are considered late if they are not turned in during class of the day on which

they are due.  NO ASSIGNMENTS will be accepted by email without prior approval by

Dr. Reeves. Grades are final; questions and appeals must be made within 2 class periods.

 

 

2)  ALL ASSIGNMENTS MUST BE COMPLETED FOR A FINAL GRADE TO BE ISSUED.  Having earned enough points for a C does not mean a student is exempt from the ZAPs  assignments, the Research Paper, or any Exam. 

 

Credit/No Credit or Pass/Fail option:  You may opt out of one major requirement  (1

Exam OR Research Paper OR Lab Report) AS LONG as you meet the following requirements:  (a) at least 70% of possible points (TOTAL – missed assignment), (b) attendance of at least 75% for EACH Exam section (i.e., 75% before Exam I; 75% between Exam I and II, and 75% between Exam II and III).

 

***************************************************************************************************************

Instructions for ZAPs assignments:  Students must complete 4 ZAPs experiments from each of the 3 topical sections (Memory, Lower Cognitive Processes; Higher Cognitive Processes).  Each experiment is worth 3 points (Total = 36 points).  There will be several extra credit opportunities offered through the semester (with a cap on extra credit points).

 

HOW TO:  Using the Username and Password in the ZAPs package that you ordered, log into http://www.wwnorton.com/zaps/

You must first register with your email address, and the username & password provided in your textbook or the ZAPs package.  Use the following class code to make sure that your data is recorded:  AQ25VUKX   ONLY perform ZAPs that are listed on the syllabus that follows (no others will count).  Each ZAP must be performed by its due date—no exceptions (the recordkeeping for 12 ZAPs x 50 students is too overwhelming to extend deadlines). 

 

It is HIGHLY recommended that you keep an exact log of when you did each ZAPs experiment, and if possible, a print out of your data or final screen. 

 

***************************************************************************************************************

 Required  Text & CD: 

 

Weisberg, R.W. & Reeves, L.R. (2009).  Cognition:  From Memory to Creativity  (manuscript).

To be published by Wiley Publishers; available at IT Copy, 512 West MLK.

 

ZAPs! Interactive Experiments (from www.wwnorton.com/college/psych/zaps)

 

Class Expectations

1.  Mandatory Attendance:  attendance will be taken regularly. Much academic benefit is gained from participating in a community of learners.   Less than 70% documented attendance may result in failure of the class.

 

 

2.  Stay up to date:  Read the relevant textbook chapters after we have begun coverage of that topic in class.  Lecture outlines will be provided in Blackboard, but are NOT intended as a substitution for class attendance or the textbook.

Experts advise that students spend 2-3 hours studying out-of-class, per hour of in-class time, in order to earn a passing grade.  This means students should spend an additional 6-9 hours studying Cognitive Psychology EACH week of class (not including the time spent in class). 

 

 

3.  Keep current your email address in UTDirect, as important class-related messages will be sent out regularly.  The instructor and TAs cannot be responsible for missed messages due to full mailboxes, etc.

 

 

4.  Please keep instructor apprised of any extenuating circumstances before they interfere with your work.  I am sympathetic if I know you’re trying.

 

 

5.  No Plagiarism in Any Form:  Students are expected to turn in their own work.  Plagiarism or scholastic dishonesty in any form will result in disciplinary penalties, including possible failure in the course and/or dismissal from the University (Section 3.22, Chapter IV, Rules and Regulations of the Board of Regents of the University of Texas System; www.utesystem.edu/bor/tocrrr.htm). 

 

Plagiarism includes all of the following: 

a.  Copying an answer from a classmate or other source during an exam.

 

b. Borrowing or copying part of another person’s paper during out-of-class assignments.

 

c.  Citing an author’s or researchers’ IDEAS, paper organization, exact wording, or

graphs/figures without giving that person proper credit through an APA-style citation or

footnote.

 

d.  Borrowing from, or using outright, papers obtained on-line or through other

sources which I myself have not written or supplied the background research.

 

 

**See http://www.indiana.edu/~wts/wts/plagiarism.html or

http://www.georgetown.edu/honor/plagiarism.html for useful information and examples.]

 

COURSE SCHEDULE

 

Required  Text & on-line Experiments: 

Weisberg, R.W. & Reeves, L.R. (2009).  Cognition:  From Memory to Creativity (manuscript).

To be published by Wiley Publishers; available at IT Copy, 512 West MLK.

 

ZAPs! Interactive Experiments (from www.wwnorton.com/college/psych/zaps)

 

Required reading/labs:  Textbook/Manuscript chapters are listed in parentheses after each topic; ZAPs experiment assignments and their due dates are in italics under each topic.  ONLY the listed ZAPs will count toward fulfillment of this requirement.

 

Section 1:  History of Cog. Psych. & Memory (+required ZAPs experiments)

AUGUST              26-31            Introduction & History of Cognitive Psychology,

                                                the Information Processing Approach (Chapter 1)

                                                   MUST DO this ZAP (not for points)Signal Detection I  

(due by midnight on Sept 2nd)

 

SEPT                          2-4                        Introduction to Neuroscience (1)

                                                            Split Brain (due Sept 8th)

 

            [Sept 7:  LABOR DAY; no class]

            [Sept 11:  PsycINFO search]

 

9-16                        Amnesia

Implicit Learning  (Sept. 13th)

                                                            PsycINFO search due September 14th

 

                        18-25                        The Multistore Model, Working Memory, & LOP  (2

                                                            Iconic Memory  (due Sept. 17th)

                                                            Memory Span   (due Sept. 17th)

                                                            Operation Span  (due Sept. 17th)

                                                            Sternberg Search (due Sept. 20th)

 

                                               

                        28-30                        Encoding & Retrieval Processes  (3)

Encoding Specificity (Sept. 27th)

Memory Bias  (Sept. 27th)

Recalling Information  (Sept. 27th)

 

OCT                        2-9                        LTM:  Forgetting, Schemata, & Reconstructive Memory  (4)

                                    False Memory (Oct. 1st)

                                    Fan Effect (Oct. 1st)

 

 

OCT                        12                        EXAM I   (Chapters 1, 2, 3, 4)


Section 2:  Lower Cognitive Processes  (+ ZAPs)

OCT                        14-19                        Perception and Pattern Recognition  (5)

                                                            Word Superiority Effect (Oct. 15th)

                                                            Feature Net (Oct.. 15th)  

                                                            Ponzo Illusion (Oct. 15th)

 

                        21-28                        Attention & Automatic Processing  (6)

                                                            Visual Search (Oct. 20th)

Spatial Cuing (Oct. 20th) 

Attentional Blink  (Oct. 20th)

Selective Attention (Oct. 22nd)

Simon Effect (Oct. 22nd) 

 

 

                        30-NOV 4             Mental Imagery    (7)

                                                            Mental Scanning  (Oct. 29th)

                                                            Mental Rotation 2-D  (Oct. 29th)

                                                            Mental Rotation 3-D (Oct. 29th)

 

   NOV              6                        EXAM II   (Chapters 5, 6, 7)  

 

 

Section 3:  Higher Cognitive Processes (+ ZAPs) 

NOV                        9-16                        Language   (9, 10)

                                                            Word Frequency (Nov. 10th)

                                                            Lexical Decision Task  (Nov. 10th)

 

           

                        18-25                        Concepts & Categories  (8)

                                                            Concept Formation  (Nov. 17th)

Sentence Verification  (Nov. 17th)

           

                         30-Dec 4            Decision Making  (11, selected pages)

                                                            Decision Making  (Nov. 29th)

                                                            Prisoner’s Dilemma  (Nov. 29th)

 

                                                            Wason Selection Task (Dec. 6th)

                                                            Syllogisms  (Dec. 6th)

                                                            Gestalt Problem Solving  (Dec. 6th)

                                                            Missionaries & Cannibals (Dec. 6th)

                                                            Misconceptions  (Dec. 6th)

 

 

EXAM III:   Tuesday, December 15th, 9 a.m.  (Chapters 8, 9, 10, 11)

 

RESEARCH PAPER TOPICS

The paper assignment requires that students write a research-based, double-spaced, typed paper on a current topic within cognitive psychology.  Papers should be between 5-7 pages; an 8.5-page limit will be enforced.  American Psychological Association style regarding paper structure and citations is to be followed.

            All students will engage in a PsycINFO search (ONLY—do not use any other search engine), and print out 4-5 viable sources (+ abstracts) on that topic.  When writing the paper, do NOT use your PsycINFO sources--Three empirical sources are required, which will be provided for you (in the the Assignments file of Blackboard).  Students are to choose from the following topics, with variable due dates per topic: 

 

*ALL PsycINFO sources are due September 14th*


Memory:   Papers due Oct. 21st

            Flashbulb Memory 

                        --Is there a special memory mechanism, or are flashbulb memories subject to

                        the same encoding and forgetting processes as regular memories?  What

                        accounts for why FB are subjectively better remembered?             

 

            Bizarreness effects in Memory 

                        --Is Bizarre material better remembered than “common” information?  Is this                                     difference due to differential encoding or retrieval?

 

 

Pattern Recogn. Attention, & Imagery:   Papers due Nov. 16th

 

            Automatic Encoding of Spatial Information/Spatial Memory           

                        --Is spatial information automatically encoded, and does memory for spatial info.                                     meet the strict criteria laid down by Hasher & Zacks? 

 

 

            Mental Imagery 

                        --Can mental images be ambiguous, or can they be reinterpreted (per claims

                        of Kosslyn’s Quasi-Picture view)?  

 

 

LanguagePapers due Nov. 23rd

            Tip of the Tongue Phenomenon**  

                        --How does the tip of the tongue phenomenon shed light on word retrieval?  At

                        what stage of lexical retrieval is the “block” in TOT?  What types of hints may                                     help or hurt retrieval, and why? Explain the theories within a connectionist model.

 

 

CategorizationPapers due Dec. 9th

            Characteristic vs. Essential Features in Categorization**   (limited slots available)

                        --Is categorization of natural kind and artifactual items based on characteristic (or

                        prototypical) or essential features? 

 

HOW TO SUCCEED** IN CLASS

 

**please note that success is defined as learning, rather than earning a high grade.  I will provide you with ALL the tools necessary for learning, but you have to supply the effort to fully process the information.

 

 

1.  Take Thorough notes: Even though lecture outlines are provided for you in the CLIPs system of UTDirect, you should take notes on any additional information I provide (including examples, film clips, discussion, etc.).  You’ll be amazed at how useful examples are to helping you remember key information (but how quickly those examples are forgotten if not written down).

 

 

2.  Re-read notes every day after lecture/discussion.  As you read the corresponding text or articles, take notes from the text into your notes (in a different color ink, preferably), so that all information is integrated & in one place.

 

 

3.  TIME MANAGEMENT!!  All available research points to the advantage of Distributed Practice over Mass Practice (cramming).  Furthermore, for each 3 credit hour class you are taking, you should be spending an additional 6-9 hours studying for that class.  Thus, if you have 15 credit hours, you’ll need a minimum additional 30 hours of studying (15 + 30 = 45 hours.  College is thus a full-time job. 

 

 

4.  Flashcards:  There is a LOT of terminology to learn in cognitive psychology.  Use flashcards with a TERM on one side; a DEFINITION + EXAMPLE on the other.  Then quiz yourself by reading a definition & trying to recall the term (similar to short answer questions on the exam), and by reading the term & trying to recall the definition.

Hint:  Flashcards are most useful as an ongoing endeavor.

 

 

5.  Active Learning

a.  Try to actively process information as you hear it—ask questions if you don’t understand something.  Relate the material to examples from your own life.

 

b.  Read newspaper articles that relate to cognitive psychology topics (e.g., on memory, multi-tasking, statistical reasoning, etc.).

 

c.  Discuss interesting things from class or the readings with friends or classmates or parents.

PSY 333D • Intro To Developmental Psych

44075 • Fall 2009
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm BUR 216
show description

UT-Austin, Fall 2009

 

Dr. Lauretta Reeves T.A.:  Ms. Brooke Schepp

reeves@psy.utexas.edu brooke.schepp@gmail.com

Phone: 471-1206 Office:  Seay 2.214A

Office:  Seay 4.220 Office Hrs:  Tues 2-5 pm

Off. Hours:   Wed. 11 am. – 12 pm

Thurs. 12-1 pm

 

 

INTRO. TO DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY  (PSY 333D)

MWF  1-2  (44075), BUR 216

 

This course will introduce students to physical, social, emotional, perceptual, and cognitive development, from conception to old age.  Both developmental theories, and empirical evidence used to support or deny these theories, will be emphasized.  Assignments will provide students with direct experience with children and adults in different developmental phases.

 

The University of Texas at Austin provides, upon request, appropriate academic accommodations for qualified students with disabilities.  For more information, contact the Office of the Dean of Students at 471-6259, or 471-4641 TTY.

 

 

Prerequisite:  PREREQUISITE: FOR PSYCHOLOGY MAJORS, PSY 301 AND 418 WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C IN EACH, and UPPER DIVISION STANDING; FOR NONMAJORS, PSY 301 WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C, AND 1 OF THE FOLLOWING WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C: BIO 318M, C E 311S, ECO 329, EDP 371, GOV 350K, KIN 373, M 316, PSY 317, SOC 317L, S W 318, STA 309.   

PSY 304 (Child Psychology) AND 333D MAY NOT BOTH BE COUNTED. ONLY 1 OF THE FOLLOWING MAY BE COUNTED: PSY 333D, WGS 345 (TOPIC 6), W S 345 (TOPIC 6).

 

 

Requirements:  Exam questions may include any material from lecture, textbook echapters, the Taking Sides book, or supplemental readings.  Study guides will be made available on the course page in Blackboard at least one week prior to each exam so that students may better organize the material. 

 

3 Exams (100 points each x 3) 300

Nine (of 12) on-line Quizzes   90

Attendance

Issue Analysis   60

450

 

 

Late exams or papers require both a documented reason (e.g., doctor's note or funeral slip) AND approval of instructor.  Please contact Dr. Reeves when extenuating circumstances FIRST occur, or BEFORE the relevant exam or assignment due date to make alternate arrangements.

 

Grading:  A total of 450 points may be accrued throughout the semester.  Attendance & class participation may contribute to raising the grades of students within a few points of the cutoff (but this is NOT guaranteed).   Individual letter grades per exam or assignment will NOT be recorded, only points earned are recorded.

 

 

ALL ASSIGNMENTS MUST BE COMPLETED FOR A FINAL GRADE TO BE ISSUED.  The only exception is that students taking the course Pass/Fail or Credit/No Credit may opt out of EITHER the written assignment or one Exam, but must meet all attendance requirements (including the requisite percentage for the period of the exempted exam).

 

 

   Points needed for Final Grades

A    (94-100%) 423-450  AND at least 90% attendance record

A-   (90-93.5%) 405-422  AND at least 90% attendance record

B+  (87.5-89.5%) 394-404  AND at least 85% attendance record

B    (84-87%) 378-393  AND at least 80% attendance record

B-   (80-83.5%) 360-377  AND at least 80% attendance record

C+  (77.5-79.5%) 349-359  AND at least 80% attendance record

C    (74-77%) 333-348  AND at least 75% attendance record

C-   (70-73.5%) 315-332  AND at least 75% attendance record

D+   (67.5-69.5%) 304-314  AND at least 75% attendance record

D     (64-67%) 288-303  AND at least 70% attendance record

D-    (60-63.5%) 270-287  AND at least 70% attendance record

F      (0-59.5%) 0-269   AND/OR less than 60% attendance

*******************************************************************************************************

 

Required Reading & Texts:   

 

  1. Guest, A. M.  (2007).  Taking Sides:  Clashing Views in Lifespan Development (2nd

edition).  Dubuque, Iowa:  McGraw-Hill Publishers.   

 

2. eChapters 1 (free), 4, 8, from Sigelman & Rider (2006) Life Span Human Development  (5th or 6th Edition), Thomson/Wadsworth.  [Available for $5.99-$7.99 a chapter  with 1st chapter free, from www.ichapters.com]

 

3.  Articles & readings available in Blackboard Course Documents

 

 

Class Expectations

1.  Attendance is mandatory, and will be taken regularly. Much academic benefit is gained from participating in a community of learners.   Less than 60% documented attendance will result in failure for the class.

 

 

2.  Students are expected to keep abreast of reading from both the textbook.  In-class questions and class discussion are encouraged.  Lecture outlines and/or Discussion questions will be provided in Blackboard, but are NOT intended as a substitution for class attendance or the textbook.

Experts advise that students spend 2-3 hours studying out-of-class, per hour of in-class time, in order to earn a passing grade.  This means students should spend an additional 6-9 hours studying Developmental Psychology EACH week of class (not including the time spent in class). 

 

 

3.  Students MUST have an updated email address in UTDirect, and check email at least every 2 days for class announcements.   The instructor and TAs cannot be responsible for missed messages due to full mailboxes, etc.

 

 

4.  Please keep instructor apprised of any extenuating circumstances before they interfere with your work.

 

 

5.  Students are expected to turn in their own work.  Plagiarism or scholastic dishonesty in any form will result in disciplinary penalties, including possible failure in the course and/or dismissal from the University (Section 3.22, Chapter IV, Rules and Regulations of the Board of Regents of the University of Texas System; www.utesystem.edu/bor/tocrrr.htm). 

 

Plagiarism includes all of the following: 

a.  Copying an answer from a classmate or other source during an exam.

 

b.  Borrowing or copying part of another person’s paper during out-of-class assignments.

 

c.  Citing an author’s or researchers’ IDEAS, exact wording, or graphs/figures without giving that person proper credit through an APA-style citation or footnote.

 

d.  Borrowing from, or using outright, papers obtained on-line or through other

sources which I myself have not written or supplied the background research.

 

 

**See http://www.indiana.edu/~wts/wts/plagiarism.html or

http://www.georgetown.edu/honor/plagiarism.html for useful information and examples.]

 

SCHEDULE OF TOPICS

*Required chapters from Sigelman & Rider, Taking Sides book (TS), and supplemental articles in Blackboard (under Course Documents), are  listed in parentheses after each topic.  Some supplemental articles may be added throughout the semester.

 

 

Section 1:  Research Methods, Prenatal Development, & Physical Growth

AUG 26 Introduction 

 

AUG 28 Research Methods Review

Sigelman & Rider, Chapter 1 (from www.ichapters.com)

 

 

AUG 31-SEPT 4 Nature/Nurture in Human Development

Taking Sides #1

ArticlesThe Blank Slate (Pinker)

   Sociobiology & You (Johnson)

   Genetics of Cognitive Abilities & Disabilities

    Are Jews Smarter? (Senior)

 

[SEPT 7 Labor Day—No class]

[SEPT 11 Research Day]

 

 

SEPT 9, 14-18 Genetics  & Prenatal Development

Sigelman & Rider, Chapter 4

ArticlesWhat Makes Us Different? (Lemonick)

    Wikipedia:  Stem Cells

    Making Time for a Baby

    Boyish Brains & Plastics

    Autism & Pesticides

    Putting a New Spin on Human Birth

 

 

21-25 Brain Development

ArticlesFertile Minds (Nash)

    Inside the Brain: Interactive Tour

(http://www.alz.org/alzheimers_disease_4719.asp)

        Mother’s Milk (Carpenter)

    What Makes Teens Tick

    Brain Breakdown begins in 40s

   Growing Effects of Alzheimer’s

 

 

 

28-Oct. 2 Health:  Infancy to Old Age

ArticlesSIDs Research (McKenna)

    Why Johnny Can’t Sleep (Wright)

    Hazards of Children in Adult Beds

   How Safe are Vaccines?

   U.S. Measles Outbreak, 2008

   The U.S. Weighs In

   Stat Consult:  Obesity

   Skinny Models Banned from Catwalk    Surprising Signs You’ll Live to 100

   The Numbers Game:  Risk Factors…Longevity

 

OCT 5 EXAM I

 

 

Section 2:  Social-Emotional Development & The Family

 

OCT 7-12 Attachment 

Articles8 Ideals of Attachment Parenting

Reading Your Baby’s Mind (Wingert, Brant)

    Chinese Orphanages 1996

    Ties that Bind

 

 

 

14-19 Physical & Sexual Abuse, & Bullying

Articles: Victimization of Children (Finkelhor & D-L)

Relative Danger (Tudge)

Sexual Abuse by Priests

Young Lives for Sale (Fang)

Child Sex Tourism  (Nair)

Dealing with Bullying (McIntyre)

 

 

 

21-28 Parenting & The Family

TS 2, 16

ArticlesWhy Our Kids are Out of Control (Azerrad)

    The Power of No  (Tyre et al.) 

    Father Love & Child Development (Rohner)

   What Makes Marriage Work?  (Gottesman)

  The 5 Mistakes Married Women  Make (Bradford)

Divorce Stalks Katrina Survivors (Callebs)

 

 

 

30-Nov 4 Birth Order Effects

ArticlesWikipedia:  Birth Order

    Context-Specific Learning, .. Birth Order (Harris)

Child Perceived Parental Favoritism (Kiracofe)

The New Science of Siblings (Kluger)

Sibling’s Direct Contribution to Child Dev (Brody)

 

NOV 9 EXAM II

 

 

Section 3:  Cognitive & Language Development

NOV 6, 11-13 Education:  Promoting Genius vs. Play

TS 8, 11

ArticlesExtreme Parenting (Quart)

    Mozart Effect:  Sound Beginnings

Long Term Studies of Preschool (Bracey, Stellar)

The New First Grade (Tyre)

  Is Your Kid Really Gifted? (Spencer)

Homeroom Zombies (Epstein)

16-23 Memory Development & Alzheimer’s

Sigelman & Rider, Chapter 8

TS 19

ArticlesLong-Term Recall Memory (Bauer),

   Remembering Early Childhood (Newcombe)

   Maintain Your Brain I, II, and III

  Alzheimer’s (Cowley)

Ten Warning Signs of Alzheimer’s

 

25-27 Autism & Theory of Mind 

Articles: Need to Know Autism (Baron-Cohen)

    Theory of Mind in Autism (Lantz)

Girls, Boys, and Autism (Cowley)

You and Your Quirky Kid (Ali)

Autism & Pesticides

The Autism Diet  (Alpert)    

 

 30-DEC 4 Sex & Gender Differences

TS 3

Articles:   Wikipedia:  Sex and Intelligence

    The Brain His and Hers

    Sizing Up the Sexes (Gorman)

   The Trouble with Boys  (Tyre)

    A Boy Without a Penis

      Gender Bender (Dingfelder)

 

 

EXAM III Friday, December 11th, 2 p.m.

 

HOW TO SUCCEED** IN CLASS

 

**please note that success is defined as learning, rather than earning a high grade.  I will provide you with ALL the tools necessary for learning, but you have to supply the effort to fully process the information.

 

 

1.  Take Thorough notes: Even though lecture outlines are provided for you in the CLIPs system of UTDirect, you should take notes on any additional information I provide (including examples, film clips, discussion, etc.).  You’ll be amazed at how useful examples are to helping you remember key information (but how quickly those examples are forgotten if not written down).

 

 

2.  Re-read notes every day after lecture/discussion.  As you read the corresponding text or articles, take notes from the text into your notes (in a different color ink, preferably), so that all information is integrated & in one place.

 

 

3.  TIME MANAGEMENT!!  All available research points to the advantage of Distributed Practice over Mass Practice (cramming).  Furthermore, for each 3 credit hour class you are taking, you should be spending an additional 6-9 hours studying for that class.  Thus, if you have 15 credit hours, you’ll need a minimum additional 30 hours of studying (15 + 30 = 45 hours.  College is thus a full-time job. 

 

 

4.  Flashcards:  There is a LOT of terminology to learn in development psychology.  Use flashcards with a TERM on one side; a DEFINITION + EXAMPLE on the other.  Then quiz yourself by reading a definition & trying to recall the term (similar to short answer questions on the exam), and by reading the term & trying to recall the definition.

Hint:  Flashcards are most useful as an ongoing endeavor.

 

 

5.  Active Learning

a.  Try to actively process information as you hear it—ask questions if you don’t understand something.  Relate the material to examples from your own life.

 

b.  Regularly use the website connected to the on-line book chapters to study information, develop flashcards, do crossword puzzles, see chapter outlines, and take quizzes at the companion site for the Sigelman & Rider text:   http://www.wadsworth.com/cgi-wadsworth/course_products_wp.pl?fid=M20b&flag=student&product_isbn_issn=9780495553403&disciplinenumber=24

 

c.  Discuss interesting things from class or the readings with friends or classmates or parents.

PSY 355 • Cognition

44185 • Fall 2009
Meets MWF 900-1000 NOA 1.124
show description

UT-Austin, Fall 2009

 

Dr. Lauretta Reeves        T.A.:  Mr. Kyle Walsh

reeves@psy.utexas.edu        kylewalsh@mail.utexas.edu

Phone: 471-1206          Office:  Seay 2.122

Office:  Seay 4.220          Office Hrs:   Monday 10 am-12 pm

Office Hrs:    Wed. 11 am-12 pm          Wed.  10-11 am

        Thurs. 12-1 pm           

 

COGNITION (PSY 355) 

MWF  9-10 a.m., NOA 1.124  (44185) 

This course will expose students to theories and research on a multitude of cognitive processes, including memory, language, attention, and pattern recognition.  Emphasis is on attainment of content knowledge within cognitive psychology, and the development of critical thinking skills. Students are expected to learn how and why research findings support (or disconfirm) the relevant theories about each cognitive process. 

 

Prerequisites:  For Psychology Majors, PSY 301 & 418 with grade of at least C in each, and upper division standing.  For Non-majors, PSY 301 with grade of at least C, & 1 of the following with grade of at least C:  BIO 318M, C E 311S, ECO 329, EDP 371, GOV 350K, KIN 373, M 316, PSY 317, SOC 317L, S W 318, STA 309.

 

**The University of Texas at Austin provides upon request appropriate academic accommodations for qualified students with disabilities.  For more information, contact the Office of the Dean of Students at 471-6259, 471-4641 TTY.

 

Requirements

Exams (3 x 100) 300

Research Paper 100

Lab Report   40

ZAP Experiments (12 x 3 pts.)   36

Attendance ____

TOTAL 476

Grading

A    (94-100%) 447-476  AND at least 90% attendance record

A-   (90-93.5%) 428-446  AND at least 90% attendance record

B+  (87.5-89.5%) 417-427  AND at least 85% attendance record

B    (84-87%) 400-416  AND at least 80% attendance record

B-   (80-83.5%) 381-399  AND at least 80% attendance record

C+  (77.5-79.5%) 369-380  AND at least 75% attendance record

C    (74-77%) 352-368  AND at least 75% attendance record

C-   (70-73.5%) 332-351  AND at least 75% attendance record

D+   (67.5-69.5%) 321-331  AND at least 70% attendance record

D     (64-67%) 305-320  AND at least 70% attendance record

D-    (60-63.5%) 286-304  AND at least 65% attendance record

F      (0-59.5%) 0-285   AND/OR less than 60% attendance


Grading Policy 

1)  Late exams or assignments require both a documented reason (e.g., doctor's note

 or funeral slip) AND approval of instructor.  Please contact Dr. Reeves when

extenuating circumstances FIRST occur, or BEFORE the relevant exam or

assignment due date. 

 

Assignments are considered late if they are not turned in during class of the day on which

they are due.  NO ASSIGNMENTS will be accepted by email without prior approval by

Dr. Reeves. Grades are final; questions and appeals must be made within 2 class periods.

 

 

2)  ALL ASSIGNMENTS MUST BE COMPLETED FOR A FINAL GRADE TO BE ISSUED.  Having earned enough points for a C does not mean a student is exempt from the ZAPs  assignments, the Research Paper, or any Exam. 

 

Credit/No Credit or Pass/Fail option:  You may opt out of one major requirement  (1

Exam OR Research Paper OR Lab Report) AS LONG as you meet the following requirements:  (a) at least 70% of possible points (TOTAL – missed assignment), (b) attendance of at least 75% for EACH Exam section (i.e., 75% before Exam I; 75% between Exam I and II, and 75% between Exam II and III).

 

***************************************************************************************************************

Instructions for ZAPs assignments:  Students must complete 4 ZAPs experiments from each of the 3 topical sections (Memory, Lower Cognitive Processes; Higher Cognitive Processes).  Each experiment is worth 3 points (Total = 36 points).  There will be several extra credit opportunities offered through the semester (with a cap on extra credit points).

 

HOW TO:  Using the Username and Password in the ZAPs package that you ordered, log into http://www.wwnorton.com/zaps/

You must first register with your email address, and the username & password provided in your textbook or the ZAPs package.  Use the following class code to make sure that your data is recorded:  MQ25ZHMC     ONLY perform ZAPs that are listed on the syllabus that follows (no others will count).  Each ZAP must be performed by its due date—no exceptions (the recordkeeping for 12 ZAPs x 90 students is overwhelming). 

 

It is HIGHLY recommended that you keep an exact log of when you did each ZAPs experiment, and if possible, a print out of your data or final screen. 

 

***************************************************************************************************************

 Required  Text & CD: 

 

Weisberg, R.W. & Reeves, L.R. (2009).  Cognition:  From Memory to Creativity  (manuscript).

To be published by Wiley Publishers; available at IT Copy, 512 West MLK.

 

ZAPs! Interactive Experiments (from www.wwnorton.com/college/psych/zaps)

 

Class Expectations

1.  Mandatory Attendance:  attendance will be taken regularly. Much academic benefit is gained from participating in a community of learners.   Less than 70% documented attendance may result in failure of the class.

 

 

2.  Stay up to date:  Read the relevant textbook chapters after we have begun coverage of that topic in class.  Lecture outlines will be provided in Blackboard, but are NOT intended as a substitution for class attendance or the textbook.

Experts advise that students spend 2-3 hours studying out-of-class, per hour of in-class time, in order to earn a passing grade.  This means students should spend an additional 6-9 hours studying Cognitive Psychology EACH week of class (not including the time spent in class). 

 

 

3.  Keep current your email address in UTDirect, as important class-related messages will be sent out regularly.  The instructor and TAs cannot be responsible for missed messages due to full mailboxes, etc.

 

 

4.  Please keep instructor apprised of any extenuating circumstances before they interfere with your work.  I am sympathetic if I know you’re trying.

 

 

5.  No Plagiarism in Any Form:  Students are expected to turn in their own work.  Plagiarism or scholastic dishonesty in any form will result in disciplinary penalties, including possible failure in the course and/or dismissal from the University (Section 3.22, Chapter IV, Rules and Regulations of the Board of Regents of the University of Texas System; www.utesystem.edu/bor/tocrrr.htm). 

 

Plagiarism includes all of the following: 

a.  Copying an answer from a classmate or other source during an exam.

 

b. Borrowing or copying part of another person’s paper during out-of-class assignments.

 

c.  Citing an author’s or researchers’ IDEAS, paper organization, exact wording, or

graphs/figures without giving that person proper credit through an APA-style citation or

footnote.

 

d.  Borrowing from, or using outright, papers obtained on-line or through other

sources which I myself have not written or supplied the background research.

 

 

**See http://www.indiana.edu/~wts/wts/plagiarism.html or

http://www.georgetown.edu/honor/plagiarism.html for useful information and examples.]

 

COURSE SCHEDULE

 

Required  Text & on-line Experiments: 

Weisberg, R.W. & Reeves, L.R. (2009).  Cognition:  From Memory to Creativity (manuscript).

To be published by Wiley Publishers; available at IT Copy, 512 West MLK.

 

ZAPs! Interactive Experiments (from www.wwnorton.com/college/psych/zaps)

 

Required reading/labs:  Textbook/Manuscript chapters are listed in parentheses after each topic; ZAPs experiment assignments and their due dates are in italics under each topic.  ONLY the listed ZAPs will count toward fulfillment of this requirement.

 

Section 1:  History of Cog. Psych. & Memory (+required ZAPs experiments)

AUGUST              26-31            Introduction & History of Cognitive Psychology,

                                                the Information Processing Approach (Chapter 1)

                                                   MUST DO this ZAP (not for points)Signal Detection I  

(due by midnight on Sept 2nd)

 

SEPT                          2-4                        Introduction to Neuroscience (1)

                                                            Split Brain (due Sept 8th)

 

            [Sept 7:  LABOR DAY; no class]

            [Sept 11:  PsycINFO search]

 

9-16                        Amnesia

Implicit Learning  (Sept. 13th)

                                                            PsycINFO search due September 14th

 

                        18-25                        The Multistore Model, Working Memory, & LOP  (2

                                                            Iconic Memory  (due Sept. 17th)

                                                            Memory Span   (due Sept. 17th)

                                                            Operation Span  (due Sept. 17th)

                                                            Sternberg Search (due Sept. 20th)

 

                                               

                        28-30                        Encoding & Retrieval Processes  (3)

Encoding Specificity (Sept. 27th)

Memory Bias  (Sept. 27th)

Recalling Information  (Sept. 27th)

 

OCT                        2-9                        LTM:  Forgetting, Schemata, & Reconstructive Memory  (4)

                                    False Memory (Oct. 1st)

                                    Fan Effect (Oct. 1st)

 

 

OCT                        12                        EXAM I   (Chapters 1, 2, 3, 4)


Section 2:  Lower Cognitive Processes  (+ ZAPs)

OCT                        14-19                        Perception and Pattern Recognition  (5)

                                                            Word Superiority Effect (Oct. 15th)

                                                            Feature Net (Oct.. 15th)  

                                                            Ponzo Illusion (Oct. 15th)

 

                        21-28                        Attention & Automatic Processing  (6)

                                                            Visual Search (Oct. 20th)

Spatial Cuing (Oct. 20th) 

Attentional Blink  (Oct. 20th)

Selective Attention (Oct. 22nd)

Simon Effect (Oct. 22nd) 

 

 

                        30-NOV 4             Mental Imagery    (7)

                                                            Mental Scanning  (Oct. 29th)

                                                            Mental Rotation 2-D  (Oct. 29th)

                                                            Mental Rotation 3-D (Oct. 29th)

 

   NOV              6                        EXAM II   (Chapters 5, 6, 7)  

 

 

Section 3:  Higher Cognitive Processes (+ ZAPs) 

NOV                        9-16                        Language   (9, 10)

                                                            Word Frequency (Nov. 10th)

                                                            Lexical Decision Task  (Nov. 10th)

 

           

                        18-25                        Concepts & Categories  (8)

                                                            Concept Formation  (Nov. 17th)

Sentence Verification  (Nov. 17th)

           

                         30-Dec 4            Decision Making  (11, selected pages)

                                                            Decision Making  (Nov. 29th)

                                                            Prisoner’s Dilemma  (Nov. 29th)

 

                                                            Wason Selection Task (Dec. 6th)

                                                            Syllogisms  (Dec. 6th)

                                                            Gestalt Problem Solving  (Dec. 6th)

                                                            Missionaries & Cannibals (Dec. 6th)

                                                            Misconceptions  (Dec. 6th)

 

 

EXAM III:   Saturday, December 12th, 2 p.m.  (Chapters 8, 9, 10, 11)

 

RESEARCH PAPER TOPICS

The paper assignment requires that students write a research-based, double-spaced, typed paper on a current topic within cognitive psychology.  Papers should be between 5-7 pages; an 8.5-page limit will be enforced.  American Psychological Association style regarding paper structure and citations is to be followed.

            All students will engage in a PsycINFO search (ONLY—do not use any other search engine), and print out 4-5 viable sources (+ abstracts) on that topic.  When writing the paper, do NOT use your PsycINFO sources--Three empirical sources are required, which will be provided for you (in the the Assignments file of Blackboard).  Students are to choose from the following topics, with variable due dates per topic: 

 

*ALL PsycINFO sources are due September 14th*

 

Memory:   Papers due October 21st

            Eyewitness Testimony:  False Memory & Misinformation Effect  

                        --Does post-event misinformation replace the original memory or

                        co-exist with the original memory (but the misinformation is better retrieved?)

 

            Semantic vs. Episodic Memory in Amnesia

                        --Does the evidence from amnesia patients support a double dissociation

                        between semantic and episodic memories?             

 

 

Pattern Recog., Attention, & Imagery:   Papers due Nov. 16th

             Change Blindness

Do we have visual representation of unattended parts of the visual field? What is/are the best explanation/s for change blindness, based on the available evidence? 

 

 

LanguagePapers due Nov. 23rd

            Lexical Ambiguity

                        --Are both meanings of polysemous (multiple meaning) words activated during                                     word recognition, and in what time sequence?  What determines resolution of                                     the final meaning of a word?

 

 

CategorizationPapers due December 9th

            Category Specific Deficits  (limited slots available)

                        Is the cognitive system modularized for recognition of, and retrieval of different

                        kinds of category information, based on evidence from neuropsychology

                        patients?               

 


 

HOW TO SUCCEED** IN CLASS

 

**please note that success is defined as learning, rather than earning a high grade.  I will provide you with ALL the tools necessary for learning, but you have to supply the effort to fully process the information.

 

 

1.  Take Thorough notes: Even though lecture outlines are provided for you in the CLIPs system of UTDirect, you should take notes on any additional information I provide (including examples, film clips, discussion, etc.).  You’ll be amazed at how useful examples are to helping you remember key information (but how quickly those examples are forgotten if not written down).

 

 

2.  Re-read notes every day after lecture/discussion.  As you read the corresponding text or articles, take notes from the text into your notes (in a different color ink, preferably), so that all information is integrated & in one place.

 

 

3.  TIME MANAGEMENT!!  All available research points to the advantage of Distributed Practice over Mass Practice (cramming).  Furthermore, for each 3 credit hour class you are taking, you should be spending an additional 6-9 hours studying for that class.  Thus, if you have 15 credit hours, you’ll need a minimum additional 30 hours of studying (15 + 30 = 45 hours.  College is thus a full-time job. 

 

 

4.  Flashcards:  There is a LOT of terminology to learn in cognitive psychology.  Use flashcards with a TERM on one side; a DEFINITION + EXAMPLE on the other.  Then quiz yourself by reading a definition & trying to recall the term (similar to short answer questions on the exam), and by reading the term & trying to recall the definition.

Hint:  Flashcards are most useful as an ongoing endeavor.

 

 

5.  Active Learning

a.  Try to actively process information as you hear it—ask questions if you don’t understand something.  Relate the material to examples from your own life.

 

b.  Read newspaper articles that relate to cognitive psychology topics (e.g., on memory, multi-tasking, statistical reasoning, etc.).

 

c.  Discuss interesting things from class or the readings with friends or classmates or parents.

PSY 304 • Intro To Child Psychology

86969 • Summer 2009
Meets MTWTHF 100pm-230pm NOA 1.124
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General introduction to physical, social, and cognitive development from conception onward. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Psychology 304 and 333D may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C.

PSY 304 • Intro To Child Psychology

43010 • Spring 2009
Meets MWF 1100-1200 NOA 1.126
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General introduction to physical, social, and cognitive development from conception onward. Three lecture hours a week for one semester.  Psychology 304 an 333D may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C.

PSY 305 • Intro To Cognitive Psychology

43025 • Spring 2009
Meets MWF 900-1000 NOA 1.126
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Introduction to the study of how people perceive, act, communicate, and reason. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequistie: Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C.

 

PSY 333M • Infant Development-W

43120 • Spring 2009
Meets MWF 1200-100pm SEA 2.108
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Examination of genetic and environmental determinants of social, perceptual, and cognitive development in infants from theoretical and research perspectives. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: For psychology majors, upper-division standing and Psychology 301 and 418 with a grade of at least C in each; for nonmajors; upper-division standing, Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C, and one of the following with a grade of at least C: Biology 318M, Civil Engineering 311S, Economics 329, Educational Psychology 371, Government 350K, Mathematics 316, Psychology 317, Sociology 317L, Social Work 318, Statistics 309.

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