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Mary Neuburger, Chair BUR 452, 2505 University Avenue, Stop F3600, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-471-3607

Mary Neuburger

Professor Ph.D., 1997, University of Washington

Professor and Chair of Department
Mary Neuburger

Contact

  • Phone: 512-471-3607
  • Office: BUR 456
  • Office Hours: Fall 2014: T 10:00-12:00, W 2:00-3:30, Th 10:30-12:00
  • Campus Mail Code: F3600

Biography

Research interests

Professor Neuburger's focus is on modern eastern Europe with a specialization in southeastern Europe. Her research interests include urban culture, consumption, commodity exchange, gender and nationalism.

Courses taught

Her courses explore ethnic conflict, nationalism, gender, and other topics in East Central European as well as Balkan history.

Recent Publications: 

Professor Neuburger's book, The Orient Within: Muslim Minorites and the Negotiation of Nationhood in Modern Bulgaria (2004), explores the evolution of Bulgarian nationalism in light of encounters with the Islamic past and a Muslim minority presence. Her recent book, Balkan Smoke: Tobacco and the Making of Modern Bulgaria (Cornell, 2012) explores the production, exchange, and consumption of tobacco in Bulgaria (and beyond) in the 19th and 20th centuries. She also has a recently released co-edited book with Dr. Paulina Bren, Communism Unwrapped: Consumption in Cold War Eastern Europe, which carefully outlines and compiles new work on the distinct and varied concerns linked to consumption under communism across Eastern Europe.

LINK to Dr Neuburger's website.

 

REE 385 • Understanding Cold War In East

45580 • Spring 2014
Meets T 330pm-630pm GAR 2.124
(also listed as HIS 383 )
show description

Understanding Communism In Eastern Europe

 This course explores the complicated nature of communist rule in its many forms and lived experience in Eastern Europe from 1945-1989.  Readings will delve into the most recent writings that try and elucidate the “roads to communism” taken from Poland in the North to Yugoslavia in the South. The course will be inherently comparative, with attention to the broader international, that is, Cold War context.  Expect to cover issues ranging from state-society dynamics, to religion, consumer culture, high culture and collectivization.  

The Following are among the Readings for the course: 

Vladimir Tismaneanu, The Devil in History: Communism, Fascism, and Some Lessons of the Twentieth Century.Gail Kligman and Katherine Verdery, Peasants under Siege: The Collectivization of Romanian Agriculture, 1949-1962.Krisztina Fehervary, Politics in Color and Concrete: Socialist Materialities and the Middle Class in Hungary.Paulina Bren, The Greengrocer and His TV: The Culture of Communism After the 1968 Prague Spring.Paulina Bren and Mary Neuburger, Communism Unwrapped: Consumption in Cold War Eastern Europe.Patrick Patterson, Bought and Sold: Living and Losing the Good Life in Socialist Yugoslavia.

 Grades will be based on participation (20%), short response papers (10%), and a final research paper (70% - this breaks down into 10% proposal/bibliography, 20% First Draft, 35% final draft).

 Participation: Students are required to come to class and participate in every session. Each un-excused absence is an automatic -2% of your final grade, and a doctor’s note must be presented for excused absences.  Short response papers (one paragraph and three questions) will be required for each week in which readings are assigned.

REE 335 • Southeast Europe In 20th Cen

44825 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm BUR 212
(also listed as EUS 346, HIS 362G, J S 364 )
show description

Through lecture and discussion this course will provide an in-depth exploration of the key events and developments of Southeastern Europe, the region commonly referred to as the Balkans, in the twentieth century.  After providing some of the basics on geography and pre-20th century developments, we will move on to a detailed investigation of this tumultuous century in a region that was wracked by war, revolution, ethnic conflict, the Holocaust, and 45 years of Communist regimes and Cold War tensions.  We will cover the territories of Romania, Albania, Bulgaria, the former Yugoslavia, and to a lesser extent Greece and Turkey. Key themes will be ethnic identity, nationalism, authoritarianism, resistance, gender and violence. The final chapter of the course will look at the fall of communism in the region and the outbreak of war in the former Yugoslavia.   

Required Texts:

Mark Mazower, The Balkans: A Short History.

John Lampe, Balkans into Southeastern Europe.

Katherine Verdery, What was Socialism and what comes Next

Slavenka Drakulic,  How We Survived Communism and Even Laughed

Zlatko Anguelov, Communism and the Remorse of an Innocent Victimizer.

Emir Sujagic, Postcards from the Grave.

Ismail Kadare,  The Successor.

 

Grading

Grading will be based on a take-home mid-term (30%); an end of quarter in-class exam (30%); a primary document assignment (20%); a map quiz (5%); 5 short quizzes on assigned readings (2% each – 10%); and participation (5%) – based on attendance.  

 

REE 385 • Conflict/Coexist East Europe

44710 • Spring 2012
Meets T 330pm-630pm GAR 2.124
(also listed as HIS 383 )
show description

This graduate seminar will explore the history of modern Eastern Europe through the prism of national identity politics.  Through reading and discussion, students will be exposed to theoretical works on national identity and then explore concrete cases of the historical development of national identities in the region. We will then analyze patterns of conflict and coexistence in the region as they have been described and explained and debated in the existing literature.  In the northern tier of Eastern Europe the focal point will be on historical tensions between Germans and non-Germans, as well as the evolution of anti-Semitism and the local contours of the Holocaust.  For Southeastern Europe, the course will focus attention on Muslim minorities, Muslim-non-Muslim relations, but also the myriad national identities formed on the basis of language, religion, and historical experience.  The conflicts and disintegration of the former Yugoslavia will be a major theme. Students should come out with a well rounded knowledge of historical and to contemporary issues surrounding identity politics in the region. 

Select Required Texts

1. Benedict Anderson, Imagined Communities.  Ernest Gellner, Nations and Nationalism. 

2. Pieter Judson, Guardians of the Nation: Activists on the Language Frontiers of Imperial Austria. 

3. Keely Stauter-Halsted. The Nation in the Village: The Genesis of Peasant National Identity in Austrian Poland, 1848-1914 (2001).

4. Tara Zahra, Kidnapped Souls: National Indifference and the Battle for Children in the Bohemian Lands, 1900-1948.

5. Chad Bryant. Prague in Black: Nazi Rule and Czech Nationalism (2007). 

6. Rogers Brubaker, Nationalist Politics and Everyday Ethnicity in a Transylvanian Town.

7. Keith Brown. The Past in Question: Modern Macedonia and the Uncertainties of Nation.

8. Theodora Dragostinova, Between Two Motherlands: Nationality and Emigration among the Greeks of Bulgaria, 1900-1949.

9. Mark Mazower. Salonica: City of Ghosts: Christians, Muslims and Jews 1430-1950 (2006).

10. Mary Neuburger, The Orient Within: Muslim Minorities and the Negotiation of Nationhood in Modern Bulgaria. 

11. Maya Shatzmiller, ed. Islam and Bosnia: Conflict Resolution and Foreign Policy in Multi-Ethnic States. 

12. Brad Blitz, ed. War and Change in the Balkans: Nationalism, Conflict and Cooperation

REE 335 • Southeast Europe In 20th Cen

45220 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm PAR 1
(also listed as EUS 346, HIS 362G, J S 364 )
show description

Through lecture and discussion this course will provide an in-depth exploration of the key events and developments of Southeastern Europe, the region commonly referred to as the Balkans, in the twentieth century.  After providing some of the basics on geography and pre-20th century developments, we will move on to a detailed investigation of this tumultuous century in a region that was wracked by war, revolution, ethnic conflict, the Holocaust, and Cold War tensions.  We will cover the territories of Romania, Albania, Bulgaria, the former Yugoslavia, and to a lesser extent Greece and Turkey. Key themes will be ethnic identity, nationalism, authoritarianism, resistance, and violence. The final chapter of the course will be the fall of communism in the region and the outbreak of war in Bosnia and Kosovo.   

Texts

Mark Mazower, The Balkans: A Short History.

Leon Trotsky, The War Correspondence of Leon Trotsky: The Balkan Wars 1912-13.

Slavenka Drakulic,  How We Survived Communism and Even Laughed

Kapka Kassabova, Street without a Name: Childhood and Other Misadventures in Bulgaria.

Tzvetan Todorov, Voices from the Gulag: Life and Death in Communist Bulgaria

Eric Stover, Witnesses: War Crimes and the Promise of Justice in the Hague.

Grading

Assignments will include a mid-term (25%), an end of quarter exam (25%), a book review (15%) and a short research assignment (30%).  Participation will be 5% of the grade.   

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