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Mary Neuburger, Chair BUR 452, 2505 University Avenue, Stop F3600, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-471-3607

Nadya Clayton

Lecturer

Nadya Clayton

Contact

  • Phone: (512) 471-3607
  • Office: BUR 402
  • Office Hours: Spring 2014: M/W 12-­1:30pm, and by appointment
  • Campus Mail Code: F3600

RUS 412L • Second-Year Russian II

45823 • Spring 2014
Meets MW 1100am-1200pm GEA 114
show description

This course is the fourth semester of Russian language instruction developing functional proficiency in the four basic skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. This semester we will cover Units 6 through 10 of the textbook, devoting ten class days to instruction for each unit. The goal is to achieve an active vocabulary of 1600-2000 words and an oral proficiency level of what is called `Intermediate Mid’ or `Intermediate High’, as defined by theAmerican Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages

RUS 412L • Second-Year Russian II

45824 • Spring 2014
Meets MW 1000am-1100am GEA 127
show description

This course is the fourth semester of Russian language instruction developing functional proficiency in the four basic skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. This semester we will cover Units 6 through 10 of the textbook, devoting ten class days to instruction for each unit. The goal is to achieve an active vocabulary of 1600-2000 words and an oral proficiency level of what is called `Intermediate Mid’ or `Intermediate High’, as defined by theAmerican Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages

RUS 412K • Second-Year Russian I

45585 • Fall 2013
Meets MW 1000am-1100am BUR 134
show description

Course Content: This course is the third semester of Russian language instruction developing functional proficiency in listening, speaking, and reading.  Writing will be developed primarily through workbook home assignments.

Welcome to Russian 412! You are entering the intermediate level of language instruction in one of the world’s most spoken and influential languages. Russian is spoken by 150 million people in the former Soviet Union and by another 50 million Russians living all over the world – including New York, Los Angeles, and Houston. This is the year of Russian study that will best prepare you to read brilliant works of Russian literature, undertake a longer term of study abroad, watch Russian films and television in the original language, and of course major in Slavic Studies here at UT! Russian is not only one of the official languages of diplomacy at the U.N. and a member language of the G-8, it is a language for which your prospects in business, engineering, teaching, law, and medicine are greatly enhanced with a reasonable functional proficiency. So whatever your goal, we hope that your second year of Russian-language studies will rewarding and memorable! А сейчас, давайте начнём!  

Required Textbook: • Irina Dolgova and Cynthia Martin.  Russian: Stage Two: Welcome Back!,  (Dubuque, IA: Kendall/Hunt Publishing Co. 2009).  This packaged set comprises one basic textbook, two workbooks, two audio CDs, and one DVD.  Available at the University Co-op.

Recommended:  All available at the University Co-op:

 • Wade, Terrence. A Comprehensive Russian Grammar (Oxford: Blackwell, 1994).

 • Gerhart, Genevra. The Russian's World.  (Bloomington: Slavica Publishers, 2000).

• Katzner, Kenneth, ed. English Russian/Russian English Dictionary, (New York: Wiley Publishers, 1994).

RUS F330 • Russian Myths And Folk Tales

87925 • Summer 2013
Meets MTWTHF 1000am-1130am BUR 112
(also listed as ANT F325L, REE F325 )
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Course description:

Russian culture is steeped in a very rich folklore tradition the enduring elements of which can be found in everyday life, religion, popular and high art, music and literature. Russian myths reflect the spiritual journey of the people which began with the worship of ancient pagan gods and matured with the dawn of the Christian age. Despite manifold cultural and religious changes, traces of their mystical beliefs have survived: in the great epics of Russian ancient heroes; in their belief in the earth’s healing power; and in the magical stories which fill the forbidding landscape with fantastical characters. Such myths are central to understanding how, since the dawn of time, Russian people have sought to explain birth, death, creation, love and other mysteries of life. What is folklore and how is it related to modern culture and experience? What connection do fairytales and myths have to evolving ideas of Russian culture and nationality? What is the relationship between traditional folklore and literature? This class will explore these ideas through an examination of the Russian folktale, its roots in ancient, pre-Christian Slavic religious tradition, its connections with other forms of folklore such as myth and legend, and its transformation in modern Russian literature. The continuing influence of folklore will be explored through various aspects of Russian culture, including literature, music, ballet, film and popular culture. In addition to Russian fairytales, we will be reading works of Russian literature (Pushkin, Gogol', Ostrovskii, Gaidar, Tatiana Tolstaya, Nina Sadur) that make use of folkloric themes and motifs, and we will look at the study of folklore as a discipline.

Course work:

1. Active and informed participation in discussion                                                            20%

2. One twenty-minute oral presentation about a topic or critical essay on the syllabus         30%

3. A short written structural and stylistic analyses of a folktale on the syllabus                    20%

4. A final research paper (12-15 pages)                                                                         30%

Course materials:

Ivanits, Linda. Russian Folk Belief. NY: M. E. Sharpe, 1989.

Afanas’ev, Aleksandr. Russian Fairy Tales. NY: Pantheon, 1973.

Warner, E. A. Heroes, Monsters and Other Worlds from Russian Mythology. Eurobooks, 1985.

Sokolov, Yu. M. Russian Folklore. Hatboro, USA, 1960.

Barker, Adele Marie. The Mother Syndrome in the Russian Folk Imagination. Slavica, 1986.

Ralston, W. The Songs of the Russian People. London, 1872.

Dolukhanov, P. The Early Slavs. Longman: London, 1996.

Perkowski, J. L. The Darkling: a Treatise on Slavic Vampirism. Slavica, 1976.

Bettelheim, Bruno. The Uses of Enchantment: The Meaning and Importance of Fairy Tales. NY: Vintage Books, 1977.

Bottigheimer, Ruth. Fairy Tales and Society: Illusion, Allusion and Paradigm. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1986.

Bottigheimer, Ruth. Grimms’ Bad Girls and Bold Boys: The Moral and Social Vision of the Tales. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1987.

RUS 507 • First-Year Russian II

45125 • Spring 2013
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm PAR 206
show description

Welcome back to UT and to Russian 507! This course is the continuation of your introduction to

the language and culture of one of the most influential and important regions of the world.

Russian is spoken by more that 200 million people in the former Soviet Union, and an additional

150 million throughout the world. As you begin your adventure in learning Russian, use the

resources of the Slavic Department and the Center for Russian, East European and Eurasian

Studies to further your knowledge of this fascinating region, people, and culture. And most of

all, use your instructor as a live source of information, advice, and support! Удачи!

 

Required Textbook: • Davidson, Gor, and Lekic. Russian: Stage One: Live from Russia!

vol. 2, (Dubuque, IA: Kendall/Hunt Publishing Co. 2009). This packaged set

comprises one basic textbook, one workbook, one audio CD, and one DVD. Available

at the University Co-op.

 

GRADING

1. Testing: 50%

2. Homework: 25%

3. Participation: 20%

RUS 611C • Intensive Russian II

45130 • Spring 2013
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am PAR 308
show description

This course is the second semester of intensive Russian language instruction developing functional proficiency in listening, speaking, and reading. Writing will be developed both through workbook home assignments and brief reviews and summaries of your reading material. 

 

The entire second-year sequence is covered in one semester.

We will cover all of the basic textbook, Units One through Unit Ten, plus an introductory unit, in the textbook, spending about seven class days on each unit. In addition, this course aims to develop your reading skills through both in-class reading assignments, and individual “free reading” based on a text of your choosing. Portfolio exercises will continue to develop your computer literacy skills – in Russian – for you to be truly functionally proficient and competitive in the language, as well as chronicle your progress in your independent reading project throughout the course. 

RUS 601C • Intensive Russian I

44975 • Fall 2012
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am PAR 302
show description

Course Description:

This course is the first semester of intensive Russian language instruction developing functional proficiency in listening, speaking, and reading. Writing will be developed primarily through workbook and computer-based home assignments.  We will cover all of Volumes One and Two of the textbooks, Units One through Unit Fourteen in the textbooks, spending about one week on each unit. In addition, this course aims to develop computer literacy skills – in Russian – for you to be truly functional and competitive in the language.

Readings:

Textbook: • Davidson, Gor, and Lekic.  Russian: Stage One: Live from Russia! 2nd ed., vols. 1 and 2, (Dubuque, IA: Kendall/Hunt Publishing Co. 2008 and 2009). These packaged sets comprise two basic textbooks, two workbooks, two audio CDs, and two DVDs. Available at the University Co-op.

Recommended:            • Russian/English Dictionary

• Gerhart, G., The Russian’s World, Orlando: Houghton Mifflin, 1994.

• Garza, T., Fundamentals of Russian Verbal Conjugation for Teachers  and Students, Dubuque, IA: Kendall/Hunt and ACTR Publications, 1993.

Grading:

There are five components of your final course grade.  These components and their relative weights are:

1.  Testing:  35%

Unit tests: 15%

Final exam: 20%

2.  Homework:  15% 

3.  Participation:  15% 

4.  Portfolio:  15%

5.  Oral Presentation:  20%

RUS 506 • First-Year Russian I

44985 • Fall 2012
Meets MTWTHF 1200pm-100pm JES A216A
show description

Course ContentThis course is the first semester of Russian language instruction developing functional proficiency in listening, speaking, and reading.  Writing will be developed primarily through workbook home assignments. 

Welcome to Russian 506! This course is designed to introduce you to the language and culture of one of the most influential and important regions of the world – today and over a millennium of history. Russian is spoken by more than 200 million people in the former Soviet Union, and an additional 150 million throughout the world. It is the language of some of the world’s greatest literature: Pushkin, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Chekhov, Pasternak, Bulgakov, Nabokov, Gorky, and Solzhenitsyn. It is the culture of some of the greatest scientists and innovators in the West: Lomonosov, Mendeleev, Pavlov, and Gagarin. And it is the country of some of most influential politicians of the Twentieth Century: Lenin, Stalin, Gorbachev, Putin – and Medvedev! The major cities of Moscow and St. Petersburg attract thousands of tourists, businesspeople, and students every year, while in Siberia and the Caspian, oil and petroleum products are produced at a rate that rivals that of the Middle East. As a Member of the Group of Eight, Russia has become in the 21st century a power player in global policy from economics to terrorism to the environment. And, as events last year in North Ossetia and Georgia indicate, Russia remains as unpredictable in the shaping of world affairs as it was during Soviet times. As such, a command of the Russian language is a powerful (and lucrative!) facility in virtually any area of employment, be it government service, business, law, medicine, teaching, engineering, or the military. As you begin your adventure in learning Russian, use the resources of the Slavic Department and the Center for Russian, East European and Eurasian Studies to further your knowledge of this fascinating region, people, and culture. And most of all, use your instructor as a live source of information, advice, and support! Удачи Вам! Good luck! 

Required Textbook: • Davidson, Gor, and Lekic.  Russian: Stage One: Live from Russia! vol. 1,  (Dubuque, IA: Kendall/Hunt Publishing Co. 2008).  This packaged set comprises one basic textbook, one workbook, one audio CD, and one DVD.  Available at the University Co-op.

Recommended:

• Cruise, Edwina. English Grammar for Students of Russian, (Ann Arbor, MI: Olivia and Hill Press, 1993).

• Garza, Thomas. Fundamentals of Russian Verbal Conjugation for Teachers and Students, (Dubuque, IA: Kendall/Hunt and ACTR Publications), 1993.

• Katzner, Kenneth, ed. English Russian/Russian English Dictionary, (New York: Wiley Publishers, 1994).

RUS S507 • First-Year Russian II

88325 • Summer 2012
Meets MTWTH 830am-1130am MEZ 2.122
show description

Required Textbook: • Davidson, Gor, and Lekic.  Russian: Stage One: Live from Russia! vol. 2,  (Dubuque, IA: Kendall/Hunt Publishing Co. 2009).  This packaged set comprises one basic textbook, one workbook, one audio CD, and one DVD.  Available at the University Co-op.

Recommended Texts: • Cruise, Edwina. English Grammar for Students of Russian, (Ann Arbor,

MI: Olivia and Hill Press, 1993).

• Garza, Thomas. Fundamentals of Russian Verbal Conjugation for

Teachers and Students, (Dubuque, IA: Kendall/Hunt and ACTR Publications), 1993.

• Katzner, Kenneth, ed. English Russian/Russian English Dictionary,

(New York: Wiley Publishers, 1994).

All Required and Recommended Texts are available at the University Co-op.

***

Welcome back to UT and to Russian 507! This course is the continuation of your introduction to the language and culture of one of the most influential and important regions of the world. Russian is spoken by more that 200 million people in the former Soviet Union, and an additional 150 million throughout the world. It is the language of some of the world’s greatest literature: Pushkin, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Chekhov, Pasternak, Bulgakov, Nabokov, Gorky, and Solzhenitsyn. It is the culture of some of the greatest scientists and innovators in the West: Lomonosov, Mendeleev, Pavlov, and Gagarin. And it is the country of some of most influential politicians of the Twentieth Century: Lenin, Stalin, Gorbachev, and Putin. The major cities of Moscow and St. Petersburg attract thousands of tourists, businesspeople, and students each year, while in Siberia and the Caspian, oil and petroleum products are produced at a rate that rivals that of the Middle East. As a member of the Group of Eight, Russia has become in the 21st century a power player in global policy from economics to terrorism to the environment. And, as recent events indicate, such as those in North Ossetia and Georgia – or even this winter’s incident with the Russia-Ukraine oil pipeline, Russia remains as unpredictable in the shaping of world affairs as it was during Soviet times. As such, a command of the Russian language is a powerful (and lucrative!) facility in virtually any area of employment, be it government service, business, law, medicine, teaching, engineering, or the military. As you begin your adventure in learning Russian, use the resources of the Slavic Department and the Center for Russian, East European and Eurasian Studies to further your knowledge of this fascinating region, people, and culture. And most of all, use your instructor as a live source of information, advice, and support! Удачи Вам! Good luck!

I. General

Course Content: This course is the second semester of Russian language instruction developing functional proficiency in listening, speaking, and reading.  Writing will be developed primarily through workbook home assignments.  

Course Requirements: You are expected to attend daily classes regularly, participate actively in class, do all assigned coursework, and take all exams.  You will be allowed a maximum of five (5) unexcused absences during the semester.  More than five (5) unexcused absences will result in the lowering of your final course grade by a diacritical (a B+ goes to a B, a B to a B-, etc.); more than 8 (eight) absences will result in a grade lowered by a letter.  Also, chronic tardiness will be treated as absences, as determined by your instructor. A Course Syllabus for the entire semester, briefly describing goals and in-class activities, is found on pp. xiii - xx in your Textbook. Corresponding homework assignments for each daily class meeting are found in the WorkbookPREPARING AND HANDING IN DAILY HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS IS ESSENTIAL TO PASS THE COURSE!  This means that you should go over and be familiar with this material (or prepare relevant questions) in advance of class.  You are also responsible for learning all of the words and expressions contained in the texts and exercises covered in the Course Syllabus which appear in non-italic type in the vocabulary lists at the end of each unit.  You should plan to spend about two hours of preparation for each hour in the classroom.  If you miss a class, it is your responsibility to contact your instructor or another student and find out what was covered and make up the missed work. 

Special Accommodations: If you have extenuating physical circumstances, all instructors in the Slavic Department will make themselves available to discuss appropriate academic accommodations that you may require as a student with a disability. Before course accommodations will be made, students may be required to provide documentation to the Office of the Dean of Students -- Services for Students with Disabilities.

 Supplementary Materials

Your Textbook comes with an audio CD and a DVD that correspond to many of the exercises in

each unit, indicated by a "cassette" and "camera" symbol, respectively. You will greatly enhance

your own listening comprehension of Russian by downloading and using these media in your

iPod or home/car stereo as often as possible. If you prefer to use the media on campus, there are facilities available in several locations, such as the Perry Castañeda Library and Flawn Academic

Center. In addition, the Department of Slavic and Eurasian Studies has in Calhoun 422 a collection of both classic and very recent DVDs with movies, music, speeches and documentaries from and about Russia and the former Soviet states. These DVDs are interesting from both a cultural and purely entertainment point of view. Many of the DVDs have English subtitles (which can help you build your confidence and facility in hearing spoken Russian and deriving meaning), and some also have Russian subtitles, which are a real benefit to building listening comprehension as you gain a larger vocabulary and fluency. These may be checked out for home viewing; see your instructor for suggestions.

RUS 412L • Second-Year Russian II

44975 • Spring 2012
Meets MTWTH 1100am-1200pm MEZ 1.210
show description

This course is the fourth semester of Russian language instruction developing functional proficiency in the four basic skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. This semester we will cover Units 6 through 10 of the textbook, devoting ten class days to instruction for each unit. The goal is to achieve an active vocabulary of 1600-2000 words and an oral proficiency level of what is called `Intermediate Mid’ or `Intermediate High’, as defined by theAmerican Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages

RUS 360 • Leo Tolstoy's Early Works

44830 • Fall 2011
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am PAR 203
(also listed as C L 323, CTI 345, REE 325 )
show description

Course description:

This course offers a survey of Tolstoy’s most emblematic early works that paved the way to recognition for the young writer on the Russian literary scene. The works that we will examine serve as perfect landmarks on the path of the young Tolstoy’s evolution as a writer and provide an invaluable insight into the birth and formation of his literary genius. It would be impossible to fully understand and appreciate Tolstoy’s later literary masterworks without familiarizing oneself with the literary, aesthetic, philosophical and historical influences and ideas that accompanied and shaped Tolstoy’s first steps as a professional writer.

Starting with his first published novel Childhood, highly acclaimed and recognized immediately after its appearance in 1852, we will look into the persistent autobiographical tendency of Tolstoy’s literary creations, his superb power of observation and portrayal of human psychic life and psychological analysis, his captivating descriptive art that resided in the love for minute details and sweeping generalizations. His military sketches will transport us to the Caucasus where a young officer Leo Tolstoy is pondering the nature of human courage and vanity and is struggling in his writing with the romantic stereotypes of war. We will trace the immergence of the two hallmarks of Tolstoy’s descriptive style – the so-called bestrangement device and interior monologue or “dialectic of the soul,” and will experience all manifestations of human psyche subjected to the horrors of war through the eyes of the best war journalist – Leo Tolstoy.

The course will also explore Tolstoy’s evolution as a writer in the context of his relationship to the aesthetic ideas of the 1850’s and his deeply personal involvement in the heated debate over the purpose of art that sharply divided the Russian literary scene of that time. Tolstoy’s two lesser known works Notes from Lucerne and “Albert” will help us to discover the primary source and nature of Tolstoy’s aesthetic rhetoric and to experience his deep personal passion for music.

And finally, we will follow Tolstoy into the classroom of his peasant school to answer his seemingly extravagant question: “Should we teach the peasant children to write, or should they teach us?” Through reading some of Tolstoy’s stimulating pedagogical essays which become a new form of artistic creation under the pen of the writer, we will see how Tolstoy’s original, humane and practical vision of education has anticipated some of the most leading principles of our contemporary educational theory and commends a great deal to a modern educator.

Course work:

1. Active and informed participation in discussion                                                                      20%

2. One twenty-minute oral presentation about a topic or critical essay on the syllabus                  30%

3. A short written textual analysis                                                                                            20%

4. A final research paper (12-15 pages)                                                                                    30%

RUS F412K • Second-Year Russian I

88310 • Summer 2011
Meets MTWTHF 830am-1030am CBA 4.338
show description

Course Description

This course is the third semester of Russian language instruction developing functional proficiency in listening, speaking, and reading.  Writing will be developed primarily thorough workbook home assignments. 

Texts:

Russian Stage 2, Welcome Back. Martin-Zaitseiv

Requirements and Grading

In-class tests                     30%

Final Exam                        30%

Homework                         25%

Participation                       15%

Prerequisites: RUS 804, 507, 507T, or appropriate score on Russian placement examination.

RUS 412K • Second-Year Russian I

87800 • Summer 2010
Meets MTWTHF 830am-1030am CBA 4.340
show description

Class Days:            MTWThF (8:30-10:30) CBA 4.340 

Instructor:            Nadya Clayton

                        Office: CAL 436C

                        Phone: 471-3607 (Slavic Department)

                        E-mail: nadyaclayton@sbcglobal.net

                        Office hours: W 10:30-11.30 am., and by appointment 

Textbook:            Martin, Cynthia and Dolgova, Irina.  Russian: Stage Two: Welcome Back!, (Kendall/Hunt Publishing Co.: Dubuque, IA, 2001).  This packaged set contains one basic textbook, two workbooks, three CDs, and one DVD.  It is available at the University Co-op.

 Recommended for reference:

• Thompson.  Oxford Russian Dictionary  (Oxford: Oxford University Press,   1997). 

• Katzner, Kenneth. English-Russian, Russain-English Dictionary (Rev. and expanded ed., New York, 1994).

• Wade, Terence. A Comprehensive Russian Grammar (Oxford: Blackwell, 1994).

• Gerhart. The Russian's World, 2nd ed.  (New York: Holt, Rinehart, Winston, 1995).

 I.         General

 Course Content: This course is the third semester of Russian language instruction developing functional proficiency in listening, speaking, and reading.  Writing will be developed primarily through workbook home assignments.  We will cover Unit 1 through Unit 5 in the textbook, spending about five class days on each unit.

 Course Requirements: You are expected to attend daily classes regularly, participate actively in class, do all assigned coursework, and take all exams.  A Course Outline for the entire semester, briefly describing goals and in-class activities, is found on pp. xiii - xv in your Textbook. Corresponding homework assignments for each daily class meeting are found in the Workbook. PREPARING AND HANDING IN DAILY HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS IS ESSENTIAL TO PASS THE COURSE!  This means that you should go over and be familiar with this material (or prepare relevant questions) in advance of class.

 You are responsible for learning all of the words and expressions contained in the texts and exercises covered in the Course Syllabus which appear in the vocabulary lists at the end of each unit.  You should plan to spend about two hours of preparation for each hour in the classroom.  If you miss a class, it is your responsibility to contact your instructor or another student and find out what was covered and make up the missed work. 

 

Accommodations for disabilities: Any student with a documented disability (physical or cognitive) who requires academic accommodations should contact the Services for Students with Disabilities area of the Office of the Dean of Students at 471-6259 (voice) or 471-4641 (TTY for users who are deaf or hard of hearing) as soon as possible to request an official letter outlining authorized accommodations.

 Testing:  There will be five in-class one-hour tests for this course.  The in-class tests, each covering in turn units 1-5, will be given on June 12, June 19, June 26, July 3, and July 10.

 

 II.          Grading

 There are three components of your final course grade.  These components and their relative weights are:

 1.  Testing (in-class tests):  55%

Because of the time constraints and pace of this course, make-ups on any of the tests will be given only in unusual cases with extenuating circumstances.

 2.  Homework:  30%

Written homework or in-class quizzes (e.g., vocabulary, grammar checks, etc.) will be graded on a credit / no credit basis.  All assignments from the Workbook must be turned in on the class day after being assigned; a "no credit" assignment may be resubmitted for credit on the following day after being returned to the student.  Your homework grade will be the percentage of "credit" assignments you submit during the term.

3.  Participation:  15%

This grade is determined by your instructor as a reflection of your overall preparedness and performance in class.  You are expected to a) attend class daily, b) prepare assigned material in advance for each class, and c) respond in class with reasonable accuracy and enthusiasm.

 The result of these calculations will be on a number on a scale of 0-100.  This numerical grade will be converted to a letter grade as follows:

 90 and above                   =           A

80 to 89                         =            B

70 to 79                         =            C

60 to 69                         =            D

59 and below                   =            F

 III.         Language  Laboratory  Facilities

 Your Textbook comes with three CDs (audio recordings) and a DVD (video recording) that accompany the exercises in each unit, indicated by a "cassette" and "camera" symbol, respectively.  You will greatly enhance your own listening comprehension of Russian by listening to these recordings in your iPod or home/car CD player as often as possible.  If you prefer to use the CDs/DVD on campus, there are several language lab facilities on campus, such as MEZ 2.104.  You can also listen to your audio tape and watch the video tape in the Audio-Visual Library on the third floor of the Undergraduate Library (FAC).

 The Language Lab and the Slavic Department (Calhoun 415) also have collections of audio and video tapes with movies, music, speeches and documentaries from and about Russia and the former Soviet states.  These tapes are interesting from both a cultural and purely entertainment point of view.  They may be checked out for home viewing; see your instructor for suggestions.

RUS F412K COURSE OUTLINE

FIRST DAY

Thursday, June 3

            • Introduction to the course RUS F412K and how to use the materials with Russian: Stage Two: Welcome Back! 

 UNIT ONE: Thursday, June 3 – Wednesday, June 9

            Unit One Exam:   Thursday, June 10

 UNIT TWO: Thursday, June 10 – Wednesday June 16

            Unit Two Exam:   Thursday, June 17

 UNIT THREE: Thursday, June 17 – Wednesday June 23

            Unit Three Exam:   Thursday, June 24

 UNIT FOUR: Thursday, June 24– Wednesday June 30

            Unit Four Exam:   Thursday, July 1

 UNIT FIVE: Thursday, July 1– Wednesday, July 7

                 Unit Five Exam:   Thursday, July 8                         (Last day of class)

  ХОРОШЕГО  ПУТЕШЕСТВИЯ  В  МОСКВУ!

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