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Jeffrey Walker, Chair PAR 3, Mailcode B5500, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-471-6109

Rasha Diab

Assistant Professor Ph.D., Composition and Rhetoric, 2009, University of Wisconsin-Madison

RHE 321 • Principles Of Rhetoric

43750 • Spring 2015
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm MEZ 1.208
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The study of rhetoric, one of the original seven Liberal Arts (along with logic, grammar, arithmetic, geometry, astronomy, and music), has a  long and proud history, stretching back to the 5th century BCE and up to the present day.  Both a productive and interpretive art, it is decidedly cross-disciplinary: the principles of rhetoric (audience, context, kairos, exigency, ethos, pathos, logos, and so forth) are consistently employed, for example, not only in literary analysis but in law, politics, education, science, and religion.

This course introduces students to common rhetorical principles and to the disciplinary history of rhetoric and writing studies.  Assignments in the class will offer students the chance to identify and apply these rhetorical principles while composing, interpreting, and presenting “texts”—oral, print, and/or electronic.   The course will meet all necessary requirements to qualify as an writing flag course.

At the end of the term, students should be able to:

(1) Write an effective rhetorical analysis.

(2) Write a responsible argument relevant to a contested issue.

(3) Discourse about some of the major issues in the field (such as: What is the relationship between truth and language? How do technologies of communication affect discourse? What is "good" public argument? What constitutes a quality rhetorical education? and so on.)

(4) Situate the significance of some of the canonical figures in rhetorical studies.

(5) Apply the basic principles of rhetorical study, as mentioned above, to contemporary situations.

RHE 330D • Rhet Inventd/Revised/Retold

43805 • Spring 2015
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm PAR 306
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In this course, we will examine how rhetoric has been theorized, taught, practiced and revisited. Throughout its history, different voices have shaped what rhetoric is and its function in a community. At times, these different understandings of rhetoric expanded and at others narrowed rhetorical territory. Moreover, social, political, intellectual, historical changes can facilitate and mandate a revision and a retelling of rhetoric.

In this course, we will revisit and critically engage the writings of key figures exemplifying rhetoric in antiquity; medieval; renaissance; enlightenment periods. We will also explore modern times, needs and challenges, studying how the work of, for example, Kenneth Burke, Chaim Perelman, Lucie Olbrechts-Tyteca, Jacquline Royster, Susan Jarratt and others impact our conception of rhetoric today.

Focusing on how rhetoric is revisited and retold, we will explore some influential revisions of rhetoric. These revisions continue to expand rhetoric’s territory beyond that conceived in antiquity. We will investigate revisions that uncovered women’s rhetorical contributions (Royster; Glenn); different rhetorical traditions; the intersections of culture, race, nation, etc. and rhetoric. For example, we will explore how scholars continue to shed light on the nuances of rhetoric especially when it intersects with facets of our experiential, relational and material lives including culture, ability, race, etc.

Requirements and Grading Policy

Students’ performance will be assessed based on an achievement rubric detailed at the beginning of the semester.   

Major assignments will include:

-       Two researched, peer reviewed, and substantially revised research papers

-       Short assignments

-       Participation (class participation, oral report/leading class discussion/individual or group presentation)

-       Attendance (attendance policy detailed at the beginning of the semester)

Texts May Include (but will not be limited to):

-       A history of rhetoric book

-       Primary readings will include Aristotle’s Rhetoric, Plato’s Gorgias, Cicero’s De Oratore

-       A course reader including selections from Keith Gilyard, Cheryl Glenn, Martin Bernal, Krista Ratcliffe, Susan Jarrett, LuMing Mao, Jackie Royster, and others.

RHE 330E • Peacemaking Rhetoric

44815 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm PAR 208
show description

Very often we invoke peace as a desirable state of being and of the world. But, what is peace? What does it take to be peaceful? To what extent does our criticism of violence help us get closer to peace? What does peace have to do with rhetoric? We will use these questions to begin our explorations of the rhetoric of peacemaking. The discipline of rhetoric has an enduring investment in countering injustice and pursuing justice and peace.

 In this course, we will explore this enduring investment. In specific terms, we will study the (1) relation between rhetoric, violence, and peacemaking, (2) ways in which our rhetorical practices can cause/exacerbate conflict or guide us to peacemaking, and (3) rhetorical choices, practices and stances that are consistent with developing peaceful communication styles.

As we reflect on the rhetoric of peacemaking, we will read scholarship on the rhetoric of nonviolence, reconciliation, and (human) rights. We will also read exemplary speeches critiquing injustice and advocating for justice and peace.

Major Assignments and Grading

Two researched and substantially revised papers: 70% (35% each)

Two presentations: overview of research undertaken and major findings: 10% (5% each)

Participation: class participation/leading class discussions, responses to freewriting prompts, and short writing assignments: 20%

Required Texts

A packet of readings,which will include:

  • Chapters from books like Erik Doxtader’s With Faith in the Works of Words: The Beginnings of Reconciliation in South Africa 1985-1995; Ellen Gorsevski’s Peaceful Persuasion: The Geopolitics of Nonviolent Communication; and Colleen E. Kelley and Anna L. Eblen’s Women Who Speak for Peace; and John P. Lederach’s The Moral Imagination: The Art and Soul of Building Peace.
  • Journal articleslike Do Kyun Kim’s “Embodied Hope: Nonviolent Rhetoric and Peacemaking Actions” and James J. Kimble “John F. Kennedy, the Construction of Peace, and the Pitfalls of Androgynous Rhetoric.”
  • Speeches like John F. Kennedy’s “The Strategy of Peace,” Mahatma Gandhi’s  speech on the eve of the last fast, and Martin L. King’s “I have a Dream.”

RHE 330E • Comparative Rhetoric

44820 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm PAR 308
show description

What does culture have to do with rhetoric? This question taps into a crucial force that impacts rhetorical practices and scholarship, and this intersection of rhetoric and culture has attracted the attention of scholars especially since second half of the 21st century, resulting in the development of comparative rhetoric. In this course we will study the conception, development and practice of rhetoric in different and mainly non-Western cultural traditions. For example, we will survey research on rhetorical traditions like ancient Indian, Egyptian, and Rhodian, demonstrating how they predate, relate to and differ from those in Greece and Rome. We will also discuss the objectives, achievement, and potential of research in comparative rhetoric as well as challenges posed by this kind of research. 

Course Requirements, Assignment and Grade Distribution

 Class Activities and Discussions (20%)

- Participating in and/or leading class discussion

- Peer review workshops

- Oral report/presentation of research

- Short Assignments

Short Papers (20%)

- Writing five short response/reflection papers to further explore and engage topics and questions addressed in class.

Two Research Papers (30% each)

- Further explore and reflect on issues raised by the course drawing on outside research.  Both papers will involve producing multiple drafts.

More detailed instructions, expectations and grading criterion will be provided at the beginning of the semester, and might be modified based on students’ performance.

Attendance

Attendance policy will be detailed at the beginning of the semester.

Potential Texts

- Selections from George Kennedy’s Comparative rhetoric (1998)

- Selections from Carol Lipson and Roberta Binkley’s two edited collections titled Rhetoric before and beyond the Greeks (2004)and Ancient Non-Greek Rhetorics (2009)

- Packet of readings

RHE 330E • Peacemaking Rhetoric

45150 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm PAR 308
show description

Very often we invoke peace as a desirable state of being and of the world. But, what is peace? What does it take to be peaceful? To what extent does our criticism of violence help us get closer to peace? What does peace have to do with rhetoric? We will use these questions to begin our explorations of the rhetoric of peacemaking. The discipline of rhetoric has an enduring investment in countering injustice and pursuing justice and peace.

In this course, we will explore this enduring investment. In specific terms, we will study the (1) relation between rhetoric, violence, and peacemaking, (2) ways in which our rhetorical practices can cause/exacerbate conflict or guide us to peacemaking, and (3) rhetorical choices, practices and stances that are consistent with developing peaceful communication styles.

As we reflect on the rhetoric of peacemaking, we will read scholarship on the rhetoric of nonviolence, reconciliation, and (human) rights. We will also read exemplary speeches critiquing injustice and advocating for justice and peace.

Major Assignments and Grading

Two researched and substantially revised papers: 70% (35% each)

Two presentations: overview of research undertaken and major findings: 10% (5% each)

Participation: class participation/leading class discussions, responses to freewriting prompts, and short writing assignments: 20%

Required Texts

A packet of readings,which will include:

  • Chapters from books like Erik Doxtader’s With Faith in the Works of Words: The Beginnings of Reconciliation in South Africa 1985-1995; Ellen Gorsevski’s Peaceful Persuasion: The Geopolitics of Nonviolent Communication; and Colleen E. Kelley and Anna L. Eblen’s Women Who Speak for Peace; and John P. Lederach’s The Moral Imagination: The Art and Soul of Building Peace.
  • Journal articleslike Do Kyun Kim’s “Embodied Hope: Nonviolent Rhetoric and Peacemaking Actions” and James J. Kimble “John F. Kennedy, the Construction of Peace, and the Pitfalls of Androgynous Rhetoric.”
  • Speeches like John F. Kennedy’s “The Strategy of Peace,” Mahatma Gandhi’s  speech on the eve of the last fast, and Martin L. King’s “I have a Dream.”

RHE 379C • Feminist Histories Of Rhetoric

45185 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm PAR 103
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Are there women rhetors? Are there female theorists of rhetoric? What do rhetoric scholars have to say about these two questions? In this class, you will mainly focus on finding out answers to these three questions.  In this exploration the class will focus on three central concepts: feminist scholarship; historiography; and rhetoric. We will study feminist historiography of rhetoric that seeks to recover the work of female rhetors and theorists of rhetoric. They reread and rewrite the history of rhetoric to

  • recover the contribution of women to rhetoric,
  • reexamine our definition(s) of rhetoric, and
  • revise our understanding of the functions, forms and goals of rhetoric.

As they take a rhetorical approach to the study of rhetoric, feminist scholars analyze a variety of rhetorical practices from antiquity until modern times, recovering rhetorical practices of women from the West, Near East and Far East including women like, Enheduanna, Aspasia, Christine de Pizan, Mary Astell, Sojourner Truth, Rigoberta Menchú, Zitkala-Ša and many others.

Assignments and Grading

  • Two researched and substantially revised papers (70% of the total grade).
  • Two presentations (10%): Overview of research undertaken and major findings.
  • Participation (20%): Class participation/leading class discussions, responses to freewriting prompts, and short writing assignments.

Required Texts and Course Readings

Chapters from edited collections and books like  Lindal Buchanan and Kathleen J. Ryan’s Walking and Talking Feminist Rhetorics: Landmark Essays and Controversies; Eileen Schell and Kim Rawson’s Rhetorica in Motion; Andrea Lunsford’s Reclaiming Rhetorica: Women in the Rhetorical Tradition; Chandra Mohanty’s Feminism Without Borders: Decolonizing Theory, Practicing Solidarity; Jacqueline Jones Royster and Ann Marie Mann Simpkins’ Calling Cards: Theory and Practice in the Study of Race, Gender, and Culture; Jacqueline Jones Royster’s Traces of a Stream: Literacy and Social Change among African American Women.

Primary Texts include speeches, articles, and hymns like Sojourner Truth’ “Ain’t I a woman;” an article by Zitkala-Ša; a hymn by Enheduanna; an excerpt from Rigoberta Menchú’s testimonio.

 

RHE 330D • Rhet Invented/Revised/Retold

44855 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm PAR 308
show description

In this course, we will examine how rhetoric has been theorized, taught, practiced and revisited. Throughout its history, different voices have shaped what rhetoric is and its function in a community. At times, these different understandings of rhetoric expanded and at others narrowed rhetorical territory. Moreover, social, political, intellectual, historical changes can facilitate and mandate a revision and a retelling of rhetoric.

In this course, we will revisit and critically engage the writings of key figures exemplifying rhetoric in antiquity; medieval; renaissance; enlightenment periods. We will also explore modern times, needs and challenges, studying how the work of, for example, Kenneth Burke, Chaim Perelman, Lucie Olbrechts-Tyteca, Jacquline Royster, Susan Jarratt and others impact our conception of rhetoric today.

Focusing on how rhetoric is revisited and retold, we will explore some influential revisions of rhetoric. These revisions continue to expand rhetoric’s territory beyond that conceived in antiquity. We will investigate revisions that uncovered women’s rhetorical contributions (Royster; Glenn); different rhetorical traditions; the intersections of culture, race, nation, etc. and rhetoric. For example, we will explore how scholars continue to shed light on the nuances of rhetoric especially when it intersects with facets of our experiential, relational and material lives including culture, ability, race, etc.

Requirements and Grading Policy

Students’ performance will be assessed based on an achievement rubric detailed at the beginning of the semester.   

Major assignments will include:

-       Two researched, peer reviewed, and substantially revised research papers

-       Short assignments

-       Participation (class participation, oral report/leading class discussion/individual or group presentation)

-       Attendance (attendance policy detailed at the beginning of the semester)

Texts May Include (but will not be limited to):

-       A history of rhetoric book

-       Primary readings will include Aristotle’s Rhetoric, Plato’s Gorgias, Cicero’s De Oratore

-       A course reader including selections from Keith Gilyard, Cheryl Glenn, Martin Bernal, Krista Ratcliffe, Susan Jarrett, LuMing Mao, Jackie Royster, and others.

RHE 330E • Peacemaking Rhetoric

44430 • Spring 2013
Meets MW 330pm-500pm PAR 208
show description

Very often we invoke peace as a desirable state of being and of the world. But, what is peace? What does it take to be peaceful? To what extent does our criticism of violence help us get closer to peace? What does peace have to do with rhetoric? We will use these questions to begin our explorations of the rhetoric of peacemaking. The discipline of rhetoric has an enduring investment in countering injustice and pursuing justice and peace.

In this course, we will explore this enduring investment. In specific terms, we will study the (1) relation between rhetoric, violence, and peacemaking, (2) ways in which our rhetorical practices can cause/exacerbate conflict or guide us to peacemaking, and (3) rhetorical choices, practices and stances that are consistent with developing peaceful communication styles.

As we reflect on the rhetoric of peacemaking, we will read scholarship on the rhetoric of nonviolence, reconciliation, and (human) rights. We will also read exemplary speeches critiquing injustice and advocating for justice and peace.

Major Assignments and Grading

Two researched and substantially revised papers: 70% (35% each)

Two presentations: overview of research undertaken and major findings: 10% (5% each)

Participation: class participation/leading class discussions, responses to freewriting prompts, and short writing assignments: 20%

Required Texts

A packet of readings,which will include:

  • Chapters from books like Erik Doxtader’s With Faith in the Works of Words: The Beginnings of Reconciliation in South Africa 1985-1995; Ellen Gorsevski’s Peaceful Persuasion: The Geopolitics of Nonviolent Communication; and Colleen E. Kelley and Anna L. Eblen’s Women Who Speak for Peace; and John P. Lederach’s The Moral Imagination: The Art and Soul of Building Peace.
  • Journal articleslike Do Kyun Kim’s “Embodied Hope: Nonviolent Rhetoric and Peacemaking Actions” and James J. Kimble “John F. Kennedy, the Construction of Peace, and the Pitfalls of Androgynous Rhetoric.”
  • Speeches like John F. Kennedy’s “The Strategy of Peace,” Mahatma Gandhi’s  speech on the eve of the last fast, and Martin L. King’s “I have a Dream.”

RHE 330E • Comparative Rhetoric

44235 • Spring 2012
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm PAR 208
show description

What does culture have to do with rhetoric? This question taps into a crucial force that impacts rhetorical practices and scholarship, and this intersection of rhetoric and culture has attracted the attention of scholars especially since the late 1950s, resulting in the development of comparative rhetoric. In this course we will study the conception, development and practice of rhetoric in different and mainly non-Western cultural traditions. For example, we will survey research on rhetorical traditions like ancient Indian, Egyptian, and Rhodian, demonstrating how they predate, relate to and differ from those in Greece and Rome. We will also discuss the objectives, achievement, and potential of research in comparative rhetoric as well as challenges posed by this kind of research.  

Course Requirements, Assignment and Grade Distribution

Class Activities and Discussions (20%)

- Participating in and/or leading class discussion

- Peer review workshops

- Oral report/presentation of research

- Short Assignments

Short Papers (20%)

- Writing five short response/reflection papers to further explore and engage topics and questions addressed in class.

Two Research Papers (30% each)

- Further explore and reflect on issues raised by the course drawing on outside research.  Both papers will involve producing multiple drafts.

More detailed instructions, expectations and grading criterion will be provided at the beginning of the semester, and might be modified based on students’ performance.

Attendance

Attendance policy will be detailed at the beginning of the semester.

Potential Texts

- Selections from George Kennedy’s Comparative rhetoric (1998)

- Selections from Carol Lipson and Roberta Binkley’s two edited collections titled Rhetoric before and beyond the Greeks (2004) and Ancient Non-Greek Rhetorics (2009)

- Packet of readings

RHE 330D • Rhet Invented/Revised/Retold

44795 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm PAR 304
show description

In this course, we will examine how rhetoric has been theorized, taught, practiced and revisited. Throughout its history, different voices have shaped what rhetoric is and its function in a community. At times, these different understandings of rhetoric expanded and at others narrowed rhetorical territory. Moreover, social, political, intellectual, historical changes can facilitate and mandate a revision and a retelling of rhetoric.

In this course, we will revisit and critically engage the writings of key figures exemplifying rhetoric in antiquity; medieval; renaissance; enlightenment periods. We will also explore modern times, needs and challenges, exploring how the work of Mikhail Bakhtin, Kenneth Burke, Chaim Perelman, Michel Foucault and others impact our conception of rhetoric today.

Focusing on how rhetoric is revisited and retold, we will explore some influential revisions of rhetoric. These revisions continue to expand rhetoric’s territory beyond that conceived in antiquity. We will investigate revisions that uncovered women’s rhetorical contributions (Royster; Glenn); different rhetorical traditions; the intersections of culture, race, nation, etc. and rhetoric. For example, we will explore how scholars continue to shed light on the nuances of rhetoric especially when it intersects with facets of our experiential, relational and material lives including culture, ability, race, etc.

Requirements and Grading Policy

Students’ performance will be assessed based on an achievement rubric detailed at the beginning of the semester.   

Major assignments will include:

-- Two researched and substantially revised research papers (7 to 10 pages), each peer reviewed
-- Short assignments
-- Participation (class participation, oral report/leading class discussion/individual or group presentation)
-- Attendance (attendance policy detailed at the beginning of the semester)

Texts May Include (but will not be limited to):

-- Primary readings will include Aristotle’s Rhetoric, Plato’s Gorgias, Cicero’s De Oratore.
-- A course reader including selections from Keith Gilyard, Kenneth Burke, Chaim Perelman, Saint Augustine, Erasmus, Glenn, Martin Bernal, Krista Ratcliffe, Wayne Booth, Susan Jarrett, George. Kennedy, LuMing Mao, Jackie Royster, and others.

RHE 330E • Comparative Rhetoric

44805 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm PAR 208
show description

What does culture have to do with rhetoric? This question taps into a crucial force that impacts rhetorical practices and scholarship, and this intersection of rhetoric and culture has attracted the attention of scholars especially since the late 1950s, resulting in the development of comparative rhetoric. In this course we will study the conception, development and practice of rhetoric in different and mainly non-Western cultural traditions. For example, we will survey research on rhetorical traditions like ancient Indian, Egyptian, and Rhodian, demonstrating how they predate, relate to and differ from those in Greece and Rome. We will also discuss the objectives, achievement, and potential of research in comparative rhetoric as well as challenges posed by this kind of research.  

Course Requirements, Assignment and Grade Distribution

Class Activities and Discussions (20%)
- Participating in and/or leading class discussion
- Peer review workshops
- Oral report/presentation of research
- Short Assignments

Short Papers (20%)
- Writing five short response/reflection papers to further explore and engage topics and questions addressed in class.

Two Research Papers (30% each)
- Further explore and reflect on issues raised by the course drawing on outside research.  Both papers will involve producing multiple drafts.

More detailed instructions, expectations and grading criterion will be provided at the beginning of the semester, and might be modified based on students’ performance.

Attendance
Attendance policy will be detailed at the beginning of the semester.

Potential Texts
- Selections from George Kennedy’s Comparative rhetoric (1998)
- Selections from Carol Lipson and Roberta Binkley’s two edited collections titled Rhetoric before and beyond the Greeks (2004) and Ancient Non-Greek Rhetorics (2009)
- Packet of readings

RHE 330E • Comparative Rhetoric

44125 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm BEN 1.126
show description

What does culture have to do with rhetoric? This question taps into a crucial force that impacts rhetorical practices and scholarship, and this intersection of rhetoric and culture has attracted the attention of scholars especially since the late 1950s, resulting in the development of comparative rhetoric. In this course we will study the conception, development and practice of rhetoric in different and mainly non-Western cultural traditions. For example, we will survey research on rhetorical traditions like ancient Indian, Egyptian, and Rhodian, demonstrating how they predate, relate to and differ from those in Greece and Rome. We will also discuss the objectives, achievement, and potential of research in comparative rhetoric as well as challenges posed by this kind of research.  

Course Requirements, Assignment and Grade Distribution

Class Activities and Discussions (20%)
- Participating in and/or leading class discussion
- Peer review workshops
- Oral report/presentation of research
- Short Assignments

Short Papers (20%)
- Writing five short response/reflection papers to further explore and engage topics and questions addressed in class.

Two Research Papers (30% each)
- Further explore and reflect on issues raised by the course drawing on outside research.  Both papers will involve producing multiple drafts.

More detailed instructions, expectations and grading criterion will be provided at the beginning of the semester, and might be modified based on students’ performance.

Attendance
Attendance policy will be detailed at the beginning of the semester.

Potential Texts

- Selections from George Kennedy’s Comparative rhetoric (1998)
- Selections from Carol Lipson and Roberta Binkley’s two edited collections titled Rhetoric before and beyond the Greeks (2004) and Ancient Non-Greek Rhetorics (2009)
- Packet of readings

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