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Jacqueline Woolley, Chair The University of Texas at Austin, SEA 4.212, Austin, TX 78712 • (512) 475-7596

Timothy J Schallert

Professor Ph.D., Arizona State University

Distinguished Teaching Professor
Timothy J Schallert

Contact

Biography

Tim Schallert (tschallert@mail.utexas.edu) received his Ph.D. in Behavioral Neuroscience from Arizona State University in 1976. He was a Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and the the Canadian Center for Behaviour and Brain at the University of Lethbridge in Alberta, Canada. In 1979 he moved to The University of Texas at Austin, where he is currently a Professor in the Institute for Neuroscience and Departments of Psychology and Neurobiology. He teaches courses on the effects and mechanism of action of psychoactive drugs and brain-behavior interactions. He was elected to the Academy of Distinguished Teachers and has received several other teaching awards, including the President's Associates Teaching Excellence Award and the Amoco Foundation Teaching Award. He has served on the Executive Committee of the Institute for Neuroscience and as the Graduate Advisor for the Neuroscience Ph.D. program. He was Associate Chairman of the Dept of Psychology from 1985-1994. He is currently an Adjunct Professor in the Department of Neurosurgery at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor and The Center for Human Growth and Development. He is a Fellow of the American Psychological Association, American Psychological Society and the International Behavioral Neuroscience Society, and the Academy of Distinguished Teachers. In the past 8 years, he has given over 100 invited talks about his research at universities and scientific meetings around the world. His research, on recovery of function after brain injury and treatment strategies for stroke, Parkinson's disease, brain tumors and spinal cord injury, has been funded by federal grants for over 30 years.

Institute for Neuroscience

Addiction Science Research and Education Center

Research Interests

The brain and spinal cord are vulnerable to traumatic injury, stroke, tumors and degenerative diseases, often with devastating functional impairments, but at no time in the history of medicine have scientists been as optimistic as they are now about treatment strategies. Understanding how the central nervous system responds to the loss of nerve cells, and how behavior can influence the mechanisms of brain repair, is a major focus of our research.

We develop rat and mouse models of neurological disorders and strive to improve upon existing models. We have a multidisciplinary approach, with extensive collaborative arrangements with experts in other labs on campus, nationally and internationally. Collaborative research projects include searching for novel treatment interventions.

In Parkinson's disease dopamine cells degenerate, eventually leading to severe impairments of movement. Using a new model of slow degeneration, we have investigated gene therapy, drugs and motor enrichment techniques that increase growth factors in the brain. These growth factors appear to keep the dopamine cells from dying, thereby preventing the behavioral dysfunction.

Whereas skilled motor activity protects neurons, behavioral inactivity is detrimental. In cerebral stroke, Parkinson's disease, and other models of brain injury, physical activity and inactivity have only recently been recognized as highly influential. Behavior is often essential for cellular changes, synapse formation and neurogenesis. We look for sensitive periods after brain damage that provide unique opportunities to intervene beneficially.

We have helped to develop a new model of brain cancer. Unlike other models used to examine anti-cancer treatments, our model includes a highly sensitive behavioral analysis of brain function and neural plasticity, which are often adversely affected by traditional anti-cancer interventions. The hope is to use this model to find treatments that can shrink brain tumors without disturbing mechanisms important to optimal brain function. We also want to understand the stealth nature of brain tumors. Tumor cells slowly activate key mechanisms of plasticity which hide their presence despite ever more extensive encroachment on critical brain tissue. In collaboration with investigators at the University of Michigan and Henry Ford Neuroscience Center, we have developed promising chemical interventions that, unlike traditional treatments, appear to stop mitotic activity in tumor cells implanted in the striatum of the brain, without interfering with mechanisms of recovery of function and with a beneficial impact on behavioral outcome due to a positive effect on remaining tissue.

Selected Recent Publications (See VITA for complete list)

Allred R, Adkins D, Woodlee MT, Kane JR, Schallert T, Jones TA (2008) Vermicelli handling: a test for fine dexterous forelimb function in rat models of stroke and parkinsonism. J. Neuroscience Methods, 170: 229-244.

Woodlee MT, Kane JR, Chang J, Cormack LK, Schallert T (2008). Enhanced gait function in the good forelimb of hemi-parkinson rats: Compensatory adaptation for contralateral postural instability. Experimental Neurology, 211: 511-517.

Spinetta MJ, Woodlee MJ, Cormack LK, Schallert K, Stroud C, Schallert T (2008) Alcohol-induced retrograde memory impairment: prevention by caffeine. Psychopharmacology, 201: 361-371.

Ciucci M, Ma TS, Schallert T (2008). Limb use and complex ultrasonic vocalization in a rat model of Parkinson's disease: Deficit-targeted training. Parkinson's Disease and Related Disorders, 14: S172-S175.

Xiong Y, Mahmood A, Lu D, Qu CS, Kazmi H, Goussev A, Zhang ZG, Noguchi, Schallert T, Chopp M. (2008) Histological and functional outcomes after traumatic brain injury in mice null for the erythropoietin receptor in the central nervous system. Brain Research, 1230: 247-257

Plane JM, Whitney JT, Schallert T, Parent JM. (2008) Retinoic acid and environmental enrichment alter subventricular zone and striatal neurogenesis after stroke. Experimental Neurology, 214: 125-134.

Kuroiwa T, Okauchi M, Hua Y, Schallert T, Keep RF, Xi G (2008) Neurological deficits and brain edema after intracerebral hemorrhage in Mongolian gerbils. Acta Neurochir Suppl 105: 127-130.

Xiong, Y., Dunyue, L., Changsheng, Q., Goussev, A., Schallert, T., Mahmood, A., Chopp, M. (2008) Effects of erythropoietin on reducing brain damage and improving functional outcome after traumatic brain injury in mice. Journal of Neurosurgery, 109: 510-521.

Zhao C, Harikainen S, Schallert T, Sivenius J, Jolkkonen J (2008) CNS-active drugs in aging population at high risk of cerebrovascular events: Evidence from preclinical and clinical studies. Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews, 32: 56-71.

Ahrens AM, Ma ST, Maier EY, Duvauchelle CL, Schallert T. (2009) Repeated intravenous amphetamine exposure: Rapid and persistent sensitization of 50-kHz ultrasonic trill calls in rats. Behavioural Brain Research, 197: 205-209. [selected for special merit by Faculty of 1000 Biology]

Ciucci MR, Ahrens A, Ma ST, Kane JR, Windham E.B, Woodlee MT, Schallert T (2009) Reduction of dopamine synaptic activity: Degradation of 50-kHz ultrasonic vocalization in rats. Behavioral Neuroscience, 123: 328-336.

Simola N, Di Chiara G, Daniels WM, Schallert T, Morelli M (2009) Priming of rotational behavior by a dopamine receptor agonist in dopamine-denervated rats: Movement-dependent induction. Neuroscience, 158: 1625-1631.

Byler, SL, Boehm, GW, Karp, JD, Kohman, RA, Tarr, AJ, Schallert, T, & Barth, TM (2008). Systemic lipopolysaccharide plus MPTP as a model of dopamine loss and gait instability in C57Bl/6J mice. Behavioral Brain Research, 198(2):434-439.

Xiong Y, Qu C, Mahmood A, Li Z, Ning R. Li Y, Kaplan DL, Schallert T, Chopp M. (2009) Delayed transplantation of human marrow stromal cell-seeded scaffolds increases transcallosal neural fiber length, angiogenesis, and hippocampal neuronal survival and improves functional outcome after traumatic brain injury in rats. Brain Research, 1263: 183-191

Carlson ES, Tkac I, Magid R, O'Conner MB, Andrews NC, Gunshin H, Schallert T, Georgieff M (2009) Iron is essential for neuron development and memory function in mouse hippocampus. Journal of Nutrition, 139: 672-679.

Pienaar IS, Schallert T, Hattingh S, Daniels WMU (2009) Behavioral and quantitative mitochondrial proteome analyses of the effects of simvastatin: Implications for models of neural degeneration. Journal of Neural Transmission, 116 (7) 791-806 DOI 10.1007/s007-009-0247-4

Simola N, Ma ST, Schallert T (2010) Influence of caffeine on 50 kHz ultrasonic vocalizations in male adult rats and relevance to caffeine-mediated psychopharmacological effects. Int J Neuropsychopharmacol, 13: 123-132

Rojas JC, Simola N, Kermath BA, Kane JR, Schallert T, Gonzales-Lima F (2009) Striatal neuroprotection with methylene blue. Neuroscience, 163 (3) 877-889.

Hicks A, Schallert T, & Jolkkonen J (2009) Cell-based therapies and functional outcome in experimental stroke. Cell Stem Cell, 7: 139-140.

Xiong Y, Mahmood A, Meng Y, Zhang Y Qu C, Schallert T, and Chopp M. (2009) Delayed administration of erythropoietin reduces hippocampal cell loss, enhances angiogenesis and neurogenesis, and improves functional outcome following traumatic brain injury in rats: Comparison of treatment with single dose and triple dose. Journal of Neurosurgery, in press

Zhang Y, Xiong Y, Mahmood A, Meng Y, Qu C, Schallert T, Chopp M. (2009) Therapeutic effects of erythropoietin on histological and functional outcomes following traumatic brain injury in rats are independent of hematocrit. Brain Research, 1294: 153-164.

Okauchi M, Hua Y, Keep RF, Morgenstern LB, Schallert T, Xi G (2010) Deferoxamine treatment for intracerebral hemorrhage in aged rats: therapeutic time window and optimal duration. Stroke, 41, 375-382.

Ma ST, Maier EY, Ahrens AM, Schallert T and Duvauchelle CL (2010) Repeated intravenous cocaine experience: Development and escalation of pre-drug anticipatory 50-kHz ultrasonic vocalizations in rats.  Behavioral Brain Research, 212: 109-114.

Britt JM, Kane JR, Spaeth CS, Zuzek A, Robinson GL, Gbanaglo MY, Estler C, Boydston EA Schallert T, Bittner GD (2010) Polyethylene glycol rapidly restores axonal integrity and improves the rate of motor behavior recovery after sciatic crush injury.  Journal of Neurophysiology, 104: 695-703.

Ciucci MR, Russell J, Conner N & Schallert T (2010) Targeted exercise therapy for voice and swallow in persons with Parkinson's disease. Brain Research, in press.

Maier EY, Ahrens AM, Ma ST, Schallert T, CL Duvauchelle CL (2010) Cocaine deprivation effect: Cue abstinence over weekends boosts anticipatory 50-kHz ultrasonic vocalizations in rats. Behavioural Brain Research, 214, 75-79.

Maier, E. Y., Ma, S.T., Ahrens, A.M., Schallert, T., Duvauchelle, C.L. (2010). Assessment of ultrasonic vocalizations during drug self-administration in rats. Journal of Visualized Experiments (JoVE): http://www.jove.com/index/details.stp?id=2041

Carlson ES, Fretham SJB, Unger E, O'Conner M, Petryk A, Schallert T, Rao R, Tkac I, Georgieff MK (2010). Hippocampus specific iron deficiency alters competition and cooperation between developing memory systems. Journal of Neurodevelopmental Disorders, 2: 133-143.

Xiong Y, Mahmood A, Qu CS, Schallert T. Chopp M. (2010) Erythropoietin improves histological and functional outcomes after traumatic brain injury in mice in the absence of the neural erythropoietin receptor. Journal of Neurotrauma, 27: 205-215.

Kane JR, Ma ST, Ciucci M, Ahrens AM, Schallert T (2011) Fine oro-motor control in a rat model of Parkinson's disease. Journal of Communication Disorders, in press.

Maier EY, Abdalla MI, Ahrens AM, Schallert T, Duvauchelle CL (2011) The missing variable: Ultrasonic vocalizations reveal hidden sensitization and tolerance-like effects during long-term cocaine administration.  Psychopharmacology, in press.

Gil-Perotin S, Haines JD, Jasbir K, Marin-Husstege M, Spinetta MJ, Kim K-H, Duran-Moreno M, Schallert T, Zindy F, Roussel M, Garcia-Verdugo JM, Casaccia P (2011) Roles of p53 and p27Kip1 in the regulation of neurogenesis in the adult subventricular zone.  European Journal of Neuroscience, in press.

 

Interests

Psychopharmacology, physiological basis of motivated behavior, animal behavior, recovery function after brain damage, experimental neurology, and neurochemistry and behavior

PSY 394P • Curr Tpcs In Behav Neurosci

42865 • Spring 2015
Meets W 300pm-600pm SEA 4.244
show description

Current Topics in Behavioral Neuroscience. Brain-behavior relationships, particularly recent research in behavioral neuroscience, including the anatomical and neurochemical mechanisms of behavioral events, and behavioral influences on the brain. Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Neuroscience 394P (Topic 1: Current Topics in Behavioral Neuroscience) and Psychology 394P (Topic 1) may not both be counted.

PSY 396D • Clinical Psychopharmacology

42960 • Spring 2015
Meets W 1000am-100pm SEA 5.106
show description

Same as Neuroscience 396D. Recent findings concerning the mechanisms of action and the behavioral effects of psychoactive drugs, particularly those used in psychiatry. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

PSY 396D • Clinical Psychopharmacology

44000 • Fall 2014
Meets W 430pm-730pm SEA 2.108
show description

Same as Neuroscience 396D. Recent findings concerning the mechanisms of action and the behavioral effects of psychoactive drugs, particularly those used in psychiatry. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

PSY 353K • Psychopharmacology

44105 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm NOA 1.126
show description

The pharmacology and the neurochemical, neurophysiological, and psychological effects of psychoactive drugs, with regard to their use as therapeutic and behavioral research tools. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: For psychology majors, upper-division standing and Psychology 301 and 418 with a grade of at least C in each; for nonmajors, upper-division standing, Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C, and one of the following with a grade of at least C: Biology 318M, Civil Engineering 311S, Economics 329, Educational Psychology 371, Electrical Engineering 351K, Government 350K, Mathematics 316, 362K, Mechanical Engineering 335, Psychology 317, Sociology 317L, Social Work 318, Statistics 309, Statistics and Scientific Computation 302, 303, 304, 305, 306, 318.

PSY 394P • Curr Tpcs In Behav Neurosci

44255 • Spring 2014
Meets W 300pm-600pm SEA 4.244
show description

Current Topics in Behavioral Neuroscience. Brain-behavior relationships, particularly recent research in behavioral neuroscience, including the anatomical and neurochemical mechanisms of behavioral events, and behavioral influences on the brain. Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Neuroscience 394P (Topic 1: Current Topics in Behavioral Neuroscience) and Psychology 394P (Topic 1) may not both be counted.

PSY 394P • Curr Tpcs In Behav Neurosci

43580 • Spring 2013
Meets W 300pm-600pm SEA 4.244
show description

Current Topics in Behavioral Neuroscience. Brain-behavior relationships, particularly recent research in behavioral neuroscience, including the anatomical and neurochemical mechanisms of behavioral events, and behavioral influences on the brain. Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Neuroscience 394P (Topic 1: Current Topics in Behavioral Neuroscience) and Psychology 394P (Topic 1) may not both be counted.

PSY 353K • Psychopharmacology

43360 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm NOA 1.124
show description

This course will cover recent findings concerning the mechanisms of action and the early and long-term behavioral effects and side effects of psychoactive drugs. As the various types of drugs are discussed (e.g., anti-depressants, anti-schizophrenia drugs, anti-parkinson drugs, anti-anxiety drugs, stimulants, sedative-hypnotics, alcohol, opioids, hallucinogenics), the relevant details of brain cell synaptic function and transmitter pathways will be highlighted as needed for an integrated view of drug mechanisms and the neurochemical basis of psychiatric and relevant neurological disorders and substance abuse.

PSY 396D • Clinical Psychopharmacology

43565 • Fall 2012
Meets W 500pm-800pm SEA 2.108
show description

Recent findings concerning the mechanism of action and the behavioral effects of psychoactive drugs, particularly those used in psychiatry.

 

PSY 394P • Curr Tpcs In Behav Neurosci

43440 • Spring 2012
Meets W 300pm-600pm SEA 4.242
show description

Current Topics in Behavioral Neuroscience. Brain-behavior relationships, particularly recent research in behavioral neuroscience, including the anatomical and neurochemical mechanisms of behavioral events, and behavioral influences on the brain. Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Neuroscience 394P (Topic 1: Current Topics in Behavioral Neuroscience) and Psychology 394P (Topic 1) may not both be counted.

PSY 353K • Psychopharmacology

43240 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm NOA 1.126
show description

This course will cover recent findings concerning the mechanisms of action and the early and long-term behavioral effects and side effects of psychoactive drugs. As the various types of drugs are discussed (anti- depressants, anti-schizophrenia drugs, anti-parkinson drugs, anti-anxiety drugs, stimulants, sedative-hypnotics, alcohol, opioids, hallucinogenics), the relevant details of brain cell synaptic function and transmitter pathways will be highlighted as needed for an integrated view of drug mechanisms and the neurochemical basis of psychiatric disorders and substance abuse.

PSY 396D • Clinical Psychopharmacology

43465 • Fall 2011
Meets W 400pm-700pm SEA 2.108
show description

Same as Neuroscience 396D. Recent findings concerning the mechanisms of action and the behavioral effects of psychoactive drugs, particularly those used in psychiatry. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

PSY F353K • Psychopharmacology

87630 • Summer 2011
Meets MTWTHF 100pm-230pm NOA 1.124
show description

 Content:

This course will cover recent findings concerning the mechanisms of action and the behavioral effects and

side effects of psychoactive drugs. As the various types of drugs are discussed (anti-depressants, antischizophrenia

drugs, anti-parkinson drugs, anti-anxiety drugs, stimulants, sedative-hypnotics, alcohol, opioids,

hallucinogenics), the relevant details of brain cell synaptic function and transmitter pathways will be highlighted

as needed for an integrated view of drug mechanisms and the neurochemical basis of psychiatric disorders and

substance abuse.

PSY 394P • Curr Tpcs In Behav Neurosci

43940 • Spring 2011
Meets W 300pm-600pm SEA 4.242
show description

Seminars in Behavioral Neuroscience and Biopsychology. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

PSY 353K • Psychopharmacology

43200 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm NOA 1.126
show description

Prerequisites

PSY 301 with a grade of at least C, and PSY 418 or an equivalent statistics course with a grade of at least C; 3 semester hours of coursework in biology are strongly recommended but not required. Upper-division standing required.

Course Description

This course will survey recent findings concerning the mechanisms of action and the behavioral effects and side effects of psychoactive drugs. As the various types of drugs are discussed (anti-depressants, anti-schizophrenia drugs, anti-parkinson drugs, anti-anxiety drugs, stimulants, sedative-hypnotics, alcohol, opioids, hallucinogenics), the relevant details of brain cell synaptic function and transmitter pathways will be highlighted as needed for an integrated view of drug mechanisms and the neurochemical basis of psychiatric disorders and substance abuse.

It is highly recommended that you will have already taken a biopsychology class or other class in which the action potential and synaptic mechanisms of neuronal cell signaling will have been covered. 

Grading Policy

TBA

Texts

Charles F. Levinthal Drugs, Behavior, and Modern Society Allyn & Bacon 6th ed.

PSY 396D • Clinical Psychopharmacology

43420 • Fall 2010
Meets W 400pm-700pm SEA 2.108
show description

Same as Neuroscience 396D. Recent findings concerning the mechanism of action and the behavioral effects of psychoactive drugs, particularly those used in psychiatry. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

PSY 353K • Psychopharmacology

87125 • Summer 2010
Meets MTWTHF 100pm-230pm NOA 1.126
show description

Prerequisites

PSY 301 with a grade of at least C, and PSY 418 or an equivalent statistics course with a grade of at least C; 3 semester hours of coursework in biology are strongly recommended but not required. Upper-division standing required.

Course Description

This course will survey recent findings concerning the mechanisms of action and the behavioral effects and side effects of psychoactive drugs. As the various types of drugs are discussed (anti-depressants, anti-schizophrenia drugs, anti-parkinson drugs, anti-anxiety drugs, stimulants, sedative-hypnotics, alcohol, opioids, hallucinogenics), the relevant details of brain cell synaptic function and transmitter pathways will be highlighted as needed for an integrated view of drug mechanisms and the neurochemical basis of psychiatric disorders and substance abuse.

It is highly recommended that you will have already taken a biopsychology class or other class in which the action potential and synaptic mechanisms of neuronal cell signaling will have been covered. 

Grading Policy

TBA

Texts

Charles F. Levinthal Drugs, Behavior, and Modern Society Allyn & Bacon 6th ed.

PSY 394P • Curr Tpcs In Behav Neurosci

44100 • Spring 2010
Meets W 300pm-600pm SEA 4.242
(also listed as NEU 394P )
show description

Seminars in Behavioral Neuroscience and Biopsychology. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

PSY 353K • Psychopharmacology

44180 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 1100-1230pm NOA 1.124
show description

Psychopharmacology

Psy 353K; Unique #44180 

Fall 2009

NOA 1.124        TTH 11:00-12:30

 

      

Instructor:   Tim Schallert, Ph.D.        TA:  Jackie Kane

Office:              SEAY 5th Floor 5.246                      SEAY 5th Floor 5.246

Office Hrs:   *TTh 12:30-2:00       MW 11:00-12:30

e-mail: tschallert@mail.utexas.edu               jacquelinerkane@gmail.com

*please inform the instructor before or after class to meet with him in office hours that day                                       

 

Content:

 

            This course will survey recent findings concerning the mechanisms of action and the behavioral effects and side effects of psychoactive drugs.  As the various types of drugs are discussed (anti-depressants, anti-schizophrenia drugs, anti-parkinson drugs, anti-anxiety drugs, stimulants, sedative-hypnotics, alcohol, opioids, hallucinogenics), the relevant details of brain cell synaptic function and transmitter pathways will be highlighted as needed for an integrated view of drug mechanisms and the neurochemical basis of psychiatric disorders and substance abuse.

It is highly recommended that you will have already taken a class in which the action potential and synaptic mechanisms of neuronal cell signaling will have been covered. 

 

Required reading:

 

Drugs, Behavior, and Modern Society

Charles F. Levinthal, 6th Edition, Allyn & Bacon, 2010

 

Exams and Grading Policy:

 

                        Three exams (multiple choice and short answer essays) will be given. The second exam (Nov. 12th) will cover the readings assigned for Sep. 29th - Nov. 10th and will be cumulative over the class notes from the beginning of the class. The third exam (Dec. 3) is the non-cumulative Final Exam. The first exam will be worth 35%, and the second 40%, of the course grade.  Most class days there will be an open-notes quiz, one question, covering that day’s notes (worth 5%). The final exam will be worth 20%. Missing class correlates highly with poor grades, so do NOT miss class. Grades will be based only on performance on the exams and quizzes. The class lectures are essential. Having someone else take notes for you will not substitute for taking your own notes. There will be no opportunity to re-take an exam or write a paper to improve a grade.  Makeup exams may be permitted only for absences with doctor’s excuse, and these will be mostly essay exams (students with doctor’s excuses must contact the TA by email within 2 days after missing the exam to arrange to take the makeup exam). Final grades will include +/- (A, B+, B, B-, C+, C, C-, D+, D, D-, F).

 

Special Needs:

           

            The University of Texas at Austin provides, upon request, appropriate academic accommodations for qualified students with disabilities. Students with disabilities may request appropriate academic accommodations from the Division of Diversity and Community Engagement, Services for Students with Disabilities, 471-6259.

 

           

 


Class Schedule (approximately):

 

Dates                      Topics                                     

 

Aug. 27             Introduction                           

 

 

Sep. 1-22 Basic mechanisms of drug action; Ch. 1-3

            neurotransmitters, synaptic

            transmission, drug abuse,

            tolerance and withdrawal from drugs

 

Sep. 24 Exam 1

 

 

Sep. 29- Major adult psychiatric disorders    Ch. 16                                                               

Oct. 22                   (antidepressants, antipsychotics)  

 

 

Oct. 27-29 Ritalin & ADHD kids; Ch 4

                                          stimulants for attention

 

Nov 3-10 cocaine and amphetamine    Ch. 4

 

 

Nov. 12  Exam 2: some questions may come from pre-Exam-1 lectures

 

 

Nov. 17-24 Barbiturates, alcohol, and                   Ch. 9. 10, 15, 5

               opioid drugs (heroin and related)                                                    

 

(Nov 26) Thanksgiving Holiday

 

 

Dec. 1  Hallucinogens, marijuana Ch. 6, 7                      

 

 

Dec. 3    Final Exam

 

 

 

PSY 396D • Clinical Psychopharmacology

44390 • Fall 2009
Meets W 500pm-800pm SEA 2.108
show description

Same as Neuroscience 396D. Recent findings concerning the mechanism of action and the behavioral effects of psychoactive drugs, particularly those used in psychiatry. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

PSY 394P • Curr Tpcs In Behav Neurosci

43355 • Spring 2009
Meets W 300pm-600pm SEA 4.242
(also listed as NEU 394P )
show description

Current Topics in Behavioral Neuroscience. Brain-behavior relationships, particularly recent research in behavioral neuroscience, including the anatomical and neurochemical mechanisms of behavioral events, and behavioral influences on the brain. Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Neuroscience 394P (Topic 1: Current Topics in Behavioral Neuroscience) and Psychology 394P (Topic 1) may not both be counted.

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