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Robert Crosnoe, Chair CLA 3.306, Mailcode A1700, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-232-6300

Course Descriptions

SOC 302 • Intro To The Study Of Society

44715-44740 • Shapira, Harel
Meets MW 900am-1000am ART 1.102
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Description:

This course will introduce you to what it means to think about the world like a sociologist. Over the course of the semester, we will read a little bit about a lot of things: culture, race, the economy, crime, cities, to name just a few. In each case, our focus will be on understanding what a sociological analysis of the topic would entail. We will talk about how sociologists analyze big changes taking place in the world like large scale economic change, but also how they examine small everyday situations like going to a movie theatre. Along the way we will also talk about major theoretical approaches to the study of society developed by the “founding” fathers of sociology: Karl Marx, Max Weber, and Emile Durkheim. By the end of the course you should be able to think about the world in a sociological way, including being able to ask sociological questions and develop sociological schemes for acquiring answers.

Required texts: 

Erving Goffman, Presentation of Self in Everyday Life

Annette Lareau, Unequal Childhoods

Grading and Requirements:

3 Short Papers

3 In Class Exams

SOC 302 • Intro To The Study Of Society

44745-44770 • Regnerus, Mark
Meets TTH 930am-1030am MEZ 1.306
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Description

Sociology 302 will offer insights to understand how social forces in society shape our behavior and influence our being. After all, we are the product of our society and vice versa. Our identity, hopes, fears, grievances and satisfactions derive from the patterns of socialization orchestrated within human groups. In this class, you will become familiar with the nature of sociology, macro-micro perspectives, sociological approaches, and concepts such as culture, socialization, social structures, social interaction, self and society, institutions, stratification, gender inequality, love, marriage, and divorce. Finally, we explore the sociology of health and the mind-body connection. In this course, we will: a) create an environment that encourages active participation and discussion in the learning process; b) Use a variety of techniques in the teaching and learning process, and c) we will assess and evaluate your work and give timely feedback.

Grading Policy

A short project paper (4-5 pages) 20% 

Three exams 20% each

Class participation and group projects 10%

Pop quizzes 10%

Class Attendance: Regular attendance is required. The repercussion of being absent a total of 4 or more classes, without justifiable reason, is that the final grade will automatically be lowered by one letter.

Texts

James M. Henslin, Sociology: A Down to Earth Approach, 2007, (seventh or eight editions)

Reading Packet: in addition to your general sociology text, you are provided with more readings on certain topics for in-depth analysis and discussion. These readings are photocopied articles available as a packet under my name at: Paradigm (407 W. 24th St)

SOC 302 • Intro To The Study Of Society

44775-44800 • Haghshenas, Hossein
Meets MW 1000am-1100am WCH 1.120
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Course Description

This course will closely examine how social forces in society shape our behavior and penetrate our being. After all, we are all the product of our society and vice versa. Our identities, hopes, fears, grievances and satisfactions derive from the patterns of socialization orchestrated within human groups. In this class, students will be introduced to the basic concept of sociological imagination and principles of sociological reasoning. Many societal issues will be examined through the practice of classical theories and sociological perspectives. As we journey through the course, students will become more familiar with the nature of sociology, social construction of reality, micro and macro sociological analysis, and concepts such as culture, socialization, social structures, self and society, stratification, gender inequality, love, marriage, and divorce. Finally, the course will explore the sociology of health, medicine, and the mind-body connection.

Grading Policy

Research paper 24% Three exams 60%Cass project and participation 8%Quiz 8 %

Texts

James M. Henslin, Sociology: A Down to Earth Approach (eighth or ninth edition), 2008Reading packet available at Paradigm (407 W. 24th St.)

SOC 302 • Intro To The Study Of Society

44805-44830 • Pudrovska, Tetyana
Meets TTH 1230pm-130pm WCH 1.120
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Description:

Sociology is the scientific study of human societies, human behavior, and social life. This course will introduce you to the major topics that sociologists study, including culture, socialization, social interaction, stratification, and social institutions. An introduction to the theoretical perspectives and research methods of sociology will enhance your critical reasoning about these social issues. Most importantly, this course intends to develop your sociological imagination, which is the ability to understand how private lives are linked to and influenced by larger social processes.   Texts:   Textbook: Giddens, Duneier, Appelbaum, Carr. (2013). “Essentials of Sociology”, 9th edition. W. W. Norton

 

SOC 302 • Intro To The Study Of Society

44835-44860 • Green, Penny A
Meets TTH 200pm-300pm WCH 1.120
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Description:  

This course introduces the science of Sociology by focusing on five broad topics: (1) What is Sociology? (2) The Individual and Society, (3) Social Institutions, (4) Social Inequality, and (5) Globalization and Social Change.  In the process, we’ll examine important concepts, theories, and methodologies used by sociologists working on both the micro and macro levels.  We’ll look at interconnections between social institutions (i.e., the family, education, the economy), as well as the way in which institutional change has caused widening income inequality in the U.S. and around the world.  Widening inequality has had particularly negative consequences for men of color and women of all races and ethnicities.  Finally, we’ll examine the process of globalization and some of its economic, political, and cultural consequences.  Much of the data that we look at will focus on the U.S., but given our increasingly interconnected world, other societies will be considered as well.  Class format will be primarily lecture, due to class size.  We’ll try to demonstrate Sociology’s relevance to everyday life, as well as public policy making.

Required Readings: 

Introduction to Sociology (2014, 9th ed., Seagull) by Giddens, Duneier, Appelbaum, and Carr. W.W. Norton.

Any additional readings will be made available in a packet and/or on Blackboard

Attendance Policy:

Good academic performance requires regular attendance and punctuality.  Students are allowed three (3) non-penalized absences during the semester (excluding our introductory class meeting), regardless of whether these absences are from lecture or lab.  These non-penalized absences are intended to cover such circumstances as illness, family emergencies, university scheduled events, etc.  Students who miss more than three classes, regardless of the reason, will have their semester grades reduced by one full percentage points for each absence beyond the three allowed.  The one exception to this policy concerns absences for religious reasons, assuming advance, written notification is given. 

Grading Policy:

Exams (4)      70%               

Pop Quizzes:        15%               

Paper (2-3 pages)         15%                                                       

SOC 307D • Capital Punishment In America

44863 • Perez, Marcos
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm GDC 4.302
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Description:

Why does the United States continue to use the death penalty when nearly every other industrialized Western nation has abolished its use? What explains the persistence of this type of punishment in our society? This course explores capital punishment's past, present and future in America. Using academic sources as well as journalistic case studies, we will examine how the death penalty is currently implemented in the United States and abroad, study the history of capital punishment in this country, discuss different perspectives that shed light on the issue, and explore the debates regarding the morality, legality and efficacy of the death penalty.

By the end of the semester, students will have an extensive understanding of the role that capital punishment plays in American society. Readings and class activities are intended to familiarize them with issues such as the various arguments for and against the death penalty; the changes in public opinion about the subject; the different US Supreme Court decisions on the matter; the influence of race and class in sentencing and executions; the historical legacy of lynching; and the dilemmas posed by the way capital punishment is applied today.

Required Readings and Materials: 

There is no formal text for the course. All required readings will be posted on Blackboard under “Course Documents”, organized by the date on which they are due.

Grading Policy:

The course requires students to complete two exams and write a research paper. In addition, there is a class participation component, and an extra credit assignment.

Exams: There will be two exams that will consist of multiple-choice and true-false questions. Each exam will constitute 30% of your final grade.

Research Paper: You will write a 5-8 page paper, in which you will analyze a topic related to the class. You will be required to state a main question, research the subject, and elaborate your argument in a professional style. Your grade in this assignment will represent 35% of your final grade.

Class participation: Each student is expected to contribute in a meaningful way to in-class discussions. Consequently, 5% of your final grade will be based on your participation in class.

 Extra credit assignment: Students who wish to do so can sign up for an individual presentation about their papers at the end of the semester, in which they will introduce their arguments to the class, and answer questions from their peers and instructor. This is an optional assignment which adds up to 5 points (out of 100) to your final grade. 

SOC 307E • Contemp US Social Problems

44865 • Kilanski, Kristine
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am CLA 1.106
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Course Description:

This course provides a survey of some of the most pressing social problems facing the United States today. Throughout the course you will learn how to apply sociological research methods, concepts, and perspectives to unravel a diverse array of contemporary social issues. Topics we will examine include: mass incarceration, widening economic inequality, work precariousness, and the proliferation of surveillance technologies in everyday life. We will take an intersectional approach to consider how race, gender, class, sexuality, and immigration status shape how these social trends and issues emerge, are experienced, and influence our individual and collective futures.

The discipline of sociology, when approached with a healthy understanding of its limitations, provides some of the best tools available for making sense of our social world. In addition to developing a strong grasp of important trends and issues in the contemporary U.S., successful students will leave this semester with a “sociological lens” or “sociological toolkit” that can be applied to critically examine social issues and experiences outside the scope of course.

Required Texts:

This course will draw on a variety of texts written by sociologists and social historians, provided via a course pack, and when possible, available for free via download from the university library. As the social problems under examination are not static, but rather, constantly evolving, students can expect to be assigned (with fair notice) relevant contemporary news articles and podcasts to enhance class discussion and understanding.  

Grading policy:

Grades for this course will be distributed as follows:

40% - Two in-class exams

30% - Final paper

30% - Short reflection assignments and in-class quizzes

 

Note: To facilitate collective engagement in the classroom, laptop and cellphone use will not be permitted during class time unless it is required for a specific classroom activity or as an assistive device for learning. (In the latter case, students will be required to provide a letter from Services for Students with Disabilities verifying the need for this technology in the classroom setting.)

SOC 307F • Diversity In Amer Families

44870 • Averett, Kathleen
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm WEL 2.256
(also listed as WGS 301)
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This course will provide a broad examination of the diversity of American families and current debates about family life from a sociological perspective, with an emphasis on how gender, race/ethnicity, social class, and sexualities shape experiences and definitions of family. The course will cover theoretical perspectives on family and kinship as well as recent trends in several aspects of family life, including cohabitation, marriage and divorce, parenthood, family policy, and family structure. Specific attention will be given to marginalized family types, including LGBT families, immigrant families, and interracial families.

SOC 307G • Culture And Society In The US

44875 • Popan, Adrian
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm CLA 0.102
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Course description:

There are these two young fish swimming along, and they happen to meet an older fish

swimming the other way, who nods at them and says, "Morning, boys, how's the water?" And the

two young fish swim on for a bit, and then eventually one of them looks over at the other and

goes, "What the hell is water?"

This parable, borrowed from the American writer David Foster Wallace, illustrates our relation

to (most of) our culture: although we are not fully aware of it, we are immersed in it. Beginning

with “What the hell is culture?”, this course will address a series of questions relevant not only to

our society, but ultimately to our individual lives, and to the relations between history, society,

and us. “What is the culture’s role in society?”, “How do social structures shape our culture”,

and “How does my society’s culture affect myself?”. This course aims to answer these questions

through an interactive environment, where students’ opinions are valued.

In the first part of the course, we will investigate some of the major social theories of culture,

from Karl Marx to Ann Swidler and Jeffrey C. Alexander, via Clifford Geertz and Pierre

Bourdieu. Such equipped, in the second part, our (instructor and students) inquiry involves the

discovery of other cultures, and a return to our own, but with a fresh, critical, perspective.

Course Objectives:

1. To enhance our understanding of the main concepts and theoretical perspectives related

to culture, and its relation with society

2. To develop a critical understanding of our own culture

3. To develop academic skills involved in research, analysis, and presenting.

Assessment (tentative):

Grading:

1. Attendance & Participation: 10%

2. Examinations (best two scores out of three exams): 60% (30% each)

3. Individual presentations: 30

SOC 307J • Education And Society

44879 • Osbakken, Stephanie
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm CPE 2.210
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Description:

This course introduces students to the sociological study of education.  The overarching goal of this class is to enhance students’ understanding of how the educational system works, how schooling shapes the opportunities available to children and adolescents, and how educational attainment influences the lives and wellbeing of adults.  This course will begin with an overview of the history of the American educational system. We will then explore the myriad factors that shape achievement and learning, beginning when children are young, considering such topics as school readiness, early childhood education, and the role of parents and caregivers in shaping educational opportunities.  As we consider older children, our focus will shift toward questions involving the significance of schools, peers, and communities, and topics such as youth culture, identity issues, bullying, truancy, social media, violence in schools, and college culture. We will spend a considerable amount of time exploring differential access to educational opportunities along race, class, and gender lines, and how these social variables shape student experiences and future outcomes. We will also explore the links between educational stratification and employment, income, relationships, health, parenting behaviors, and other outcomes. Finally, throughout the course we will keep an eye on recent debates in and challenges to the educational system in the U.S. including educational reform, the evaluation of teachers and teacher tenure, the charter school movement, and differences between public and private schools at all educational levels.

Texts:                         

One required textbook to be determined. Empirical journal articles, and other                                    required reading materials will be posted to Canvas.

Grading:         

Exams 70%

Paper exploring a contemporary issue in education  20%

Attendance and in-class writing exercises   10%

 

                                               

                       

            

 

SOC 307K • Fertility And Reproduction

44880 • Glass, Jennifer
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm CLA 0.130
(also listed as WGS 301)
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Description

Why do birth rates rise and fall?  How can the U.S. have both record rates of childlessness as well as the highest rates of teen childbearing and unwanted pregnancy in the industrialized world?  Why does educating women lower birth rates faster than any population control program in the Third World?  This course will explore when, why, how, and with whom Americans bear children, and how we compare to other developed and developing countries in the world.  We will explore infertility and its treatments, the ethics of surrogacy, voluntary childlessness, the rapid rise of nonmarital childbearing in the U.S. and other countries, the politics of childbirth and risks of maternal mortality in developed and developing countries, and the declining populations and rapid aging  of  rich countries including Japan, Italy, and Spain where women have basically stopped having children. 

SOC 307N • Intro To Soc Of Development

44890 • Cuvi Escobar, Jacinto
Meets MWF 900am-1000am CLA 0.102
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Course Description:

In 2013 the average GDP per capita of the twenty wealthiest countries in the world was just over $50,000, while that of the poorest twenty countries was only $1,000. In low-income countries, literacy rates remain between 25% and 50% and 1 in 10 newborn children is expected to die before the age of 5. What accounts for the persisting (if not expanding) gap between rich and poor countries? Is economic growth the most important factor for improving the living standards of poor people in emerging countries? And what impact do social actors like drug cartels, the World Bank, or McDonald’s have on social well-being in the developing world?

Development is an inherently controversial concept, but remains central to the idea of improving the human condition. This course is designed to introduce students to major concepts and theories in the study of development and globalization with a focus on problems of inequality in wealth and well-being. The first part of the course will present the major concepts and tools used in the field. In the second part, we will discuss theories of economic development, exploring the causes and consequences of inequalities among countries. The third and last section will take a closer look at the social actors and forces that shape social and economic change on the ground, with a special focus on Latin America. Students with an interest in the global economic system and global inequalities as well as students seeking to add an international perspective to questions about growth, wealth, and inequality in their home country will benefit from this class.  

Required texts:

McMichael, Philip. 2012. Development and Social Change: A Global Perspective. London: Sage. 5th ed. Other required readings will be posted on Canvas.

Requirements:

2 In Class Exams

1 Short Paper

 

SOC 307P • Intro Soc Of Health/Well-Being

44895 • Shafeek Amin, Neveen
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm CLA 1.106
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Course Description

This course is designed to provide a broad multidisciplinary overview that introduces students to central topics in the sociology of health and well-being. We will critically examine how social, cultural, political, and economic forces shape our understanding and experience of health and illness. We will discuss several contemporary topics such as eating disorders, the effects of inequality, health care reform, and the internet on health, and how race, class, and gender affect health outcomes.

 Required Readings

Conrad, Peter, and Valerie Leiter. 2013.  The Sociology of Health and Illness: Critical Perspectives (9th Ed.) Worth Publishers.

Additional readings will be available on canvas.

Grading Policy

Attendance 10%

Quizzes 15%

Three exams 25% each

A 93–100%

A- 90–92.9%

B+ 87–89.9%

B 83–86.9%

B- 80–82.9%

C+ 77–79.9%

C 73–76.9%

C- 70–72.9%

D+ 67–69.9%

D 63–66.9%

D- 60–62.9%

F 0–59

 

SOC 308 • Rsch Meths Health And Society

44903 • Durden, Emily
Meets W 300pm-600pm CLA 0.108
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Description:   This course introduces students to the logic and methods of social science research, with an emphasis on health-related research. Specific topics include elements of research design, measurement of theoretical constructs, sampling procedures, experimentation, survey research, and qualitative research. The course emphasizes reading and interpreting empirical research.  

Required Texts:  

Singleton, Royve and Bruce Straits. 2010.  Approaches to Social Research, 5th Edition, New York NY:  Oxford Press  

Grading: 

Research Assignment 20% Exam 1 40% Exam 2 40%

PLEASE NOTE:   Although Sociology 308 has been on previous core lists to count for the social and behavioral science requirement of the core curriculum, it has been removed from that list beginning with the 2014-16 undergraduate catalog, so students pursuing a degree in that catalog will not be able to use it to fulfill the social and behavioral science core requirement.

 

SOC 308 • Social Determinants Of Health

44904 • Durden, Emily
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm JES A217A
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Please NOTE: Although Sociology 308 has been on previous core lists to count for the social and behavioral science requirement of the core curriculum, it has been removed from that list beginning with the 2014-16 undergraduate catalog, so students pursuing a degree in that catalog will not be able to use it to fulfill the social and behavioral science core requirement.

Description

This course considers the social factors that influence health and longevity, including sex/gender, race and ethnicity, socioeconomic status, and social integration. Our primary purpose will be to examine the link between social position and health patterns in the US.  This course is not on the 2014-2016 UGS Social & Behavioral Sciences Core Course List.  This course is not on the 2014-2016 COLA Social Science Course List.

Required Text

Mirowsky, John and Catherine Ross. 2003. Social Causes of Psychological Distress. Hawthorne, NY: Aldine de Gruyter/Transaction.

Articles available on Blackboard (in order in which they will be covered):

 Sociological Study of Health and Illness:

Evans, Robert G. 1994. “Introduction.” Pp. 3–26 in Why Are Some People Healthy and Others Not? The Determinants of Health of Populations, edited by R.G. Evans, M.L. Barer, and T. R. Marmor. New York: Aldine De Gruyter.

Link, Bruce G. and Jo Phelan. 1995. “Social Conditions as Fundamental Causes of Disease.” Journal of Health and Social Behavior. (Extra Issue):80-94.

Marmot, M. 2005. “Social Determinants of Health Inequalities.” The Lancet 36, no. 9464: 1099-1104.

Schulman et al. 1999. “The Effect of Race and Sex on Physicians’ Recommendations for Cardiac Catheterization.” New England Journal of Medicine 340(8):618-626.

Stress and Illness:

Pearlin, Leonard. 1989. “The Sociological Study of Stress.” Journal of Health and Social Behavior 30:241−256.

Methods:

Kaufman and Cooper. 1999. “Seeking Causal Explanations in Social Epidemiology.” American Journal of Epidemiology 150:113-120.

Kaufman, Kaufman, and Poole. 2003. “Causal Inference from Randomized Trials in Social Epidemiology.” Social Science & Medicine 57:2397-409.

Socioeconomic Status:

Adler, Nancy and Joan Ostrove. 1999. “Socioeconomic Status and Health: What We Know and What We Don’t.” Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences 896:3−15.

Lantz, Paula, et al. 1998. “Socioeconomic Factors, Health Behaviors, and Mortality.” JAMA 279(21):1703-1708.

Ross, Catherine and John Mirowsky. 2010. “Why Education Is the Key to Socioeconomic Differentials in Health.” Pp. 33−51 in Handbook of Medical Sociology, 6th Edition, edited by C. Bird, P. Conrad, A. Fremont, and S. Timmermans. Nashville, TN: Vanderbilt University Press.

Race & Ethnicity:

Hummer, Robert. 1996. “Black-White Differences in Health and Mortality: A Review and Conceptual Model.” The Sociological Quarterly 37:105−125.

Franzini, Luisa, John Ribble, and Arlene Keddie. 2001. “Understanding the Hispanic Paradox.” Ethnicity & Disease 11:496−518.

Williams, David R., Harold Neighbors, and James Jackson. 2003. ‘‘Racial/Ethnic Discrimination and Health: Findings from Community Studies.’’ American Journal of Public Health 93:200-208.

Williams, David R. and Michelle Sternthal. 2010. “Understanding Racial-Ethnic Disparities in Health: Sociological Contributions.” Journal of Health and Social Behavior 51: S15-27.

Gender:

Courtenay, Will. 2000a. “Behavioral Factors Associated with Disease, Injury, and Death among Men: Evidence and Implications for Prevention.” The Journal of Men’s Studies 9:81−142.

Courtenay, Will. 2000b. “Constructions of Masculinity and their Influence on Men’s Well-being: A Theory of Gender and Health.” Social Science & Medicine 50:1385−1401.

Verbrugge, Lois. 1985. “Gender and Health: An Update on Hypotheses and Evidence.” Journal of Health and Social Behavior 26:156−182.

Family/Marital Status:

Ferraro, Kenneth. 2006. “Health and Aging.” Pp. 238-256 in Handbook of Aging and the Social Sciences, 6th Edition, edited by R. Binstock and L. George. Burlington, MA: Academic Press.

Liu, Hui and Debra J. Umberson. 2008. “The Times They Are a Changin’: Marital Status and Health Differentials from 1972 to 2003.” Journal of Health and Social Behavior 49:239-253.

Umberson, Debra. 1987. “Family Status and Health Behaviors: Social Control as a Dimension of Social Integration.” Journal of Health and Social Behavior 28:306−319.

Waite, Linda. 1995. Does Marriage Matter?” Demography 32:483-507.

Social Networks/Social Integration:

Berkman, Lisa F. and Thomas Glass. “Social Integration, Social Networks, Social Support and Health.” Pp. 137-173 in Social Epidemiology, edited by L.F. Berkman & I. Kawachi. New York: Oxford University.

Fowler James H. and Nicholas A. Christakis. 2008. “Dynamic Spread of Happiness in a Large Social Network: Longitudinal Analysis over 20 Years in the Framingham Heart Study.” British Medical Journal 337:2338.

Grading Policy

Book Review... 20 points

Exam #1......... 40 points

Exam #2......... 40 points

 

A = 90 – 100

B = 80 – 89

C = 70 – 79

D = 60 – 69

F = 0 – 59

SOC 308J • Romantic Rltns/Fam Formatn

44905 • Maldonado, Amias
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am CLA 1.104
(also listed as WGS 301)
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Description:

This course draws upon sociological and demographic perspectives to explore romantic relationships. Specifically, the course aims to foster understanding of the social dimensions which structure romantic relationship development. Throughout the course students will be encouraged to develop a critical view of the complex and culturally-conditioned arena of human dating and mating. The college experience will provide a central context for considering romantic relationships and family formation from a cultural framework. In addition to general discussion of relationship formation patterns among young adults, the course considers historical transformations of romance, socio-economic perspectives on sexual relationships and family formation, the impact of demographic transitions on both, the emergence of cohabitation as a relationship form, the economics undergirding relationship decision making, common narratives, practices, and gender differences about entry into marriage in the West, and population-level implications of contemporary patterns.

Required Texts:

Bogle, Kathleen A. 2008. Hooking Up: Sex, Dating, and Relationships on Campus. New York: New York University Press.

Edin, Kathryn, and Maria Kefalas. 2005. Promises I Can Keep: Why Poor Women Put Motherhood Before Marriage. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press.

Lewin, Ellen. 2009. Gay Fatherhood: Narratives of Family and Citizenship in America. Chicago: University of Chicago Press

 

Grading Policy

Course Requirement               Points              Grading Scale

12 Reading Quizzes*              30                    90-100 points = A

Exam #1                                  15                    80-89 points = B                                           

Exam #2                                  15                    70-79 points = C

Final Exam                              20                    60-69 points = D

Response Paper #1                 10                    59 and below = F

Response Paper #2                 10

*The lowest two quiz grades will be dropped

**There will be one extra credit opportunity

SOC 308K • Social Change And The Future

44907 • Jaster, Daniel
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm CLA 0.102
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Description

This course provides an introduction to using the past to inform understandings of the future via the historical-comparative sociological method. The main goals of the course are: 1) to provide students an introduction to sociological theories about the origins and implications of change in social structures; 2) to teach students how to use these theories through historical case studies; 3) to apply lessons from the past to predict the effects of contemporary changes for society in the near future.

The course is organized thematically, not chronologically. First, the theoretical foundation will be built. Various schools on social change will be illustrated and compared, ranging from Marxism to cultural accounts of change. From there, case studies will illustrate these varying perspectives. We will focus on three types of change: economic, political, and cultural. After case studies illustrate how to analyze past events using theory, we will end with illustrating how these theories are used to predict the future. This will be accomplished by examining how prominent sociologists use current trends to predict the future.

By the end of the course, students should be able to: 1) understand some theories on social change, 2) use them understand historical cases, and 3) understand how to apply these skills in making informed predictions about the near future using long- or short-term trends. They should understand the links between economic, political, and cultural changes and how each affects a wide variety of social structures.

Reading

Course Packet

Grading Policy

There will be three multiple choice exams. While not strictly comprehensive, principles from the first exam will appear on the second and third exams. Each exam will be worth 1/3 of the total grade.

The grading scale will be as follows:

A 93-100

A- 90-92.99

B+ 87-89.99

B 83-86.99

B- 80-82.99

C+ 77-79.99

C 73-76.99

C- 70-72.99

 D+ 67-69

D 63-66.99

D- 60-62.99

F 0-59.99

 

SOC 308L • Socl Trnsfmtn Love/Rltnshps

44910 • Haghshenas, Hossein
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm WAG 214
(also listed as MES 310)
show description

“All the particles of the world are in love and looking for lovers.” --Rumi

 OBJECTIVES

Sociology 308 examines the social, psychological, spiritual, and historical perspectives toward love and intimacy. It focuses on the cross-cultural diversity of passionate love and sexuality from early civilization in the East and West to the modern era. The course will offer insights to understand how love and intimacy interact with rapid social, economic, and cultural change, and how the subsequent change transformed the social world and the meaning of love. As we journey through this course, you will become familiar with: the aspects of self and identity; differentiation in the context of love in the modern age; the family and the individual; the impact of industrialization and capitalism on private lives and the public order; gender, love, and communication; love, health, and socialization; intercultural love and intimacy; personal choice and arranged marriages. Finally, we will look at the current state of love and aggression in modern democracies.  This course brings some of the current research and thinking, not only from the social perspective, but also from a wide variety of intellectual disciplines. Artistic films, documentaries, and other media will be presented as technical methods of representation of "social reality" to better understand and experience the subject.

 Readings: Course Packet – a selection of articles has been prepared in a packet available at Paradigm (407 W. 24thSt.)

*Assigned readings with asterisk below can be found on Blackboard: http://courses.utexas.edu          

Format and Attendance: This course will use a combination lecture-discussion style format, with more emphasis on discussion. Attendance will be taken on a regular basis. Regular attendance is required and I expect that students will come to all classes- both lectures and discussions. Please note that: the repercussion of being absent a total of 4 or more classes for the entire spring semester (without justifiable reason) is that your grade will automatically be lowered by one letter. Unexcused absences will count against your grade.

 Grades: Are assigned based on the standard scale: 93-100%= A; 90-92.9% = A-; 87-89.9% = B+; 83-86.9%=B; 80-82.9%= B-; 77-79.9% = C+; 73-76.9%= C; 70-72.9%=C-; 67-69.9% = D+; 63-66.9= D; 60-62.9%= D-; <60 = F.  There are no grading curves.

1) A research paper (4 – 5 pages) OR group paper (10 – 15 pages) on the subject of love, intimacy, relationships, or related issues. Course project and presentations constitute 25% of the final grade. The project is central to the course and the topic must be chosen by the student and/or the group and approved by the teaching assistant and the instructor.

2) Two exams 50% (each exam counts 25%)

3) Quizzes 9%

4) Class participation/group discussions 16%

SOC 308N • Compar Relig/Politics/Culture

44915 • Ha, Hyun Jeong
Meets MWF 900am-1000am CLA 1.106
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Course Description

This course provides students with an understanding of how religion, culture, and power are deeply interconnected (or disassociated) in national politics and how their dynamics affect individuals’ daily lives. The course has two components of theory and empirical cases. We begin the first part of the course with sociological concepts of culture, religion and power drawn from the literature of political sociology and sociology of religion. Following the theoretical framework, we comparatively examine several cases of different countries in America, Middle East, and Asia.

Texts:

Weber, Max. 2002. The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism. Roxbury Publications.

Durkheim, Emile. 1995. Elementary Forms of Religious Life. New York: Free Press.

Geertz, Clifford.1973. The Interpretation of Cultures: Selected Essays. Basic Books.

Said, Edward. 1978. Orientalism. New York: Vintage

Mills, C. Wright. 1967. Sociological Imagination. A Galaxy Book.

*All readings will be available on Canvas.

Grading Policy:

Participation: 10%

Response papers: 30%

Midterm exam: 30%

Final exam: 30%

Attendance Policy:

Students are expected to finish readings before coming to class. Both attendance and engagement in discussion will be reflected to your participation grade.

For religious holy days, students are encouraged to inform the instructor at least one week before her/his absence.

SOC 308S • Intro To Health & Society

44920 • Durden, Emily
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm JGB 2.218
(also listed as H S 301)
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This course offers a broad multidisciplinary overview that introduces students to the study of health and society. Basic topics include health patterns, health behavior, medical care, and health policy in social, demographic, cultural, economic, political, and ethical contexts. Basic methodological approaches to studying these topics will be covered. This course will include guest lectures by representatives from various disciplines including economics, advertising and communications, public health and health promotion, 1, sociology, and demography. For those students interested in the new College of Liberal Arts major in Health and Society (HS), SOC308S will count as the Introduction to Health & Society course that is required for the HS major. There will be three exams and one essay assignment for this course. Exams will be comprised of multiple choice, short answer, and short essay questions.

SOC 310S • Wmns Reprod Hlth Nonsci Maj

44925 • Hopkins, Kristine
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm ART 1.120
(also listed as WGS 301)
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Description

To study women’s reproductive health is to study biology, chemistry, anatomy, physiology, endocrinology, female sexuality, and the social meaning of gender.  This course provides non-science majors with the scientific and social scientific knowledge needed to understand the basis of women’s reproductive health and the medical, cultural, and political issues surrounding women’s reproductive health.  Students will learn about female reproductive health across the lifespan.  Students will also learn about some of the ways that social, economic, and cultural factors influence a woman’s reproductive health.

SOC 313K • Intro To Sociology Of Religion

44930 • McMorris, Jennifer
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm CLA 0.102
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Description

People join and leave religions for a host of different and intensely personal reasons. As consequence, we tend to think of religious engagement as an individual experience. However, sociologists studying religious engagement have found that involvement in different religious traditions impacts people’s lives in many different and intriguing ways. Religious involvement shapes teen’s sexual and risk-taking behaviors, adult’s parenting decisions, individual ideas of gender roles and sexuality, educational goals, and career choices. Religious involvement impacts the ways that immigrants to the United States experience their cultural identities and adjust to American culture. There are even many studies showing that religious engagement even has strong and long-term consequences for personal health. This course looks at the ways that religious engagement or disengagement impacts these varied aspects of life. We also look at bigger questions such as: Why is the US so much more religious than other Western Democracies? Is religion in America and the rest of the world in decline?  Are religion and science in conflict? If so, how has this changed over time? Also, why are people religious, anyway? We will examine the works of leading sociologists and social theorists who have sought to address these questions. We will also engage in frequent discussions about these many questions. By the end of the course students will not only have a broader understanding of the ways that religious engagement and disengagement shapes both their own lives and broader American culture but they will also be able to think critically about both the theoretical and practical reasons for and consequences of individual religious engagement. 

Required Texts

 Our course readings will be available through the class Blackboard page. No additional book purchases will be required.

Grading policy

The course will have three in-class exams including a comprehensive final. The exams will account for 75% of your final course grade. 20% for the first exam, 25% for the second, and 30% for the comprehensive final. The remaining 25% of course grades will come from group and individual in-class assignments and quizzes.  

 

SOC 317L • Intro To Social Statistics

44935 • Powers, Daniel A.
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm CLA 0.118
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Description:

This is an introductory course in statistics for undergraduate majors in sociology.  The basics of descriptive and inferential statistics and quantitative reasoning will be covered.  Descriptive statistics involves organizing and summarizing important characteristics of the data.  Statistical inference involves making informed guesses about the unknown characteristics of a population based on the known characteristics of a sample. Students are expected to know how to carryout elementary mathematical operations.

Required Text:

R. Johnson and P. Kuby (2012) STAT, 2e. Cengage Learning ISBN-10: 0538733500  ISBN-13: 978-0-538-73841-5  (available from http://books.google.com)

Course Requirement:

Exams: There will be 3 in-class examinations graded on a 100 point scale.  Roughly 75% to 90% of the points on the examinations are accounted for by problems requiring the student to work toward a solution, with the remainder accounted for by true and false or multiple choice questions.  Examinations will be based entirely on topics covered in lectures. In-class examinations are non-cumulative; they cover only the material since the previous exam. Students must take all exams to pass the course. Make up exams will be given only in the case of documented emergencies or illness.

Problems: There will be 5 problem sets worth a total of 200 points. Problem sets include material from the book as well as handout problems. Problem sets must be received in class no later than the dates indicated. No credit will be given for assignments turned in late.

In-Class Assessments: There will be approximately 20 in-class exercises carried out at various points during the course to assess understanding of current topics. These will count 100 points towards the total grade.

 

SOC 317L • Intro To Social Statistics

44940 • Lin, Ken-Hou
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm CLA 1.402
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Description:

This course presents a general overview of the statistical methods used in the social sciences. While it’s important that you gain an understanding of the mathematical concepts behind the statistical analyses, it is of even greater importance that you leave this course with a conceptual and rational understanding of today’s most commonly used (and useful) statistical methods.

Truth claims made with statistics are abundant and often have the quality of facts in U.S. social and political life. Unfortunately, because many people do not understand the statistics undergirding these claims, they receive less scrutiny than they deserve. It is my primary goal to ensure that students learn the basic statistical literacy they need to be smart consumers of information. Our increasing reliance on statistics to understand the social world means that statistical and analytic skills are marketable skills. In fact statistics is one of very few classes that sociology majors take that provides them with concretely marketable skills. I believe that giving undergraduates a solid understanding of statistics is a way of democratizing knowledge and its production. In teaching statistics my goals are:

  •   To demystify statistics so that every student can be a smart consumer of quantitative information.

  •  To teach students to think sociologically with and about quantitative information.

  • To provide students with a solid foundation of quantitative and computing skills that could serve

    as assets in subsequent employment and academic settings.

  •   To demonstrate to students that learning statistics has practical applications outside of the       classroom in everyday life.

Texts:

Salkind, Neil J.. 2012. Statistics for People Who (Think They) Hate Statistics: Excel 2010 Edition. 3rd Edition. SAGE Publications. 

Grading and Reqirement:

I will use a non-competitive grading scale. In other words, the grade you receive will not depend on how well others have performed in class. You can earn a maximum of 115 points in this class. Your grade will be based on your mastery of each of the required tasks in the class. The grading scale for the final course grade is as follows: 115-94=A; 90-93=A-; 87-89=B+; 83-86=B; 80-82-B-; 77-79=C+; 73-76=C; 70-72=C-; 67- 69=D+; 63-66=D; 60-62=D-; 59 & below=F.

I do not give incomplete and will not change the final grade for whatever reason. You have plenty of opportunities to do well in this class. Use them.

If you receive a final grade of B+ or higher, I will write a personal recommendation for you in the future, stating that you have significant quantitative and computing skills.CLASS & LAB ATTENDANCE 10 PTS

As will be addressed later in detail, you have two free absences you can choose. However, I’d recommend you to use them only for emergencies. More than two absences will affect your class attendance grades negatively.

COLLABORATIVE LEARNING 10 PTS

You will be assigned to a team with two or three other students. Team members should meet weekly and collaboratively learn the materials, practice how to use Excel, and prepare for the exams. At the end of the semester you will be asked to evaluate other team members on a 0 to 10 scale based on their contribution to the team.

THREE (3) EXCEL EXAMS 15 PTS (5 PTS EACH)

You will be given 3 Excel exams during the lab hours to increase your Excel proficiency. These exams should be done independently without the help from other students.

THREE (3) STATS EXAMS 65 PTS (20/20/25 PTS)

You will be given three exams (which will be cumulative). These exams will consist of multiple-choice questions as well as short-answer question.

EXTRA CREDITS #1: PODCAST 5 PTS

You have two opportunities to earn extra credits. The first opportunity is to listen and review two Radiolab podcasts:

Numbers http://www.radiolab.org/2009/nov/30/

Stochasticity http://www.radiolab.org/2009/jun/15/

To earn the extra credits, you should listen to the two podcasts carefully and write a 1-page single-space review, which talks about what you learn from the podcasts. 

EXTRA CREDITS #2: BOOK REVIEW 10 PTS

The second opportunity is to review the book Numbers rule your world: the hidden influence of probabilities and statistics on everything you do by Kaiser Fung. An electronic version of this book is available at the library, so you do not have to purchase this book or wait in line to borrow it. To earn the extra credits, you should read this book thoroughly and write a 2-page single-spaced review, which includes 1) a brief summary of the book, 2) a more in-depth discussion on your favorite chapter, and 3) a discussion on how you view certain things differently after reading the book. 

 

SOC 317M • Intro To Social Research

44950 • Pettit, Becky
Meets MW 1100am-1200pm CLA 0.122
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Course Description

 In Sociology 317M, we will investigate questions central to the study of social life.  Using a hands-on approach, we will explore how to examine and communicate core sociological concepts, methods, and explanations.  Like historians, we will examine archival materials.  Like ethnographers, we will observe – and record – contemporary social life.  Like survey methodologists, we will design and implement a survey.  As in other sociology classes, you will be asked to analyze and interpret the evidence you collect.  This class requires you to make a commitment to using – and thinking about – the methods of social science research. 

 This course is designed to promote an experiential and interactive learning environment.  The course will involve a combination of lectures, lab/discussion sections, guided field study (i.e., field trips), and opportunities to apply and communicate learned concepts (i.e., assignments/field projects).   A significant amount of classroom time is reserved to introduce students to the methods of inquiry used by social scientists.  Students are required to practice sociological methods as part of the course.  No prior experience is necessary. 

 Course Materials

 Babbie, Earl.  The Practice of Social Research.  Belmont, CA:  Wadsworth Publishing. 

  • Any Edition after 9
  • I-Clicker
  • Additional readings will be available as links through the course webpage.

 Course Objectives

 When you have completed this course, you will be able to:

  • Articulate a theoretically-oriented research question
  • Identify ethical and unethical methodologies
  • Examine archival materials
  • Observe and record contemporary social life
  • Design and implement a survey
  • Analyze and interpret evidence
  • Evaluate the validity, reliability, and generalizability of different types of data and methods
  • Communicate core sociological concepts, methods, and explanations

 

SOC 317M • Intro To Social Research

44955 • Pedulla, David
Meets TTH 1100am-1200pm CLA 0.118
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Course Description:

How do social scientists know what they know? This course strives to address that question by introducing students to the research methods used by sociologists to understand the world around them. The following are among the topics covered in this course: 1) How to link social theory with empirical inquiry; 2) How to identify the relative strengths and weaknesses of qualitative and quantitative approaches to social research; 3) How to critically understand and evaluate the claims made by social scientists about their research findings; 4) How to analyze, interpret, and present survey data; and 5) How to conceptualize and design a research project. The course will also cover the ethics and politics of conducting social research. Additionally, there will be a lab component to this course, which will take a “hands on” approach to the material covered in class and provide students with the necessary skills to analyze survey data.

Required Readings:

 

In addition to articles and readings that will be provided on the course website, we will use the following textbook:

Babbie, Earl. 2013. The Practice of Social Research (13th Edition). Wadsworth, Cengage Learning.

Course Grading:

 Grades for the course will be based on two exams (exam 1 = 20%, exam 2 = 20%), an analysis paper (15%), a research proposal (20%), a class presentation (5%), lab assignments (15%), and class participation (5%).

Attendance in class and at the lab is required and will be factored into the class participation component of the grade. Make-up exams will not be allowed, except in extreme circumstances. Late assignments will only be accepted if approved in advance by the professor.

 

SOC 317M • Intro To Social Research

44960 • Robinson, Keith
Meets MW 1200pm-100pm CLA 0.118
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COURSE DESCRIPTION

Sociology 317M is a general introduction to social research methods.  It is designed to introduce students to the intent and procedures of contemporary research methods.  For instance, we will discuss the factors determining the selection of particular data gathering techniques, their strengths and weaknesses, and the ethical and political issues that researchers may encounter during the research process.  A large part of the course will focus on the various methods used in research and data analysis.    

REQUIRED READINGS

Russell K. Schutt.  Investigating the Social World (5th edition, Pine Forge).  It is available at the Co-op bookstore. 

GRADING

Your overall grade for this course will be based on your performance on three in-class exams, five assignments (one of which is a final research paper), class participation and a presentation based on your final paper.  There will be a total of 250 available points for this course. No extra credit points will be available.

 A = 225-250                        D = 150-174                       

B = 200-224                        F = 149 and below                       

C = 175-199          

Exams                                     

There will be three in-class exams: the first will cover Chapters 1, 3, and 4; the second will cover Chapters 5, 6, and 8; the third will be considered a final exam and will cover Chapters 7, 9, 10, 14.  Exams will not be cumulative. 

POINT BREAKDOWN:

Assign 1= 5

Assign 2 = 20  

Assign 3 = 25

Assign 4 = 35 

Assign 5 (Final Paper) = 55

Exam 1 = 25  

Exam 2 = 35  

Exam 3 (Final) = 40

Participation = 10

Extra Credit = 5, 10 (see below)

Assignment #1: (5 points)

Group activity on validity. 

Assignment #2: Take-Home (20 points)

The focus of this assignment is the development of a preliminary research question for the final paper.  This assignment will be 1.5-2 pages in length double spaced. 

Assignment #3: Sampling (25 points)

 Assignment #4: Take-Home (35 points)

This assignment is meant to further develop your final research paper.  It will involve expanding what you did on assignment #2.  Paper length will be 5 pages. 

Assignment #5: Final Research Paper (55 points)

Students will be required to write a 10-page research paper.  Guidelines for the research paper will be distributed later in the semester.  

PARTICIPATION (10 points)

Participation points are part of the total 250 points.  Participation points have to be earned.  Simply coming to class is not considered participating.  Rather, receiving points is based on the contribution you make to a particular lecture discussion.  Asking questions (excluding ones for clarification), furthering the discussion with relevant points, answering questions posed by classmates or myself are ways to gain participation points. A maximum of 1 point per lecture can be gained through participation.  Only excused absences from lecture that constitute an emergency will allow you to make up points that were lost due to your absence. 

EXTRA CREDIT - PRESENTATIONS (10 points for presenters)

12 students will present an 8-10 minute Powerpoint slide on their research paper.  More details will be given during the course.

EXTRA CREDIT DURING PRESENTATIONS (5 points for non-presenters)

Non-presenters can gain a total of 5 points by contributing to the presentation discussion.  More details will be given in week 11. 

LATE ASSIGNMENTS & LATE RESEARCH PAPER

Will be marked down 5 points for every day the assignment is late unless a valid excuse is provided.  Assignments are officially late if not turned in by the end of the lab session in which they are due.  Late final papers will be accepted, but with a penalty for each day late.  Papers turned in after 3:00pm will be reduced by 5 points. Each day thereafter (a day ends at 3:00pm) will result in an additional 5 point deduction.  Papers that have not been turned in within four days of the due date will count for 0 points.

PLAGIARISM

Do not do it.

SOC 317M • Intro To Social Research

44965 • Raley, Kelly
Meets TTH 930am-1030am GDC 5.302
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Description:

The purpose of this course is to teach basic research skills. You can use these skills in a wide variety of settings (not just the ivory towers of academia).  Specifically, students will learn 1) basic research approaches, 2) how to recognize the strengths and weaknesses of these approaches and 3) how to apply these methods to a research problem.

To achieve these goals this course takes a "hands on" approach.  This means that often class time will involve your active participation.  It is essential that you come to class (and labs) having read the assigned material.

Grading:

Three exams:  the first one is worth 10% and the second and third are 15% each

Be sure to mark your calendar!  No make-up exams except in extreme circumstances.  Make ups will be 100% essay.

Analysis paper (20%)

Review Paper (20%) 

 Assignments (20% of your grade)-- There will be approximately 7. You may

drop one. All assignments should be word processed unless instructed otherwise.

Note: All late assignments will receive a grade of 0.  If for any reason you are unable to complete one assignment on time you may drop this assignment grade. 

Note Also: Class attendance is required.  Excessive absences will result in a lower grade.

Grades are calculated as a weighted average of grades on assignments, papers, and exams. A=93-100; A-90-92; B+=87-89; B=83-86; B-=80-82; C+=77-79; C=73-76; C-70-72; D+=67-69; D=63-66; D-=60-62; F < 60.

Lab -- Most weeks the Wednesday held from 3:00-5:00, will meet and often an assignment grade will be related to work conducted during the lab.  For some lab assignments you may work as a group, but you should assume that collaboration is not allowed unless you are told specifically that the work is a group effort.  Usually, if you miss a lab you can get the assignment from the T.A., another student, or off of the course website.  However, if you miss the lab you may not collaborate with anyone.  NOTE: The exams occur during lab hours.

Analysis paper -- The purpose of this paper is to teach you how to analyze data, present results, and form a conclusion.  You will use the computer to analyze data from a secondary source (i.e. the General Social Survey). I will supply the data.  You will present your analyses in tables and/or graphs and discuss your findings.  Four to five pages of text, plus tables/graphs, title page and optional bibliography should be sufficient.

Review paper -- The purpose of this paper is to help you learn how to evaluate and improve on research.  You will identify a paper to review through a search of the literature and will write a paper describing this research, evaluating measurement validity, generalizability, and causal validity. 

Text 

Babbie, Earl. 2007. The Practice of Social Research, 11th edition

 

SOC 318 • Juvenile Delinquency

44970 • Osborne, Lynette
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm CLA 0.128
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COURSE DESCRIPTION 

In this course, we will engage in an analysis of historical, economic, and social conditions affecting both difficulties in socializing youth and the evolution of the state's formal systems of control.  We will also learn about current issues in youth and delinquency as well as programs designed to aid in deterrence and rehabilitation of youth.

COURSE OBJECTIVES

At the end of this course, students will be able to

  • Describe historical trends in delinquency
  • Identify and describe current trends in youth and delinquency
  • Use sociological theories of deviance to analyze trends
  • Identify and interpret data from government sources
  • Analyze scholarly research on delinquency

SOC 319 • Intro To Social Demography

44974 • Hummer, Robert A.
Meets TTH 930am-1100am CLA 0.112
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Description:

This course provides an introduction to the study of demography from a sociological perspective. The course focuses most centrally on understanding the core population processes – fertility, mortality, and migration – as well as linkages between the core population processes and social change and stratification. The course also focuses on issues of population structure, particularly age, sex, and race/ethnicity.

Required Texts:

Yaukey, David, Douglas L. Anderton, and Jennifer Hickes Lundquist. 2014. Demography: The Study of Human Population, 4th Edition. Waveland Press, Inc.

Grading Policy:

Exam 1: 20%

Exam 2: 20%

Exam 3: 20%

Exam 4: 20%

Daily Assignments: 20%

 

SOC 321C • Consumption In Latin Amer

44975 • Fridman, Daniel
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm CLA 0.124
(also listed as LAS 325)
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Consumption is at the same time an economic, political and cultural phenomenon. During the twentieth-century and the beginning of the twenty first, in many parts of the world the promise of extending mass-consumption became a central part of political discourses about the rights and benefits of citizens. In Latin America, the goal of achieving a vibrant internal consumer market was conflated by many with the idea of development, progress, and modernity. Conceptually, consumers have been seen alternatively as the sovereigns of markets, as victims of manipulation, or as a locus of resistance and expression. In this course, we will study the place of consumption in social, economic, and political relations in Latin America. We will read recent literature from various disciplines (sociology, history, anthropology, etc.) on consumer culture in the region, with a special focus on Argentina, Chile, Mexico and Brazil. We will deal with a variety of topics and consumption goods, including consumer policies, popular consumption, advertising, neoliberal consumption, middle class consumer culture, home appliances, jeans and tupperware.

SOC 321G • Global Health Issues/Systems

44980 • Jeon, Jiwon
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm CLA 0.118
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 Course Description

 This course provides an overview of global health challenges in the world today. It is essential to understand the links between health and education, poverty, and development with an appreciation of the values, beliefs, and cultures of diverse groups. The first half of the course will review critical global health issues from biosocial, cultural and environmental perspectives. A biosocial approach to global health equity is the underlying theme. The second half of the course will review various health systems in the World Health Organization geographic regions and will compare and contrast the various regions, as well as countries within regions, with regard to the specific health challenges they face.

This course carries both the Writing Flag and Global Cultures flag. We will use writing to improve on critical thinking skills and understanding of global health issues as well as to improve on ability to formulate ideas with an emphasis on the ASA writing style.  In this class, you can expect to write regularly during the semester, complete substantial writing projects, and receive feedback from your instructor to help you improve your writing. You will also have the opportunity to revise one or more assignments, and you may be asked to read and discuss your peer’s work. Global Cultures courses are designed to increase your familiarity with cultural groups outside the United States. You should therefore expect a substantial portion of your grade to come from writing assignments covering the practices, beliefs, and histories of at least one non-U.S. cultural group.

Course Objectives

 Describe global health issues, trends, and policies

  1. Understand how population growth, disease, environmental changes, and economic and political activities impact global health
  2. Assess and analyze global health program interventions and their impacts
  3. Compare and contrast health issues and policies between economically developed countries and developing countries
  4. Synthesize findings to highlight common patterns and unique differences in health challenges between and within major world regions

 Required Text and Readings

Farmer, Paul., J.Y. Kim, A. Kleinman and M. Basilico. 2013. Reimagining Global Health: An Introduction, University of California Press

Skolnik, Richard. 2011. Global Health 101. Sudbury, MA: Jones and Bartlett Publishers

Recommended readings

 Kidder, Tracy. 2009 Mountains Beyond Mountains: The quest of Dr. Paul Farmer, A man who would cure the world, Random House

Reid, T.R. 2010 The Healing of America, Penguin Books

Additional readings:  In addition to above textbooks, other course materials including additional readings will be posted on Blackboard each week.  Readings should be completed for the week they are assigned.

Course requirements

There are two major paper assignments and one exam. The assignments are due at the beginning of the class and must be turned in as hard copies.  Please do not submit papers as e-mail attachments. Late papers will be marked down one letter grade for each day past the deadline. Papers more than one week late will not be accepted.

Assignment 1 (25%)

Each student is required to write a research paper (5-6 pages) about global health issues. This assignment should allow the student to examine the rise and fall of global health issues with a more critical view.  There will be peer reviews (5%) as well as instructor comments on this assignment.  You will submit a memo detailing your revision with the final draft.  Detailed instructions and criteria for evaluation will be posted on Blackboard

                                

  • Assignment 2: Group Project Paper & Presentation (30%)
    • Paper (15%)
    • Presentation (10%)
    • Peer evaluation (5%)

Students are required to form a group to prepare a short presentation at the end of the semester and to write a research paper (not more than 10 pages). Students should work together as a team to analyze the political, social and economic determinants of health and analyze how delivery systems for preventive and curative health services might be strengthened in developing countries. Group members will conduct an evaluation of their fellow group members for the final project and presentation. Detailed instructions and criteria for the group project and criteria for evaluation will be posted on Blackboard

Exam 20%

Class Participation 25%

Discussion group summary 15%

Class participation: contribution during class discussions 10%

Assignment 1 (mentioned above) 25%

Assignment 2 (mentioned above) 30%

There will be small group discussions during class and each student will submit a short written summary report.  Each member will be encouraged to participate and contribute substantially to small group discussi

SOC 321K • Border Control/Deaths

44985 • Rodríguez, Néstor P.
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm CLA 0.102
(also listed as MAS 374)
show description

Description

Each decade since the 1980s about 4,000 undocumented migrants have died trying to cross the US-Mexico border through dangerous terrain. This border mortality in the undocumented migrant flow raises important sociological, ethical, and legal issues about the formulation and implementation of border control strategies and resulting deaths.  Sociologist, criminologists, the GAO, the CDC, legal experts, forensic scientists, etc.—all have published since on the topic of border control and migrant deaths in journals (e.g., International Migration Review, Criminology & Public Policy, American Journal of Public Health, and law journals), government reports, and in numerous monographs.  The course will focus on the following related aspects of border control and migrant deaths: a) enactment of border control policies, b) policy implementation and death patterns at the US-Mexico border, c) patterns of unauthorized border crossings through dangerous border terrain, d) grassroots movements to support migrants and lessen deaths, and e) the ethics of coercive border control.  Basically the course will survey the public sentiments and attitudes that undergird new border control policies, the patterns of migrant deaths in deserts and in the Rio Grande River associated with border control strategies, movements and community efforts to support migrants in the Arizona border area, and legal and ethical arguments and concepts that frame discussions of migrant deaths at the US-Mexico border.  The course will enable me to delve into this important topic much deeper than in the “US Immigration” undergraduate course I presently teach.

Required Texts

Guerette, Rob. T.  2007.  Migrant Deaths:  Border Safety and Situational Crime Prevention on the U.S.-Mexico Border Divide.  El Paso, TX:  LFB Scholarly Publishing.

Haddal, Chad C. 2010.  Border Security:  The Role of the U.S. Border Patrol.  Congressional Research Service, 7-5700, RL32562. Washington, DC.

Meissner, Doris, Donald M. Kerwin, Muzaffar Chishti, and Claire Bergeron. 2013.  Immigration Enforcement in the United States:  The Rise of a Formidable Machinery.  Migration Policy Institute. Washington, DC. 

Nevins, Joseph.  Dying to Live:  A Story of U.S. Immigration in an Age of Global Apartheid.  San Francisco:  City Light Books, 2008.

Urrea, Luis Alberto. 2004.  The Devil’s Highway.  New York: Little, Brown and Company.

Grading Policy

  • Three (3) exams: multiple choice with short essay; 100 points each
  • Research report paper: short paper (5+ pages) summarizing and critiquing research report or journal article concerning an aspect of border control and migrant deaths; 50 points.

SOC 321K • Building The Sustainable City

44990 • Swearingen, Scott
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm CLA 0.118
show description

Description

Building the Sustainable City is an interdisciplinary course that examines why we have to create  more sustainable living environments, what we are presently doing to rebuild American cities in more sustainable ways, and where we need to go in the future.  The course adopts the strong definition of sustainability to include the connections between economy, equity, and environment.   80% of the population lives in urban areas today, the vast majority of economic activity occurs in them, and most environmental problems are related to urbanization and industrialization.  Understanding how to build a sustainable city, then, is the key to building a sustainable society.  This course will focus on energy use, transportation policy, housing, and food production/distribution in the city.  Social equity issues will be integrated into all four themes, as all four are both cause and effect of social inequalities. 

The course links our academic understanding of sustainability with “real world”, on-the-ground people doing sustainability today.  It will feature several people working in city government, the non-profit sector, and academic positions as guest speakers.  These speakers will discuss their organizations as examples of how to build a sustainable city, and show students how they are building a more sustainable future here in Austin.  

Required Texts

Girardet, Herbert; "Cities, People, Planet."  Wiley and Sons, 2008.

Grading Policy

There will be 3 essays of 4-5 pages, typed, double spaced, and one group design project where student team design and "build" a sustainable city (this is a poster project which can be displayed on the wall, but those with technical expertise are welcome to mount it on a web platform).  Each essay will be 25% of the course grade, and the design project will be the final 25% of grade.

 

SOC 321K • Israeli Peace & Social Justice

44993 • Chaitin, Julia
Meets TTH 930am-1100am PAR 208
(also listed as J S 365, MES 341)
show description

This course will look at NGOs (non-governmental organizations) and grassroots organizations working for peace/social justice in the Israeli-Palestinian context. The course will present and discuss the major activists and organizations in this field that have emerged over the years (since the 1970s), look at the work they do, how they do it, their place in Israeli/Palestinian society, culture, and political realm, the obstacles they face in their own societies, and attempts to overcome the obstacles and work for peace-building and reconciliation between the two peoples.

The course will also offer basic concepts/theories concerning activism and grassroots initiatives that include: peace-building, conflict resolution, reconciliation, dialogue, forgiveness, inter-group relations, social perceptions and processes such as stereotyping, group-think, de-individuation, de-humanization, moral exclusion, people-to-people processes, altruism and pro-social behavior, etc. Furthermore, students will read and hear about “stories from the ground”. The course will also draw heavily on the presentation and work of the organizations on the internet and in social media (e.g. Facebook, Twitter).

Proposed readings

  • Chaitin, J. (2011). Peace Building in Israel and Palestine: Social Psychology and Grassroots Initiatives. New York: Palgrave-Macmillan.
  • Chaitin, J. (2011) "Here's the Separation Wall": Political tourism to the Holy Land. Conflict Resolution Quarterly, 29, 39-63. 
  • Chaitin, J., Obeidi, F., Adwan, S. & Bar-On, D. (2004). Palestinian and Israeli NGOs: Work during the “Peace Era”. International Journal of Politics, Culture and Society, 17 (3), 523 – 542.
  • Kaufman-Lacusta, M. (2010). Refusing to be enemies: Palestinian and israeli nonviolent resistance to the Israeli Occupation. Reading, UK: Ithaca Press.
  • Kidron, P. (2004). Refusenik! New York, NY: Zed Books.

Basis of grading

The students will be required to:

  1. Attend and be active participants in the course.
  2. Write one short paper (5-7 pages) about one peace/social justice organization that includes a description of the organization, its vision, mission and activities, its main focus/foci as well as an analysis of the organization based on concepts taught in the course.
  3. Give a short in-class presentation (15 minutes, using power point or other visuals - this can be done in pairs) that focuses on one specific peace/social justice activity or program undertaken by an Israeli/Palestinian activist or NGO.  The presentation will include a description of the activity and group/activist as well as an analysis of whether or not the activity appears to have aided peace efforts or constructed obstacles to such processes, based on concepts taught in the course.
  4. Write a final paper (approximately 10-12 pages) which will compare two NGOs working in the same realm (e.g. peace and environment; dialogue groups etc.), analyze their work based on concepts covered in the course, and offer concrete recommendations for how these organizations can help further peace processes in Israel-Palestine.

SOC 321K • Personal Narrs: Jews/Palestins

44994 • Chaitin, Julia
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm CLA 0.120
(also listed as J S 365, MES 341)
show description

Since the 1940s, more and more personal stories of experiences of different massive social trauma (e.g. the Holocaust, wars, genocides, forced refugee experiences) have been collected and used for research and/or for social-political purposes. This course will draw on life story interviews and personal stories from Jews and Arabs in Israel as they relate to the social-historical-political context of the region.

The course will draw on published narratives (in books, on the internet) as well as narratives from my different research projects that have studied such topics as: aliya (immigration to Israel), the psycho-social impacts of the Holocaust on survivors, their children and grandchildren, Palestinian refugee experiences, establishment of kibbutzim, childhood/soldier memories from wars, social workers who engage in peace-building, and the life stories of Israeli young and older adults in the context of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. The course will look at the actual experiences that the interviewees have had and the ways in which they talk about these life experiences. Furthermore, we will look at ways to understand their narratives from a psycho-social perspective and I will introduce different analytical tools that can be used to gain a deeper meaning of the significance of these experiences for the autobiographers. 

Proposed readings

  • Bar-On, D. (1995). Fear and Hope: Three Generations of the Holocaust. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.
  • Breaking the silence. Soldiers talk about the occupied territories. http://www.breakingthesilence.org.il/testimonies/database
  • Chaitin, J. (forthcoming). “I need you to listen to what happened to me”: Personal narratives of social trauma in research and peace-building. American Journal of Orthopsychiatry.
    • Chaitin, J. (2004). My Life, My Story, My Identity. International Journal of Qualitative Methodologies Vol 3 (4).
    • Chaitin, J., Awwad, E. & Andriani, C. (2009).  Belonging to the Conflict: Collective Identities among Israeli and Palestinian Émigrés to the United States. Social Identities: Journal for the Study of Race, Nation and Culture, 15(2), 207-225.
    • Chaitin, J., & Steinberg, S. (2013). “I can almost remember it now”: Between personal and collective memories of massive social trauma. Journal of Adult Development.

Grading

The students will be required to:

  1. Attend and be active participants in the course. No points, but mandatory
  2. Submit one short paper (2-3 pages) that presents and explains the chronology of a Holocaust survivor OR a Jewish-Israeli who was a refugee from Northern Africa/Asia OR his/her child OR grandchild. Additionally, each paper will include a short presentation of one major theme that appears important to the interviewee in the personal narrative. This is 15% of the grade. This will be due by the 4th-5th week.
  3. Give a short in-class presentation (done in pairs – 15-20 minutes) that focuses on the narratives of two Israelis, OR one Israeli and one Palestinian OR two Palestinians that have lived through the same social-political events. The presentation will include short summaries of the autobiographers’ lives and one main theme that were discerned in analyses of both narratives. This is 20% of the grade. Students will sign up for a date to present. The presentations will start from the 3rd or 4th week and continue throughout the semester.
  4. Write one short paper (5-7 pages) that analyzes a personal narrative from a Palestinian or Israeli autobiographer. This is 25% of the grade. This paper will be due 10th-11th weeks into the course.
  5. Write a final paper (approximately 10-12 pages) which will include a detailed analysis of one to two themes that emerge from an in-depth reading of an Israeli’s or Palestinian’s narrative. This is 40% of the final grade. This will be due by the last class period.

SOC 321K • Veiling In The Muslim World

44997 • Shirazi, Faegheh
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm PAR 303
(also listed as ANS 372, ISL 372, MEL 321, R S 358, WGS 340)
show description

This course will deal with the cultural significance and historical practices of veiling, “Hijab”, in the Muslim world. The issue of veiling as it relates to women has been subject to different interpretations and viewed from various perspectives, and with recent political developments and the resurgence of Islam, the debate over it and over women’s roles in Muslim countries has taken various shapes.  A number of Muslim countries are going back to their Islamic traditions and implementing a code of behavior that involves some form of veiling in Public /or segregation to various degrees for women. In some Muslim nations women are re-veiling on their own. In others, women resist the enforcement of such practices. We will examine the various perspectives, interpretations and practices relating to Hijab in the Muslim world with respect to politics, religion, feminism, culture, new wave of women converts and the phenomenon of “Islamic fashion” as a marketing tool.    

Prerequisites:  Upper Division Standing

Texts

Readers Packet. Sold at Speedway Copy Center/ Dobie Mall

1- Faegheh Shirazi. The Veil Unveiled: Hijab in Modern Culture. University Press of Florida, 2001, 2003

2- Fatima Mernissi. The Veil And The Male Elite: A Feminist Interpretation Of Women's Rights In Islam (Paperback)

Grading

Active participation (assigned article with discussion question) 10%, Regular Class Attendance 5%, 3 quizzes (Lowest grade will be dropped) 20%, Midterm Exam 30%, Final Research Paper 20%, and Oral Presentation %15

SOC 321L • Sociology Of Education

44998 • Fulton, Kelly
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm CLA 0.118
(also listed as AFR 321L, WGS 345)
show description

Course Description

This course examines education in the United States from a sociological perspective. We will use various sociological concepts, methods and theories to explore the institution of education, going beyond our own individual experiences with education. Specific topics include public education; standardized testing; charter schools; and stratification within and between schools with a focus on race, class and gender.

This course carries the Writing Flag. Writing Flag courses are designed to give students experience with writing in an academic discipline. In this class, you can expect to write regularly during the semester, complete substantial writing projects, and receive feedback to help you improve your writing. You will also have the opportunity to revise one or more assignments, and you will be asked to read and discuss your peers’ work.

Required Texts

* Arum, Richard and Irenee R. Beattie, The Structure of Schooling: Readings in the Sociology of Education, Second Edition, Sage Publications, 2011.


* Lareau, Annette, Unequal Childhoods: Class, Race, and Family Life, 2nd Edition, University of California Press, 2011.

* Ravitch, Diane, Reign of Error, Knopf, 2013.

* A collection of readings available on the Canvas course site.

 Evaluation

There will be in-class tests, short papers, a group project, and a literature review for this writing flag course.  Class participation is a component of the final grade.

SOC 321L • Sociology Of Education

44999 • Fulton, Kelly
Meets TTH 930am-1100am CLA 0.102
(also listed as AFR 321L, WGS 345)
show description

Course Description

This course examines education in the United States from a sociological perspective. We will use various sociological concepts, methods and theories to explore the institution of education, going beyond our own individual experiences with education. Specific topics include public education; standardized testing; charter schools; and stratification within and between schools with a focus on race, class and gender.

Required Texts

* Arum, Richard and Irenee R. Beattie, The Structure of Schooling: Readings in the Sociology of Education, Second Edition, Sage Publications, 2011.


* Lareau, Annette, Unequal Childhoods: Class, Race, and Family Life, 2nd Edition, University of California Press, 2011.

* Ravitch, Diane, Reign of Error, Knopf, 2013.

* A collection of readings available on the Canvas course site.

 Evaluation

There will be in-class tests, short papers, a group project, and a literature review for this writing flag course.  Class participation is a component of the final grade.

SOC 322C • Sociology Of Creativity

45000 • Haghshenas, Hossein
Meets MW 300pm-430pm CLA 0.118
show description

Description

This course will introduce the students to different aspects of creative insights, human consciousness, social processes, and the ‘invention of reality’.  The class will bring the intellectual abilities and intuitive inclinations together as a complementary process. We’ll pursue and encourage elements of mindfulness, intuition, and creativity at the individual, organizational, societal, and environmental levels.  The course will draw upon a wide range of sources- lectures, group discussions, books, articles, artistic films, documentaries–in order to better understand and appreciate the interconnectedness and interrelationship between ‘inner’ (personal) and the other (‘social’) reality. The media will be presented as technical methods of representation of "social reality" and socio-cultural phenomena. No technical aspects will be emphasized.

Required Texts

A selection of articles will be, prepared in a packet.

Michael Schwalbe. 2007. The Sociologically Examined Life: Pieces of the Conversation.

Otis Carney. 2002. Wars R’ Us: Taking Action for Peace.

Paulo Coelho. 1995. The Alchemist: A Fable About Following Your Dream   

Joseph Campbell. 2004. Pathways to Bliss: Mythological and Personal  Transformation                                   

Mitch Albon. Tuesday with Morrie.

 Grading Policy             

20%  Short essays / Journal entries

20% Group Workshops and class participation

10%  Written Critiques of student paper

10% Oral Presentation

10% Final assessment

30% Final course project

SOC 322D • Race And The Digital

45005 • Browne, Simone A.
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm CLA 1.404
(also listed as AFR 322D, WGS 322)
show description

Review of theoretical developments in the sociological study of "race," including an examination of processes of racialization and cultural texts, in order to better understand the ways in which identities are socially produced. Attention will be placed on forms of popular culture, black cultural production, and political action to question how such practices are shaped by migrations within the African diaspora.

SOC 322M • Sociology Of Masculinities

45010 • González-López, Gloria
Meets MW 500pm-630pm CLA 0.118
(also listed as WGS 322)
show description

DESCRIPTION:

Why do we study men and masculinity? Isn’t traditional academic knowledge male biased, anyway? Yes, most scholarship has been androcentric but women’s studies intellectuals have facilitated the emergence of a critical analysis and study of men as men. This course is devoted to a sociological examination of the most important debates and discussions about men’s experiences of masculinity in contemporary patriarchal societies. In this course, we will examine social and individual meanings of masculinity, the dominant paradigms of masculinity that we take as the norm, and the problems, contradictions and paradoxes men experience in modern society. We will examine these themes while looking at the social and cultural dynamics shaped by class, race/ethncity, sexuality, age, and culture in a variety of social contexts and arrangements. Although we will study men representing the diverse cultural groups in the United States, we will pay special attention to the experiences of African American and Latino men. We will examine the privileges as well as the costs of rigid expressions of masculinity. In our discussions we will explore avenues for social justice and change.

REQUIRED TEXTS:     

Kimmel & Messner, Men’s Lives, 7th. Edition, Allyn and Bacon

Additional readings are available in Blackboard (Bb) and the UT Library System

COURSE REQUIREMENTS:

(1) Class participation and attendance 10%

Students are responsible for the following: a) attending all class meetings; b) completing reading assignments on time; and c) participating in small group exercises, and class discussions and assignments.  I will run this class in a way that is similar to graduate seminars.  Therefore, I will deliver a lecture and we will spend a good deal of time discussing the assigned reading.  You are required to analyze materials and lectures as you develop your own critical thinking and views of men’s lives, culture and society.   

(2) Exams 60%

The Exam # 1 (30%) and Exam # 2 (30%) will consist of both multiple choice and short essay questions.  The exams will include all assigned readings, lectures and guest lectures, and any film or video clips covered in class.  The student must obtain the  professor’s permission one week in advance if she/he is not able to attend class on the day of the exam. She/he will then be assigned an alternate day and time to take the exam. Excuses for missing an exam will not be accepted unless the student offers a physician statement or other valid documentation as required by university policies and regulations.  

(3) Final Paper 30%

 

SOC 323 • The Family

45019 • Osbakken, Stephanie
Meets TTH 930am-1100am CLA 0.118
(also listed as WGS 345)
show description

 Description:

This course explores the family as a social institution in American society. The primary goal of this class is to encourage students to step beyond their personal experiences and cultivate a more sociological and analytical approach to the family.  By the end of the term, students will be able understand the cultural and structural forces that shape family life, and how these dimensions can shift, but also resist change over time. We will begin with a historical overview of the family where we will contextualize and challenge nostalgic depictions of the family in popular culture.  Throughout the term we will chart multiple dimensions of family life, including dating, cohabitation, marriage, parenting, childhood, and divorce, and changing ideas of the American family, to name a few.  We will adopt a sociological perspective, considering how gender, race, class, sexuality, and other social factors shape family relationships and family life.  We will also consider alternate family structures that were once dismissed as deviant (e.g. having children outside marriage and gay marriage) but are increasingly common and continue to shape public policy in the 21st century.  This course carries a writing flag designation and so also seeks to develop students’ writing skills throughout the term.

Texts:                         

One textbook to be determined                   

Edin, Kathryn and Maria Kerfalas. 2011.  Promises I Can Keep: Why Poor Women Put Motherhood Before Marriage. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press.

Lareau, Annette. 2011. Unequal Childhoods: Class, Race, and Family Life, Second Edition with an Update a Decade Later.  Berkeley, CA: University of California Press.

Broyland, Jennifer Finney. 2013.  Stuck in the Middle with You: A Memoir of Parenting in Three Genders. New York: Broadway Books.                    

Additional Readings posted to Canvas

Grades:           

Two Papers 45%

 Journal Writing Assignments  20%

Peer Reviews   5%

 Attendance and Participation  20%

Group Presentation on a topic about the Family 10%

                        

SOC 325K • Criminology

45025 • Warr, E. Mark
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm CLA 0.112
show description

UPPER-DIVISION STANDING REQUIRED. COMPLETION OF SIX SEMESTER HOURS OF SOCIOLOGY.

Course Description

An investigation into the nature of criminal events including, homicide, rape, robbery, property crimes and white-collar crimes. Also examines the US criminal justice system.

Grading Policy

Three tests (no final) Occasional quizzes

Texts

Mark Warr, Companions in Crime, Cambridge University Press

SOC 325K • Criminology

45030 • Warr, E. Mark
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm CLA 0.102
show description

UPPER-DIVISION STANDING REQUIRED. COMPLETION OF SIX SEMESTER HOURS OF SOCIOLOGY.

Course Description

An investigation into the nature of criminal events including, homicide, rape, robbery, property crimes and white-collar crimes. Also examines the US criminal justice system.

Grading Policy

Three tests (no final) Occasional quizzes

Texts

Mark Warr, Companions in Crime, Cambridge University Press

SOC 325L • Soc Of Criminal Justice

45035 • Kelly, William R
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm CLA 0.128
(also listed as URB 354)
show description

Course Description

This course will provide an introduction to the American criminal justice system, its policies and procedures. The primary focus will be on the roles and functions of the police, the courts and corrections, with a special emphasis on how well or not so well the system operates. We will also spend some time on recent innovations in criminal justice policy.

The class periods will be devoted to lectures, guest speakers, and videos. The lecture material will sometimes correspond very closely with the material in the text and sometimes it will supplement the assigned readings. I encourage class discussions and questions and hope that the material will be sufficiently interesting and controversial to motivate class participation.

Grading Policy

There will be four exams - three during the session and a comprehensive final. The exams will be multiple choice/true false. The three exams during the session will count 20% toward the final grade and will consist of 50 questions. The final exam, which is comprehensive, is worth 40% and will consist of 100 questions. The exams will cover all of the material - assigned readings, lectures, guest speakers and videos.

I do not grade on the basis of need and I do not negotiate grades. If you "need" a particular grade, you can figure out what it will take to obtain that grade. There is no extra credit and it is not possible to change the exam dates.

Grades for the course are determined in the following manner.90 to 100 A80 to 89 B70 to 79 C60 to 69 D< 60 F

Regarding rounding of grades, in my book, 88.7 is not 90, 79.1 is not 80 and 57.7 is not 60. If your final grade is .5 or higher, I will round up to the next whole percent. If you are taking the course pass/fail, a pass is 60 or above.

Texts

James Inciardi, Criminal Justice,9th edition

SOC 325L • Soc Of Criminal Justice

45040 • Kelly, William R
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm CLA 0.128
(also listed as URB 354)
show description

Course Description

This course will provide an introduction to the American criminal justice system, its policies and procedures. The primary focus will be on the roles and functions of the police, the courts and corrections, with a special emphasis on how well or not so well the system operates. We will also spend some time on recent innovations in criminal justice policy.

The class periods will be devoted to lectures, guest speakers, and videos. The lecture material will sometimes correspond very closely with the material in the text and sometimes it will supplement the assigned readings. I encourage class discussions and questions and hope that the material will be sufficiently interesting and controversial to motivate class participation.

Grading Policy

There will be four exams - three during the session and a comprehensive final. The exams will be multiple choice/true false. The three exams during the session will count 20% toward the final grade and will consist of 50 questions. The final exam, which is comprehensive, is worth 40% and will consist of 100 questions. The exams will cover all of the material - assigned readings, lectures, guest speakers and videos.

I do not grade on the basis of need and I do not negotiate grades. If you "need" a particular grade, you can figure out what it will take to obtain that grade. There is no extra credit and it is not possible to change the exam dates.

Grades for the course are determined in the following manner.90 to 100 A80 to 89 B70 to 79 C60 to 69 D< 60 F

Regarding rounding of grades, in my book, 88.7 is not 90, 79.1 is not 80 and 57.7 is not 60. If your final grade is .5 or higher, I will round up to the next whole percent. If you are taking the course pass/fail, a pass is 60 or above.

Texts

James Inciardi, Criminal Justice,9th edition

SOC 333K • Sociology Of Gender

45045 • Williams, Christine L
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm CLA 0.112
(also listed as WGS 322)
show description

Description: 

This course is an introduction to the sociological study of gender in U.S. society.  From the moment of birth, boys and girls are treated differently.  Gender structures the experiences of men and women in all major social institutions, including the family, the workplace, and schools.  We will explore how gender impacts everyone’s lives and life chances.  The central themes of the course are historical changes in gender beliefs and practices; socialization practices that reproduce gender identities; how race/ethnicity, class, and sexuality shape the experience of gender; and the relationship between gender, power, and social inequality.  The goals of the course are:

 

  • To understand the sociological perspective as it relates to gender.  What are gender stereotypes?  How do social institutions, including schools, the mass media, families, and work organizations, treat men and women?  You should be able to discuss how the social environment influences the behavior and experiences of men and women.

 

  • To understand how gender is related to other forms of social inequality.  How do men and women from different racial/ethnic groups, social class positions, and sexual orientations, experience gender inequality?  You should be able to discuss hegemonic, marginalized, and alternative definitions of masculinity and femininity.

 

  • To understand how and why gender norms change over time.  Why are behaviors that were considered “masculine” at one time now considered “feminine”?  What role do social movements (including feminism) play in changing society’s expectations of appropriate behavior for men and women?  How has globalization altered relationships between men and women?

 

  • To develop a deeper appreciation of how your own experiences, views, choices, and opportunities have been shaped by gender.

 

This course carries the UGS flag for Cultural Diversity in the United States, which means that it is “designed to increase your familiarity with the variety and richness of the American cultural experience. You should therefore expect a substantial portion of your grade to come from assignments covering the practices, beliefs, and histories of at least one U.S. cultural group that has experienced persistent marginalization.”

 Required Texts

C.J. Pascoe, Dude, You’re a Fag, Univ. of California Press, 2007.

Kristen Schilt, Just one of the guys?, University of Chicago Press, 2010.

Susan Thistle, From Marriage to the Market, Univ. of California Press, 2006.

Sinikka Elliott, Not My Kid. NYU Press, 2012.

Carolina Bank-Muñoz, Transnational Tortillas. ILR Press, 2008.

FILM:  The Education of Shelby Knox (DVD).

Course Requirements

 You must have completed at least 60 hours (junior standing) to take this class.  Students who do not meet this prerequisite will be dropped from the course.

 Students are required to attend all lectures and complete all reading assignments on time.  You are encouraged to participate in class discussion and to attend office hours regularly. 

 I am available to discuss appropriate academic accommodations that you may require as a student with a disability.  Before course accommodations will be made, you may be required to provide documentation to the Office of the Dean of Students, Services for Students with Disabilities.

Grading Policy

Your grade in this class is based on your written work, including three in-class essays and 4-5 homework assignments.  You will be evaluated based on both your mastery of the material and the quality of your writing.  Make-up examinations will be given only to those absent for university-approved reasons. The homework assignments require you to write 2-page essays.   Essay questions will be distributed in class and posted on Blackboard one week before they are due at the beginning of class.  No late assignments will be accepted.

 

            Exam 1                        30%

            Exam 2                        30%

            Exam 3                        20%

            Periodic Homework Assignments 20% (4-5% each)

 

SOC 336P • Social Psychology And The Law

45050 • Rose, Mary
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm ART 1.102
show description

Description:

Crimes, trials, evidence, juries, sentences, lawsuits – you hear a lot about issues with which the legal system concerns itself. But people in the legal system are not the only ones who consider these issues. This course will look at courts, legal actors, and legal policies through the lens of social science, especially social psychology.  The goal of the course will be to learn about existing research on law-related topics.  A sample of areas to be covered include: predicting dangerousness, eyewitness testimony, mental health issues in the law (such as competence to stand trial and the insanity defense), children in the law, and jury decision-making on verdicts in criminal and civil cases.  Students enrolling must have taken at least one introductory sociology or psychology course.

Texts:

This course has one required textbook (Greene & Heilbrun, “Wrightsman’s Psychology and the Legal System”); attendance is not mandatory but is gauged through for-credit activities that occur during some class sessions. This course has an “Ethics and Leadership” Flag. 

SOC 344 • Racial And Ethnic Relations

45055 • Rodríguez, Néstor P.
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm CLA 1.106
show description

Description:

The study of racial and ethnic relations is a major teaching and research part of

sociology. Research on racial and ethnic relations helps us understand the constitution

and dynamics of societies according to conditions of different racial and ethnic groups.

II. Course Aims and Objectives

Aims

This course is designed to provide a sociological understanding concerning the nature

of racial and ethnic intergroup relations, as well as an understanding of how large

(macro) and small (micro) levels of social interaction affect these relations.

Specific Learning Objectives

• Gain background information on the formation of racial and ethnic groups in society

and discuss the social forces that drove, and continue to drive, this formation.

• Review and discuss different perceptions about racial and ethnic intergroup

relations.

• Review and analyze research reports concerning issues of racial and ethnic

relations.

• Develop an awareness of the significance and impacts of racial and ethnic relations

for society.

Cultural Diversity Objective:

“This course carries the flag for Cultural Diversity in the United States. Cultural Diversity

courses are designed to increase your familiarity with the variety and richness of the

American cultural experience. You should therefore expect a substantial portion of your

grade to come from assignments covering the practices, beliefs, and histories of at least

one U.S. cultural group that has experienced persistent marginalization.”

III. Format and Procedures

The course is designed with the expectation that it will follow a format of lectures and

class discussions. A key expectation is that students will come to class prepared to

discuss thematic issues covered in the class, or at least come to class with a curious

and critical predisposition to become intellectually engaged in the class. Class

attendance is expected and highly encouraged. All students are expect to contribute to

class discussion, with a high regard for an open academic dialogue, which values

respect for the ideas, opinions, and views of others.

IV. My Assumptions

My assumptions about the nature of racial and ethnic relations is that these relations a)

follow an historical course, b) flow from human agency and structure, c) follow paths of

division and accommodation, d) and are affected by social constructions regarding the

concepts of race and ethnicity.

V. Course Requirements

1. Class attendance and participation policy

To get the most out of this class you should attend all classes and arrive on time.

Also, you should review previous lecture notes and bring questions to class about

points you did not clearly understand—including points from the assigned readings.

Please be attentive in class (turn off phones). You are greatly encouraged to

participate in class discussion, and please do so in a manner that respects the rights

of others to also participate. If you have a problem hearing the lectures and

discussion, or viewing class presentations, please let me know immediately.

Religious Holidays

UT Austin policy requires that you notify course instructors at least 14 days in

advance if you plan to be absent due to a religious holiday. You will be given an

opportunity to make up activities (exams, assignments, etc.) that you miss because

of your absence due to a religious holiday. You will be given a reasonable time to

make up an exam or assignment after your absence.

Texts:

• Schaefer, Richard T. 2013. Race and Ethnicity in the United States.

Seventh edition. Boston: Pearson. (S)

3

• Gallagher, Charles A. 2012. Rethinking the Color Line: Race and

Ethnicity. Fifth edition. Columbus, OH: McGraw-Hill. (G)

b) Websites to review:

Census Bureau: http://www.census.gov/

Population Reference Bureau: http://www.prb.org/

U.S. Department of Homeland Security (Immigration Statistics):

http://www.dhs.gov/immigration-statistics

Migration Policy Institute: http://www.migrationpolicy.org/

UT Austin Center for Mexican American Studies:

http://www.utexas.edu/depts/cmas/

UT Austin Center for Asian American Studies:

http://www.utexas.edu/cola/centers/aas/

UT Austin Center for African and African American Studies:

http://www.utexas.edu/cola/centers/caaas/

Grading and Requirements:

a) Three regular exams (40 multiple-choice items and a take-home essay question):

100 points per exam x 3 regular exams = 300 points

c) Total possible points = 300 (or 315 with full extra credit).

d) Letter grades (A, B, C, D, F) based on percentage of total points: A (-) = 90%-100%,

B (-/+)= 80%-89.5%, C (-/+)= 70%-79.5%, D (-/+) = 60%- 69.5%, F = less than 60%

 

 

 

SOC 352D • Boundaries And Dilemmas-Honors

45063 • Ekland-Olson, Sheldon
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm MEZ 1.210
(also listed as LAH 350)
show description

 

PREREQUISIITES:

Upper-division standing and a grade point average of at least 3.50.

RESTRICTIONS:

Restricted to Plan I majors in the College of Liberal Arts

DESCRIPTION:

This is a research and writing course designed to explore moral imperatives, violation of these imperatives, and perhaps most interestingly how we justify such violation. 

Why is the title of the course Boundaries and Dilemmas? A good deal of the semester will be spent on how communities establish boundaries to determine lives more or less worthy  of protection and support than others. We will also spend time on how communities weigh one imperative against another when confronted with moral dilemmas.

The first portion of the course will offer quick overviews of specific questions. With these overviews in hand, you will be asked to choose a specific topic, such as physician assisted suicide, capital punishment, eugenics, or war. You will be asked to develop a set of ideas consistent with the general framework developed in the early sessions of class. You and I will meet one-on-one to discuss your ideas. 

TEXT:

There is one assigned book:  WHO LIVES, WHO DIES, WHO DECIDES.  

GRADING AND REQUIREMENTS:

1) 15 minute presentation

2)  I see class discussions as very important to the success of this class. 20% of your grade will come from class participation, primarily from postings on Discussion Board. Attendance is required. More than three absences will lower your grade one full point -- A to B, B to C etc. I know this is tough, but so am I.... Never fear, I will make every effort to ensure classes are worth attending.

3) I consider the material we cover to be very important. The assigned paper will be graded with high standards, as will the class presentation. Both will require substantial work. You will love it! 

This course is designed to hone various communication skills. Individually, you will be asked to write a 16-20 page paper on a topic of your choice. This paper will be handed in for initial grading and editorial comment. Your grade on the initial draft will constitute 40% of your final grade. The paper will be handed back to you for revision. You will be asked to hand in the revised version at the end of the semester. This final version of the paper will be graded and will also constitute 40% of your grade.

I look forward to many lively and fruitful discussions throughout the semester.

 

 

SOC 352D • Boundaries And Dilemmas

45064 • Ekland-Olson, Sheldon
Meets TTH 930am-1100am CLA 3.106
show description

Description:

This is a research and writing course designed to explore moral imperatives, violation of these imperatives, and perhaps most interestingly how we justify such violation. 

Why is the title of the course Boundaries and Dilemmas? A good deal of the semester will be spent on how communities establish boundaries to determine lives more or less worthy  of protection and support than others. We will also spend time on how communities weigh one imperative against another when confronted with moral dilemmas.

The first portion of the course will offer quick overviews of specific questions. With these overviews in hand, you will be asked to choose a specific topic, such as physician assisted suicide, capital punishment, eugenics, or war. You will be asked to develop a set of ideas consistent with the general framework developed in the early sessions of class. You and I will meet one-on-one to discuss your ideas. 

Text:

There is one assigned book:  WHO LIVES, WHO DIES, WHO DECIDES.  

Grading and Requirements:

1) 15 minute presentation

2)  I see class discussions as very important to the success of this class. 20% of your grade will come from class participation, primarily from postings on Discussion Board. Attendance is required. More than three absences will lower your grade one full point -- A to B, B to C etc. I know this is tough, but so am I.... Never fear, I will make every effort to ensure classes are worth attending.

3) I consider the material we cover to be very important. The assigned paper will be graded with high standards, as will the class presentation. Both will require substantial work. You will love it! 

This course is designed to hone various communication skills. Individually, you will be asked to write a 16-20 page paper on a topic of your choice. This paper will be handed in for initial grading and editorial comment. Your grade on the initial draft will constitute 40% of your final grade. The paper will be handed back to you for revision. You will be asked to hand in the revised version at the end of the semester. This final version of the paper will be graded and will also constitute 40% of your grade.

I look forward to many lively and fruitful discussions throughout the semester.

SOC 354K • Sociology Of Health & Illness

45065 • Hopkins, Kristine
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm CLA 0.128
show description

Description:

Using lectures, documentaries, and class discussions as well as reflections of your own and others’ health and illness and representations of health and illness in the media, this course will critically examine the distribution of mortality and morbidity, how health and illness are defined and socially constructed, the experiences of illness, training and hierarchies of health care workers, interactions between health care providers and patients, alternative medicine, ethical issues, and health care financing. The majority of the course will focus on health and illness in the United States. 

SOC 366 • Deviance

45070 • Osborne, Lynette
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm CLA 3.106
show description

Course Description

This course examines deviant behavior in the US.  The course begins by defining different types of deviance (negative and positive).  Discussions of types of deviance, how/why we define certain activities as deviant, how deviance changes over time, and how we understand deviant behavior through theories will be the main focus of the course. Empirical, peer reviewed journal articles will be used to learn about current deviance research findings.  Theory articles will be used to demonstrate core theories and how they can be used to understand and predict behavior.

Learning Objectives

By the end of a successfully completed term, students will be able to:

  • define deviance and understand the difference between positive and negative deviance;
  • explain how ideas about what counts as deviance changes over time and how these changes are reflected in society;
  • discuss current research on deviance in the US; 
  • explain and apply various theoretical approaches to deviant behavior.

Additional Objectives

This course is also designed to teach and/or improve the following skills:

  • critical thinking
  • professional/academic writing
  • comprehension of challenging material

Required Materials:                 

Articles:  required articles will be posted on Bb as .pdf or .doc attachments.

Films:  viewing several films is also required.  Titles are on the schedule.  You may find them online or order them from a source like Netflix or iTunes.

Grading:

In class participation  75 point

Reading Briefs           50 points

Journal Analysis         25 points

Three exams             50 points each

Project                     100 points

Grading scale

100-90 = A, 89-88 = B+, 87-80 = B, 79-78 = C+, 77-70 = C, 69-68 = D+, 67-60 = D, below 59 = F

As a general rule, I do not assign minuses (-).  If you earn an 80%, you get the B.  However, in circumstances when the grade is earned by rounding up, a minus will be assigned (e.g.:  79.9=B-).

 

 

SOC 369K • Population And Society

45080 • Cavanagh, Shannon E.
Meets TTH 930am-1100am WAG 420
(also listed as WGS 322)
show description

Description

Population studies or demography is an interdisciplinary field, encompassing the study of the size, distribution, and composition of human populations, and the processes of fertility, mortality, and migration through which populations’ change. These processes are closely connected to many of the pressing problems facing contemporary societies. For instance, the funding of health care in developed countries is a major issue because of declining fertility and population aging. Civil unrest in parts of Africa and the Middle East are, in part, a function of persistently high fertility rates. These processes are also important drivers of many contemporary environmental problems. Finally, a grasp of population processes is important for a deeper understanding of the population explosion in urban areas and the higher transmission and impact of AIDS in the developing world. 

This course provides an overview of the field of population studies. A sociological approach is emphasized, but economic, geographic, anthropological, and biological perspectives will also be used. Attention will be given to a) the demographic concepts needed to objectively evaluate population issues and b) the substantive content of the population issues. Emphasis will be given to evaluating the evidence regarding debates on population topics. 

Reading Materials 

Required text: Population: An Introduction to Concepts and Issues, 10th edition, John R. Weeks. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth Publishing Co. ISBN-10: 0495096377 

On-line Readings: There are a number of short reading assignments, marked with an [EL]. These readings can be found in External Links section of the class Blackboard site and should be read prior to class period. 

Grading and Requirement:

You are expected to complete all readings for the day's class before coming to class. Read as actively as possible. Class time will be an opportunity to discuss and further explore the readings, so it is essential that everyone comes prepared to participate. Our class periods will be more productive and enjoyable when we all begin with the same materials. 

There will be TWO examinations during the semester, each worth 20% of your final grade. The exams will draw from both readings and class discussions. The exams are not cumulative. Each will include multiple choice and short answer questions. Make-up examinations will not be administered except in extreme circumstances and only if I am notified beforehand. All make-up examinations are 100% essay. 

You must also complete TWO assignments and ONE short paper during the semester. The assignments—on mortality and fertility—are designed to familiarize you with demographic data on the web, give you an overview of your country of choice, and help you identify your country’s population angle that most interests you and that you will explore in more detail in the short paper. Each assignment is worth 15% of your final grade. The short paper is worth 25% of your grade. 

The final 5% of your grade is based on attendance/class participation. I expect you to show up and engage (i.e., not text, sleep, or read the newspaper) with classmates, the TA, and me in the class. 

SOC 679HA • Honors Tutorial Course

45085
Meets TH 330pm-430pm CLA 0.124
show description

Description:

This double-semester seminar was created after feedback from former Honors students and faculty supervisors.

The idea is to provide structure, instruction, and assistance throughout the duration of your thesis project, as well as to enable you to interact with and support one another.  Seminar participation should not increase your  workload, but the discussions and assignments will help you become more efficient in your research and writing.  Seminar format is a mixture of discussion, oral presentations, and guest speakers. 

Required Books:

C. Wright Mills (1959) The Sociological Imagination. Oxford University Press.

Howard S. Becker (2007) Writing for Social Scientists. (2nd ed.) University of Chicago Press. Attendance Policy:

 Regular attendance and active seminar participation are expected of all Honors students.  If you miss more than six (6) classes during the double-semester program, regardless of the reason for the absences, your 679HA grade will be reduced by one full percentage point for each absence beyond the six allowed.  This policy excepts absences for religious holidays, assuming advance, written notification is given. 

Grading Policy:

First Semester:

1. An annotated bibliography comprised of 20 strong sources relevant to your thesis (20%) 2. A 6-7 page research proposal (20%) 3. A detailed outline of your research project by the end of the first semester (20%) 4. Quality of seminar participation (e.g., oral presentations, discussions, giving peer feedback) (40%)

Second Semester:

1. A well-written draft of a chapter of your thesis (20%) 2. Quality of seminar participation (e.g., oral presentations, class discussions, giving peer feedback) (60%) 3. Oral presentation of your thesis at the Sociology Honors Colloquium (20%) At the end of your first semester in Honors, you’ll be assigned an “incomplete.”  At the end of your second semester, after you’ve submitted your signed thesis to the Sociology Department, I’ll remove the incomplete and assign a grade for SOC 679HA, based on your two semesters of work and participation in the Honors Seminar. Your thesis supervisor will assign your grade for SOC 369HB, based on the quality of your thesis.

SOC 679HB • Honors Tutorial Course

45090
Meets TH 330pm-430pm CLA 0.124
show description

Description:

This double-semester seminar was created after feedback from former Honors students and faculty supervisors.

The idea is to provide structure, instruction, and assistance throughout the duration of your thesis project, as well as to enable you to interact with and support one another.  Seminar participation should not increase your  workload, but the discussions and assignments will help you become more efficient in your research and writing.  Seminar format is a mixture of discussion, oral presentations, and guest speakers. 

Required Books:

C. Wright Mills (1959) The Sociological Imagination. Oxford University Press.

Howard S. Becker (2007) Writing for Social Scientists. (2nd ed.) University of Chicago Press. Attendance Policy:

 Regular attendance and active seminar participation are expected of all Honors students.  If you miss more than six (6) classes during the double-semester program, regardless of the reason for the absences, your 679HA grade will be reduced by one full percentage point for each absence beyond the six allowed.  This policy excepts absences for religious holidays, assuming advance, written notification is given. 

Grading Policy:

First Semester:

1. An annotated bibliography comprised of 20 strong sources relevant to your thesis (20%) 2. A 6-7 page research proposal (20%) 3. A detailed outline of your research project by the end of the first semester (20%) 4. Quality of seminar participation (e.g., oral presentations, discussions, giving peer feedback) (40%)

Second Semester:

1. A well-written draft of a chapter of your thesis (20%) 2. Quality of seminar participation (e.g., oral presentations, class discussions, giving peer feedback) (60%) 3. Oral presentation of your thesis at the Sociology Honors Colloquium (20%) At the end of your first semester in Honors, you’ll be assigned an “incomplete.”  At the end of your second semester, after you’ve submitted your signed thesis to the Sociology Department, I’ll remove the incomplete and assign a grade for SOC 679HA, based on your two semesters of work and participation in the Honors Seminar. Your thesis supervisor will assign your grade for SOC 369HB, based on the quality of your thesis.

SOC 379M • Sociological Theory

45095 • Fridman, Daniel
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm CLA 0.102
show description

Description

The course introduces students to some of the main sociological theories and theorists since the late 19th century, including classic (Karl Marx, Emile Durkheim, Max Weber), mid-century (Alfred Schutz’s pehnomenology, Harold Garfinkel’s ethnomethodology, Erving Goffman, Western Marxism), and late twentieth century (Pierre Bourdieu, Bruno Latour, Dorothy Smith). My goal is to introduce you to interesting and imaginative authors that took great pains to answer tough questions about society. Some readings will be more difficult than others, some will be more fun than others, and you will be more interested in some readings over others. But all of them will be worth your effort. However, not everything about theory is reading; a great deal of your work will be thinking “theoretically”. I think that theories are a bit like play dough. They have a defined shape, but they can also be stretched, reshaped, and combined with other pieces. The final shape will not always satisfy you, but you can always start over. So, our goal will be to understand the theories by “playing” with them and relating them to what we usually call the “real world” (although ‘one’s world’ is not the same as the ‘real world’). Eventually, I hope you will discover how powerful and useful sociological theories can be to help you answer some of the toughest questions about societies.

Readings

Most readings will be in a course packet, in addition to two or three books TBA.

Grading (tentative)

Exams (60%)

Paper (25%)

Class participation and forum posts (15%)

SOC 379M • Sociological Theory

45100 • Young, Michael P
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm CLA 0.102
show description

Description

The purpose of this course is to introduce the student to some of the more important theoretical foundations of the discipline of sociology and to current debates in modern social theory. The first part of the course covers select classical theorists. The second part provides an introduction to twentieth-century social theory and critical perspectives on the classical foundations of sociology. The third and final part presents a highly influential response to these challenges by a leading sociological theorist of our day. Throughout the course, the main topics of interest are the rise and transformation of modern society, the changing relationship between the individual and social institutions, the role of social structures and agency in social theory, the role of moral and instrumental action in agency theory, the challenge of critical theory to the social sciences, and contemporary attempts at a critical and multidimensional theory of society.

This course challenges students to think theoretically and critically about society and its material and cultural construction. The readings for the course are difficult but not inaccessible. This course will be fruitful if, and only if, students make a serious commitment to do the reading and to attend class. If this commitment is made, the social world might never look and feel quite the same. At least this is my goal and I aim to deliver.

Grading Policy

Three short papers 75%
Three one to two page memos on reading 15%
Class participation 10%

Short papers: Students must write three papers, each approximately five pages in length. One paper is due for each of the three parts of the course.

Memos: For the first part of the course, I will ask you to write three memos, each approximately one page in length. One memo will be on Karl Marx. The second memo will be on Emile Durkeim. And the final memo is on Max Weber.

Texts

All texts have been ordered through MonkeyWrench Books (110 E. North Loop, Austin, TX 78751; tel. (512) 407-6925)

Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels, The Marx-Engels Reader, ed. Robert Tucker, Norton
Emile Durkheim, On Morality and Society, ed. Robert N. Bellah, Chicago
Max Weber, The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism, Roxbury
Georg Simmel, On Individuality and Social Forms, ed. Donald Levine, Chicago
Sigmund Freud, Civilization and Its Discontents, Norton
Michel Foucault, The Foucault Reader, ed. Paul Rabinow, Pantheon
Jurgen Habermas, Jurgen Habermas on Society and Politics: A Reader, ed. Seidman, Beacon

 

SOC 379M • Sociological Theory

45104 • Young, Michael P
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm CLA 3.106
show description

Description

The purpose of this course is to introduce the student to some of the more important theoretical foundations of the discipline of sociology and to current debates in modern social theory. The first part of the course covers select classical theorists. The second part provides an introduction to twentieth-century social theory and critical perspectives on the classical foundations of sociology. The third and final part presents a highly influential response to these challenges by a leading sociological theorist of our day. Throughout the course, the main topics of interest are the rise and transformation of modern society, the changing relationship between the individual and social institutions, the role of social structures and agency in social theory, the role of moral and instrumental action in agency theory, the challenge of critical theory to the social sciences, and contemporary attempts at a critical and multidimensional theory of society.

This course challenges students to think theoretically and critically about society and its material and cultural construction. The readings for the course are difficult but not inaccessible. This course will be fruitful if, and only if, students make a serious commitment to do the reading and to attend class. If this commitment is made, the social world might never look and feel quite the same. At least this is my goal and I aim to deliver.

Grading Policy

Three short papers 75%
Three one to two page memos on reading 15%
Class participation 10%

Short papers: Students must write three papers, each approximately five pages in length. One paper is due for each of the three parts of the course.

Memos: For the first part of the course, I will ask you to write three memos, each approximately one page in length. One memo will be on Karl Marx. The second memo will be on Emile Durkeim. And the final memo is on Max Weber.

Texts

All texts have been ordered through MonkeyWrench Books (110 E. North Loop, Austin, TX 78751; tel. (512) 407-6925)

Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels, The Marx-Engels Reader, ed. Robert Tucker, Norton
Emile Durkheim, On Morality and Society, ed. Robert N. Bellah, Chicago
Max Weber, The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism, Roxbury
Georg Simmel, On Individuality and Social Forms, ed. Donald Levine, Chicago
Sigmund Freud, Civilization and Its Discontents, Norton
Michel Foucault, The Foucault Reader, ed. Paul Rabinow, Pantheon
Jurgen Habermas, Jurgen Habermas on Society and Politics: A Reader, ed. Seidman, Beacon

 

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