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Mary Neuburger, Chair BUR 452, 2505 University Avenue, Stop F3600, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-471-3607

Michael Pesenson

Assistant Professor Ph.D, Yale University

Assistant Professor, Graduate Advisor
Michael Pesenson

Contact

  • Phone: 512 232 9132
  • Office: BUR 464
  • Office Hours: Fall 2013: by appointment
  • Campus Mail Code: F3600

RUS F356 • Literature & Dissent In Russia

87615 • Summer 2014
Meets TWTH 1000am-1230pm BUR 128
(also listed as C L F323, REE F325 )
show description

Russian literature has traditionally been viewed as a literature of ideas and social awareness. The writer was celebrated not only as a literary craftsman but as a philosopher, a prophet, a voice of conscience. This course will explore Russian literature of dissent directed against the stifling and oppressive rules of tsars and commissars alike, as well as more recent autocratic trends in post-Soviet Russia. We will read repressed works by writers harshly critical of the ruling regimes and elites, who often paid a heavy price for their outspokenness and opposition. We will discuss the manifestation of dissent in their works, its influence on society, and the repercussions their acts of defiance had for the writers themselves. Readings of literature will be complemented by weekly screenings of films, also banned in the Soviety Union.

Grading Policy:

  • 3 short response papers  10%
  • Oral presentation  20%
  • Final paper  30%
  • Attendance and participation  20%

RUS 329 • The Russian Short Story

45835 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm GEA 127
show description

Russian writers have used the genre of the short story to create extraordinary literary miniatures that serve as counterweights to the sprawling Russian novel and demonstrate unparalleled virtuosity with character and plot development, and exposition of ideas within the constraints of a short form. The objective of this course is to increase advanced reading and conversation skills through close reading and discussion of the major short works by 19th-21st century Russian writers such as Pushkin, Gogol, Lermontov, Turgenev, Dostoevsky, Chekhov, Prilepin, Lipskerov, Slavnikova, Sorokin, Shishkin, Ulitskaya, Petrushevskaya, Gelasimov, Tolstaya and Pelevin. Background lectures by the instructor will be kept to a minimum to allow maximum student conversation. All readings, class discussion and written assignments are in Russian.

Readings:

  1. Pushkin, “The Shot” and “The Storm”
  2. Lermontov, “Fatalist”
  3. Gogol, “The Nose”
  4. Turgenev, selections from the “Hunter’s Notebook”
  5. Dostoevsky, “Christmas Eve and the Wedding,”  “Boy at Christ’s Christmas,” and “The Meek One”
  6. Chekhov, “Lady with a Lapdog”
  7. Prilepin, “Grandmother, Wasps, and Watermelon”
  8. Lipskerov, “Oedipus Complex”
  9. Slavnikova, “Russian Bullet” and “The Substance”
  10. Sorokin, “Underground” and “Hiroshima”
  11. Pelevin, “Blue Lantern”
  12. Shishkin “Calligraphy Lesson” and “The Half-Belted Coat”
  13. Ulitskaya, “The Beast”
  14. Petrushevskaya, “Hygiene,” “Revenge,” The Miracle,” “The Fountain House”
  15. Gelasimov, “Zhanna” and “The Tender Years”
  16. Tolstaya, “Okkervil River” and “Poet and Muse”

Grading:

  1. Attendance/Participation in class – 20%
  2. 3-4 Short Response Papers (in Russian) on assigned topic – 40%
  3. Weekly homework on readings – 20%
  4. Final class presentation/paper – 20%

RUS 329 • The Russian Short Story

45165 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm PAR 310
show description

Course Description

This course introduces students to great short works of Russian literature, which similarly to the sprawling Russian novel possess a long and distinguished place in Russian literary history. Since the early nineteenth century, Russian writers have used the genres of short story and novella to create polished and brilliant gems demonstrating the possibilities of character development, narrative voice, plot, and the judicious exposition of ideas in compact prose. Over the course of the semester we will read a selection of works by Pushkin, Gogol, Turgenev, Leskov, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Chekhov, Babel, Bulgakov, Solzhenitsyn, Tolstaya, Pelevin, and others.  All readings and discussion are in Russian.

Requirements and Grading for Undergrad level

Several Short Response Papers (2-3 pp.): 30%

Midterm Paper: 30%

Final Paper: 30%

 For graduate credit, students are expected to read some works in Russian, discuss additional secondary sources, and write the short response papers in Russian.  In addition, they will be expected to do one class presentation and lead class discussion on a work of their choice.

Requirements and Grading for Grad level

Several Short Response Papers (2-3 pp.) in Russian: 30%

Midterm Paper: 20%

Final Paper: 30%

Class Presentation/discussion: 10%

Attendance and Participation: 10%

RUS 330 • Intro Old Russian Lit & Cul

45170 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm PAR 301
(also listed as C L 323, REE 325, REE 385 )
show description

This course serves as an introduction to the colorful and exotic literature and culture of medieval and early modern Russia.  Over the course of the semester, we will learn about all aspects of medieval Russian life, exploring important texts from Kievan and Muscovite Rus’ that reveal a vibrant and thriving literary and cultural community.  These texts include notable examples of historical writing, military tales, saints’ lives, homilies, adventure tales, biographies, polemical treatises, and miracle tales.  We will also devote time to the study of medieval Russian art and iconography, examining in particular regional differences in icon painting and other artistic production. In addition, we will watch several well-known Russian films and operas based on medieval historical subjects, such as Alexander Nevsky, Andrei Rublev, Ivan the Terrible, and Boris Godunov, and discuss how composers and directors re-imagined medieval Russian culture for their own times.  All class discussion and reading will be in English.

Texts:

  1. S. Zenkovsky, Medieval Russia’s Epics, Chronicles and Tales
  2. D. Likhachev, A History of Russian Literature, 11th-17th Centuries
  3. On Blackboard: selections from Kievan Caves Paterikon, Domostroi, Kurbsky-Grozny correspondence, I. Timofeev’s Chronicle; J. Meyendorff, Byzantium and the Rise of Russia; R. Crummey, The Formation of Muscovy, 1304-1613; J. Billington, The Icon and the Axe.

Films to be screened:

  1. Alexander Nevsky (1938)
  2. Andrei Rublev (1966)
  3. Ivan the Terrible (1944)
  4. 1612 (2007)

Operas:

  1. Prince Igor (Borodin)
  2. Boris Godunov (Mussorgsky)
  3. Life for the Tsar (Ivan Susanin) (Glinka)

Requirements and Grading:

  1. Short Essay (5pp)                      20%
  2. Longer essay (10-12 pp)            30%
  3. Final examination                       30%
  4. Active enthusiastic participation 20%

Prerequisites

Upper Division Standing.

SLA 301 • Intro Rus/E Eur/Eurasian Stds

45235 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm PAR 208
(also listed as REE 301 )
show description

Introduction to the former Soviet Union and Eastern Europe through each of the major disciplines represented in the program: language, literature, anthropology, geography, history, government, sociology, and economics. Core course required for a degree in Russian, East European and Eurasian Studies. Meets with SLA 301 and GRG 309. May not be used to fulfill the foreign language requirement for any Bachelor’s degree. Course number may be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Texts:

1.Slavenka Drakulic, 2005, They Would Never Hurt a Fly, Penguin

2. Heda Kovaly, 1997, Under a Cruel Star: A Life in Prague, 1941-1968. New York: Holmes

and Meier

3. Brigid Pastulka, 2009, A Long Time Ago and Essentially True, Boston, New York,

Houghton Mifflin Harcourt 

4. Bella Bychkova Jordan and Terry G Jordan-Bychkov, 2001, Siberian Village: Land and

Life in the Sakha Republic, Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press.

Additional readings might be recommended for individual lectures.

Requirements and Grading:

Attendance 10%

Participation in lectures 10%

Participation in book discussions 10%

Book quizzes 40% (each)

RUS 329 • The Russian Short Story

44995 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm PAR 210
show description

Course Description

This course introduces students to great short works of Russian literature, which similarly to the sprawling Russian novel possess a long and distinguished place in Russian literary history. Since the early nineteenth century, Russian writers have used the genres of short story and novella to create polished and brilliant gems demonstrating the possibilities of character development, narrative voice, plot, and the judicious exposition of ideas in compact prose. Over the course of the semester we will read a selection of works by Pushkin, Gogol, Turgenev, Leskov, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Chekhov, Babel, Bulgakov, Solzhenitsyn, Tolstaya, Pelevin, and others.  All readings and discussion are in Russian.

 

Requirements and Grading for Undergrad level

Several Short Response Papers (2-3 pp.): 30%

Midterm Paper: 30%

Final Paper: 30%

 For graduate credit, students are expected to read some works in Russian, discuss additional secondary sources, and write the short response papers in Russian.  In addition, they will be expected to do one class presentation and lead class discussion on a work of their choice.

 

Requirements and Grading for Grad level

Several Short Response Papers (2-3 pp.) in Russian: 30%

Midterm Paper: 20%

Final Paper: 30%

Class Presentation/discussion: 10%

Attendance and Participation: 10%

RUS 356 • War & Peace In Russian Lit/Cul

45005 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm PAR 206
(also listed as C L 323, REE 325, REE 385, RUS 391 )
show description

Course Description

 This exciting course explores Russian literary and cinematic responses to the ravages of war and revolution, heroic and bloody conflicts that repeatedly devastated the country throughout its long and tumultuous history. We will read a variety of texts dealing with the Napoleonic invasion, the Caucasus campaign, the Revolution of 1917, the Civil War, World War II, the Cold War, the Afghan War, and the present-day conflict in Chechnya, and explore how individual writers portrayed the calamity of war and its devastating effect on people’s lives, while expressing hope for ever-elusive peace and universal brotherhood. All readings and discussion will be English. All films will be screened with English subtitles.

 

Texts:

  1. L. Tolstoy, Hadji Murad
  2. L. Tolstoy, War and Peace
  3. M. Bulgakov, White Guard
  4. I. Babel, Red Cavalry
  5. V. Grossman, Life and Fate
  6. V. Pelevin, Omon Ra
  7. Selections from journalistic accounts of A. Borovik and A. Politkovskaya on wars in Chechnya and Afghanistan

 

Requirements and Grading


-       Keeping up with the readings and participation in class discussion       10% 

-       3-4 response papers to readings (2 pages), topics TBA                     30% 

-       Midterm paper (Tolstoy) (6-8 pages)                                           30% 

-       Final Paper (8-10 pages)                                                          30% 

 

RUS 391 • War & Peace In Russian Lit/Cul

45038 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm PAR 206
(also listed as C L 323, REE 325, REE 385, RUS 356 )
show description

Course Description

 This exciting course explores Russian literary and cinematic responses to the ravages of war and revolution, heroic and bloody conflicts that repeatedly devastated the country throughout its long and tumultuous history. We will read a variety of texts dealing with the Napoleonic invasion, the Caucasus campaign, the Revolution of 1917, the Civil War, World War II, the Cold War, the Afghan War, and the present-day conflict in Chechnya, and explore how individual writers portrayed the calamity of war and its devastating effect on people’s lives, while expressing hope for ever-elusive peace and universal brotherhood. All readings and discussion will be English. All films will be screened with English subtitles.

 

Texts:

  1. L. Tolstoy, Hadji Murad
  2. L. Tolstoy, War and Peace
  3. M. Bulgakov, White Guard
  4. I. Babel, Red Cavalry
  5. V. Grossman, Life and Fate
  6. V. Pelevin, Omon Ra
  7. Selections from journalistic accounts of A. Borovik and A. Politkovskaya on wars in Chechnya and Afghanistan

 

Requirements and Grading


-       Keeping up with the readings and participation in class discussion       10% 

-       3-4 response papers to readings (2 pages), topics TBA                     30% 

-       Midterm paper (Tolstoy) (6-8 pages)                                           30% 

-       Final Paper (8-10 pages)                                                          30% 

 

RUS 330 • Apocalypse In Russian Lit/Cul

44815 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm PAR 201
(also listed as C L 323, REE 325, REE 385, RUS 391 )
show description

The Russians have been famously termed “wanderers in search of God’s truth”. In much of their literature there is a discernable thirst for another life, another world, a clear displeasure at what is. There is an eschatological directedness, an expectation that there will be an end to all that is finite, that a final truth will ultimately be revealed, that in the future an extraordinary event will take place. This new course will explore and analyze apocalyptic consciousness in Russian literature and culture from the Middle Ages to the present. Emphasis will be on such themes as the expectation of the end of the world, identification of the Antichrist, messianic prophecy and visions of an afterlife. Readings will include works of Gogol, Pushkin, Dostoevsky, Bely, Merezhkovsky, Soloviev, Bulgakov, Makanin, and Tolstaya.

The graduate component of this class will involve an additional moderate amount of reading in Russian (for Slavic graduate students) or other apocalyptic traditions (for Comparative Literature graduate students).  Slavic graduate students will also be expected to write their response papers in Russian.  All graduate students will make brief presentations in class on an agreed upon topic of their choice depending on their individual interests.

Reading List: (These works are all available in the bookstore, on Blackboard or on Google Books)

D. Merezhkovsky, Peter and Alexei

A. Pushkin, Bronze Horseman

F. Dostoevsky, Demons

N. Gogol, Dead Souls

M. Bulgakov, Master and Margarita

V. Soloviev, Third Conversation and Short Story on the Antichrist

A. Bely, Petersburg

M. Bulgakov, Master and Margarita

T. Tolstaya, Slynx

V. Makanin, Escape Hatch

RUS 356 • The Russian Novel

44825 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm PAR 201
(also listed as C L 323, CTI 345, E 322, REE 325 )
show description

Description: 

The Russian novel represents one of Russia’s greatest contributions to world culture.  This course surveys classic authors as well as experimental works from the 19th through the 21st centuries.  Students in the course will deepen their understanding of the cultural context for Russian writers from Turgenev, Dostoevsky and Tolstoy through Pelevin and Sorokin. They will gain familiarity with literary movements and genres including romanticism, realism, modernism, and the postmodern as they developed in Russia.  We will highlight issues including the relationship of Russia to the West, the question of national identity, and the complex relationship of literature to politics.

Readings:

M. Lermontov, A Hero of Our Time

I. Turgenev, Fathers and Sons

F. Dostoevsky, Crime and Punishment

L. Tolstoy, Anna Karenina

M. Bulgakov, Master and Margarita

A. Solzhenitsyn, One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich

V. Pelevin, Yellow Train

T. Tolstaya, The Slynx

V. Sorokin, Ice

Grading:

 1. Attendance and Class Participation 10%

2. Response Papers 30%

3. Midterm Paper 30%

4. Final Paper 30%

RUS 391 • Apocalypse In Russian Lit/Cul

44855 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm PAR 201
(also listed as C L 323, REE 325, REE 385, RUS 330 )
show description

The Russians have been famously termed “wanderers in search of God’s truth”. In much of their literature there is a discernable thirst for another life, another world, a clear displeasure at what is. There is an eschatological directedness, an expectation that there will be an end to all that is finite, that a final truth will ultimately be revealed, that in the future an extraordinary event will take place. This new course will explore and analyze apocalyptic consciousness in Russian literature and culture from the Middle Ages to the present. Emphasis will be on such themes as the expectation of the end of the world, identification of the Antichrist, messianic prophecy and visions of an afterlife. Readings will include works of Gogol, Pushkin, Dostoevsky, Bely, Merezhkovsky, Soloviev, Bulgakov, Makanin, and Tolstaya.

The graduate component of this class will involve an additional moderate amount of reading in Russian (for Slavic graduate students) or other apocalyptic traditions (for Comparative Literature graduate students).  Slavic graduate students will also be expected to write their response papers in Russian.  All graduate students will make brief presentations in class on an agreed upon topic of their choice depending on their individual interests.

Reading List: (These works are all available in the bookstore, on Blackboard or on Google Books)

D. Merezhkovsky, Peter and Alexei

A. Pushkin, Bronze Horseman

F. Dostoevsky, Demons

N. Gogol, Dead Souls

M. Bulgakov, Master and Margarita

V. Soloviev, Third Conversation and Short Story on the Antichrist

A. Bely, Petersburg

M. Bulgakov, Master and Margarita

T. Tolstaya, Slynx

V. Makanin, Escape Hatch

RUS 330 • The Icon And The Sword

44915 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm GAR 3.116
(also listed as C L 323, MDV 392M, REE 325, REE 385 )
show description

Course Description

This course serves as an introduction to the exciting and exotic literature and culture of the medieval and early modern Russia.  Over the course of the semester, we will learn about all aspects of medieval Russian life, exploring important literary texts from Kievan and Muscovite Rus’ that reveal a vibrant and thriving literary and cultural community.  These texts include notable examples of historical writing, military tales, saints’ lives, homilies, adventure tales, biographies, polemical treatises, and miracle tales.  We will also devote time to the study of art and iconography, examining in particular regional differences in icon painting and other artistic production. In addition, we will watch several well-known Russian films and operas based on medieval historical subjects, such as Alexander Nevsky, Andrei Rublev, Ivan the Terrible, and Boris Godunov, and discuss how librettists, composers, directors, and screenwriters re-imagined medieval Russian culture in their own times.  All readings and discussion will be in English.

 

Prerequisites

Upper Division Standing.

 

SLA 301 • Intro Rus/E Eur/Eurasian Stds

45125 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm PAR 206
(also listed as REE 301 )
show description

Course Description

Introduction to the former Soviet Union and Eastern Europe through each of the major disciplines represented in the program: language, literature, anthropology, geography, history, government, sociology, and economics.  Core course required for a degree in Russian, East European and Eurasian Studies. Meets with SLA 301 and GRG 309. May not be used to fulfill the foreign language requirement for any Bachelor’s degree. Course number may be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

 

Texts:

1. Slavenka Drakulic, 1992, How We Survived Communism and even Laughed, Harper-Collins.

2. Bella Bychkova Jordan and Terry G .Jordan-Bychkov, 2001. Siberian Village: Land and Life in the Sakha Republic (Yakutia). Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press.

3. Heda Kovaly, 1997. Under a Cruel Star: A Life in Prague, 1941-1968. New York: Holmes and Meier.

4. Figer, Orlando. Natasha’s Dance.


Requirements and Grading

Map quiz: 5%

Participation: 5%

Essays (5-7 pages each) on books listed above: 20% each (60%)

(assignments will be distributed in class)

Final exam: 30%

Prerequsite

None

Undergraduate Courses

Fall 2010 REE 301/SLA 301 "Introduction to Russian, E. European, and Eurasian"

Course Description

Introduction to the former Soviet Union and Eastern Europe through each of the major disciplines represented in the program: language, literature, anthropology, geography, history, government, sociology, and economics.  Core course required for a degree in Russian, East European and Eurasian Studies. Meets with SLA 301 and GRG 309. May not be used to fulfill the foreign language requirement for any Bachelor’s degree. Course number may be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Fall 2010 REE 330/REE 325/CL 323/REE 385/RUS 391 "The Icon and the Sword: An Introduction to Old Russian Literature and Culture"

Course Description

This course serves as an introduction to the exciting and exotic literature and culture of the medieval and early modern Russia.  Over the course of the semester, we will learn about all aspects of medieval Russian life, exploring important literary texts fro Kievan and Muscovite Rus’ that reveal a vibrant and thriving literary and cultural community.  These texts include notable examples of historical writing, military tales, saints’ lives, homilies, adventure tales, biographies, polemical treatises, and miracle tales.  We will also devote time to the study of art and iconography, examining in particular regional differences in icon painting and other artistic production. In addition, we will watch several well-known Russian films and oeras based on medieval historical subjects, such as Alexander Nevsky, Andrei Rublev, Ivan the Terrible, and Boris Godunov, and discuss how librettists, composers, directors, and screenwriters re-imagined medieval Russian culture in their own times.  All readings and discussion will be in English.

Fall 2011 RUS 356/REE 325/E322/CTI345 "The Russian Novel"

The Russian novel represents Russia’s most fundamental contribution to world culture.  This course surveys classic authors and experimental works from the 19th and 20th centuries.  Students in the course will deepen their understanding of the context for writers, including Dostoevsky and Tolstoy. They will gain familiarity with literary movements and genres including romanticism, realism, modernism, and the postmodern as they developed in Russia.  We will highlight issues including the relationship of Russia to the West, national identity, and the complex relationship of literature to politics.

Reading List: (These novels are all available in the bookstore or on Blackboard)

M. Lermontov, A Hero of Our Time

I. Turgenev, Fathers and Son

F. Dostoevsky, Crime and Punishment

L. Tolstoy, Anna Karenina

M. Bulgakov, Master and Margarita

A. Solzhenitsyn, One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich

V. Grossman, Everything Flows

V. Sorokin, Day of the Oprichnik

V. Pelevin, Yellow Arrow

Fall 2011 RUS 330/REE 325/REE 385/CL 323/CL 382 "The Apocalypse in Russian Literature and Culture"

The Russians have been famously termed “wanderers in search of God’s truth”. In much of their literature there is a discernable thirst for another life, another world, a clear displeasure at what is. There is an eschatological directedness, an expectation that there will be an end to all that is finite, that a final truth will ultimately be revealed, that in the future an extraordinary event will take place. This new course will explore and analyze apocalyptic consciousness in Russian literature and culture from the Middle Ages to the present. Emphasis will be on such themes as the expectation of the end of the world, identification of the Antichrist, messianic prophecy and visions of an afterlife. Readings will include works of Gogol, Pushkin, Dostoevsky, Bely, Merezhkovsky, Soloviev, Bulgakov, Makanin, and Tolstaya.

The graduate component of this class will involve an additional moderate amount of reading in Russian (for Slavic graduate students) or other apocalyptic traditions (for Comparative Literature graduate students).  Slavic graduate students will also be expected to write their response papers in Russian.  All graduate students will make brief presentations in class on an agreed upon topic of their choice depending on their individual interests.

 

Reading List: (These works are all available in the bookstore, on Blackboard or on Google Books)

D. Merezhkovsky, Peter and Alexei

A. Pushkin, Bronze Horseman

F. Dostoevsky, Demons

N. Gogol, Dead Souls

M. Bulgakov, Master and Margarita

V. Soloviev, Third Conversation and Short Story on the Antichrist

A. Bely, Petersburg

M. Bulgakov, Master and Margarita

T. Tolstaya, Slynx

V. Makanin, Escape Hatch

Graduate Courses

Fall 2010 REE 330/REE 325/CL 323/REE 385/RUS 391 "The Icon and the Sword: An Introduction to Old Russian Literature and Culture"

Course Description

This course serves as an introduction to the exciting and exotic literature and culture of the medieval and early modern Russia.  Over the course of the semester, we will learn about all aspects of medieval Russian life, exploring important literary texts fro Kievan and Muscovite Rus’ that reveal a vibrant and thriving literary and cultural community.  These texts include notable examples of historical writing, military tales, saints’ lives, homilies, adventure tales, biographies, polemical treatises, and miracle tales.  We will also devote time to the study of art and iconography, examining in particular regional differences in icon painting and other artistic production. In addition, we will watch several well-known Russian films and oeras based on medieval historical subjects, such as Alexander Nevsky, Andrei Rublev, Ivan the Terrible, and Boris Godunov, and discuss how librettists, composers, directors, and screenwriters re-imagined medieval Russian culture in their own times.  All readings and discussion will be in English.

Fall 2011 RUS 330/REE 325/REE 385/CL 323/CL 382 "The Apocalypse in Russian Literature and Culture"

The Russians have been famously termed “wanderers in search of God’s truth”. In much of their literature there is a discernable thirst for another life, another world, a clear displeasure at what is. There is an eschatological directedness, an expectation that there will be an end to all that is finite, that a final truth will ultimately be revealed, that in the future an extraordinary event will take place. This new course will explore and analyze apocalyptic consciousness in Russian literature and culture from the Middle Ages to the present. Emphasis will be on such themes as the expectation of the end of the world, identification of the Antichrist, messianic prophecy and visions of an afterlife. Readings will include works of Gogol, Pushkin, Dostoevsky, Bely, Merezhkovsky, Soloviev, Bulgakov, Makanin, and Tolstaya.

The graduate component of this class will involve an additional moderate amount of reading in Russian (for Slavic graduate students) or other apocalyptic traditions (for Comparative Literature graduate students).  Slavic graduate students will also be expected to write their response papers in Russian.  All graduate students will make brief presentations in class on an agreed upon topic of their choice depending on their individual interests.

Reading List: (These works are all available in the bookstore, on Blackboard or on Google Books)

D. Merezhkovsky, Peter and Alexei

A. Pushkin, Bronze Horseman

F. Dostoevsky, Demons

N. Gogol, Dead Souls

M. Bulgakov, Master and Margarita

V. Soloviev, Third Conversation and Short Story on the Antichrist

A. Bely, Petersburg

M. Bulgakov, Master and Margarita

T. Tolstaya, Slynx

V. Makanin, Escape Hatch

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