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Mary Neuburger, Chair BUR 452, 2505 University Avenue, Stop F3600, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-471-3607

Marina Potoplyak

Lecturer PhD, UT Austin

Marina Potoplyak

Contact

  • Phone: (512) 471-3607
  • Office: BUR 466
  • Office Hours: Fall 2014: Monday, Wednesday 1 to 2 PM, and by appointment
  • Campus Mail Code: F3600

Interests

Russian Modernism, Russian Avant-Garde, Russian Pedagogy, Instructional Technology

REE 325 • Russian Food Ways

45190 • Fall 2014
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am BUR 228
(also listed as RUS 330 )
show description

Explores the history and practice of food production and consumption in Russia and the former Soviet Union from historical, literary, and cultural points of view.  Using the methodology of food history, we will explore the restrictions, beliefs, etiquette, and taboos surrounding food and drink in Tsarist and Soviet Russia.  From Orthodox Church-mandated dietary restrictions and fasting through the Soviet cult of nutritious and abundant food to “deficit”-driven inventive dishes of the Perestroika period, the history of Russian food reflects the vicissitudes of political, social, economic, and even spiritual life.  Through a variety of historical and literary texts, we will explore the rich cultural context of Russian food and drinks and their role as an integral part of Russian national identity.

RUS 506 • First-Year Russian I

45520 • Fall 2014
Meets MW 1100am-1200pm BUR 128
show description

Welcome to Russian 506! This course is designed to introduce you to the language and culture of one of the most influential and important regions of the world – today and over a millennium of history. Russian is spoken by more than 200 million people in the former Soviet Union, and an additional 150 million throughout the world. It is the language of some of the world’s greatest literature: Pushkin, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Chekhov, Pasternak, Bulgakov, Nabokov, Gorky, and Solzhenitsyn. It is the culture of some of the greatest scientists and innovators in the West: Lomonosov, Mendeleev, Pavlov, and Gagarin. And it is the country of some of most influential politicians of the Twentieth Century: Lenin, Stalin, Gorbachev, Putin – and Medvedev! The major cities of Moscow and St. Petersburg attract thousands of tourists, businesspeople, and students every year, while in Siberia and the Caspian, oil and petroleum products are produced at a rate that rivals that of the Middle East. As a Member of the Group of Eight, Russia has become in the 21st century a power player in global policy from economics to terrorism to the environment. And, as events last year in North Ossetia and Georgia indicate, Russia remains as unpredictable in the shaping of world affairs as it was during Soviet times. As such, a command of the Russian language is a powerful (and lucrative!) facility in virtually any area of employment, be it government service, business, law, medicine, teaching, engineering, or the military. As you begin your adventure in learning Russian, use the resources of the Slavic Department and the Center for Russian, East European and Eurasian Studies to further your knowledge of this fascinating region, people, and culture. And most of all, use your instructor as a live source of information, advice, and support! Удачи Вам! Good luck! 

Course Content: This course is the first semester of first-year Russian language instruction developing functional proficiency in listening, speaking, and reading.  Writing will be developed primarily through workbook home assignments. The second course in the first-year sequence is RUS 507.

Required Textbook: • Davidson, Gor, and Lekic.  Russian: Stage One: Live from Russia! vol. 1,  (Dubuque, IA: Kendall/Hunt Publishing Co. 2008).  This packaged set comprises one basic textbook, one workbook, one audio CD, and one DVD.  Available at the University Co-op.

Recommended:

  • Cruise, Edwina. English Grammar for Students of Russian, (Ann Arbor, MI: Olivia and Hill Press, 1993).
  • Garza, Thomas. Fundamentals of Russian Verbal Conjugation for Teachers and Students, (Dubuque, IA: Kendall/Hunt and ACTR Publications), 1993.
  • Katzner, Kenneth, ed. English Russian/Russian English Dictionary, (New York: Wiley Publishers, 1994).
 

RUS 324 • Third-Year Russian I

45530 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm BUR 128
show description

Prerequisites: RUS 611C or 412L. Or a proficiency level of 1 on the ILR scale (equivalent to Intermediate-low or Intermediate‑mid on the ACTFL scale).

Course Content: This course is the fifth semester of Russian language instruction. It is a practical advanced all-round language course, based on the communicative-functional approach to language. We have two goals. The first is to develop functional linguistic proficiency in the four basic skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The second is to develop practical linguo-cultural competence, encompassing both high and popular culture. The textbook, a systematic review of Russian grammar, serves as a skeleton for the course structure. It will be supplemented by various authentic materials in different media developing listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Special attention will be paid to the contemporary mass media not only as linguistic material, but also as a point of access to Russian culture in its various forms. The course is conducted in Russian. At the end of the year (after this course and its successor Russian 325), most students should have achieved a proficiency level of 2 on the ILR scale (comparable to Advanced on the ACTFL scale).

Textbook:           

  • Benjamin Rifkin, Grammatika v kontekste. Russian grammar in literary contexts. McGraw-Hill, 1996. ISBN-10: 007-052831-4.

Recommended reference sources (not required):

Katzner, Kenneth. English-Russian, Russian-English Dictionary. 2nd ed. (John Wiley & Sons, 1994). ISBN: 978-0-471-01707-3.

Wade, Terence. A Comprehensive Russian Grammar. 3rd ed. (John Wiley & Sons, 2000). ISBN: 978-1-4051-3639-6.

Gerhart, Genevra. The Russian's World. 3rd ed. (Slavica Publishers, 2001). ISBN: 978-0-893-57293-8.

Grading. The components of the course grade and their relative weights are:

  • Unit exams: 40%
  • Daily homework assignments: 20%
  • Class participation: 20%
  • Cultural project: composition and oral presentation: 10%
  • Oral proficiency exams (mid-term and end-of-semester): 10%

There is no final in the course. Plus/minus grading will apply.

Please contact the instructor if you have any questions.

RUS 330 • Russian Food Ways

45545 • Fall 2014
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am BUR 228
(also listed as REE 325 )
show description

Explores the history and practice of food production and consumption in Russia and the former Soviet Union from historical, literary, and cultural points of view.  Using the methodology of food history, we will explore the restrictions, beliefs, etiquette, and taboos surrounding food and drink in Tsarist and Soviet Russia.  From Orthodox Church-mandated dietary restrictions and fasting through the Soviet cult of nutritious and abundant food to “deficit”-driven inventive dishes of the Perestroika period, the history of Russian food reflects the vicissitudes of political, social, economic, and even spiritual life.  Through a variety of historical and literary texts, we will explore the rich cultural context of Russian food and drinks and their role as an integral part of Russian national identity.

REE 325 • Lit & Art, Rus Mod, & Av-Gard

45510 • Spring 2014
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm GEA 127
(also listed as RUS 330 )
show description

Focusing on literary and artistic expressions of Russian modernist and avant-garde aesthetics, this course explores various responses to Russian cultural modernity between 1890s, when Russian Symbolists first published their works, and the Party decree of 1932 that established the Writers’ Union and outlawed all other artistic organizations.  Unfolding against the background of the revolutions and civil war in Russia, diverse manifestations of the spirit of modernity were captured by the aesthetics of Diaghilev’s Ballets Russes, Futurists’ shocking manifestos, socialist realist works, and avant-garde art movements like Constructivism and Malevich’s Suprematism, among others.  While reading critically both textual and non-textual works, we will constantly reference the unique socio-political and cultural context of the period locally and globally in order to create a panoramic vision of possibly the richest period in Russian culture.

Requirements:

Participation – 10%

Short response paper – 15%

Presentation – 15%

Two exams – 30%

Final paper or multimedia project – 30%

Texts:

Dmitry Merezhkovsky. On the Causes of the Decline and on the New Trends in Contemporary Russian Literature (1892) (Excerpts)

Alexandr Blok.  The Unknown Lady (1906)

A Slap in the Face of Public Face (1912)

Igor Stravinsky.  The Rite of Spring (1913)

Vladimir Mayakovsky.  A Cloud in Trousers (1915)

---. About That (1923)

Evgeny Zamiatin. We (1920)

Osip Mandelstam.  The Noise of Time (1923)

Trotsky, Leon.  Literature and Revolution (1923) (excerpts)

Various manifestos and documents (course packet)

Poems by Velimir Khlebnikov, Konstantin Balmont, Valery Bryusov, Anna Akhmatova and others (course packet)

RUS 611C • Intensive Russian II

45800 • Spring 2014
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm GEA 127
show description

This course is the second semester of intensive Russian language instruction developing functional proficiency in listening, speaking, and reading. Writing will be developed both through workbook home assignments and brief reviews and summaries of your reading material. 

 

The entire second-year sequence is covered in one semester.

We will cover all of the basic textbook, Units One through Unit Ten, plus an introductory unit, in the textbook, spending about seven class days on each unit. In addition, this course aims to develop your reading skills through both in-class reading assignments, and individual “free reading” based on a text of your choosing. Portfolio exercises will continue to develop your computer literacy skills – in Russian – for you to be truly functionally proficient and competitive in the language, as well as chronicle your progress in your independent reading project throughout the course. 

RUS 330 • Lit & Art, Rus Mod, & Av-Gard

45840 • Spring 2014
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm GEA 127
(also listed as REE 325 )
show description

Focusing on literary and artistic expressions of Russian modernist and avant-garde aesthetics, this course explores various responses to Russian cultural modernity between 1890s, when Russian Symbolists first published their works, and the Party decree of 1932 that established the Writers’ Union and outlawed all other artistic organizations.  Unfolding against the background of the revolutions and civil war in Russia, diverse manifestations of the spirit of modernity were captured by the aesthetics of Diaghilev’s Ballets Russes, Futurists’ shocking manifestos, socialist realist works, and avant-garde art movements like Constructivism and Malevich’s Suprematism, among others.  While reading critically both textual and non-textual works, we will constantly reference the unique socio-political and cultural context of the period locally and globally in order to create a panoramic vision of possibly the richest period in Russian culture.

Requirements:

Participation – 10%

Short response paper – 15%

Presentation – 15%

Two exams – 30%

Final paper or multimedia project – 30%

Texts:

Dmitry Merezhkovsky. On the Causes of the Decline and on the New Trends in Contemporary Russian Literature (1892) (Excerpts)

Alexandr Blok.  The Unknown Lady (1906)

A Slap in the Face of Public Face (1912)

Igor Stravinsky.  The Rite of Spring (1913)

Vladimir Mayakovsky.  A Cloud in Trousers (1915)

---. About That (1923)

Evgeny Zamiatin. We (1920)

Osip Mandelstam.  The Noise of Time (1923)

Trotsky, Leon.  Literature and Revolution (1923) (excerpts)

Various manifestos and documents (course packet)

Poems by Velimir Khlebnikov, Konstantin Balmont, Valery Bryusov, Anna Akhmatova and others (course packet)

RUS 601C • Intensive Russian I

45560 • Fall 2013
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm RLM 6.112
show description

Course Description:

This course is the first semester of intensive Russian language instruction developing functional proficiency in listening, speaking, and reading. Writing will be developed primarily through workbook and computer-based home assignments.  We will cover all of Volumes One and Two of the textbooks, Units One through Unit Fourteen in the textbooks, spending about one week on each unit. In addition, this course aims to develop computer literacy skills – in Russian – for you to be truly functional and competitive in the language.

Readings:

Textbook: • Davidson, Gor, and Lekic.  Russian: Stage One: Live from Russia! 2nd ed., vols. 1 and 2, (Dubuque, IA: Kendall/Hunt Publishing Co. 2008 and 2009). These packaged sets comprise two basic textbooks, two workbooks, two audio CDs, and two DVDs. Available at the University Co-op.

Recommended:            • Russian/English Dictionary

• Gerhart, G., The Russian’s World, Orlando: Houghton Mifflin, 1994.

• Garza, T., Fundamentals of Russian Verbal Conjugation for Teachers  and Students, Dubuque, IA: Kendall/Hunt and ACTR Publications, 1993.

Grading:

There are five components of your final course grade.  These components and their relative weights are:

1.  Testing:  30%

Unit tests: 15%

Final exam: 15%

2.  Homework:  15% 

3.  Participation:  15% 

4.  Portfolio:  20%

5.  Oral Presentation:  20%

REE S325 • Rebels/Revolutnrs Rus Hist/Lit

87780 • Summer 2013
Meets MTWTHF 1000am-1130am BUR 116
(also listed as C L S323, HIS S362G, RUS S356 )
show description

RUS S356 • Rebels/Revolutnrs Rus Hist/Lit

87995 • Summer 2013
Meets MTWTHF 1000am-1130am BUR 116
(also listed as C L S323, HIS S362G, REE S325 )
show description

Course Description: Spanning almost a century of Russian literature, this course highlights a gallery of fictional and real rebels and revolutionaries.  Were they heroes and martyrs who sacrificed their lives to improve the lot of others?  Or unscrupulous and manipulative individuals who disguised their thirst for power behind an agenda of societal betterment?  From Pushkin’s portrayal of Emelian Pugachev’s rebellion in the 1770s to Nechaev’s organized revolutionary group, which inspired Dostoevsky’s Demons, to Bakunin’s writings and memoirs of notorious revolutionaries and intelligentsia’s responses to the “revolutionary virus,” the array of representations of rebels and revolutionaries simultaneously served as a reflection of their popular perception and formed the reading public’s opinion on these issues.  We will supplement textual analysis of prose and poetry with the study of historical documents in order to understand the complex historical, moral, and cultural dimensions of such enduring phenomena as revolution, rebellion, and terrorism. 

Course Materials:

Pushkin, Aleksandr.  The Captain’s Daughter (1836)

Pushkin, Aleksandr.  “In the Depths of Siberian Mines” (1827)*

Bakunin, Mikhail.  The Revolutionary Catechism (1865)*

Nechaev's Catechism of the Revolutionary (1869)(excerpts)*

Dostoevsky, Fyodor.  The Demons (1873)

Stepniak-Kravchinsky, Sergei.  Underground Russia: Revolutionary Profiles and Sketches from Life (1883) – Google Books

Vera Zasulich's memoirs (excerpts from Five Sisters: Women against the Tsar)*

Ropshin, V. (Savinkov, Boris) Pale Steed (1909) – Google Books

Andreyev, Leonid. The Seven Who Were Hanged (1909) – Google Books

*Included in course packet available from Jenn’s Copies on Guadalupe St.

Class Attendance:  Daily class attendance is required.  You are expected to read all assigned texts before the class and to participate actively in the discussion.  According to the General Information catalog, “[a] student who is absent from a class or examination for the

observance of a religious holy day may complete the work issued within a reasonable time after the

absence, if proper notice has been given” (page 71). The deadline for notification of such an absence

is fourteen days prior to the class absence or the first class day for religious holy days that fall

within the first two weeks of the semester.

Special Accommodations: At the beginning of the semester, students with disabilities who need special accommodations should notify the instructor by presenting a letter prepared by the Services for Students with Disabilities Office. To ensure that the most appropriate accommodations can be provided, students should contact the SSD Office at 471-6259 or 471-4641 TTY.

Policy on Scholastic Dishonesty: Students who violate University rules on scholastic dishonesty are subject to disciplinary penalties, including the possibility of failure in the course and/or dismissal from the University. Since such dishonesty harms the individual, all students, and the integrity of the University, policies on scholastic dishonesty will be strictly enforced.  Refer to the Student Judicial Services website for official University policies and procedures on scholastic dishonesty.

Grade Evaluations: 

a. Two Response Papers (30% total): Response papers should reflect your thinking on assigned reading. Format: 2-3 pages (at least 1,000 words), Times New Roman, 12 pt. You will be evaluated on the depth and quality of your reflections, clarity of style, and cohesive argumentation. After you receive your paper back, you will have about a week to revise and resubmit it, if desired. Detailed instructions will be provided two weeks before the draft is due.  

b. Two In-Class and One Take-Home Exams (50% total): Each exam will test your knowledge of material discussed in class and studied independently at home. Exams will include ID, multiple-choice, and essay questions. 

First in-class exam (40 min) – 15%

Take-home exam – 15%

Final in-class exam (75 min) – 20%

c. Presentation (10%): In pairs, you will prepare a 10-15-minute oral presentation on one of the topics offered at the beginning of the semester. You will discuss your presentation with your instructor no later than one week in advance. Graduate students will prepare to teach or co-teach during one class meeting. Two meetings with your instructor are required (one before the class and one after). More instructions to follow.

e. Participation (10%): Your instructor will determine this part of the grade based on your preparedness and participation in class.  There are three components of success: regular attendance, advance reading/preparation of assigned materials, and insightful, well-formulated comments during discussions. Important: Bring your text and reading diary to each class! In the diary, you will record your thoughts, questions, and observations while reading the assigned pieces.  It is tremendously helpful when you are generating ideas for your papers and prepare for exams. 

RUS 611C • Intensive Russian II

45135 • Spring 2013
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm PAR 308
show description

This course is the second semester of intensive Russian language instruction developing functional proficiency in listening, speaking, and reading. Writing will be developed both through workbook home assignments and brief reviews and summaries of your reading material. 

 

The entire second-year sequence is covered in one semester.

We will cover all of the basic textbook, Units One through Unit Ten, plus an introductory unit, in the textbook, spending about seven class days on each unit. In addition, this course aims to develop your reading skills through both in-class reading assignments, and individual “free reading” based on a text of your choosing. Portfolio exercises will continue to develop your computer literacy skills – in Russian – for you to be truly functionally proficient and competitive in the language, as well as chronicle your progress in your independent reading project throughout the course. 

RUS 601C • Intensive Russian I

44980 • Fall 2012
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm MEZ 1.102
show description

Course Description:

This course is the first semester of intensive Russian language instruction developing functional proficiency in listening, speaking, and reading. Writing will be developed primarily through workbook and computer-based home assignments.  We will cover all of Volumes One and Two of the textbooks, Units One through Unit Fourteen in the textbooks, spending about one week on each unit. In addition, this course aims to develop computer literacy skills – in Russian – for you to be truly functional and competitive in the language.

Readings:

Textbook: • Davidson, Gor, and Lekic.  Russian: Stage One: Live from Russia! 2nd ed., vols. 1 and 2, (Dubuque, IA: Kendall/Hunt Publishing Co. 2008 and 2009). These packaged sets comprise two basic textbooks, two workbooks, two audio CDs, and two DVDs. Available at the University Co-op.

Recommended:            • Russian/English Dictionary

• Gerhart, G., The Russian’s World, Orlando: Houghton Mifflin, 1994.

• Garza, T., Fundamentals of Russian Verbal Conjugation for Teachers  and Students, Dubuque, IA: Kendall/Hunt and ACTR Publications, 1993.

Grading:

There are five components of your final course grade.  These components and their relative weights are:

1.  Testing:  30%

Unit tests: 15%

Final exam: 15%

2.  Homework:  15% 

3.  Participation:  15% 

4.  Portfolio:  20%

5.  Oral Presentation:  20%

RUS S412L • Second-Year Russian II

88330 • Summer 2012
Meets MTWTHF 830am-1030am CAL 419
show description

This course is the fourth semester of Russian language instruction developing functional proficiency in the four basic skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. This semester we will cover Units 6 through 10 of the textbook, devoting ten class days to instruction for each unit. The goal is to achieve an active vocabulary of 1600-2000 words and an oral proficiency level of what is called `Intermediate Mid’ or `Intermediate High’, as defined by the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages.

Course Requirements: You are expected to attend classes regularly, participate actively in class, do all assigned coursework (written, oral, and preparatory), and take all exams.  An outline of each unit, listing video episodes (found on the DVD), communicative goals, lexical fields, and grammatical topics, is found on pp. vii-xvii of your textbook. An overview of our schedule this semester is given (with dates of exams) is given on p. 5 of this syllabus. The homework assignments are found in the workbook and, for aural work, on the CDs (as well as on the website http://www.livefromrussia.org). We are going to work in group on the Black Board. Every week your group will be assigned a new task. Guidelines will be posted on BB on week before the assignment is due.

If you miss a class, it is your responsibility to contact your instructor or another student, find out what was covered, and make up the missed work.

In order to do well in this (or any) language class, you must:

Read this syllabus!

Attend class regularly, participate actively, and take notes.

Prepare for each class in advance so that you are familiar with what will be covered that day.

Learn all of the words and expressions which appear in the vocabulary list at the end of each unit covered; these words are utilized in the chapter material. 

Review material specified in the homework assignments and submit written homework on time.

Spend about two hours of preparation for each hour in the classroom. 

Take all exams as scheduled.

Accommodations for disabilities: Any student with a documented disability (physical or cognitive) who requires academic accommodations should contact the Services for Students with Disabilities area of the Office of the Dean of Students at 471-6259 (voice) or 471-4641 (TTY for users who are deaf or hard of hearing) as soon as possible to request an official letter outlining authorized accommodations.

Electronic devices. Please ensure that your cell phone and any other electronic devices are off and out-of-sight throughout the class period. Laptop computers may be utilized during class ONLY for class-related purposes and ONLY with the permission of the instructor. Failure to observe these courtesies will be reflected in your class participation grade.

II. GRADING

There are three components of your final course grade.  These components and their relative weights are:

1. Testing: 50%

In-class tests: 30% Final exam: 15%.  Oral proficiency exam: 5%

There are no make-ups on in-class tests or on the final. If you must miss an exam, contact your instructor as soon as you can. Any accommodations will require documentation of the reason for your absence; otherwise a zero will be recorded. 

2. Homework: 25%+10%

Written homework or in-class quizzes (e.g., vocabulary, grammar checks, etc.) will be graded on a credit/no credit basis. An assignment for which you are not awarded credit may be resubmitted for credit on the following class day. Your homework grade will be the percentage of assignments for which you receive credit.

On Monday in class your group will receive an assignment for the BB work. First posting is due on Friday, 6 p.m. Second posting is due on Sunday that week 10 p.m.

3. Participation: 15%

This grade is determined by your instructor as a reflection of your overall preparedness and performance in class. 

You are expected to a) attend class daily, b) prepare assigned material in advance for each class, and c) respond in class with reasonable accuracy, relevance, and enthusiasm.

Attendance will be recorded by your instructor. While there is no direct, automatic penalty for absences (however, if there is more than 5 unexcused absences, instructor is required to fill out “absence report and submit it to the dean’s office), your attendance record will be reflected in your participation grade: if you aren’t present, you can’t participate.

The result of these calculations will be on a number on a scale of 0-100.  Plus/minus grading will apply. This numerical grade will be converted to a letter grade as follows:

98 – 100 = A+

78 – 79 = C+

94 – 97 = A

74 – 77 = C

90 – 93 = A-

70 – 73 = C-

88 – 89 = B+

68 – 69 = D+

84 – 87 = B

64 – 67 = D

80 – 83 = B-

60 – 63 = D-

59 and below = F

An Incomplete will be granted only under the direst of circumstances (e.g., an unexpected family or health crisis preventing you from continuing your academic work) and you will be asked to substantiate any such circumstances. 

These rules will be strictly observed by your instructor.

III. RESOURCES

Your Textbook comes with two CDs and a DVD that accompany the exercises in each unit, indicated by a "cassette" and "camera" symbol, respectively.  You will greatly enhance your listening comprehension of Russian by using these resources as often as indicated in the book and as possible.  The Department of Slavic and Eurasian Studies, Center for Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies, and Audio-Visual Library of the General Libraries have extensive collections of recordings that may be checked out for home viewing.  There are vast resources on the Web as well. For example, you can take a look at my blog http://teachl2memo.blogspot.com/, where I collect resources for learners of Russian of different levels. If you have any good finds, let your instructor know. 

Remember to come at least once to the Russian Table, which is held on Fridays and provides you with more opportunities to carry out activities in Russian not associated with your class.

REE 325 • Lit & Art,Rus Modern & Av-Gard

44605 • Spring 2012
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm PAR 303
(also listed as RUS 330 )
show description

Course Description

 

Focusing on literary and artistic expressions of Russian modernist and avant-garde aesthetics, this course explores various responses to Russian cultural modernity between 1890s, when Russian Symbolists first published their works, and the Party decree of 1932 that established the Writers’ Union and outlawed all other artistic organizations.  Unfolding against the background of the revolutions and civil war in Russia, diverse manifestations of the spirit of modernity were captured by the aesthetics of Diaghilev’s Ballets Russes, Futurists’ shocking manifestos, socialist realist works, and avant-garde art movements like Constructivism and Malevich’s Suprematism, among others.  While reading critically both textual and non-textual works, we will constantly reference the unique socio-political and cultural context of the period locally and globally in order to create a panoramic vision of possibly the richest period in Russian culture.

  

Texts:

Dmitry Merezhkovsky. On the Causes of the Decline and on the New Trends in Contemporary Russian Literature (1892) (Excerpts)

Alexandr Blok.  The Unknown Lady (1906)

A Slap in the Face of Public Face (1912)

Igor Stravinsky.  The Rite of Spring (1913)

Vladimir Mayakovsky.  A Cloud in Trousers (1915)

---. About That (1923)

Evgeny Zamiatin. We (1920)

Osip Mandelstam.  The Noise of Time (1923)

Trotsky, Leon.  Literature and Revolution (1923) (excerpts)

Various manifestos and documents (course packet)

Poems by Velimir Khlebnikov, Konstantin Balmont, Valery Bryusov, Anna Akhmatova and others (course packet 

 

Requirements and Grading

 

Participation – 10%

Short response paper – 15%

Presentation – 15%

Two exams – 30%

Final paper or multimedia project – 30%

RUS 330 • Lit & Art,Rus Modern & Av-Gard

45000 • Spring 2012
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm PAR 303
(also listed as REE 325 )
show description

Course Description

 

Focusing on literary and artistic expressions of Russian modernist and avant-garde aesthetics, this course explores various responses to Russian cultural modernity between 1890s, when Russian Symbolists first published their works, and the Party decree of 1932 that established the Writers’ Union and outlawed all other artistic organizations.  Unfolding against the background of the revolutions and civil war in Russia, diverse manifestations of the spirit of modernity were captured by the aesthetics of Diaghilev’s Ballets Russes, Futurists’ shocking manifestos, socialist realist works, and avant-garde art movements like Constructivism and Malevich’s Suprematism, among others.  While reading critically both textual and non-textual works, we will constantly reference the unique socio-political and cultural context of the period locally and globally in order to create a panoramic vision of possibly the richest period in Russian culture.

  

Texts:

Dmitry Merezhkovsky. On the Causes of the Decline and on the New Trends in Contemporary Russian Literature (1892) (Excerpts)

Alexandr Blok.  The Unknown Lady (1906)

A Slap in the Face of Public Face (1912)

Igor Stravinsky.  The Rite of Spring (1913)

Vladimir Mayakovsky.  A Cloud in Trousers (1915)

---. About That (1923)

Evgeny Zamiatin. We (1920)

Osip Mandelstam.  The Noise of Time (1923)

Trotsky, Leon.  Literature and Revolution (1923) (excerpts)

Various manifestos and documents (course packet)

Poems by Velimir Khlebnikov, Konstantin Balmont, Valery Bryusov, Anna Akhmatova and others (course packet 

 

Requirements and Grading

 

Participation – 10%

Short response paper – 15%

Presentation – 15%

Two exams – 30%

Final paper or multimedia project – 30%

REE 325 • Rebels/Revolutnrs Rus Hist/Lit

44469 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm BEN 1.122
(also listed as RUS 356 )
show description

Course Description: Spanning almost a century of Russian literature, this course highlights a gallery of fictional and real rebels and revolutionaries.  What was their cause?  Who supported them?  How were they portrayed in popular novels of the time?  We will supplement textual analysis of prose and poetry with the study of historical documents in order to understand the complex historical, moral, and cultural dimensions of such enduring phenomena as revolution, rebellion, and terrorism.

 Course Materials:

Pushkin, Aleksandr.  The Captain’s Daughter (1836)

Pushkin, Aleksandr.  “In the Depths of Siberian Mines” (1827)*

Turgenev, Ivan.  Fathers and Sons (1862)

Bakunin, Mikhail.  The Revolutionary Catechism (1865) vs. Nechaev's Catechism of the Revolutionary (1869)(excerpts)*

Dostoevsky, Fyodor.  The Demons (1873)

Vera Zasulich's memoirs (excerpts from Five Sisters: Women against the Tsar)*

Andreyev, Leonid.  “The Seven That Were Hanged” (1909)

Bely, Andrei.  Petersburg (1913)

Related documents and articles*

*Included in Course Packet

 

Class Attendance:  Twice-weekly class attendance is required.  You are expected to read all assigned texts before the class and to participate actively in the discussion.    According to the General Information catalog, “[a] student who is absent from a class or examination for the

observance of a religious holy day may complete the work issued within a reasonable time after the

absence, if proper notice has been given” (page 71). The deadline for notification of such an absence

is fourteen days prior to the class absence or the first class day for religious holy days that fall

within the first two weeks of the semester.

 

Deadlines: 

February 15 – First in-class exam

March 1 – Response paper #1 due

March 10 – Revised paper due

March 29 – Second in-class exam

April 7 – Response paper #2 due

April 19 – Revised paper due

May 6 – Third in-class exam

May 15 – Final paper due

*Deadlines are subject to change.  Please consult Blackboard for latest announcements!*

 

Special Accommodations: At the beginning of the semester, students with disabilities who need special accommodations should notify the instructor by presenting a letter prepared by the Services for Students with Disabilities Office. To ensure that the most appropriate accommodations can be provided, students should contact the SSD Office at 471-6259 or 471-4641 TTY.

 

Policy on Scholastic Dishonesty: Students who violate University rules on scholastic dishonesty are subject to disciplinary penalties, including the possibility of failure in the course and/or dismissal from the University. Since such dishonesty harms the individual, all students, and the integrity of the University, policies on scholastic dishonesty will be strictly enforced.  Refer to the Student Judicial Services website for official University policies and procedures on scholastic dishonesty.

 

Grade Evaluations: 

 

a. Two Response Papers (10% each):  Response papers should reflect your thinking on assigned reading.  Format: 3-5 pages (at least 1,000 words), Times New Roman, 12 pt.  You will be evaluated on the depth and quality of your reflections, clarity of style, and cohesive argumentation.  After you receive your paper back, you will have about a week to revise and resubmit it.  Detailed instructions will be provided two weeks before the due date.

 b. Three In-Class Exams (10% each): Each exam will test your knowledge of material discussed in class and read independently at home.

 c.  Presentation (10%): Individually or in pairs, you will prepare a 5-10-minute oral presentation on one of the topics offered in the beginning of the semester.  You will discuss your presentation with your instructor no later than two weeks in advance.

d. Final Paper  (30%):  You final paper may draw on one of your response papers.  It should include  your reflections on the topic supported by textual evidence from assigned works.  Detailed instructions will be available mid-semester.  Format: 8-10 pages (at least 2,500 words), Times New Roman, 12 pt.

 e. Participation (10%):  Your instructor will determine this part of the grade based on your preparedness and participation in class.  There are three components of success: regular attendance, advance reading/preparation of assigned materials, and insightful, well-formulated comments during discussions.

RUS 412K • Second-Year Russian I

44800 • Fall 2011
Meets MTWTH 1100am-1200pm PAR 214
show description

Required Textbook: • Irina Dolgova and Cynthia Martin.  Russian: Stage Two: Welcome Back!,  (Dubuque, IA: Kendall/Hunt Publishing Co. 2009).  This packaged set comprises one basic textbook, two workbooks, two audio CDs, and one DVD.  Available at the University Co-op.

Recommended:  All available at the University Co-op:

            • Wade, Terrence. A Comprehensive Russian Grammar (Oxford: Blackwell, 1994).

             • Gerhart, Genevra. The Russian's World.  (Bloomington: Slavica Publishers, 2000).

• Katzner, Kenneth, ed. English Russian/Russian English Dictionary, (New York: Wiley Publishers, 1994).

***

Welcome to the Russian 412! You are entering into the intermediate level of language and culture instruction in one of the world’s most spoken and influential languages. Russian is spoken by 150 million in the former Soviet Union and by another 50 million Russians living all over the world – including New York, Los Angeles, and Houston. This is the year of Russian study that will best prepare you to read the brilliant works of Russian literature, to undertake a longer term of study abroad, to watch Russian films and television in the original, and of course to major in Slavic Studies here at UT! Russian is not only one of the official languages of diplomacy at the U.N., and a member language of the G-8, it is a language for which your prospects in business, engineering, teaching, law, and medicine are greatly enhanced with a reasonable functional proficiency. So whatever your goal, we hope that your second year of study of Russian will bring you many rewards! А сейчас, давайте начнём!

I.            General

Course Content: This course is the third semester of Russian language instruction developing functional proficiency in listening, speaking, and reading.  Writing will be developed primarily through workbook home assignments.  We will cover the Introductory Unit during the first week of classes, and then continue with Units 1 through 5 in theTextbook, spending ten class days on each unit.

Course Requirements: You are expected to attend classes regularly, participate actively in class, do all assigned coursework, and take all exams.  A description of each unit’s work, listing video episodes (found on the DVD), communicative goals, lexical fields, and grammatical topics, is found on pp. vii - xvii in your Textbook.  The homework assignments are found in the Workbook and, for aural work, on the CDs. You will be allowed a maximum of five (5) unexcused absences during the semester.  More than 5 (five) unexcused absences will result in the lowering of your final course grade by a diacritical (a B+ goes to a B, a B to a B-, etc.); more than eight (8) absences will result in a grade lowered by a letter. PREPARING AND HANDING IN DAILY HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS IS ESSENTIAL TO PASS THE COURSE!  This means that, using the Course Syllabus, you should go over and be familiar with this material (or prepare relevant questions) in advance of class.

You are also responsible for learning actively all of the words and expressions contained in the texts and exercises covered in the Course Syllabus that appear in non-italic type in the vocabulary lists at the end of each unit in theTextbook.  You should plan to spend about two hours of preparation for each hour in the classroom.  If you miss a class, it is your responsibility to contact your instructor or another student and find out what was covered and make up the missed work. Excused absences shall be for illness and family emergency only.  Your instructor will need to see documentation. 

All cell-phones and other electronic devices must be turned off during class.  No laptops or hand-held devices are to be used in class, please. 

Special Accommodations: If you have extenuating physical circumstances, all instructors in the Department of Slavic and Eurasian Studies will make themselves available to discuss appropriate academic accommodations that you may require as a student with a disability.  Before course accommodations will be made, students may be required to provide documentation to the Office of the Dean of Students -- Services for Students with Disabilities.

Testing:  There will be five (5) in-class one-hour tests and a final examination for this course.  The in-class tests, each covering one unit, will be given on September 22, October 11, October 27, November 15, and December 2.  A fifteen-minute individual oral proficiency exam given during the final week of classes, and a comprehensive three-hour final exam will be given during the University's exam period between December 10 and 16, 2010.  

II. Grading

There are three components of your final course grade.  These components and their relative weights are:

1.  Testing:  60%

In-class tests: 40%

Final exam: 15%

Oral Proficiency Interview: 5%

Because of the time constraints and pace of this course, make-ups on any of the tests will be given only in unusual cases with extenuating circumstances.

2.  Homework:  25%

Written homework or in-class quizzes (e.g., vocabulary, grammar checks, etc.) will be graded on a credit (4) / no credit (7) basis.  All assignments from the Workbook must be turned in on the class day after being assigned; a "no credit" assignment may be resubmitted for credit on the following day after being returned to the student.  Your homework grade will be the percentage of "credit" assignments you submit during the term. 

3.  Participation:  15%

Your instructor determines this component as a reflection of your overall preparedness and performance in class; it is NOT merely an attendance grade.  You are expected to a) attend class daily, b) prepare assigned material in advance for each class, and c) respond in class with reasonable accuracy and, of course, enthusiasm.

The result of these calculations will be on a number on a scale of 0-100.  This numerical grade will be converted to a letter grade as follows:

98 – 100 = A+

94 – 97 = A

90 – 93 = A-

88 – 89 = B+

84 – 87 = B

80 – 83 = B-

78 – 79 = C+

74 – 77 = C

70 – 73 = C-

68 – 69 = D+

64 – 67 = D

60 – 63 = D-

59 and below = F

III. Media resources

Your Textbook comes with two audio CDs and a DVD that correspond to many of the exercises in each unit, indicated by a "disk" and "camera" symbol, respectively.  You will greatly enhance your own listening comprehension of Russian by downloading and using to these media in your

iPod or home/car stereo as often as possible.  If you prefer to use the media on campus, there are facilities available in several locations, such as the Perry Castañeda Library and Flawn Academic Center. In addition, the Department of Slavic and Eurasian Studies also has in Calhoun 422 a collection of both classic and very recent DVDs with movies, music, speeches and documentaries from and about Russia and the former Soviet states.  These DVDs are interesting from both a cultural and purely entertainment point of view.  Many of the DVDs have both English subtitles (which can help you build your confidence and facility in hearing spoken Russian and deriving meaning), and some also have Russian subtitles, which are a real benefit to building listening comprehension as you gain a larger vocabulary and fluency. These may be checked out for home viewing; see your instructor for suggestions.

RUS 356 • Rebels/Revolutnrs Rus Hist/Lit

44823 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm BEN 1.122
(also listed as REE 325 )
show description

Course Description: Spanning almost a century of Russian literature, this course highlights a gallery of fictional and real rebels and revolutionaries.  What was their cause?  Who supported them?  How were they portrayed in popular novels of the time?  We will supplement textual analysis of prose and poetry with the study of historical documents in order to understand the complex historical, moral, and cultural dimensions of such enduring phenomena as revolution, rebellion, and terrorism.

 Course Materials:

Pushkin, Aleksandr.  The Captain’s Daughter (1836)

Pushkin, Aleksandr.  “In the Depths of Siberian Mines” (1827)*

Turgenev, Ivan.  Fathers and Sons (1862)

Bakunin, Mikhail.  The Revolutionary Catechism (1865) vs. Nechaev's Catechism of the Revolutionary (1869)(excerpts)*

Dostoevsky, Fyodor.  The Demons (1873)

Vera Zasulich's memoirs (excerpts from Five Sisters: Women against the Tsar)*

Andreyev, Leonid.  “The Seven That Were Hanged” (1909)

Bely, Andrei.  Petersburg (1913)

Related documents and articles*

*Included in Course Packet

 

Class Attendance:  Twice-weekly class attendance is required.  You are expected to read all assigned texts before the class and to participate actively in the discussion.    According to the General Information catalog, “[a] student who is absent from a class or examination for the

observance of a religious holy day may complete the work issued within a reasonable time after the

absence, if proper notice has been given” (page 71). The deadline for notification of such an absence

is fourteen days prior to the class absence or the first class day for religious holy days that fall

within the first two weeks of the semester.

 

Deadlines: 

February 15 – First in-class exam

March 1 – Response paper #1 due

March 10 – Revised paper due

March 29 – Second in-class exam

April 7 – Response paper #2 due

April 19 – Revised paper due

May 6 – Third in-class exam

May 15 – Final paper due

*Deadlines are subject to change.  Please consult Blackboard for latest announcements!*

 

Special Accommodations: At the beginning of the semester, students with disabilities who need special accommodations should notify the instructor by presenting a letter prepared by the Services for Students with Disabilities Office. To ensure that the most appropriate accommodations can be provided, students should contact the SSD Office at 471-6259 or 471-4641 TTY.

 

Policy on Scholastic Dishonesty: Students who violate University rules on scholastic dishonesty are subject to disciplinary penalties, including the possibility of failure in the course and/or dismissal from the University. Since such dishonesty harms the individual, all students, and the integrity of the University, policies on scholastic dishonesty will be strictly enforced.  Refer to the Student Judicial Services website for official University policies and procedures on scholastic dishonesty.

 

Grade Evaluations: 

 

a. Two Response Papers (10% each):  Response papers should reflect your thinking on assigned reading.  Format: 3-5 pages (at least 1,000 words), Times New Roman, 12 pt.  You will be evaluated on the depth and quality of your reflections, clarity of style, and cohesive argumentation.  After you receive your paper back, you will have about a week to revise and resubmit it.  Detailed instructions will be provided two weeks before the due date.

 b. Three In-Class Exams (10% each): Each exam will test your knowledge of material discussed in class and read independently at home.

 c.  Presentation (10%): Individually or in pairs, you will prepare a 5-10-minute oral presentation on one of the topics offered in the beginning of the semester.  You will discuss your presentation with your instructor no later than two weeks in advance.

d. Final Paper  (30%):  You final paper may draw on one of your response papers.  It should include  your reflections on the topic supported by textual evidence from assigned works.  Detailed instructions will be available mid-semester.  Format: 8-10 pages (at least 2,500 words), Times New Roman, 12 pt.

 e. Participation (10%):  Your instructor will determine this part of the grade based on your preparedness and participation in class.  There are three components of success: regular attendance, advance reading/preparation of assigned materials, and insightful, well-formulated comments during discussions.

REE 325 • Rebels/Revolutnrs Rus Hist/Lit

45174 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 930am-1100am GAR 3.116
(also listed as C L 323, RUS 356 )
show description

Course Description: Spanning almost a century of Russian literature, this course highlights a gallery of fictional and real rebels and revolutionaries.  What was their cause?  Who supported them?  How were they portrayed in popular novels of the time?  We will supplement textual analysis of prose and poetry with the study of historical documents in order to understand the complex historical, moral, and cultural dimensions of such enduring phenomena as revolution, rebellion, and terrorism.

 Course Materials:

Pushkin, Aleksandr.  The Captain’s Daughter (1836)

Pushkin, Aleksandr.  “In the Depths of Siberian Mines” (1827)*

Turgenev, Ivan.  Fathers and Sons (1862)

Bakunin, Mikhail.  The Revolutionary Catechism (1865) vs. Nechaev's Catechism of the Revolutionary (1869) (excerpts)*

Dostoevsky, Fyodor.  The Demons (1873)

Vera Zasulich's memoirs (excerpts from Five Sisters: Women against the Tsar)*

Andreyev, Leonid.  “The Seven That Were Hanged” (1909)

Bely, Andrei.  Petersburg (1913)

Related documents and articles*

*Included in Course Packet

 

Class Attendance:  Twice-weekly class attendance is required.  You are expected to read all assigned texts before the class and to participate actively in the discussion.    According to the General Information catalog, “[a] student who is absent from a class or examination for the

observance of a religious holy day may complete the work issued within a reasonable time after the

absence, if proper notice has been given” (page 71). The deadline for notification of such an absence

is fourteen days prior to the class absence or the first class day for religious holy days that fall

within the first two weeks of the semester.

 

Deadlines: 

February 15 – First in-class exam

March 1 – Response paper #1 due

March 10 – Revised paper due

March 29 – Second in-class exam

April 7 – Response paper #2 due

April 19 – Revised paper due

May 6 – Third in-class exam

May 15 – Final paper due

*Deadlines are subject to change.  Please consult Blackboard for latest announcements!*

 

Special Accommodations: At the beginning of the semester, students with disabilities who need special accommodations should notify the instructor by presenting a letter prepared by the Services for Students with Disabilities Office. To ensure that the most appropriate accommodations can be provided, students should contact the SSD Office at 471-6259 or 471-4641 TTY.

 

Policy on Scholastic Dishonesty: Students who violate University rules on scholastic dishonesty are subject to disciplinary penalties, including the possibility of failure in the course and/or dismissal from the University. Since such dishonesty harms the individual, all students, and the integrity of the University, policies on scholastic dishonesty will be strictly enforced.  Refer to the Student Judicial Services website for official University policies and procedures on scholastic dishonesty.

 

Grade Evaluations: 

 

a. Two Response Papers (10% each):  Response papers should reflect your thinking on assigned reading.  Format: 3-5 pages (at least 1,000 words), Times New Roman, 12 pt.  You will be evaluated on the depth and quality of your reflections, clarity of style, and cohesive argumentation.  After you receive your paper back, you will have about a week to revise and resubmit it.  Detailed instructions will be provided two weeks before the due date.

 b. Three In-Class Exams (10% each): Each exam will test your knowledge of material discussed in class and read independently at home.

 c.  Presentation (10%): Individually or in pairs, you will prepare a 5-10-minute oral presentation on one of the topics offered in the beginning of the semester.  You will discuss your presentation with your instructor no later than two weeks in advance.

d. Final Paper  (30%):  You final paper may draw on one of your response papers.  It should include  your reflections on the topic supported by textual evidence from assigned works.  Detailed instructions will be available mid-semester.  Format: 8-10 pages (at least 2,500 words), Times New Roman, 12 pt.

 e. Participation (10%):  Your instructor will determine this part of the grade based on your preparedness and participation in class.  There are three components of success: regular attendance, advance reading/preparation of assigned materials, and insightful, well-formulated comments during discussions.

RUS 356 • Rebels/Revolutnrs Rus Hist/Lit

45573 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 930am-1100am GAR 3.116
(also listed as C L 323, REE 325 )
show description

Course Description: Spanning almost a century of Russian literature, this course highlights a gallery of fictional and real rebels and revolutionaries.  What was their cause?  Who supported them?  How were they portrayed in popular novels of the time?  We will supplement textual analysis of prose and poetry with the study of historical documents in order to understand the complex historical, moral, and cultural dimensions of such enduring phenomena as revolution, rebellion, and terrorism.

 Course Materials:

Pushkin, Aleksandr.  The Captain’s Daughter (1836)

Pushkin, Aleksandr.  “In the Depths of Siberian Mines” (1827)*

Turgenev, Ivan.  Fathers and Sons (1862)

Bakunin, Mikhail.  The Revolutionary Catechism (1865) vs. Nechaev's Catechism of the Revolutionary (1869) (excerpts)*

Dostoevsky, Fyodor.  The Demons (1873)

Vera Zasulich's memoirs (excerpts from Five Sisters: Women against the Tsar)*

Andreyev, Leonid.  “The Seven That Were Hanged” (1909)

Bely, Andrei.  Petersburg (1913)

Related documents and articles*

*Included in Course Packet

 

Class Attendance:  Twice-weekly class attendance is required.  You are expected to read all assigned texts before the class and to participate actively in the discussion.    According to the General Information catalog, “[a] student who is absent from a class or examination for the

observance of a religious holy day may complete the work issued within a reasonable time after the

absence, if proper notice has been given” (page 71). The deadline for notification of such an absence

is fourteen days prior to the class absence or the first class day for religious holy days that fall

within the first two weeks of the semester.

 

Deadlines: 

February 15 – First in-class exam

March 1 – Response paper #1 due

March 10 – Revised paper due

March 29 – Second in-class exam

April 7 – Response paper #2 due

April 19 – Revised paper due

May 6 – Third in-class exam

May 15 – Final paper due

*Deadlines are subject to change.  Please consult Blackboard for latest announcements!*

 

Special Accommodations: At the beginning of the semester, students with disabilities who need special accommodations should notify the instructor by presenting a letter prepared by the Services for Students with Disabilities Office. To ensure that the most appropriate accommodations can be provided, students should contact the SSD Office at 471-6259 or 471-4641 TTY.

 

Policy on Scholastic Dishonesty: Students who violate University rules on scholastic dishonesty are subject to disciplinary penalties, including the possibility of failure in the course and/or dismissal from the University. Since such dishonesty harms the individual, all students, and the integrity of the University, policies on scholastic dishonesty will be strictly enforced.  Refer to the Student Judicial Services website for official University policies and procedures on scholastic dishonesty.

 

Grade Evaluations: 

 

a. Two Response Papers (10% each):  Response papers should reflect your thinking on assigned reading.  Format: 3-5 pages (at least 1,000 words), Times New Roman, 12 pt.  You will be evaluated on the depth and quality of your reflections, clarity of style, and cohesive argumentation.  After you receive your paper back, you will have about a week to revise and resubmit it.  Detailed instructions will be provided two weeks before the due date.

 b. Three In-Class Exams (10% each): Each exam will test your knowledge of material discussed in class and read independently at home.

 c.  Presentation (10%): Individually or in pairs, you will prepare a 5-10-minute oral presentation on one of the topics offered in the beginning of the semester.  You will discuss your presentation with your instructor no later than two weeks in advance.

d. Final Paper  (30%):  You final paper may draw on one of your response papers.  It should include  your reflections on the topic supported by textual evidence from assigned works.  Detailed instructions will be available mid-semester.  Format: 8-10 pages (at least 2,500 words), Times New Roman, 12 pt.

 e. Participation (10%):  Your instructor will determine this part of the grade based on your preparedness and participation in class.  There are three components of success: regular attendance, advance reading/preparation of assigned materials, and insightful, well-formulated comments during discussions.

RUS 412K • Second-Year Russian I

44895 • Fall 2010
Meets MTWTH 1100am-1200pm CAL 323
show description

Course Description

This course is the third semester of Russian language instruction developing functional proficiency in listening, speaking, and reading.  Writing will be developed primarily thorough workbook home assignments. 

Texts:

Russian Stage 2, Welcome Back. Martin-Zaitseiv

Requirements and Grading

In-class tests                        30%

Final Exam                        30%

Homework                        25%

Participation                        15%

 

Prerequisites: RUS 804, 507, 507T, or appropriate score on Russian placement examination.

 

 

 

 

 

 

RUS 325 • Third-Year Russian II

45845 • Spring 2010
Meets MWF 1000-1100 BEN 1.106
show description

RUS 325 Third-Year Russian (45845)

Syllabus

Instructor:                        Marina Potoplyak

E-mail:                        marina.potoplyak@gmail.com

Office Hours:                        MF 11:00 AM-12:30 PM in CAL 429C

and by appointment

Class Meetings:            MWF 10:00-11:00 AM in BEN 1.106

                                    Lab meetings in MEZ 2.120

 

Course Description:  Building on language skills and cultural competence acquired during first two years of Russian and RUS 324, this course aims at further expansion of students’ vocabulary and improvement of both writing and speaking skills.  In addition to the textbook, this course uses a variety of authentic materials and resources to enhance learning experience.  Russian only is spoken in class.

Course Materials: 

Rosengrant, Sandra F. Focus on Russian: An Interactive Approach to Advanced Communicative Competence.  (FR)

Course Packet available at JENN’S Copies next to Caffé Medici (CP)

 

Class Attendance:  Regular class attendance and extensive preparation at home are crucial to your success in this class.  It is your responsibility to review the vocabulary and study grammar rules presented in your textbook before coming to class. Bring Focus on Russian and the course packet to class every day.  Please arrive on time, turn off your cell phone, and be ready to participate!  Only three unexcused absences are allowed.  Any additional undocumented absences will result in lower grade (half-grade per absence).  Make sure to complete all assignments missed in class. 

Russian outside the Class:  You are strongly encouraged to join Austin Russian Speakers Meet-Up group (http://www.meetup.com/RusskiYazyk/), so you can practice Russian regularly with native and non-native speakers of Russian.  We will also have a conversation group on Fridays at 12:00 noon (Russian Table).  Please take advantage of all Russia-related activities and events on campus and around Austin.  For example, join Russian Facebook of Austin (http://www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=13487049484 to enjoy their non-academic fun activities.  You can earn extra credit by attending Russian film screenings and participating in the departmental events (the Department of Slavic and Eurasian Studies and CREEES).  Please discuss with the instructor other options to improve your Russian and gain cultural proficiency (independent reading, journaling, blogging, etc.).

Special Accommodations: At the beginning of the semester, students with disabilities who need special accommodations should notify the instructor by presenting a letter prepared by the Services for Students with Disabilities Office. To ensure that the most appropriate accommodations can be provided, students should contact the SSD Office at 471-6259 or 471-4641 TTY.

 

Policy on Scholastic Dishonesty: Students who violate University rules on scholastic dishonesty are subject to disciplinary penalties, including the possibility of failure in the course and/or dismissal from the University. Since such dishonesty harms the individual, all students, and the integrity of the University, policies on scholastic dishonesty will be strictly enforced.  Refer to the Student Judicial Services website for official University policies and procedures on scholastic dishonesty.

 

Grade Evaluations: 

a. Presentation on Russian Culture (5%):  Working in pairs, prepare a 10-min long presentation on one of the topics (in Russian!).  You may use small index cards with an outline of your presentation.  Do not hesitate to ask your instructor for suggestions and resources.  The date of your presentation cannot be changed, so make sure you and your partner have rehearsed the presentation several times before the big day!  Use a variety of authentic materials (music, images, games, etc.) to engage your audience.  Design a short quiz to test their knowledge!   (Make sure to show your presentation to your instructor at least two days in advance!).  

 

b. Homework (15%): You are responsible for writing out the homework assignments listed on your chapter schedule. Your instructor may assign other homework in addition to that listed on the schedule.  If you receive a “-” you have a chance to resubmit your homework with corrections.    NO LATE HOMEWORK assignments will be accepted, unless you have been absent. In that case, the missing homework must be turned in immediately upon your return to class.

c. Essays and Translations (15% and 15%): Essays and translations will be written individually, outside of class, and should be turned in on the day stated on the chapter schedule.  Translations can be turned in just once.  For the essays, the first due date is for the first draft; the second (“Essay Revised”) specifies when you may turn in your corrected version.  Criteria for grading the take-home essay are similar to those used for the translation exercises. Late essays will have 10% subtracted from the grade for each class day they are late, unless you have been absent due to verified illness, religious holy day, or university-connected activity. In that case, the missing assignment must be turned immediately upon your return to class.

d. Unit Tests (20%):  At the end of each unit, students are expected to show their knowledge of the vocabulary, grammar, and any other relevant cultural information covered in the unit during a 50-min long exam.  There will be no make-ups for unit tests.

e. Class Participation (10%): Evaluated on the grounds of the students’ daily preparedness for class, readiness to contribute to activities, completion of lab tasks, and overall performance.

f. Vocabulary Quizzes (5%):  Short, 10-min translation tests on vocabulary covered in the unit.

g. Final Exam (15%):  Final exam is a comprehensive test covering lexical, grammatical, and cultural issues discussed over the spring semester.  Oral proficiency will also be tested.

 

 

 

TENTATIVE COURSE SCHEDULE

 

January 20 – February 5

 

Unit 6

Lab: January 25

Quiz: January 27

Test 1: February 5

February 8 – February 24

Unit 7

Quiz: February 12

Lab: February 15

Test 2: February 24

February 26 – March 12

Unit 8

Quiz: March 3

Lab: March 8

Test 3: March 12

March 15 – March 21

No Class: Spring Break

 

March 22 – April 5

Unit 9

Quiz: March 26

Test 4: April 5

April 7 – May 5

Unit 10

Quiz: April 12

Lab: April 19, May 3

Test 5: May 5

May 7

Last Day of Class

Preparation for the final exam[1]

 


[1] Date and time of the final exam to be announced

RUS 324 • Third-Year Russian I

45965 • Fall 2009
Meets MWF 1000-1100 CAL 422
show description

Prerequisites: RUS 611C or 412L. Or a proficiency level of 1 on the ILR scale (equivalent to Intermediate-low or Intermediate‑mid on the ACTFL scale).

Course Content: This course is the fifth semester of Russian language instruction. It is a practical advanced all-round language course, based on the communicative-functional approach to language. We have two goals. The first is to develop functional linguistic proficiency in the four basic skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The second is to develop practical linguo-cultural competence, encompassing both high and popular culture. The textbook, a systematic review of Russian grammar, serves as a skeleton for the course structure. It will be supplemented by various authentic materials in different media developing listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Special attention will be paid to the contemporary mass media not only as linguistic material, but also as a point of access to Russian culture in its various forms. The course is conducted in Russian. At the end of the year (after this course and its successor Russian 325), most students should have achieved a proficiency level of 2 on the ILR scale (comparable to Advanced on the ACTFL scale).

Textbook:           

  • Benjamin Rifkin, Grammatika v kontekste. Russian grammar in literary contexts. McGraw-Hill, 1996. ISBN-10: 007-052831-4.

Recommended reference sources (not required):

Katzner, Kenneth. English-Russian, Russian-English Dictionary. 2nd ed. (John Wiley & Sons, 1994). ISBN: 978-0-471-01707-3.

Wade, Terence. A Comprehensive Russian Grammar. 3rd ed. (John Wiley & Sons, 2000). ISBN: 978-1-4051-3639-6.

Gerhart, Genevra. The Russian's World. 3rd ed. (Slavica Publishers, 2001). ISBN: 978-0-893-57293-8.

Grading. The components of the course grade and their relative weights are:

  • Unit exams: 40%
  • Daily homework assignments: 20%
  • Class participation: 20%
  • Cultural project: composition and oral presentation: 10%
  • Oral proficiency exams (mid-term and end-of-semester): 10%

There is no final in the course. Plus/minus grading will apply.

Please contact the instructor if you have any questions.

RUS 324 • Third-Year Russian I

45970 • Fall 2009
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm CAL 422
show description

Prerequisites: RUS 611C or 412L. Or a proficiency level of 1 on the ILR scale (equivalent to Intermediate-low or Intermediate‑mid on the ACTFL scale).

Course Content: This course is the fifth semester of Russian language instruction. It is a practical advanced all-round language course, based on the communicative-functional approach to language. We have two goals. The first is to develop functional linguistic proficiency in the four basic skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The second is to develop practical linguo-cultural competence, encompassing both high and popular culture. The textbook, a systematic review of Russian grammar, serves as a skeleton for the course structure. It will be supplemented by various authentic materials in different media developing listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Special attention will be paid to the contemporary mass media not only as linguistic material, but also as a point of access to Russian culture in its various forms. The course is conducted in Russian. At the end of the year (after this course and its successor Russian 325), most students should have achieved a proficiency level of 2 on the ILR scale (comparable to Advanced on the ACTFL scale).

Textbook:           

  • Benjamin Rifkin, Grammatika v kontekste. Russian grammar in literary contexts. McGraw-Hill, 1996. ISBN-10: 007-052831-4.

Recommended reference sources (not required):

Katzner, Kenneth. English-Russian, Russian-English Dictionary. 2nd ed. (John Wiley & Sons, 1994). ISBN: 978-0-471-01707-3.

Wade, Terence. A Comprehensive Russian Grammar. 3rd ed. (John Wiley & Sons, 2000). ISBN: 978-1-4051-3639-6.

Gerhart, Genevra. The Russian's World. 3rd ed. (Slavica Publishers, 2001). ISBN: 978-0-893-57293-8.

Grading. The components of the course grade and their relative weights are:

  • Unit exams: 40%
  • Daily homework assignments: 20%
  • Class participation: 20%
  • Cultural project: composition and oral presentation: 10%
  • Oral proficiency exams (mid-term and end-of-semester): 10%

There is no final in the course. Plus/minus grading will apply.

Please contact the instructor if you have any questions.

Undergraduate Courses

Fall 2010 RUS 412K "Second Year Russian I"

Course Description

This course is the third semester of Russian language instruction developing functional proficiency in listening, speaking, and reading.  Writing will be developed primarily thorough workbook home assignments. 

Texts:

Russian Stage 2, Welcome Back. Martin-Zaitseiv

Requirements and Grading

In-class tests                        30%

Final Exam                        30%

Homework                        25%

Participation                        15%

 

Prerequisites: RUS 804, 507, 507T, or appropriate score on Russian placement examination.

Fall 2011 RUS 412K "Second-Year Russian I"

Required Textbook: • Irina Dolgova and Cynthia Martin.  Russian: Stage Two: Welcome Back!,  (Dubuque, IA: Kendall/Hunt Publishing Co. 2009).  This packaged set comprises one basic textbook, two workbooks, two audio CDs, and one DVD.  Available at the University Co-op.

 

Recommended:  All available at the University Co-op:

            • Wade, Terrence. A Comprehensive Russian Grammar (Oxford: Blackwell, 1994).

             • Gerhart, Genevra. The Russian's World.  (Bloomington: Slavica Publishers, 2000).

• Katzner, Kenneth, ed. English Russian/Russian English Dictionary, (New York: Wiley Publishers, 1994).

Welcome to the Russian 412! You are entering into the intermediate level of language and culture instruction in one of the world’s most spoken and influential languages. Russian is spoken by 150 million in the former Soviet Union and by another 50 million Russians living all over the world – including New York, Los Angeles, and Houston. This is the year of Russian study that will best prepare you to read the brilliant works of Russian literature, to undertake a longer term of study abroad, to watch Russian films and television in the original, and of course to major in Slavic Studies here at UT! Russian is not only one of the official languages of diplomacy at the U.N., and a member language of the G-8, it is a language for which your prospects in business, engineering, teaching, law, and medicine are greatly enhanced with a reasonable functional proficiency. So whatever your goal, we hope that your second year of study of Russian will bring you many rewards! А сейчас, давайте начнём! 

Fall 2011 RUS 356/REE 325/C L 323 “Rebels and Revolutionaries in Russian History and Literature”

Course Description: Spanning almost a century of Russian literature, this course highlights a gallery of fictional and real rebels and revolutionaries.  Were they heroes and martyrs who sacrificed their lives to improve the lot of others?  Or unscrupulous and manipulative individuals who disguised their thirst for power behind an agenda of societal betterment?  From Pushkin’s portrayal of Emelian Pugachev’s rebellion in the 1770s to Nechaev’s organized revolutionary group, which inspired Dostoevsky’s Demons, to Bakunin’s writings and memoirs of notorious revolutionaries and intelligentsia’s responses to the “revolutionary virus,” the array of representations of rebels and revolutionaries simultaneously served as a reflection of their popular perception and formed the reading public’s opinion on these issues.  We will supplement textual analysis of prose and poetry with the study of historical documents in order to understand the complex historical, moral, and cultural dimensions of such enduring phenomena as revolution, rebellion, and terrorism. 

Course Materials:

Pushkin, Aleksandr.  The Captain’s Daughter (1836)

Pushkin, Aleksandr.  “In the Depths of Siberian Mines” (1827)*

Bakunin, Mikhail.  The Revolutionary Catechism (1865)*

Nechaev's Catechism of the Revolutionary (1869) (excerpts)*

Dostoevsky, Fyodor.  The Demons (1873)

Stepniak-Kravchinsky, Sergei.  Underground Russia: Revolutionary Profiles and Sketches from Life (1883) – Google Books

Vera Zasulich's memoirs (excerpts from Five Sisters: Women against the Tsar)*

Ropshin, V. (Savinkov, Boris) Pale Steed (1909) – Google Books

Andreyev, Leonid. The Seven Who Were Hanged (1909) – Google Books

*Included in course packet available from Jenn’s Copies on Guadalupe St.

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