Skip Navigation
UT wordmark
College of Liberal Arts wordmark
rhetoric masthead rhetoric masthead
Jeffrey Walker, Chair PAR 3, Mailcode B5500, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-471-6109

Jacqueline M Henkel

Associate Professor Ph.D., 1985, University of Minnesota

RHE 368E • Grammar: Writ/Editors/Tchrs

43845 • Spring 2015
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am PAR 206
show description

Students in Grammar for Writers, Editors, and Teachers will study the grammar or structure of written English; assess grammatical issues, handbooks, and controversies; and apply grammatical knowledge in composing, rewriting, and editing exercises.  They should expect to learn traditional grammatical vocabulary and also to critique it; to learn about different approaches and attitudes toward “correctness”; to look carefully at the structure of written English; and to edit effectively.

This course is meant for students who:

- want to become more conscious and confident about their own sentence-level editing choices.

- want to know which “rules” to follow and which not.  (If the New York Times can split infinitives, why can’t you?)

 -want to develop grammatical knowledge and conquer “grammar anxiety.” 

- will need to teach grammatical lessons but are unsure of their own knowledge.

(Note:  Students need not begin the course knowing grammatical terminology.)

Assignments and Grading

Minimum requirements are:  1) satisfactory performance both on unannounced and announced quizzes or problems; 2) satisfactory work on writing exercises (1 paragraph-1 page each); 3) satisfactory text analyses (1-2 pages each); 4) effective peer review and workshop participation in class; 5) discussion informed by familiarity with the required readings; and 6) regular attendance. Note that these are minimum requirements.

Grades are based on quizzes and problems (30%); writing exercises (30%); text analyses (10%); peer review, discussion, and workshop performance (30%).  Attendance and courteous classroom behavior are considered essential, and unsatisfactory marks in these areas are deducted from the final average.

Final course grades are assigned relative to the overall performance of the class; in other words, scores are "curved" rather than absolute.  Final grades include "plus" or "minus" grades.  Final class scores may be rounded up or down, according to students' class participation and performance on minor and ungraded assignments.

A grade of C will indicate work that meets all the basic course requirements; A's and B's are honors grades, designating work of some distinction.  Grades are based only on work assigned to everyone in the class; no extra credit work can be accepted.

Required Texts and Course Readings

Kolln, Martha J., and Loretta Gray.  Rhetorical Grammar: Grammatical Choices, Rhetorical Effects, 7th ed., 2012.

Scharton Maurice.  Things Your Grammar Never Told You:  A Pocket Handbook, 2nd ed., Longman, 2001.

David Crystal, The Fight for English: How Language Pundits Ate, Shot, and Left, Oxford UP, 2008.

RHE 325M • Advanced Writing

44760 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm GAR 2.128
show description

Rhetoric 325M is an advanced-level non-fiction writing course. Its aim is to develop already accomplished students into more sophisticated and publishable writers.  During classes, students in the course should expect to complete (and share with others) essay analyses, imitation exercises, sentence-styling assignments, and editing exercises.  Outside of class, students will write two drafts of each of four papers representing familiar kinds of writing tasks:  a personal narrative, a general-audience "translation" of a specialized study or report, a researched persuasive paper, and a manuscript speech.

Assignments and Grading

Minimum requirements are:  1) satisfactory performance on (almost daily) in-class writing exercises; 2) satisfactory work on rough drafts of four papers; 3) a satisfactory average on four final paper drafts; 4) effective peer review and workshop participation; 5) discussion informed by familiarity with the required readings; and 6) regular attendance. Note that these are minimum requirements.

Grades are based on in-class writing exercises (10%); rough drafts (20%); final drafts (60% [longest papers weighted most]); peer review, discussion, and workshop performance (10%).  Attendance and courteous classroom behavior are considered essential, and unsatisfactory marks in these areas are deducted from the final average.

Final course grades are assigned relative to the overall performance of the class; in other words, scores are "curved" rather than absolute.  Final grades include "plus" or "minus" grades.  Final class scores may be rounded up or down, according to students' class participation and performance on minor and ungraded assignments.

A grade of C will indicate work that meets all the basic course requirements; A's and B's are honors grades, designating work of some distinction.  Grades are based only on work assigned to everyone in the class; no extra credit work can be accepted.

Required Texts and Course Readings

--Ruszkiewicz, John.  A Reader's Guide to College Writing, Bedford-St. Martin's, 2014

--Scharton, Maurice.  Things Your Grammar Never Told You:  A Pocket Handbook, 2nd ed., Longman, 2001

--additional on-line reading assignments

RHE 325M • Advanced Writing

45105 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm MEZ 1.102
show description

Rhetoric 325M is an advanced-level non-fiction writing course. Its aim is to develop already skilled students into more polished and publishable writers.  Students in the course should expect to complete (and share with others) several short analyses of others’ prose, imitation exercises, sentence-styling assignments, and editing exercises. 

Assignments and Grading

Minimum requirements are:  1) satisfactory performance on (possible) unannounced quizzes or problems; 2) satisfactory work on writing exercises (1 paragraph-1 page each); 3) satisfactory prose analyses (2 pages each); 4) effective peer review and workshop participation; 5) discussion informed by familiarity with the required readings; and 6) regular attendance. Note that these are minimum requirements.

Grades are based on quizzes and problems (10%); writing exercises (30%); prose analyses (30%); peer review, discussion, and workshop performance (30%).  Attendance and courteous classroom behavior are considered essential, and unsatisfactory marks in these areas are deducted from the final average.

Final course grades are assigned relative to the overall performance of the class; in other words, scores are "curved" rather than absolute.  Final grades include "plus" or "minus" grades.  Final class scores may be rounded up or down, according to students' class participation and performance on minor and ungraded assignments.

A grade of C will indicate work that meets all the basic course requirements; A's and B's are honors grades, designating work of some distinction.  Grades are based only on work assigned to everyone in the class; no extra credit work can be accepted.

Required Texts and Course Readings

--Williams, Joseph, and Joseph Bizup.  Style:  Lessons in Clarity and Grace, 11th ed., Pearson, 2014.

--Scharton Maurice.  Things Your Grammar Never Told You:  A Pocket Handbook, 2nd ed., Longman, 2001.

bottom border