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Robert Crosnoe, Chair CLA 3.306, Mailcode A1700, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-232-6300

Ben Carrington

Ph.D., Leeds Metropolitan University, UK

Associate Professor
Ben Carrington

Contact

Biography

Ben Carrington is a sociologist who has taught at the University of Texas at Austin since 2004. Prior to that he taught at the University of Brighton in England. Professor Carrington studies a broad range of topics and areas generally concerned with mapping the circulation and reproduction of power within contemporary societies. More specifically, he is interested in how ideologies of race shape - and are themselves shaped by - cultural forms, practices and identities and how popular culture is often a key site of both cultural resistance and domination. His work examines the mass media, music and sport as way to understand key sociological dimensions of everyday life such as personal and communal identity and nationalistic identification and dis-identification. Professor Carrington also teaches various undergraduate and graduate classes on the sociology of race, culture, sport and identity. He supervises doctoral students doing interesting work on a range of politically-relevant topics whatever that topic may be. Professor Carrington currently serves on the editorial boards of Sociological Theory, Identities: Global Studies in Culture and Power, the Journal of Sport and Social Issues, the Sociology of Sport Journal, and the International Review for the Sociology of Sport.

Outside of the Sociology Department, Ben Carrington is actively engaged with a range of institutions and intellectual spaces, including the Center for European Studies, the Center for Women’s and Gender Studies and the Warfield Center for African and African American Studies. He also holds an appointment with the African and African Diaspora Studies Department

Professor Carrington is a Carnegie Research Fellow at Leeds Metropolitan University, England and is a Research Associate of the Centre for Urban and Community Research, based at Goldsmiths College, University of London.

Interests

Post/colonial Theory; Sociology of Race; Cultural Sociology; Sociology of Sport, Media and Popular Culture; Cultural Studies; Masculinity and Gender Studies

SOC 322R • Race, Sport, And Identity

46206 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm CLA 0.118
(also listed as AFR 374D )
show description

Description:

This course explores the sociological significance of sport in relation to the construction of racialized identities.  Focusing primarily, although not exclusively, on the black experience in sport, the course examines the changing social meanings given to sport from the start of the 20th century through to today.  The African-American experience is used as a paradigmatic case study through which to locate the ways in which the expression of identity in sport has been used as a form of cultural resistance to racism.  The sociological and historical importance of sport within African-American life is located within the broader context of the African diaspora  in order to understand the wider political significance of sport in the context of global movements of people, images and ideologies. 

Assessment criteria

There are two aspects to how your final grade is reached:

1.            40%        Book Review (6 pages)

2.            60%        End of term essay (12 pages after rewrite)

 

Required reading:

Course pack

 

SOC 322S • The Sociology Of Sport

46210 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm WEL 2.312
show description

Course Description:

Over the past four decades, as the social significance of sport has increased, the sociology of sport has emerged to become a significant sub-discipline of sociology.  Scholars within the sociology of sport have drawn on a wide range of theoretical perspectives to understand the enduring appeal of sporting practices, as well as the various processes of conflict, control and power in and around the institutions of sport.  The course examines the main perspectives in the sociology of sport in order to better understand the complex and contradictory relationship between sport and society.  Further, the course examines the theoretical points of conflict between the different sociological perspectives, which do not merely provide different points of view, but also present the student of sport sociology with competing analytical frameworks on how society itself is structured and works.  The course examines various topics and issues such as gender and representation, violence and deviancy, sexuality and homophobia, commercialization and college sport, race and inequality, and sport and the media. 

Grading Policy:

There are three aspects to how your final grade is reached:

30%                Midterm Exam on Sociological Theories of Sport

30%                Six to eight page book review of a book

40%                Final Exam on Social Issues in Sport

Texts:

Andrews, David L. and Carrington, Ben  (2013) A Companion to Sport, Blackwell.

SOC 321K • Sport And English Society-Eng

46410 • Spring 2014
Meets
(also listed as EUS 346 )
show description

SOC 321K • Sport and English Society

Spring 2014

Description:

Sport occupies a significant place within English society; from the centrality of cricket in helping to shape the British empire, to the importance of soccer (“football”) in promoting the varied national identities within the UK and Northern Ireland, to the ways in which women and racial minorities have used sport to achieve social mobility and recognition, sport remains one of the most important ways to understand the changing nature of English society in the 21st century.  The course is located in Leeds, a diverse metropolis, known for its culture and sporting teams. Given this unique location, the Maymester enables students to explore the internal divisions around class and region that are central to understanding English identity, particularly the tensions between “the north” and “the south”, as well as discover the origins of American football and baseball.

Assessment criteria:

40% - Three page critical summary of each field trip (each summary will be worth 10% of final grade).

60% - Final synoptic ten to twelve page essay drawing on the lectures, field trips and readings – essay title to be agreed with Professor Ben Carrington.

Required reading: Course pack

 

SOC 395L • Crit Thry Of Race & Racism

46660 • Spring 2014
Meets T 300pm-600pm CLA 3.214F
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Description

This course introduces students to critical, global perspectives on race, ethnicity and racism. Through a series of close readings of key texts the course examines the historical relationship between the emergence of ideas about race and Western modernity. The course is divided into two parts.

Part I examines the importance of slavery and European colonialism in producing modern understandings of race and racial difference. We look at how the social sciences themselves have been implicated in the production of racialized ways of seeing and knowing both the (Western) Self and the (abject) Other: the "West" and _the Rest_. Part I concludes by examining the interrelationships between race, gender, sexuality and nation in the colonial setting.

Part II examines contemporary racial formation in the period after the anti-colonial struggles of the mid-20th century. Key here are the ways in which social theorists have sought to understand both the continuities and discontinuities of colonial regimes in structuring societies in the West, and elsewhere.

Part II thus focuses on questions of State formation, anti-racist political struggle, and the politics of identity in relation to questions of ethnicity. A key aspect of this course is its focus on the global dimensions and manifestations of racism and ethnicity. Although historical and contemporary debates concerning the articulation of race and the ethnicity within the U.S. remain central to many of the readings and class discussions, the course aims to provide a broader, contextual understanding of the changing nature of race and ethnicity across both time and geography. While W.E.B. Du Bois famously observed that the key issue of the 20th century would be the problem of the color line, the course ends by discussing the extent to which race, ethnicity and racism still matter, both sociologically and politically, in the 21st century. The course will be relevant to those students with an interest in critical theories of race and ethnicity and contemporary social theory.

SOC 321K • Sport And English Society-Eng

45770 • Spring 2013
Meets
(also listed as EUS 346 )
show description

Description:

Sport occupies a significant place within English society; from the centrality of cricket in helping to shape the British empire, to the importance of soccer (“football”) in promoting the varied national identities within the UK and Northern Ireland, to the ways in which women and racial minorities have used sport to achieve social mobility and recognition, sport remains one of the most important ways to understand the changing nature of English society in the 21st century.  The course is located in Leeds, a diverse metropolis, known for its culture and sporting teams. Given this unique location, the Maymester enables students to explore the internal divisions around class and region that are central to understanding English identity, particularly the tensions between “the north” and “the south”, as well as discover the origins of American football and baseball.

Assessment criteria:

40% - Two page critical summary of each field trip (each summary will be worth 10% of final grade).

60% - Final synoptic ten page essay drawing on the lectures, field trips and readings – essay title to be agreed with Professor Ben Carrington.

SOC 321K • Sport And English Society-Eng

45555 • Spring 2012
Meets
show description

Description:

Sport occupies a significant place within English society; from the centrality of cricket in helping to shape the British empire, to the importance of soccer (“football”) in promoting the varied national identities within the UK and Northern Ireland, to the ways in which women and racial minorities have used sport to achieve social mobility and recognition, sport remains one of the most important ways to understand the changing nature of English society in the 21st century.  The course is located in Leeds, a diverse metropolis, known for its culture and sporting teams. Given this unique location, the Maymester enables students to explore the internal divisions around class and region that are central to understanding English identity, particularly the tensions between “the north” and “the south”, as well as discover the origins of American football and baseball.

Assessment criteria:

40% - Two page critical summary of each field trip (each summary will be worth 10% of final grade).

60% - Final synoptic ten page essay drawing on the lectures, field trips and readings – essay title to be agreed with Professor Ben Carrington.

SOC 394K • Crit Theories On Race & Racism

46315 • Spring 2011
Meets M 600pm-900pm BUR 214
show description

Course Description

This course introduces students to critical, global perspectives on race, ethnicity and racism. Through a series of close readings of key texts the course examines the historical relationship between the emergence of ideas about race and Western modernity. The course is divided into two parts. Part I examines the importance of slavery and European colonialism in producing modern understandings of race and racial difference. We look at how the social sciences themselves have been implicated in the production of racialized ways of seeing and knowing both the (Western) Self and the (abject) Other: the "West" and _the Rest_. Part I concludes by examining the interrelationships between race, gender, sexuality and nation in the colonial setting. Part II examines contemporary racial formation in the period after the anti-colonial struggles of the mid-20th century. Key here are the ways in which social theorists have sought to understand both the continuities and discontinuities of colonial regimes in structuring societies in the West, and elsewhere. Part II thus focuses on questions of State formation, anti-racist political struggle, and the politics of identity in relation to questions of ethnicity. A key aspect of this course is its focus on the global dimensions and manifestations of racism and ethnicity. Although historical and contemporary debates concerning the articulation of race and the ethnicity within the U.S. remain central to many of the readings and class discussions, the course aims to provide a broader, contextual understanding of the changing nature of race and ethnicity across both time and geography. While W.E.B. Du Bois famously observed that the key issue of the 20th century would be the problem of the color line, the course ends by discussing the extent to which race, ethnicity and racism still matter, both sociologically and politically, in the 21st century. The course will be relevant to those students with an interest in critical theories of race and ethnicity and contemporary social theory.

 

 

 

SOC 322R • Race, Sport, And Identity

45530 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 930am-1100am BUR 231
(also listed as AFR 374D )
show description

Meets with AFR 374D/35365

Carries a Writing Flag.

SOC 321K • The Sociology Of Sport

87995 • Summer 2010
Meets MTWTHF 100pm-230pm UTC 1.102
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Course Description

This course introduces students to the sociology of sport. The course is divided into two parts. Part one examines the place of sport within social theory, in particular the understanding of sport and society found in functionalist, Weberian, Marxist, and feminist accounts. Part two of the course uses this theoretical framework in order to understand key social issues in sport. These include gender and ideology, violence and deviancy, commercialization and college sport, race and inequality, and media and representation. The course will be relevant to those with an interest in both sociological theory and contemporary sporting cultures.

 

Grading Policy

Attendance 10%
Mid-semester multiple choice exam covering aspects of sport and social theory 30% 
Four page critical review of a journal article 30%
End-of-semester test covering sport and social issues 30%

 

Texts

Coakley, J. and Dunning, E. (eds.) (2000) "Handbook of Sport Studies" (Sage)
Coakley, J. (2009, 10th edition) "Sports in Society: Issues and Controversies" (McGraw-Hill)

 

SOC SOC394 • Crit Theories On Race & Racism

46590 • Spring 2010
Meets M 600pm-900pm BUR 214
show description

 Course Description

This course introduces students to critical, global perspectives on race, ethnicity and racism. Through a series of close readings of key texts the course examines the historical relationship between the emergence of ideas about race and Western modernity. The course is divided into two parts. Part I examines the importance of slavery and European colonialism in producing modern understandings of race and racial difference. We look at how the social sciences themselves have been implicated in the production of racialized ways of seeing and knowing both the (Western) Self and the (abject) Other: the "West" and _the Rest_. Part I concludes by examining the interrelationships between race, gender, sexuality and nation in the colonial setting. Part II examines contemporary racial formation in the period after the anti-colonial struggles of the mid-20th century. Key here are the ways in which social theorists have sought to understand both the continuities and discontinuities of colonial regimes in structuring societies in the West, and elsewhere. Part II thus focuses on questions of State formation, anti-racist political struggle, and the politics of identity in relation to questions of ethnicity. A key aspect of this course is its focus on the global dimensions and manifestations of racism and ethnicity. Although historical and contemporary debates concerning the articulation of race and the ethnicity within the U.S. remain central to many of the readings and class discussions, the course aims to provide a broader, contextual understanding of the changing nature of race and ethnicity across both time and geography. While W.E.B. Du Bois famously observed that the key issue of the 20th century would be the problem of the color line, the course ends by discussing the extent to which race, ethnicity and racism still matter, both sociologically and politically, in the 21st century. The course will be relevant to those students with an interest in critical theories of race and ethnicity and contemporary social theory.

 

 

 

SOC 321K • Race, Sport, And Identity-W

46535 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 930-1100 BUR 231
show description

Race, Sport and Identity

Fall Semester 2009

Course Code:  SOC 321K/AFR 374D               

Time: Tuesday and Thursday 9.30am–11am

Place: BUR 231

 

Instructor:

Dr. Ben Carrington

Department of Sociology

Burdine Hall 570

Phone: 512 232 6341

Email: bcarrington@austin.utexas.edu

Office hours:  Thursday 2pm-3pm

 

Course introduction

 

This course explores the sociological significance of sport in relation to the construction of racialized identities.  Focussing primarily, although not exclusively, on the black experience in sport, the course examines the changing social meanings given to sport throughout the 20th century.  The African-American experience is used as a paradigmatic case study through which to locate the ways in which the expression of identity in sport has been used as a form of cultural resistance to racism.  The sociological and historical importance of sport within African-American life is located within the broader context of the African diaspora – in particular the black Caribbean and black British populations - in order to understand the wider political significance of sport in the context of global movements of people, images and ideologies. 

 

This course will enable students to understand the ways in which the public meanings given to sport have played a role in sustaining racial discourse, the importance of sport within the African diaspora, and how racism continues to structure the field of play today.  By the end of the course students will have a deeper understanding and appreciation of the interrelationship between sport and race, the ways in which identity has been used to affect political change in the arena of sport, and the importance of sociology in analysing these relationships.

 

In order to fully comprehend the significance of these interrelationships the first few weeks of the course will be concerned with mapping key concepts, namely race, racism, identity, empire, colonialism and sport.   This way, all students, regardless of their disciplinary background, will have the conceptual tools with which to make sense of the more sport-specific material we examine later.

Course outline

 

A course reading pack is available at Paradigm Books 407 West 24th Street.  Each week I will post questions on Blackboard that relate to the essential reading that must be done BEFORE the following week’s session.  Many of the sessions will involve students presenting summaries of the readings for the rest of the class, so you need to think about and develop your presentations skills. If you attend a lecture without having done the preparatory reading you will struggle to follow the lecture.  In the weeks where there is no specific reading, students are encouraged to finish reading their chosen book for their book review or to research relevant texts for their essay.

 

Week 1: Introduction to the course

Thursday 27th August:  Introduction ‘Race, Sport and Identity’

Essential follow-up reading: Carrington, B. ‘Race and sport’, in Ritzer, G. (2007) The Blackwell Encyclopedia of Sociology (pp. 1-8).

 

Week 2: Key Concepts and Theories

Tuesday 1st September: Conceptualising race/theorising racism

Essential reading: ‘Chapter 11: The Architecture of Inequality: Race and ethnicity’, in Newman, D. (2004, 5th ed.) Sociology: Exploring the architecture of everyday life (Pine Forge Press) pp. 9-33.

Thursday 3rd September: What is identity?

Essential reading: ‘Chapter 6: The Question of Cultural Identity’, in Hall, S. (1992) Modernity and its Futures (Open University) pp.35-63.

 

Week 3: Sport, colonialism and empire 

Tuesday 8th September: Empire, colonialism and the idea of race

Thursday 10th September: Imperialism and the emergence of sport

Essential reading: ‘Introduction: The invention and diffusion of modern sports’ pp. 65-73 AND ‘Chapter 9: Cultural Imperialism?’, in Guttmann, A. (1996) Games and Empires: Modern sports and cultural imperialism (Columbia University Press) pp. 75-89.

 

Week 4: Sport and Jim Crow America

Tuesday 15th September: Racial segregation and the role of sport in the era of Jim Crow I

Essential reading: ‘Year of the Comet: Jack Johnson versus Jim Jeffries, July 4, 1910’, by Roberts, R. in Miller, P. and Wiggins, D. (eds.) (2004) Sport and the Color Line: Black athletes and race relations in twentieth-century America (Routledge) pp.91-101.

Thursday 17th September: Racial segregation and the role of sport in the era of Jim Crow II

Essential reading: ‘Chapter 2: In Sports the Best Man Wins: How Joe Louis whupped Jim Crow’, by Runstedtler, T., in Bass, A. (2005) (ed.) In the Game: Race, identity, and sports in the twentieth century (Palgrave) pp. 103-127.

 

Week 5: Book review workshop

Tuesday 22nd September:  Writing sociologically/writing a book review

Thursday 24th September:  Book review tutorials

 

Week 6: Sport and Protest in the 1960s and 1970s

Tuesday 29th September: Muhammad Ali and the Civil Rights Movement

Essential reading: ‘Chapter 1: Muhammad Ali, Third World Contender’, in Farred, G. (2003)  What’s My Name?  Black vernacular intellectuals (University of Minnesota Press) pp. 129-167.

Thursday 1st October: Mexico ’68 and the revolt of the black athlete

Essential reading: ‘The Politics of Protest: The 1968 Olympic Games’, Harry Edwards’ ‘Mounting the Revolt’ and ‘The Boycott Debate’, in Wiggins, D. and Miller, P. (eds.) (2003) The Unlevel Playing Field: A documentary history of the African American experience in sport (University of Illinois Press) pp. 169-176.

 

Week 7a: Anti-colonialism within the black diaspora and the politics of sport

Tuesday 6th October: C.L.R. James, cricket and resistance in the Caribbean diaspora

Essential reading: ‘Sport, Colonialism and Struggle: C.L.R. James and cricket’ by Brian Stoddart, in Giulianotti, R. (ed.) (2004) Sport and Modern Social Theorists (Palgrave) pp. 177-187.

 

Week 7b: Sport, Race and the Body

Thursday 8th October: White men can’t jump? Race, sport and genetics

Essential reading: ‘Chapter 6: Europeans, Not West Africans, Dominate the NBA: The social construction of race and sports’, in Graves, J. (2005) The Race Myth: Why we pretend race exists in America (Plume) pp. 189-208.

 

Week 8: Book Review Office Hours

Tuesday 13th October: Book review preparation time

Thursday 15th October: Book review preparation time

 

BOOK REVIEWS SUBMITTED TO THE SOCIOLOGY OFFICE (5th Floor BURDINE)

BY 2PM ON FRIDAY OCTOBER 16th     

 

Week 9: Film: When We Were Kings

Tuesday 20th October: WWWK Part I

Thursday 22nd October: WWWK Part II and discussion

Essential reading: Students will be given a relevant critical review of the film to read.

 

Week 10: Essay preparation and research for writing

Tuesday 27th October: Writing sociologically and guidance for the essay 

Thursday 29th October: Researching for a sociological essay with Susan Macicak PCL 1.124

 

Week 11: Sport and Race in US College sports

Tuesday 3rd November: College sport or sporting commerce? Race, campus politics and the ‘student-athlete’ – Book Reviews returned

Essential reading: ‘Chapter 20: College Sports: Winners and losers’ by Sperber, M., AND ‘Chapter 21: The Big-Time College Sports Plantation and the Slaves Who Drive It’ Eitzen, S. in Eitzen, S. (ed.) (2005) Sport in Contemporary Society: An anthology (Plume) pp. 209-223. 

Thursday 5th November: Draft essay preparation time

 

DRAFT ESSAYS SUBMITTED TO THE SOCIOLOGY OFFICE

BY 2PM ON FRIDAY NOVEMBER 6th    

 

Week 12: Film: Hoop Dreams

Tuesday 10th November: HD Part I

Thursday 12th November: HD Part II and discussion

Essential reading: Students will be given a relevant critical review of the film to read.

 

Week 13: Globalization: Sport, race and national identity

Tuesday 17th November: Draft essays returned and essay guidance

Thursday 19th November:  Globalization, sport and identity

Essential reading: ‘Chapter 8: Sporting nationalism and national identities’, in Bairner, A. (2001) Sport, Nationalism, and Globalization (SUNY) pp. 225-234.

 

 

 

 

 

Week 14: Sport and race in the 21st century

Tuesday 24th  November:  Race and the future politics of sport

Essential reading: ‘The Next Millennium’ by Shropshire, AND ‘Performance and Reality’ by Early AND ‘The Decline of the Black Athlete’ by Edwards, in Wiggins, D. and Miller, P. (eds.) (2003) The Unlevel Playing Field: A documentary history of the African American experience in sport (University of Illinois Press) pp. 235-245. 

Thursday 26th November:  Thanks Giving – No class

 

Week 15: Final Essay Tutorials

Tuesday 1st December:  Course summary, evaluation and final essay advice

Thursday 3rd December:  Essay tutorials

 

Week 15: Submission

Friday 4th December:  Essay submission

 

In order to successfully complete this course it is recommended that students commit themselves to regular and sustained reading.  Students who do not do this will struggle to pass this course.  You will also need to do at least one presentation to class on one of the week’s topics.

 

I strongly recommend that you consult relevant help books on how to critically and use grammar and punctuation correctly.  Students who do not follow suitable rules for sociological writing will lose marks.  Further guidance on “how to write sociologically” will be given out in Week 10.  However, for those unfamiliar or unused to writing long essays, I recommend that you read both Johnson, Rettig, Scott and Garrison’s (6th Ed.) (2000) The Sociology Student Writer’s Manual (Prentice Hall) and Lynne Truss’s (2004) Eats, Shoots and Leaves (Gotham Books).

 

Assessment criteria

 

There are two aspects to how your final grade is reached:

 

  1. 40%                             Book review (6 pages)
  2. 60%                             End of term essay (12 pages after rewrite)

 

It is expected that, with the exception of unforeseen emergencies, students will attend every session of the course. If you know that you will miss a session you should let me know BEFORE that class. 

Students will have to submit a critical and sociologically informed book review by the end of Week 8, FRIDAY OCTOBER 16th.  These will be returned to students, with a grade and comments within two weeks.  The book review must be based on one of the following two books (available from the CO-OP at either SOC 321K or AFR 374D and most good bookstores): 

 

Mike Marqusee (2005, 2nd ed.) Redemption Song: Muhammad Ali and the spirit of the sixties (Verso)

Charles Lemert (2003) Muhammad Ali: Trickster in the Culture of Irony (Polity Press).  

 

Further details on what is expected will be given out in Week 5.  The book review must be six pages long (based on standard size paper and double spacing).  

 

The final assessment will be an essay based on material covered in the lectures.  Essay titles will be given out in Week  6.  All STUDENTS must submit a full draft of their referenced essay (including a bibliography) by the end of Week 11, FRIDAY NOVEMBER 6th. The draft essay must be eight pages in length.  You will then have feedback and a provisional grade in Week 13.  Students must then rewrite and expand their essay into a final piece of work which will determine your final grade for this part of the assessment.  The final essay must be 12 pages in length.  Further details on the essay and what is expected will be given out in week 10.

 

Students must avoid plagiarism by ensuring that all work submitted is their own and is properly referenced.  Late submissions will be subject to a grade penalty for each day late, so an A late on the first day will be reduced to a B, then C if given in the next day and so on.

 

I also recommend that you make use of the Undergraduate Writing Center when preparing your reviews and final essays: Undergraduate Writing Center, FAC 211, 471-6222:  http://uwc.utexas.edu/home). The Undergraduate Writing Center offers free, individualized, expert help with writing for any UT undergraduate, by appointment or on a drop-in basis. Any undergraduate enrolled in a course at UT can visit the UWC for assistance with any writing project. They work with students from every department on campus, for both academic and non-academic writing. Whether you are writing a lab report, a resume, a term paper, a statement for an application, or your own poetry, UWC consultants will be happy to work with you. Their services are not just for writing with “problems”.  Getting feedback from an informed audience is a normal part of a successful writing project. Consultants help students develop strategies to improve their writing. The assistance they provide is intended to foster independence. Each student determines how to use the consultant’s advice. The consultants are trained to help you work on your writing in ways that preserve the integrity of your work.

 

 

Guide to further reading

 

Students should regularly consult the main journals that carry articles on race and sport, particularly the Sociology of Sport Journal (SSJ), the Journal of Sport and Social Issues (JSSI), the International Review for the Sociology of Sport (IRSS), and Leisure Studies (LS).  In addition, the following books will provide useful contextual information for this course.

 

Andrews, D. (ed.) (2001) Michael Jordan Inc.: Corporate sport, media culture and late modern America. New York: SUNY Press.

Ansari, H. (ed.) (2004) Racialization and Sport. Patterns and Prejudice 38, 3 (September):

Back, L., Crabbe, T., and Solomos, J. (2001) The Changing Face of Football: Racism, identity and multiculture in the English game. Oxford: Berg.

Bass, A. (2002) Not the Triumph but the Struggle: The 1968 Olympics and the making of the black athlete. Minnesota: The University of Minnesota Press.

Bass, A. (2005) (ed.) In the Game: Race, identity, and sports in the twentieth century. Basingstoke: Palgrave.

Beckles, H., and Stoddard, B. (eds.) (1995) Liberation Cricket: West Indies cricket culture. Manchester: Manchester University Press.

Bloom, J. and Willard, M. (eds.) (2002) Sport Matters: Race, recreation and culture. New York: New York University Press.

Carrington, B. (ed.) (2004) Race/Nation/Sport. Leisure Studies. 23, 1 (January):

Carrington, B. and McDonald, I. (eds.) (2001) ‘Race’, Sport and British Society. London: Routledge.

Edwards, H. (1969) The Revolt of the Black Athlete. New York: Free Press.

Garland, J. and Rowe, M. (2001) Racism and Antiracism in Football. Basingstoke: Palgrave.

Guttmann, A. (1996) Games and Empires: Modern sports and cultural imperialism. Columbia: Columbia University Press.

Hartmann, D. (2003) Race, Culture and the Revolt of the Black Athlete: The 1968 Olympic protests and their aftermath. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Hietala, T., R. (2002) The Fight of the Century: Jack Johnson, Joe Louis and the struggle for racial equality. New York: M.E. Sharpe.

Hoberman, J. (1997) Darwin’s Athletes: How sport has damaged black America and preserved the myth of race. Boston: Mairner Books.

Ismond, P. (2003) Black and Asian Athletes in British Sport and Society: A sporting chance? Basingstoke: Palgrave.

James, C.L.R. (1994[1963]) Beyond a Boundary. London: Serpent’s Tail.

King, C. R., and Springwood, C.F. (2001) Beyond the Cheers: Race as spectacle in college

            Sport. Albany: State University of New York Press.

Mangan, J., A., and Ritchie, A. (eds.) (2005) Ethnicity, Sport, Identity: Struggles for Status. London: Routledge.

Marqusee, M. (2005) 2nd ed., Redemption Song: Muhammad Ali and the spirit of the sixties. London: Verso.

Melling, P. and Collins, T. (eds.) (2004) The Glory of Their Times: Crossing the colour line in Rugby League. Skipton: Vertical Editions.

Miller, P. and Wiggins, D. (eds.) (2004) Sport and the Color Line: Black athletes and race relations in twentieth-century America. London: Routledge.

Platt, L. (2002) New Jack Jocks: Rebels, race and the American Athlete. Philadelphia: Temple University Press.

Shropshire, K. (1996) In Black and White: Race and sports in America. London: New York University Press.

Vasili, P. (2000) Colouring Over the White Line: The history of black footballers in Britain. Edinburgh: Mainstream Publishing.

Ward, G., C. (2004) Unforgivable Blackness: The rise and fall of Jack Johnson, New York: Alfred A. Knopf.

Wiggins, D. and Miller, P. (eds.) (2003) The Unlevel Playing Field: A documentary history of the African American experience in sport. Urbana: University of Illinois Press.

Williams, J. (2001) Cricket and Race. Oxford: Berg.

 

Publications

Andrews, D. and Carrington, B. (eds.) (2013) A Companion to Sport, Blackwell, Oxford/Malden.

Carrington, B. (2010) Race, Sport and Politics: The sporting black diaspora, Sage, London/Thousand Oaks.

Carrington, B. and McDonald, I. (eds.) (2009) Marxism, Cultural Studies and Sport, Routledge, London/New York.

Carrington, B. and McDonald, I. (eds.) (2001) “Race”, Sport and British Society, Routledge, London/New York.

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