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Mary Neuburger, Chair BUR 452, 2505 University Avenue, Stop F3600, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-471-3607

Keith Livers

Associate Professor Ph.D., University of Michigan

Keith Livers

Contact

RUS 325 • Third-Year Russian II

45830 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm BEN 1.124
show description

Course Content: This course is the sixth semester of Russian language instruction. It is a practical advanced all-round language course, based on the communicative-functional approach to language learning. We have two goals:

  • Develop functional linguistic proficiency in the four basic skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing.
  • Acquire practical linguo-cultural competence, encompassing both high and popular culture.

The textbook by Rifkin, a systematic review of Russian grammar, serves as a skeleton for the course structure. It will be supplemented by Paperno’s DVD course, with a plethora of multi-media materials, along with various other authentic materials determined by student interest, to develop listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Special attention will be paid to the contemporary mass media not only as linguistic material, but also as a point of access to Russian culture in its various forms. The course is conducted in Russian. At the end of the year, most students should have achieved a proficiency level of 2 on the ILR scale (comparable to Advanced on the ACTFL scale).

Prerequisites: Grade C or higher in Russian 324 here at UT Austin or the equivalent: two-and-a-half years (five semesters) of formal study or a demonstrated proficiency level of 1+ on the ILR scale (equivalent to Intermediate-high on the ACTFL scale).

Course Requirements: You are expected to attend classes regularly, participate actively in class, do all assigned coursework (written, oral, and preparatory), and take all quizzes and exams.

Readings:   Course pack containing all relevant materials

Grading

The components of the course grade and their relative weights are:

  • 4 in-class exams (контрольные работы): 50%
  • Vocabulary quizzes (словарные тесты): 10%
  • Homework assignments (домашние задания): 15%
    • Homework assignments should be submitted on the day they are due. No late assignments will be accepted. I will only grant extensions for family or medical emergencies, with my explicit advance permission.
    • In order to receive credit, you must submit each written assignment in its entirety on a separate full-size sheet of paper identified by the date for which it was assigned (e.g., Домашнее задание на 15 января).
  • Reading project (дополнительное чтение): 5%
  • Class participation (работа на занятии): 10%. Participation is based on attendance, active involvement in class activities, and preparedness (which includes familiarity with grammar explanations assigned for reading at home).
  • Oral proficiency exam (устный экзамен) at the end of the semester: 10%

RUS 324 • Third-Year Russian I

45595 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm NOA 1.110
show description

Prerequisites: Two years (four semesters) of formal study or the equivalent: a proficiency level of 1 on the ILR scale (equivalent to Intermediate-low or Intermediate‑mid on the ACTFL scale).

Course Content: This course is the fifth semester of Russian language instruction. It is a practical advanced all-round language course, based on the communicative-functional approach to language. We have two goals. The first is to develop functional linguistic proficiency in the four basic skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The second is to develop practical linguo-cultural competence, encompassing both high and popular culture. The textbook, a systematic review of Russian grammar, serves as a skeleton for the course structure. It will be supplemented by various authentic materials in different media developing listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Special attention will be paid to the contemporary mass media not only as linguistic material, but also as a point of access to Russian culture in its various forms. The course is conducted in Russian. At the end of the year (after this course and its successor Russian 325), most students should have achieved a proficiency level of 2 on the ILR scale (comparable to Advanced on the ACTFL scale).

Textbook:           

  • Benjamin Rifkin, Grammatika v kontekste. Russian grammar in literary contexts. McGraw-Hill, 1996. ISBN-10: 007-052831-4.

Recommended reference sources (not required):

Katzner, Kenneth. English-Russian, Russian-English Dictionary. 2nd ed. (John Wiley & Sons, 1994). ISBN: 978-0-471-01707-3.

Wade, Terence. A Comprehensive Russian Grammar. 3rd ed. (John Wiley & Sons, 2000). ISBN: 978-1-4051-3639-6.

Gerhart, Genevra. The Russian's World. 3rd ed. (Slavica Publishers, 2001). ISBN: 978-0-893-57293-8.

Grading. The components of the course grade and their relative weights are:

  • Unit exams: 40%
  • Daily homework assignments: 20%
  • Class participation: 20%
  • Cultural project: composition and oral presentation: 10%
  • Oral proficiency exams (mid-term and end-of-semester): 10%

There is no final in the course. Plus/minus grading will apply.

Please contact the instructor if you have any questions.

RUS 360 • Major Works Of Dostoevsky

45610 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm RLM 5.122
(also listed as C L 323, CTI 345, E 322, EUS 347, REE 325 )
show description

This course explores the dilemmas of homicide, suicide, patricide and redemption in the novels of Fyodor Dostoevsky — Russia’s greatest chronicler of human suffering and triumph. Over the course of the semester we will read a number of Dostoevsky’s greatest works, including Notes From Underground, Crime and Punishment and The Brothers Karamazov. At the same time, we will look at the contemporary intellectual and social trends relevant to the development of Dostoevsky’s career as a writer and thinker.

Required Texts:

Fyodor Dostoevsky, Notes From Underground, tr. Richard Pevear & Larissa Volokhonsky

Fyodor Dostoevsky, Crime and Punishment, tr. Richard Pevear & Larissa Volokhonsky

Fyodor Dostoevsky, The Brothers Karamazov, tr. Richard Pevear & Larissa Volokhonsky

Fyodor Dostoevsky, Great Short Works of Fyodor Dostoevsky

READINGS SHOULD BE COMPLETED BY DATE INDICATED BELOW

Most classes will consist of both lecture and discussion.  Since part of the course grade is based on informed participation, it is imperative that you do ALL of the readings by the day in which they appear in the syllabus. 

СOURSE REQUIREMENTS:

 

            1. Regular attendance/participation

            2. Completion of required readings by date indicated in          syllabus

            3. Course work/Course Credit:

            3 essays (5-6 pages each): 70%   

            Participation: 20%

            4. Attendance: 10%

RUS 325 • Third-Year Russian II

45155 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm MEZ 1.118
show description

This course is the sixth semester of Russian language instruction, the natural successor to Russian 324 offered in the fall. It is a practical advanced all-round language course, based on the communicative-functional approach to language. We have two goals. The first is to develop functional linguistic proficiency in the four basic skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The second is to develop practical linguo-cultural competence, encompassing both high and popular culture. The textbook, a systematic review of Russian grammar, serves as a skeleton for the course structure. It will be supplemented by various authentic materials in different media developing listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Special attention will be paid to the contemporary mass media not only as linguistic material, but also as a point of access to Russian culture in its various forms. The course is conducted in Russian. At the end of the course most students should have achieved a proficiency level of 2 on the ILR scale (comparable to Advanced on the ACTFL scale).

RUS 330 • Contemporary Russian Cinema

45025 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm SZB 284
(also listed as REE 325 )
show description

This course will use both contemporary Russian film as a means of exploring the confusion that resulted from the demise of the Soviet Union in 1991 and the search for a new sense of identity in Russia throughout the 1990s and early 2000s. We will look at the work of Russia's best contemporary (and not quite so contemporary) directors, such as Pavel Lungin,  Aleksei Balabanov, Nikita Mikhalkov, Andrei Zviaginstev and Aleksandr Sokurov as an entry-point into the soul of contemporary Russia.

Requirements: Active in-class participation, three 6-page papers and one presentation (approx. 15 minute presentation) with a partner.

Required/recommended films: 

The Brother (1997), Aleksei Balabanov

Close to Eden (1993), Nikita Mikhalkov

Father and Son (2003), Aleksandr Sokurov

Four (2003), Ilya Krzhanovskii

House of Fools (2002), Andrei Konchalovsky

Luna Park (1991), Pavel Lungin

Mermaid (2007), Anna Melikyan

Nightwatch (2004), Timur Bekmabetov

Of Freaks and Men (1997), Aleksei Balabanov

Prisoner of the Mountains (1996), Sergei Bodrov

The Return (2003), Andrei Zviagintsev

Russian Ark (2002), Aleksandr Sokurov

Siberian Barber (1998), Nikita Mikhalkov

The Thief (1997), Pavel Chukhrai

Grading:

Participation   20%

3 essays (5-6 pages) 60%

1 presentation 20%

RUS 356 • Consprcy Contemp Amer/Rus Cul

45030 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm PAR 301
(also listed as REE 325 )
show description

There is no denying that conspiracy thinking has become an important—perhaps even unavoidable—part of the cultural landscape in the past decades. The spectrum of paranoia in contemporary (American) culture extends from fiction to film and television, and beyond. This course examines a rich and constantly growing body of conspiracist expression, from such historical texts as The Protocols of the Elders of Zion to the intricately woven fictional worlds of Phillip K. Dick, Don DeLillo, Thomas Pynchon and Viktor Pelevin. We will also be looking at such pop cultural explorations of the theme as Chris Carter’s The X-Files, Wachowski Brothers’ The Matrix, and Timur Bekmambetov’s Night/Day Watch. Theoretical works by Jodi Dean, Peter Knight, Daniel Pipes and others will be used to provide a theoretical frame for the primary materials.

Required Texts:

Dick, Phillip K. Ubik.

DeLillo, Don. Libra.

Pelevin, Viktor. Homo Zapiens

Pynchon, Thomas. The Crying of Lot 49.

Pelevin, Viktor. Homo Zapiens.

Pelevin, Viktor. Omon Ra.

Sorokin, Vladimir. The Ice Trilogy

Grading:

Three essays: 70%

Presentation: 20%

Participation: 10%            

RUS 325 • Third-Year Russian II

44985 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm PAR 310
show description

This course is the sixth semester of Russian language instruction, the natural successor to Russian 324 offered in the fall. It is a practical advanced all-round language course, based on the communicative-functional approach to language. We have two goals. The first is to develop functional linguistic proficiency in the four basic skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The second is to develop practical linguo-cultural competence, encompassing both high and popular culture. The textbook, a systematic review of Russian grammar, serves as a skeleton for the course structure. It will be supplemented by various authentic materials in different media developing listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Special attention will be paid to the contemporary mass media not only as linguistic material, but also as a point of access to Russian culture in its various forms. The course is conducted in Russian. At the end of the course most students should have achieved a proficiency level of 2 on the ILR scale (comparable to Advanced on the ACTFL scale).

RUS 324 • Third-Year Russian I

44807 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm MEZ 1.204
show description

Course Content: This is the fifth semester of Russian language instruction. Our goal in the course is do develop a working proficiency in the four basic skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing. The textbook provides the student with a systematic review of Russian grammar and will be used as the basic skeleton of the course. It will be supplemented using authentic materials taken from the contemporary Russian media. The course is conducted in Russian. At the end of the year (after taking Russian 325), most students should have achieved a proficiency level of 2 on the ILR scale (comparable to Advanced on the ACTFL scale).

Grading. The components of the course grade and their relative weights are:

• Unit exams: 40%

• Daily homework assignments: 20%

• Class participation: 20%

• Cultural project: composition and oral presentation: 10%

• Oral proficiency exams (end-of-semester): 10%

There is no final in the course. Plus/minus grading will apply.

Please contact the instructor if you have any questions.

RUS 360 • Major Works Of Dostoevsky

44832 • Fall 2011
Meets MW 400pm-530pm PAR 301
(also listed as CTI 345, REE 325 )
show description

Course Description

This course explores the dilemmas of homicide, suicide, patricide and redemption in the novels of Fyodor Dostoevsky—Russia’s greatest chronicler of human suffering and triumph.  Over the course we will immerse ourselves in three of Dostoevsky’s most important works—Notes From the Underground, Crime and Punishment, and finally The Brothers Karamazov. At the same time, we will look at the contemporary intellectual and social trends, as well as the political realities relevant to the development of Dostoevsky’s career as a writer and thinker.  In addition, we will view several film adaptations of these works.  Classes will consist of lecture and discussion. All readings are in English.

Texts:

Fyodor Dostoevsky, Notes From Underground, tr. Michael Katz (Norton Critical Edition)

Fyodor Dostoevsky, Crime and Punishment, tr. Richard Pevear & Larissa Volkhonsky

Fyodor Dostoevsky, The Brothers Karamazov, tr. Richard Pevear & Larissa Volkhonsky

Course pack (available at Speedway in Dobie Mall

Requirements and Grading

Two short essays (3 pages)                        30%

Long Essay (10 pages)                              40%

In-Class Presentation                                10%

Quizzes/Informed Participation/In

Class Discussion                                       20%

NOTE:  Course essays are an opportunity for you to explore in greater depth the issues raised in lectures and class discussions.  They DO NOT require you to do extensive outside/secondary research.  First and foremost, they should be based on an informed and creative reading of the texts in question.  If you are interested in finding out more about Dostovsky on the internet, I suggest that you go to the following site:  http://222.kiosek.com/dostoevsky/links.html.

Prerequisites

Upper Division Standing.

RUS 412L • Second-Year Russian II

45535 • Spring 2011
Meets MTWTH 1100am-1200pm MEZ 1.210
show description

This course is the fourth semester of Russian language instruction developing functional proficiency in the four basic skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. This semester we will cover Units 6 through 10 of the textbook, devoting ten class days to instruction for each unit. The goal is to achieve an active vocabulary of 1600-2000 words and an oral proficiency level of what is called `Intermediate Mid’ or `Intermediate High’, as defined by the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages

RUS 330 • Contemporary Russian Cinema

45560 • Spring 2011
Meets MWF 300pm-400pm PAR 206
(also listed as REE 325 )
show description

This course will use both contemporary Russian film as a means of exploring the confusion that resulted from the demise of the Soviet Union in 1991 and the search for a new sense of identity in Russia throughout the 1990s and early 2000s. We will look at the work of Russia's best contemporary (and not quite so contemporary) directors, such as Pavel Lungin,  Aleksei Balabanov, Nikita Mikhalkov, Andrei Zviaginstev and Aleksandr Sokurov as an entry-point into the soul of contemporary Russia.

RUS 360 • Major Works Of Dostoevsky

44930 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm PAR 101
(also listed as CTI 345, REE 325 )
show description

Course Description

This course explores the dilemmas of homicide, suicide, patricide and redemption in the novels of Fyodor Dostoevsky—Russia’s greatest chronicler of human suffering and triumph. Over the course of the session we will read three of Dostoevsky’s most important works—Notes From the Underground, Crime and Punishment and finally The Brothers Karamazov. Contemporary intellectual and social trends, as well as the political realities relevant to the development of Dostoevsky’s career as a writer and thinker will be included as the necessary background for understanding Dostoevsky’s career. In addition, we will view several film adaptations of these works. Classes will consist of lecture and discussion.

Texts:

Notes From Underground, ed. & tr. Michael Katz

Crime and Punishment, tr. Larissa Volkhonsky & Richard Pevear 

Demons, tr. Larissa Volkhonsky & Richard Pevear 

The Brothers Karamozov, tr. Larissa Volkhonsky & Richard Pevear 

Requirements and Grading

5-7 page essay         20%

Rewrite                   15%

5-7 page essay         20%

Mid term                  10%

Final                           10%

Weekly critiques         15%

Attendance                  5%

Prerequisites

Upper division standing or consent of the instructor.

 

RUS 324 • Third-Year Russian I

87805 • Summer 2010
Meets MTWTHF 830am-1000am CAL 422
show description

ADVANCED RUSSIAN I

Class time:

M-F: 8:30 – 10:00, CALHOUN 422.

Office hours: M,W, 1:00 – 2:00.

 

Required texts:

1. S.Rosengrant, E.Lifschitz, Focus on Russian, John Wiley&Sons, 2nd edition, 1996;

 

Course description: The purpose of this course is to increase students’ vocabulary and to review those grammatical points that are most troublesome for the students at this level. Special attention will be given to the development of writing skills by writing compositions on assigned topics. Supplemental readings will facilitate the development of reading proficiency.

 

Class time will be devoted primarily to exercises, oral and writing practice, listening comprehension practice, and discussions of readings.

 

Grade Breakdown:

Exams: - Tests/exams 70%

Participation, classwork, home work: grammar exercises, reading assignments -30%

Total: 100%

 Schedule

 

Расписание занятий на главу 1: «Щи да каша, пища наша».

 

Лексическая тема: питание, изготовление пищи

Грамматическая тема: родительный падеж множественного числа, verbs of putting/placing.

 

Домашнее задание на четверг, 3 июня

Intros. Reading Handout.

 

Домашнее задание на пятницу, 4 июня

Глава 1, стр. 1-18. Vocab., vocab notes, grammar.

Упражнения 3,4.

 

Домашнее задание на понедельник, 7 июня.

Глава 1, Выучить все глаголы на странице 4, упр 7-8.

Квиз по глаголам.

 

Домашнее задание на вторник, 8 июня.

Глава 1, упр. 9-10, Чтение (стр. 21), отвечайте на вопросы (стр. 21).

 

Домашнее задание на cреду, 9 июня

Глава 1, Cочинение (стр. 22), упр. 2 (стр. 23).

 

Домашнее задание на четверг, 10 июня

Подготовка к контрольной.

 

Домашнее задание на пятницу, 11 июня.

КОНТРОЛЬНАЯ ПО ПЕРВОЙ ГЛАВЕ.

 

            Расписание занятий на главу 2: «В гостях хорошо, а дома лучше»

 

Лексическая тема: цвета и мебель

Грамматическая тема: прилагательные (краткая форма) (adjectives, short form), наречия (adverbs), существительные-определения (nouns as modifiers), измерения (measurement)

 

Домашнее задание на понедельник, 14 июня.

Глава 2, Vocab. and vocab. notes, grammar, стр. 27-40, упр. 2-3.

 

Домашнее задание на вторник, 15 июня

Глава 2, стр. 40-43, упр. 4, 6.

КВИЗ (мебель)

 

Домашнее задание на cреду, 16 июня

Глава 2, стр. 43-47, упр. 7-8. Чтение (стр. 47).

 

Домашнее задание на четверг, 17 июня

Глава 2, Сочинение: Моя квартира (или мой дом). Опишите вашу квартиру. Расскажите, где что находится. Какой ремонт вы бы провели, чтобы сделать её более привлекательной? Упр. 3 (стр. 50).

 

Домашнее задание на пятницу, 18 июня

Подготовиться к контрольной работе

 

Домашнее задание на понедельник, 21 июня

КОНТРОЛЬНАЯ РАБОТА ПО ВТОРОЙ ГЛАВЕ

 

            Расписание занятий на главу 3: «Не место красит человека, а человек — место».

 

Лексическая тема: внешность и одежда

Грамматическая тема: местоимения

 

Домашнее задание на вторник, 22 июня

Глава 3, Vocab. and vocab. notes, grammar, стр. 52-62, упр. 3,5.

 

Домашнее задание на cреду, 23 июня

Глава 3, cтр. 63-65, упр. 7-9.

Квиз (внешность)

 

Домашнее задание на четверг, 24 июня.

Глава 3, cтр. 66-71, упр. 11-13.

 

Домашнее задание на пятницу, 25 июня.

Глава 3, стр. 72-74, упр. 14-15.

 

Домашнее зание на понедельник,  28 июня.

Глава 3, стр. 79, читайте описание русских писателей.

 

Домашнее задание на вторник, 29 июня.

КОНТРОЛЬНАЯ ПО ТРЕТЬЕЙ ГЛАВЕ.

 

            Расписание занятий на главу 4: «По одежде встречают, по уму провожают».

 

Лексическая тема: Характер

Грамматическая тема: Сравнительная и превосходная степень прилагательных, «тоже», также и еще».

 

Домашнее задание на среду, 30 июня.

Глава 4, стр. 82-90, упр. 1-3, 5.

 

Домашнее задание на четверг, 1 июля.

VOCAB QUIZ (personality/характер)

Глава 4, стр. 93-95, упр. 6. Стр. 96-98, упр. 7-8.

 

Домашнее задание на пятницу, 2 июля.

Глава 4, упр. 9 и Чтение (стр. 101).

 

Домашнее задание на понедельник, 5 июля.

КОНТРОЛЬНАЯ ПО ЧЕТВЕРТОЙ ГЛАВЕ.

 

Домашнее задание на вторник, 7 июля.

TBA

 

Домашнее задание на cреду, 8 июля.

ТВА

 

Prerequisite

RUS 612, 412L (or 312L), or appropriate score on  Russian Placement Examination

 

RUS 324 • Third-Year Russian I

87570 • Summer 2009
Meets MTWTHF 830-1000 CAL 422
show description

Prerequisites: RUS 611C or 412L. Or a proficiency level of 1 on the ILR scale (equivalent to Intermediate-low or Intermediate‑mid on the ACTFL scale).

Course Content: This course is the fifth semester of Russian language instruction. It is a practical advanced all-round language course, based on the communicative-functional approach to language. We have two goals. The first is to develop functional linguistic proficiency in the four basic skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The second is to develop practical linguo-cultural competence, encompassing both high and popular culture. The textbook, a systematic review of Russian grammar, serves as a skeleton for the course structure. It will be supplemented by various authentic materials in different media developing listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Special attention will be paid to the contemporary mass media not only as linguistic material, but also as a point of access to Russian culture in its various forms. The course is conducted in Russian. At the end of the year (after this course and its successor Russian 325), most students should have achieved a proficiency level of 2 on the ILR scale (comparable to Advanced on the ACTFL scale).

Textbook:           

  • Benjamin Rifkin, Grammatika v kontekste. Russian grammar in literary contexts. McGraw-Hill, 1996. ISBN-10: 007-052831-4.

Recommended reference sources (not required):

Katzner, Kenneth. English-Russian, Russian-English Dictionary. 2nd ed. (John Wiley & Sons, 1994). ISBN: 978-0-471-01707-3.

Wade, Terence. A Comprehensive Russian Grammar. 3rd ed. (John Wiley & Sons, 2000). ISBN: 978-1-4051-3639-6.

Gerhart, Genevra. The Russian's World. 3rd ed. (Slavica Publishers, 2001). ISBN: 978-0-893-57293-8.

Grading. The components of the course grade and their relative weights are:

  • Unit exams: 40%
  • Daily homework assignments: 20%
  • Class participation: 20%
  • Cultural project: composition and oral presentation: 10%
  • Oral proficiency exams (mid-term and end-of-semester): 10%

There is no final in the course. Plus/minus grading will apply.

Please contact the instructor if you have any questions.

Undergraduate Courses

Fall 2010 REE 325/RUS 360 "The Major Works of Dostoevsky"

Course Description

This course explores the dilemmas of homicide, suicide, patricide and redemption in the novels of Fyodor Dostoevsky—Russia’s greatest chronicler of human suffering and triumph. Over the course of the session we will read three of Dostoevsky’s most important works—Notes From the Underground, Crime and Punishment and finally The Brothers Karamazov. Contemporary intellectual and social trends, as well as the political realities relevant to the development of Dostoevsky’s career as a writer and thinker will be included as the necessary background for understanding Dostoevsky’s career. In addition, we will view several film adaptations of these works. Classes will consist of lecture and discussion.

Fall 2011 RUS 360/REE 325 "The Major Works of Dostoevsky"

This course explores the dilemmas of homicide, suicide, patricide and redemption in the novels of Fyodor Dostoevsky — Russia’s greatest chronicler of human suffering and triumph. Over the course of the semester we will read a number of Dostoevsky’s greatest works, including Notes From Underground, Crime and Punishment and The Brothers Karamazov. At the same time, we will look at the contemporary intellectual and social trends relevant to the development of Dostoevsky’s career as a writer and thinker.

Fall 2011 RUS 324 "Third-Year Russian I"

Course Content: This is the fifth semester of Russian language instruction. Our goal in the course is do develop a working proficiency in the four basic skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing. The textbook provides the student with a systematic review of Russian grammar and will be used as the basic skeleton of the course. It will be supplemented using authentic materials taken from the contemporary Russian media. The course is conducted in Russian. At the end of the year (after taking Russian 325), most students should have achieved a proficiency level of 2 on the ILR scale (comparable to Advanced on the ACTFL scale).

Grading. The components of the course grade and their relative weights are:

• Unit exams: 40%

• Daily homework assignments: 20%

• Class participation: 20%

• Cultural project: composition and oral presentation: 10%

• Oral proficiency exams (end-of-semester): 10%

There is no final in the course. Plus/minus grading will apply.

Please contact the instructor if you have any questions.

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