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Jeffrey Walker, Chair PAR 3, Mailcode B5500, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-471-6109

Linda Ferreira-Buckley

Associate Professor Ph. D.

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RHE 321 • Principles Of Rhetoric

44755 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 500pm-630pm PAR 206
show description

The study of rhetoric, one of the original seven Liberal Arts (along with logic, grammar, arithmetic, geometry, astronomy, and music), has a long and proud history, stretching back to the 5th century BCE and up to the present day. Both a productive and interpretive art, it is decidedly cross-disciplinary: the principles of rhetoric (audience, context, kairos, exigency, ethos, pathos, logos, and so forth) are consistently employed, for example, not only in literary analyses but in law, politics, education, science, and religion.

This course will introduce you to common rhetorical principles and to the disciplinary history of rhetoric and writing studies. Assignments in this class will offer you the chance to identify and apply these rhetorical principles while composing, interpreting, and presenting "texts"—oral, print, and/or electronic. (We’ll work on revision and peer review though out the course.) Assignments will include one major collaborative project, six 2-page papers, rhetorical exercises, a midterm and final exam.

You’ll read and discuss significant works from major historical periods (including Classical, Medieval/Renaissance, Early Modern/Modern, and Contemporary) and examine the development of rhetorical practices specific to oral, print, and electronic technologies of interaction. You’ll also do rhetorical analyses of different kinds of texts (e.g., political speeches, advertisements, judicial decisions) to engage with both mainstream and culturally specific rhetorics  (feminist, African American, Native American, queer, etc.) and to read, discuss, and apply at least two different contemporary rhetorical approaches.

TEXTS (tentative)

Crowley & Hawhee, Classical Rhetoric for Contemporary Students

Bizzell & Herzberg, The Rhetoric Tradition

Course packet of readings

Six short papers (& revisions to each): 60%

Collaborative project 20%

Midterm exam 10%

Final exam 10%

Exercises, peer reviews & class participation: mandatory

RHE S330E • Film As Rhetoric

87355 • Summer 2014
Meets MTWTHF 1000am-1130am CLA 0.118
show description

“The words, too, ought to set the scene before our eyes;  for events ought to be seen

in progress rather than in prospect.” Aristotle, Rhetoric

 “[S]ight engraves upon the mind images of things which have been seen. And many frightening impressions linger, and what lingers is exactly analogous to [what is] spoken.” Gorgias, “Encomium of Helen”

 This course is designed to examine films as rhetorical acts that serve as powerful function in the American polis. Their status as popular entertainment sometimes obscures viewers’ perception of films as a vehicle of persuasion. In what ways does film function as rhetoric, which Kant labeled as “the art of deceiving by a beautiful show” aiming “to win minds to the side of the orator before they have formed a judgment and to deprive them of their freedom”?  Is the director the rhetor, or is the message framed more collaboratively by, say, the director, screen writer, actors? 

We will attempt to answer these and similar question as we discuss approximately 7 to 10 films that students have viewed for class (no more than 1 film per week).  The syllabus will be organized around signal rhetorical concepts, which we discuss in class and which students will use to analyze films in 8 short response papers.  Additionally, students will keep a dialectical journal. Students will develop one longer paper on a film of their choice not viewed or discussed in class.  They develop their over the second half of the semester, during which time it will be reviewed by peers,  presented in a conference with the instructor and, finally, revised and submitted for a grade.

This course does not study cinematic technique though we will occasionally draw on technical terminology and concepts as we discuss how film makers use images, movements, and sound to rhetorical effect.

Assignments and Grading

40%            8 response papers, 1 to 2 pages each

40%            1 longer paper, 6 to 9 pages

10%            quizzes

10%            final exam

Peer reviews, revisions, attendance, participation  all required to pass course.

Required Texts and Course Readings

Films:

Crash

Lincoln

Mulan

Thank You for Smoking

The Great Debaters

The King’s Speech

Film nominated and selected by students to be integrated into syllabus

Texts:

Barry Brummett, Rhetorical Dimensions in Popular Culture

Course packet to include:

Robert Arnett, “The Enthymeme and Contemporary Film Criticism.”

Laurence Behrens, “The Argument in Film: Applying Rhetorical Theory to Film Criticism.”

Wayne Booth, “Is There an ‘Implied’ Author in Every Film?”

Michael Carter, “Stasis and Kairos: Principles of Social Construction in Classical Rhetoric”

Pauline Kael, “Pauline Kael Talks About Violence, Sex, Eroticism and Women & Men in the Movies,”

from Conversations with Pauline Kael.

James Naremore, “Death and Rebirth of Rhetoric,” In Senses of Cinema

Chaim Perelman, “The Social Contexts of Argumentation.”

Colleen Tremonte, “Film, Classical Rhetoric, and Visual Literacy”

Annalee R. Ward, “Disney, Film, and Morality”  &  “Mulan: East Meets West”

              in Mouse Morality: Rhetoric in Disney Animated Films

Trinh T. Minh-ha. “‘Who Is Speaking?’ Of Nation, Community, and First-Person Interviews”

              from Feminisms in the Cinema

Other:

Dartmouth Writing Program, “Writing About Film,” http://www.dartmouth.edu/~writing/materials/student/humanities/film.shtml

Movie Speeches.” American Rhetoric. <http://www.americanrhetoric.com/moviespeeches.htm>

Internet Movie Database (IMDb), http://www.imdb.com/

Yale, “Film Analysis Website 2.0,” http://classes.yale.edu/film-analysis/index.htm

RHE 330E • Film As Rhetoric

45145 • Spring 2014
Meets MW 330pm-500pm GAR 0.128
show description

“The words, too, ought to set the scene before our eyes;  for events ought to be seen in progress rather than in prospect.” Aristotle, Rhetoric

“[S]ight engraves upon the mind images of things which have been seen. And many frightening impressions linger, and what lingers is exactly analogous to [what is] spoken.” Gorgias, “Encomium of Helen”

This course is designed to examine films as rhetorical acts that serve as powerful function in the American polis. Their status as popular entertainment sometimes obscures viewers’ perception of films as a vehicle of persuasion. In what ways does film function as rhetoric, which Kant labeled as “the art of deceiving by a beautiful show” aiming “to win minds to the side of the orator before they have formed a judgment and to deprive them of their freedom”?  Is the director the rhetor, or is the message framed more collaboratively by, say, the director, screen writer, actors? 

We will attempt to answer these and similar question as we discuss approximately 7 to 10 films that students have viewed for class (no more than 1 film per week).  The syllabus will be organized around signal rhetorical concepts, which we discuss in class and which students will use to analyze films in 8 short response papers.  Additionally, students will keep a dialectical journal. Students will develop one longer paper on a film of their choice not viewed or discussed in class.  They develop their over the second half of the semester, during which time it will be reviewed by peers,  presented in a conference with the instructor and, finally, revised and submitted for a grade.

This course does not study cinematic technique though we will occasionally draw on technical terminology and concepts as we discuss how film makers use images, movements, and sound to rhetorical effect.

Assignments and Grading

40%            8 response papers, 1 to 2 pages each

40%            1 longer paper, 6 to 9 pages

10%            quizzes

10%            final exam

Peer reviews, revisions, attendance, participation  all required to pass course.

Required Texts and Course Readings

Films:

Crash

Lincoln

Mulan

Thank You for Smoking

The Great Debaters

The King’s Speech

Film nominated and selected by students to be integrated into syllabus

Texts:

Barry Brummett, Rhetorical Dimensions in Popular Culture

Course packet to include:

Robert Arnett, “The Enthymeme and Contemporary Film Criticism.”

Laurence Behrens, “The Argument in Film: Applying Rhetorical Theory to Film Criticism.”

Wayne Booth, “Is There an ‘Implied’ Author in Every Film?”

Michael Carter, “Stasis and Kairos: Principles of Social Construction in Classical Rhetoric”

Pauline Kael, “Pauline Kael Talks About Violence, Sex, Eroticism and Women & Men in the Movies,”

from Conversations with Pauline Kael.

James Naremore, “Death and Rebirth of Rhetoric,” In Senses of Cinema

Chaim Perelman, “The Social Contexts of Argumentation.”

Colleen Tremonte, “Film, Classical Rhetoric, and Visual Literacy”

Annalee R. Ward, “Disney, Film, and Morality”  &  “Mulan: East Meets West”

              in Mouse Morality: Rhetoric in Disney Animated Films

Trinh T. Minh-ha. “‘Who Is Speaking?’ Of Nation, Community, and First-Person Interviews”

              from Feminisms in the Cinema

Other:

Dartmouth Writing Program, “Writing About Film,” http://www.dartmouth.edu/~writing/materials/student/humanities/film.shtml

Movie Speeches.” American Rhetoric. <http://www.americanrhetoric.com/moviespeeches.htm>

Internet Movie Database (IMDb), http://www.imdb.com/

Yale, “Film Analysis Website 2.0,” http://classes.yale.edu/film-analysis/index.htm

RHE 330E • Film As Rhetoric

44865 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 500pm-630pm MEZ 1.208
show description

 “The words, too, ought to set the scene before our eyes;  for events ought to be seen in progress rather than in prospect.” Aristotle, Rhetoric

“[S]ight engraves upon the mind images of things which have been seen. And many frightening impressions linger, and what lingers is exactly analogous to [what is] spoken.” Gorgias, “Encomium of Helen”

This course is designed to examine films as rhetorical acts that serve as powerful function in the American polis. Their status as popular entertainment sometimes obscures viewers’ perception of films as a vehicle of persuasion. In what ways does film function as rhetoric, which Kant labeled as “the art of deceiving by a beautiful show” aiming “to win minds to the side of the orator before they have formed a judgment and to deprive them of their freedom”?  Is the director the rhetor, or is the message framed more collaboratively by, say, the director, screen writer, actors? 

We will attempt to answer these and similar question as we discuss approximately 7 to 10 films that students have viewed for class (no more than 1 film per week).  The syllabus will be organized around signal rhetorical concepts, which we discuss in class and which students will use to analyze films in 8 short response papers.  Additionally, students will keep a dialectical journal. Students will develop one longer paper on a film of their choice not viewed or discussed in class.  They develop their over the second half of the semester, during which time it will be reviewed by peers,  presented in a conference with the instructor and, finally, revised and submitted for a grade.

This course does not study cinematic technique though we will occasionally draw on technical terminology and concepts as we discuss how film makers use images, movements, and sound to rhetorical effect.

Assignments and Grading

40%            8 response papers, 1 to 2 pages each

40%            1 longer paper, 6 to 9 pages

10%            quizzes

10%            final exam

Peer reviews, revisions, attendance, participation  all required to pass course.

Required Texts and Course Readings

Films:

Crash

Lincoln

Mulan

Thank You for Smoking

The Great Debaters

The King’s Speech

Film nominated and selected by students to be integrated into syllabus

Texts:

Barry Brummett, Rhetorical Dimensions in Popular Culture

Course packet to include:

Robert Arnett, “The Enthymeme and Contemporary Film Criticism.”

Laurence Behrens, “The Argument in Film: Applying Rhetorical Theory to Film Criticism.”

Wayne Booth, “Is There an ‘Implied’ Author in Every Film?”

Michael Carter, “Stasis and Kairos: Principles of Social Construction in Classical Rhetoric”

Pauline Kael, “Pauline Kael Talks About Violence, Sex, Eroticism and Women & Men in the Movies,”

from Conversations with Pauline Kael.

James Naremore, “Death and Rebirth of Rhetoric,” In Senses of Cinema

Chaim Perelman, “The Social Contexts of Argumentation.”

Colleen Tremonte, “Film, Classical Rhetoric, and Visual Literacy”

Annalee R. Ward, “Disney, Film, and Morality”  &  “Mulan: East Meets West” in Mouse Morality: Rhetoric in Disney Animated Films

Trinh T. Minh-ha. “‘Who Is Speaking?’ Of Nation, Community, and First-Person Interviews” from Feminisms in the Cinema

Other:

Dartmouth Writing Program, “Writing About Film"

Movie Speeches - American Rhetoric

Internet Movie Database (IMDb)

Yale, “Film Analysis Website 2.0,”

RHE 321 • Principles Of Rhetoric

44365 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm PAR 304
show description

The study of rhetoric, one of the original seven Liberal Arts (along with logic, grammar, arithmetic, geometry, astronomy, and music), has a long and proud history, stretching back to the 5th century BCE and up to the present day. Both a productive and interpretive art, it is decidedly cross-disciplinary: the principles of rhetoric (audience, context, kairos, exigency, ethos, pathos, logos, and so forth) are consistently employed, for example, not only in literary analyses but in law, politics, education, science, and religion.

This course will introduce you to common rhetorical principles and to the disciplinary history of rhetoric and writing studies. Assignments in this class will offer you the chance to identify and apply these rhetorical principles while composing, interpreting, and presenting "texts"—oral, print, and/or electronic. (We’ll work on revision and peer review though out the course.) Assignments will include one major collaborative project, six 2-page papers, rhetorical exercises, a midterm and final exam.

 You’ll read and discuss significant works from major historical periods (including Classical, Medieval/Renaissance, Early Modern/Modern, and Contemporary) and examine the development of rhetorical practices specific to oral, print, and electronic technologies of interaction. You’ll also do rhetorical analyses of different kinds of texts (e.g., political speeches, advertisements, judicial decisions) to engage with both mainstream and culturally specific rhetorics  (feminist, African American, Native American, queer, etc.) and to read, discuss, and apply at least two different contemporary rhetorical approaches.

Texts (Tentative)

Crowley & Hawhee, Classical Rhetoric for Contemporary Students

Bizzell & Herzberg, The Rhetoric Tradition

Course packet of readings

Assignments and Grading

Six short papers (& revisions to each): 60%

Collaborative project 20%

Midterm exam 10%

Final exam 10%

Exercises, peer reviews & class participation: mandatory

RHE 321 • Principles Of Rhetoric

44035 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 500pm-630pm PAR 208
show description

The study of rhetoric, one of the original seven Liberal Arts (along with logic, grammar, arithmetic, geometry, astronomy, and music), has a long and proud history, stretching back to the 5th century BCE and up to the present day. Both a productive and interpretive art, it is decidedly cross-disciplinary: the principles of rhetoric (audience, context, kairos, exigency, ethos, pathos, logos, and so forth) are consistently employed, for example, not only in literary analyses but in law, politics, education, science, and religion.

This course will introduce you to common rhetorical principles and to the disciplinary history of rhetoric and writing studies. Assignments in this class will offer you the chance to identify and apply these rhetorical principles while composing, interpreting, and presenting "texts"—oral, print, and/or electronic. (We’ll work on revision and peer review though out the course.) Assignments will include one major collaborative project, six 2-page papers, rhetorical exercises, a midterm and final exam.

You’ll read and discuss significant works from major historical periods (including Classical, Medieval/Renaissance, Early Modern/Modern, and Contemporary) and examine the development of rhetorical practices specific to oral, print, and electronic technologies of interaction. You’ll also do rhetorical analyses of different kinds of texts (e.g., political speeches, advertisements, judicial decisions) to engage with both mainstream and culturally specific rhetorics  (feminist, African American, Native American, queer, etc.) and to read, discuss, and apply at least two different contemporary rhetorical approaches.

TEXTS (tentative)

Crowley & Hawhee, Classical Rhetoric for Contemporary Students

Bizzell & Herzberg, The Rhetoric Tradition

Course packet of readings

GRADING

Six short papers (& revisions to each): 60%

Collaborative project 20%

Midterm exam 10%

Final exam 10%

Exercises, peer reviews & class participation: mandatory

RHE F321 • Principles Of Rhetoric

88000 • Summer 2011
Meets MTWTHF 830am-1000am GEA 127
show description

The study of rhetoric, one of the original seven Liberal Arts (along with logic, grammar, arithmetic, geometry, astronomy, and music), has a long and proud history, stretching back to the 5th century BCE and up to the present day. Both a productive and interpretive art, it is decidedly cross-disciplinary: the principles of rhetoric (audience, context, kairos, exigency, ethos, pathos, logos, and so forth) are consistently employed, for example, not only in literary analyses but in law, politics, education, science, and religion.

This course will introduce you to common rhetorical principles and to the disciplinary history of rhetoric and writing studies. Assignments in this class will offer you the chance to identify and apply these rhetorical principles while composing, interpreting, and presenting "texts"—oral, print, and/or electronic. (We’ll work on revision and peer review though out the course.) Assignments will include one major collaborative project, six 2-page papers, rhetorical exercises, a midterm and final exam.

You’ll read and discuss significant works from major historical periods (including Classical, Medieval/Renaissance, Early Modern/Modern, and Contemporary) and examine the development of rhetorical practices specific to oral, print, and electronic technologies of interaction. You’ll also do rhetorical analyses of different kinds of texts (e.g., political speeches, advertisements, judicial decisions) to engage with both mainstream and culturally specific rhetorics  (feminist, African American, Native American, queer, etc.) and to read, discuss, and apply at least two different contemporary rhetorical approaches.

Assignments and Grading

Six short papers (& revisions to each): 60%

Collaborative project 20%

Midterm exam 10%

Final exam 10%

Exercises, peer reviews & class participation: mandatory

Texts (tentative)

Crowley & Hawhee, Classical Rhetoric for Contemporary Students

Bizzell & Herzberg, The Rhetoric Tradition

Course packet of readings

 

RHE 321 • Principles Of Rhetoric

44080 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm PAR 208
show description

The study of rhetoric, one of the original seven Liberal Arts (along with logic, grammar, arithmetic, geometry, astronomy, and music), has a long and proud history, stretching back to the 5th century BCE and up to the present day. Both a productive and interpretive art, it is decidedly cross-disciplinary: the principles of rhetoric (audience, context, kairos, exigency, ethos, pathos, logos, and so forth) are consistently employed, for example, not only in literary analyses but in law, politics, education, science, and religion.

This course will introduce you to common rhetorical principles and to the disciplinary history of rhetoric and writing studies. Assignments in this class will offer you the chance to identify and apply these rhetorical principles while composing, interpreting, and presenting "texts"—oral, print, and/or electronic. (We’ll work on revision and peer review though out the course.) Assignments will include one major collaborative project, six 2-page papers, rhetorical exercises, a midterm and final exam.

You’ll read and discuss significant works from major historical periods (including Classical, Medieval/Renaissance, Early Modern/Modern, and Contemporary) and examine the development of rhetorical practices specific to oral, print, and electronic technologies of interaction. You’ll also do rhetorical analyses of different kinds of texts (e.g., political speeches, advertisements, judicial decisions) to engage with both mainstream and culturally specific rhetorics  (feminist, African American, Native American, queer, etc.) and to read, discuss, and apply at least two different contemporary rhetorical approaches.

Texts (tentative)
Crowley & Hawhee, Classical Rhetoric for Contemporary Students
Bizzell & Herzberg, The Rhetoric Tradition
Course packet of readings

Grading
Six short papers (& revisions to each): 60%
Collaborative project 20%
Midterm exam 10%
Final exam 10%
Exercises, peer reviews & class participation: mandatory

RHE 321 • Principles Of Rhetoric-W

87555 • Summer 2010
Meets MTWTHF 830am-1000am MEZ 1.202
show description

The study of rhetoric, one of the original seven Liberal Arts (along with logic, grammar, arithmetic, geometry, astronomy, and music), has a long and proud history, stretching back to the 5th century BCE and up to the present day. Both a productive and interpretive art, it is decidedly cross-disciplinary: the principles of rhetoric (audience, context, kairos, exigency, ethos, pathos, logos, and so forth) are consistently employed, for example, not only in literary analyses but in law, politics, education, science, and religion.

This course will introduce you to common rhetorical principles and to the disciplinary history of rhetoric and writing studies. Assignments in this class will offer you the chance to identify and apply these rhetorical principles while composing, interpreting, and presenting "texts" oral, print, and/or electronic. (We'll work on revision and peer review though out the course.) Assignments will include one major collaborative project, six 2-page papers, rhetorical exercises, a midterm and final exam.

You'll read and discuss significant works from major historical periods (including Classical, Medieval/Renaissance, Early Modern/Modern, and Contemporary) and examine the development of rhetorical practices specific to oral, print, and electronic technologies of interaction. You'll also do rhetorical analyses of different kinds of texts (e.g., political speeches, advertisements, judicial decisions) to engage with both mainstream and culturally specific rhetorics (feminist, African American, Native American, queer, etc.) and to read, discuss, and apply at least two different contemporary rhetorical approaches.

Grading Policy

Six short papers (& revisions to each): 60%
Collaborative project 20%
Midterm exam 10%
Final exam 10%
Exercises, peer reviews & class participation: mandatory

Texts

Crowley & Hawhee, Classical Rhetoric for Contemporary Students

Bizzell & Herzberg, The Rhetorical Tradition
Course packet of readings

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