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Christine L. Williams, Chair CLA 3.306, Mailcode A1700, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-232-6300

Andres Villarreal

Ph.D., University of Chicago

Associate Professor
Andres Villarreal

Contact

SOC 317L • Intro To Social Statistics

46345 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm CLA 0.122
show description

Course Description

This course is intended to provide undergraduate students with an understanding of the

basic concepts and methods used in statistical analysis for the social sciences. We will

focus on measures of central tendency and dispersion, the normal and chi-square

distributions, hypothesis testing and parameter estimation, and simple correlation and

bivariate regressions.

Grading Policy

The final grade for the course will be based on two midterm exams and a final exam,

each worth 25% of the final grade. Homeworks and two lab assignments will make up the

remaining 25% of the grade.

Students should take note of the exam dates in the course schedule below since no makeup

exams will be given (see notes below). Similarly, students should pay attention to the

due dates for the homework assignments distributed in class since late homeworks will be

penalized 15% of the grade for each day they are late (homeworks handed in after class

time will be considered a day late).

Required Text

Levin, Jack, and James Alan Fox. Elementary Statistics in Social Research: The Essentials. Third Edition. Boston: Allyn & Bacon.

SOC 340D • Violence

46475 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm CLA 1.104
show description

Description

This course will provide an overview of the different theories of interpersonal and group violence. Although the course will pay special attention to criminological theories, we will also cover readings on feuding, ethnic and nationalist violence, political violence, and aggression in intimate relations among other subjects. Students are expected to have some prior exposure to sociology. 

Grading Policy 

The final grade for the course will be based on two midterm exams each worth 35% of the final grade and a final exam worth 30%. Students should take note of the exam dates in the course schedule below since no make-up exams will be given (see notes below). 

Exams will be largely (probably entirely) based on essay questions where students will be asked to demonstrate a thorough understanding of the readings and an ability to integrate the course material. 

Required Texts 

• A reading packet is available from Abel’s Copies, 715D West 23rd Street, 472-5353. 

• Other required readings will be posted on Blackboard

SOC 317L • Intro To Social Statistics

46115 • Fall 2013
Meets MW 330pm-500pm CLA 0.104
show description

Course Description

This course is intended to provide undergraduate students with an understanding of the

basic concepts and methods used in statistical analysis for the social sciences. We will

focus on measures of central tendency and dispersion, the normal and chi-square

distributions, hypothesis testing and parameter estimation, and simple correlation and

bivariate regressions.

Grading Policy

The final grade for the course will be based on two midterm exams and a final exam,

each worth 25% of the final grade. Homeworks and two lab assignments will make up the

remaining 25% of the grade.

Students should take note of the exam dates in the course schedule below since no makeup

exams will be given (see notes below). Similarly, students should pay attention to the

due dates for the homework assignments distributed in class since late homeworks will be

penalized 15% of the grade for each day they are late (homeworks handed in after class

time will be considered a day late).

Required Text

• Levin, Jack, and James Alan Fox. Elementary Statistics in Social Research: The

Essentials. Third Edition. Boston: Allyn & Bacon.

SOC 317L • Intro To Social Statistics

45680 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 930am-1100am CLA 0.112
show description

Course Description

This course is intended to provide undergraduate students with an understanding of the

basic concepts and methods used in statistical analysis for the social sciences. We will

focus on measures of central tendency and dispersion, the normal and chi-square

distributions, hypothesis testing and parameter estimation, and simple correlation and

bivariate regressions.

Grading Policy

The final grade for the course will be based on two midterm exams and a final exam,

each worth 25% of the final grade. Homeworks and two lab assignments will make up the

remaining 25% of the grade.

Students should take note of the exam dates in the course schedule below since no makeup

exams will be given (see notes below). Similarly, students should pay attention to the

due dates for the homework assignments distributed in class since late homeworks will be

penalized 15% of the grade for each day they are late (homeworks handed in after class

time will be considered a day late).

Required Text

• Levin, Jack, and James Alan Fox. Elementary Statistics in Social Research: The

Essentials. Third Edition. Boston: Allyn & Bacon.

SOC 395D • Intro To Sociol Of Lat Amer

45770 • Fall 2012
Meets M 1200pm-300pm BUR 214
(also listed as LAS 381 )
show description

Course Description:

 This seminar is designed to introduce students to some of the topics that sociologists interested in Latin America have been writing about in recent years. We will discuss general theories of economic development, the effects of globalization on society and politics, women’s labor force participation, the consequences of Neoliberalism and free trade, racial inequality, urbanization, crime, and social movements, among other topics.

Requirements and Grading Policy:

Students are expected to attend class regularly and read the assigned material prior to the session for which they are assigned. To facilitate class participation students are required to email the instructor two questions for discussion based on the readings each Tuesday morning before class (by 10:00am). Students are also required to make one or two class presentations of the readings during the course of the semester (the number of presentations will depend on the number of students registered). Grades for the course will be based on class presentations and participation (20%), a take-home midterm exam (40%), and a take-home final exam (40%).

Questions for the take home exams will be given one week before they are due (see schedule below). Although students are encouraged to consult all the readings and notes, collaboration in exams is prohibited. Students will be given several essay questions to choose from. The maximum length of each exam will be approximately 12 pages (subject to change).

Required Texts:

  • Held, David, and Anthony McGrew. 2002. Globalization/Anti-Globalization. Cambridge, UK: Polity Press.
  • Telles, Edward. 2004. E. Race in Another America: The Significance of Skin Color in Brazil. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.
  • A reading is packet available from Abel’s Copies, 715D West 23rd Street, 472-5353.
  • Other readings will be available in electronic form through Blackboard (marked with an asterisk in the list below).

 Optional Texts

(These two books are available electronically through the UT library; they are also available for purchase at the University Co-op bookstore)

  • Evans, Peter B. 1995. Embedded Autonomy: States and Industrial Transformation. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.
  • Haber, Stephen, Herbert S. Klein, Noel Maurer, and Kevin J. Middlebrook. 2008. Mexico Since 1980. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

 

 

SOC 317L • Intro To Social Statistics

45470 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm MEZ 1.120
show description

Course Description

This course is intended to provide undergraduate students with an understanding of the

basic concepts and methods used in statistical analysis for the social sciences. We will

focus on measures of central tendency and dispersion, the normal and chi-square

distributions, hypothesis testing and parameter estimation, and simple correlation and

bivariate regressions.

Grading Policy

The final grade for the course will be based on two midterm exams and a final exam,

each worth 25% of the final grade. Homeworks and two lab assignments will make up the

remaining 25% of the grade.

Students should take note of the exam dates in the course schedule below since no makeup

exams will be given (see notes below). Similarly, students should pay attention to the

due dates for the homework assignments distributed in class since late homeworks will be

penalized 15% of the grade for each day they are late (homeworks handed in after class

time will be considered a day late).

Required Text

• Levin, Jack, and James Alan Fox. Elementary Statistics in Social Research: The

Essentials. Third Edition. Boston: Allyn & Bacon.

SOC 340D • Violence

45615 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm BUR 112
show description

 Description

This course will provide an overview of the different theories of interpersonal and group violence. Although the course will pay special attention to criminological theories, we will also cover readings on feuding, ethnic and nationalist violence, political violence, and aggression in intimate relations among other subjects. Students are expected to have some prior exposure to sociology. 

Grading Policy 

The final grade for the course will be based on two midterm exams each worth 35% of the final grade and a final exam worth 30%. Students should take note of the exam dates in the course schedule below since no make-up exams will be given (see notes below). 

Exams will be largely (probably entirely) based on essay questions where students will be asked to demonstrate a thorough understanding of the readings and an ability to integrate the course material. 

Required Texts 

• A reading packet is available from Abel’s Copies, 715D West 23rd Street, 472-5353. 

• Other required readings will be posted on Blackboard

SOC 340D • Violence

45435 • Fall 2011
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am BUR 116
show description

This course will provide an overview of the different theories of interpersonal and group violence. Although the course will pay special attention to criminological theories, we will also cover readings on feuding, ethnic and nationalist violence, political violence, and aggression in intimate relations among other subjects. Students are expected to have some prior exposure to sociology.

SOC 317L • Intro To Social Statistics

46045 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm MEZ 1.120
show description

This course is intended to provide undergraduate students with an

understanding of the basic concepts and methods used in statistical

analysis for the social sciences. We will focus on measures of central

tendency and dispersion, the normal and chi-square distributions,

hypothesis testing and parameter estimation, and simple correlation and

bivariate regressions.

 

SOC 340D • Violence

46165 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm BUR 112
show description

This course will provide an overview of the different theories of

interpersonal and group violence. Although the course will pay special

attention to criminological theories, we will also cover readings on

feuding, ethnic and nationalist violence, political violence, and

aggression in intimate relations among other subjects. Students are

expected to have some prior exposure to sociology.

SOC 395D • Intro To Sociol Of Lat Amer

45755 • Fall 2010
Meets M 300pm-600pm BUR 231
(also listed as LAS 381 )
show description

Course Description

This seminar is designed to introduce students to some of the topics that sociologists interested in Latin America have been writing about in recent years. We will discuss general theories of economic development, the effects of globalization on society and politics, women’s labor force participation, the consequences of Neoliberalism and free trade, racial inequality, urbanization, crime, social movements, and migration among other topics.

SOC 340D • Violence

46445 • Spring 2010
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm BUR 112
show description

Violence

Spring 2010

SOC 340D, unique number 46445

TTh 2:00-3:30pm, BUR 112

 

 

Instructor: Andrés Villarreal

Office: Main 2414

Tel: 471-8309

Email: avilla@prc.utexas.edu

Office hours: TTh 3:30-5:00pm

 

 

Course Description

This course will provide an overview of the different theories of interpersonal and group violence. Although the course will pay special attention to criminological theories, we will also cover readings on feuding, ethnic and nationalist violence, political violence, and aggression in intimate relations among other subjects. Students are expected to have some prior exposure to sociology.

 

 

Grading Policy

The final grade for the course will be based on one midterm exam and a final exam, each worth one half of the final grade. Students should take note of the exam dates in the course schedule below since no make-up exams will be given (see notes below).

 

Exams will be largely (probably entirely) based on essay questions where students will be asked to demonstrate a thorough understanding of the readings and an ability to integrate the course material.

 

 

Required Texts

  • A reading packet is available from Abel’s Copies, 715D West 23rd Street,

472-5353

 

 

Notes

  • I will make all appropriate arrangements for students with disabilities. Any student requiring special arrangements should contact me immediately.
  • Policy on make-up exams: No make up exams will be given for any reason! Students who can provide official documentation for their absence (i.e., a note from a physician) may have the value of their remaining exams readjusted so that the total possible points add up to 100%. Students must contact me prior to the exam date in order to be eligible for this adjustment. I will not grant this adjustment for circumstances that involve weddings, family get-togethers, or other social events.
  • Students are expected to comply with the university’s policies regarding academic honesty. Violations of these policies will be brought before the appropriate authorities.
  • Although students will not be graded based on class participation everyone is expected to keep up with the readings and be prepared to participate in class (I will call on students if necessary).
  • The instructor reserves the right to adjust the course schedule based on students’ progress.

 

 

 Course Schedule

 

Week 1: Jan. 19,21

Theories of Crime

  • Introduction
  • Sampson, Robert J. and W. Byron Groves. 2003 [1989]. “A Community Structure and Crime: Testing Social-Disorganization Theory.” Pp. 79-87 in Theories of Crime: A Reader, Claire M. Renzetti, Daniel J. Curran and Patrick J. Carr, eds. Boston: Alyn and Bacon.

 

Week 2: Jan. 26,28

Theories of Crime, Continued

  • Cohen, Lawrence E. and Marcus Felson. 2003 [1979] “Social Change and Crime Rate Trends: A Routine Activity Approach.” Pp. 88-94 in Theories of Crime: A Reader, Claire M. Renzetti, Daniel J. Curran and Patrick J. Carr, eds. Boston: Alyn and Bacon.
  • Glick, Leonard. 2005. “Strain Theory”. Criminology. Pp. 134-139.
  • Hirschi, Travis. 2003 [1969]. “A Control Theory of Delinquency.” Pp. 117-132 in Theories of Crime: A Reader, Claire M. Renzetti, Daniel J. Curran and Patrick J. Carr, eds. Boston: Alyn and Bacon.

 

Week 3: Feb. 2,4

Theories of Crime, Continued

  • Gottfredson, Michael R. and Travis Hirschi 2003 [1990] “The Nature of Criminality: Low Self-Control” Pp. 133-146 in Theories of Crime: A Reader, Claire M. Renzetti, Daniel J. Curran and Patrick J. Carr, eds. Boston: Alyn and Bacon.
  • Akers, Ronald L. 2003 [1998]. “Social Learning Theory” Pp. 155-165 in Theories of Crime: A Reader, Claire M. Renzetti, Daniel J. Curran and Patrick J. Carr, eds. Boston: Alyn and Bacon.

Structural and Cultural Theories of Violence

  • Messner, Steven F. and Richard Rosenfeld. 1999. “Social Structure and Homicide: Theory and Research.” Pp. 27-41 in Homicide: A Sourcebook of Social Research, M. Dwayne Smith and Margaret A Zahn, eds. Thousand Oaks: Sage Publications.

 

Week 4: Feb. 9,11

Structural and Cultural Theories of Violence, Continued

  • Corzine, Jay, Lin Huff-Corzine and Hugh P. Whitt. 1999. “Cultural and Subcultural Theories of Homicide.” Pp. 42-57 in Homicide: A Sourcebook of Social Research, M. Dwayne Smith and Margaret A Zahn, eds. Thousand Oaks: Sage Publications.
  • Anderson, Elijah. 1998. “The Social Ecology of Youth Violence.” Crime and Justice 24: 65-104.

 

 

Capital Punishment

  • Bailey, William C. and Ruth D. Peterson. 1999. “Capital Punishment, Homicide, and Deterrence.” Pp. 257- 276 in Homicide: A Sourcebook of Social Research, M. Dwayne Smith and Margaret A Zahn, eds. Thousand Oaks: Sage Publications.

 

Week 5: Feb. 16,18

Gun Control

  • Cook, Philip J. and Mark H. Moore. 1999. “Guns, Gun Control, and Homicide” in Homicide: A Sourcebook of Social Research, M. Dwayne Smith and Margaret A Zahn, eds. Thousand Oaks: Sage Publications.

 

Violence in Schools

  • Newman, Katherine S. 2004. Rampage: The Social Roots of School Shootings. Chapter 10.

 

Week 6: Feb. 23,25

Documentary

  • Video: TBA

 

Violence in the United States in Historical Perspective

  • Monkkonen, Eric H. Murder in New York City. Berkeley: University of California Press, chapters 1 and 7.

 

Week 7: Mar. 2,4

  • Lane, Roger. 1999. “Murder in America: A Historian’s Perspective.” Crime and Justice 25: 191-224.
  • Lane, Roger. 1979. Violent Death in the City: Suicide, Accident, and Murder in Nineteenth-Century Philadelphia. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, chapter 6, “Conclusion” (pp. 115-141).
  • Review for first midterm exam

 

Week 8: Mar. 9,11

  • Midterm exam (March 9)

 

Violence in Colonial Mexico

  • Taylor, William B. 1979. Drinking, Homicide, and Rebellion in Colonial Mexican Villages. Stanford: Stanford University Press, chapter 3 (Homicide), and Conclusion.

 

Week 9: Mar. 16,18 (Spring Break)

 

Week 10: Mar. 23,25

Role of Third Parties in Social Conflict

  • Cooney, Mark. 1998. Warriors and Peacemakers: How Third Parties Shape Violence. New York: New York University Press, chapters 1, 2 and 4.
  • Black, Donald. 1983. “Crime as Social Control.” American Sociological Review 48, 1: 34-45.

 

Week 11: Mar. 30, Apr. 1

Dominance, Social Rank and Violence

  • Gould, Roger. 2003. Collision of Wills: How Ambiguity about Social Rank Breeds Conflict. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. Chapters 3, 5 and 6.

 

Domestic Violence

  • Miller, JaAnn Langley and Dean D. Knudsen. 1999. “Family Abuse and Violence.” Pp. 705-741 in Handbook of Marriage and the Family, Marvin B. Sussman, Suzanne K. Steinmetz and Gary W. Peterson, eds. New York: Plenum Press. [pages 705-714 only]
  • Johnson, Michael P. and Kathleen J. Ferraro. 2000. “Research on Domestic Violence in the 1990s: Making Distinctions.” Journal of Marriage and the Family 62: 948-963.
  • Anderson, Kristin L. 1997. “Gender, Status, and Domestic Violence: An Integration of Feminist and Family Violence Approaches.” Journal of Marriage and the Family 59: 655-669.

 

Week 12: Apr. 6,8

Domestic Violence, Continued

  • Video: “Defending our Lives”

 

Political Change and Violence

  • Villarreal, Andrés. 2002. “Political Competition and Violence in Mexico: Hierarchical Social Control in Local Patronage Structures.” American Sociological Review 67, 4: 477-498.

 

Week 13: Apr. 13,15

Political Violence

  • Gurr, Ted. R. 1970. Why Men Rebel. Princeton: Princeton University Press, chapters 2,10.

 

Ethnic and Nationalist Violence

  • Brubaker, Rogers, and David D. Laitin. 1998. “Ethnic and Nationalist Violence.” Annual Review of Sociology 24: 423-452

 

Week 14: Apr. 20,22

Darfur

  • Video: “On our Watch”

 

The Holocaust

  • Goldhagen, Daniel J. 1996. Hitler’s Willing Executioners: Ordinary Germans and the Holocaust. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, Introduction (pp. 3-24) and chapters 1 (pp. 25-48), 4 (pp. 131-163), and 6 (pp. 181-202) and 15 (pp. 375-389).

 

Week 15: Apr. 27,29

Terrorism

  • Pape, Robert A. 2003. “The Strategic Logic of Suicide Terrorism.” American Political Science Review 97: 343-361.
  • Robison, Kristopher K., Edward M. Crenshaw, and J. Craig Jenkins. 2006. “Ideologies of Violence: The Social Origins of Islamist and Leftist Transnational Terrorism.” Social Forces 84: 2009-2026.

 

 

Week 16: May 4,6

  • Review for final exam

 

 

SOC 395D • Intro To Sociol Of Lat Amer

46602 • Spring 2010
Meets T 600pm-900pm BUR 231
show description

Introduction to the Sociology of Latin America

Spring 2010

SOC 395D/LAS 381

Tuesdays 6:00 - 9:00pm, Burdine 231

 

 

Instructor: Andrés Villarreal

Office: Main 2414

Tel: 471-8309

Email: avilla@prc.utexas.edu

Office hours: TTh 3:30-5:00pm

 

 

Course Description:

 

This seminar is designed to introduce students to some of the topics that sociologists interested in Latin America have been writing about in recent years. We will discuss general theories of economic development, the effects of globalization on society and politics, women’s labor force participation, the consequences of Neoliberalism and free trade, racial inequality, urbanization, crime, and social movements, among other topics.

 

 

Requirements and Grading Policy:

Students are expected to attend class regularly and read the assigned material prior to the session for which they are assigned. To facilitate class participation students are required to email the instructor two questions for discussion based on the readings each Tuesday morning before class (by 10:00am). Students are also required to make one or two class presentations of the readings during the course of the semester (the number of presentations will depend on the number of students registered). Grades for the course will be based on class presentations and participation (20%), a take-home midterm exam (40%), and a take-home final exam (40%).

 

Questions for the take home exams will be given one week before they are due (see schedule below). Although students are encouraged to consult all the readings and notes, collaboration in exams is prohibited. Students will be given several essay questions to choose from. The maximum length of each exam will be approximately 12 pages (subject to change).

 

 

 

Required Texts:

  • Held, David, and Anthony McGrew. 2002. Globalization/Anti-Globalization. Cambridge, UK: Polity Press.
  • Telles, Edward. 2004. E. Race in Another America: The Significance of Skin Color in Brazil. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.
  • A reading is packet available from Abel’s Copies, 715D West 23rd Street, 472-5353.
  • Other readings will be available in electronic form through Blackboard (marked with an asterisk in the list below).

 

Optional Texts

(These two books are available electronically through the UT library; they are also available for purchase at the University Co-op bookstore)

  • Evans, Peter B. 1995. Embedded Autonomy: States and Industrial Transformation. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.
  • Haber, Stephen, Herbert S. Klein, Noel Maurer, and Kevin J. Middlebrook. 2008. Mexico Since 1980. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

 

 

 

Notes

  • I will make all appropriate arrangements for students with disabilities. Any student requiring special arrangements should contact me immediately.
  • Policy on make-up exams: No make up exams will be given for any reason! Students who can provide official documentation for their inability to take the exam (i.e., a note from a physician) may have the value of the remaining exam and class presentations readjusted so that the total possible points add up to 100%. Students must contact me prior to the date of the exam in order to be eligible for this adjustment. I will not grant this adjustment for circumstances that involve weddings, leisure trips, family get-togethers, or other social events. Please check the exam dates below before making any travel plans.
  • Students are expected to comply with the university’s policies regarding academic honesty.
  • The instructor reserves the right to adjust the course schedule based on students’ progress.

 

 

 

 

Course Schedule

(Note: Readings marked with an asterisk are available through Blackboard or electronically through the UT library system)

 

Week 1 (Jan. 19): Introduction

 

Week 2 (Jan. 26): Weber and Economic Institutions

 

Weber, Max. 1927 [1981]. General Economic History. New Brunswick: Transaction Books, chapters 22, 27, 28, 29, 30.

 

North, Douglas C. 1973. The Rise of the Western World: A New Economic History. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp. 1-8.

 

North, Douglas C. 1981. Structure and Change in Economic History. New York: Norton, chapters 1, 11.

 

* Coatsworth, John. 1978. “Obstacles to Economic Growth in Nineteenth Century Mexico.” American Historical Review 83, 1, supplement: 80-100.

 

 

Week 3 (Feb. 2):

 

Week 4 (Feb. 9): Dependency Theory and its Critics

 

Gereffi, Gary. 1983. The Pharmaceutical Industry and Dependency in the Third World. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, chap. 1.

 

* Wallerstein, Immanuel. 1974. “The Rise and Future Demise of the World Capitalist System: Concepts for Comparative Analysis.” Comparative Studies in Society and History 16: 387-415.

 

* Firebaugh, Glenn. 1992. “Growth Effects of Foreign and Domestic Investment.” American Journal of Sociology 98: 105-130.

 

Villarreal, Andrés, and Arthur Sakamoto. 2008. “Bringing the Firms into Globalization Research: The Effects of Foreign Investment and Exports on Wages in Mexican Manufacturing Firms.” Manuscript.

 

* Drake, Paul, and Lisa Hilbink. 2003. “Latin American Studies: Theory and Practice.” Pp. 34-73 in The Politics of Knowledge: Area Studies and the Disciplines, edited by David Szanton. Berkeley, CA: UCIS.

 

 

 

 

Week 5 (Feb. 16): Globalization

 

Held, David, and Anthony McGrew. 2002. Globalization/Anti-Globalization. Cambridge, UK: Polity Press. Selected chapters

 

* Guillén, Mauro F. 2001. “Is Globalization Civilizing, Destructive or Feeble? A Critique of Five Key Debates in the Social Science Literature.” Annual Review of Sociology, 27:235-260.

 

 

Week 6 (Feb. 23): Role of the State in Economic Development: Comparisons with Asia

 

Haggard, Stepan. 1990. Pathways from the Periphery: The Politics of Growth in the Newly Industrializing Countries. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, chapters 2, 9, 10.

 

* Evans, Peter B. 1995. Embedded Autonomy: States and Industrial Transformation. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, chaps. 1, 3 and 9 (skim chaps. 5-8) (book available electronically through the university library).

 

 

Week 7 (Mar. 2): Economic Restructuring and Free Trade

 

* Haber, Stephen, Herbert S. Klein, Noel Maurer, and Kevin J. Middlebrook. 2008. Mexico Since 1980. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Chapters 1, 3 and 7 (chapter 2 recommended) (book available electronically through the university library).

 

* Babb, Sarah. 2005. “The Social Consequences of Structural Adjustment: Recent Evidence and Current Debates.” Annual Review of Sociology 31: 199-222.

 

* Rodrik, Dani. 2001. “Trading in Illusions.” Foreign Policy 123: 54-62.

 

 

Week 8 (Mar. 9): No class. Midterm Take-home Exam due (4:00 pm)

 

Week 9 (Mar. 16): No class. Spring Break

 

Week 10 (Mar. 23): Gender and Work in Latin America

 

Chant, Sylvia H. 2003. Gender in Latin America. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press, chap. 8.

 

Salzinger, Leslie. 2003. Genders in Production: Making Workers in Mexico’s Global Factories. Berkeley: University of California Press, chaps. 1 – 3, 8.

 

Joekes, Susan P. and Ann Weston. 1994. Women and the New Trade Agenda. New York: United Nations Development Fund for Women, parts IV and V.

 

* Villarreal, Andrés, and Wei-hsin Yu. 2007. “Economic Globalization and Women’s Employment: The Case of Manufacturing in Mexico.” American Sociological Review 72: 365-389.

 

 

Week 11 (Mar. 30): Race in Brazil

 

Telles, Edward. 2004. E. Race in Another America: The Significance of Skin Color in Brazil. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.

 

 

Week 12 (Apr. 6): Urbanization and Spatial Segregation

 

* Portes, Alejandro, and Bryan R. Roberts. 2005. “The Free-Market City: Latin American Urbanization in the Years of the Neoliberal Experiment.” Studies in Comparative International Development 40: 43-82.

 

* Roberts R., Bryan, and Robert H. Wilson, eds. 2009. Urban Segregation and Governance in the Americas. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, chapters 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, 11 (suggested: 4, 8)

 

 

 

Week 13 (Apr. 13): Crime and Violence in Latin America

 

* Villarreal, Andrés. 2002. “Political Competition and Violence in Mexico: Hierarchical Social Control in Local Patronage Structures.” American Sociological Review 67, 4: 477-498.

 

Levitt, Steven, and Mauricio Rubio. 2005. “Understanding Crime in Colombia and What Can be Done about It” Pp. 131-172 in Alberto Alesina (ed.), Institutional Reforms: The Case of Colombia. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.

 

* Thoumi, Francisco E. 2002. “Illegal Drugs in Colombia: From Illegal Economic Boom to Social Crisis.” ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science 582: 102-116.

 

* Prillaman, William C. 2003. “Crime, Democracy, and Development in Latin America.” CSIS Policy Papers on the Americas, Volume XIV, Study 6.

 

            Suggested reading:

* Brands, Hal. 2009. “Mexico’s Narco-Insurgency and U.S. Counterdrug Policy.” Strategic Studies Institute.

 

 

Week 14 (Apr. 20): Social Movements: Urban and Rural

 

* Almeida, Paul D. 2007. “Defensive Mobilization: Popular Movements against Economic Adjustment Policies in Latin America.” Latin American Perspectives 34: 123-139.

 

* Almeida, Paul. 2006. “Social Movement Unionism, Social Movement Partyism, and Policy Outcomes: Health Care Privatization in El Salvador.” Pp. 57-73 in Latin American Social Movements: Globalization, Democratization, and Transnational Networks, Hank Johnston, and Paul Almeida, editors. Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield.

 

Carr, Barry. “‘From the Mountains of the Southeast’: A Review of Recent Writings on the Zapatistas of Chiapas.” Journal of Iberian and Latin American Studies 3: 109-123.

 

Collier, George A. 1999. Basta! Land and the Zapatista Rebellion in Chiapas. Oakland, CA: Food First Books, chapters 2, 3, 4, 5.

 

 

Week 15 (Apr. 27): No class. Final Take-home Exam due Monday, May 3 (4:00 pm)

 

 

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