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Robert Crosnoe, Chair CLA 3.306, Mailcode A1700, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-232-6300

Gloria González-López

Ph.D., University of Southern California

Associate Professor
Gloria González-López

Contact

Biography

My sociological research focuses on the areas of sexuality, gender, Mexican American and Mexican studies, and social inequality. These intellectual projects are inspired by feminist theorizing and research in the social sciences whereby sexuality is considered a social prism through which to explore institutional dynamics in the areas of religion, education, law, family, culture and politics. In my current research project I am conducting an in-depth sociological examination of incest and other forms of sexualized contact (i.e., voluntary and involuntary) within the context of the family in Mexican society. My primary methodological approach is ethnographic, and I also have a special interest in engaging in multidisciplinary conversations on the ethical and methodological issues and concerns researchers encounter while conducting research on sensitive issues. Lastly, I have a special interest in exploring ways in which feminist-informed epistemologies and methodologies in the social sciences have the potential to facilitate individual and collective healing, and social justice through dialogue with emerging critical theories of feminism and engaged research across disciplines. 

Department affiliations: Center for Mexican American Studies, Center for Women's and Gender Studies, and the Teresa Lozano Long Institute of Latin American Studies 

Publications:

Co-edited with AnaLouise Keating. Bridging: How Gloria Anzaldúa’s Life and Work Transformed Our Own. University of Texas Press, 2011.  Visit: www.utexas.edu/utpress/books/keabri.html

Travesías eróticas: La vida sexual de mujeres y hombres migrantes de México. Mexico City: Grupo Editorial Miguel Angel Porrúa, 2009. [Spanish translation of Erotic Journeys]

Erotic Journeys: Mexican Immigrants and Their Sex Lives. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2005. 

Nunca he dejado de tener terror: Sexual Violence in the Lives of Mexican Immigrant Women,” pp. 224-246, in Women and Migration in the U.S.-Mexico Borderlands: A Reader, ed. Denise A. Segura and Patricia Zavella. Duke University Press, 2007. Translated and reprinted in Debate Feminista, Año 19, Vol. 37, Abril 2008, 49-77

 

SOC 395G • Sociology Of Sexual Violence

46445 • Fall 2014
Meets T 300pm-600pm CLA 3.214F
(also listed as WGS 393 )
show description

DESCRIPTION:

Why do we study men and masculinity? Isn’t traditional academic knowledge male biased, anyway? Yes, most scholarship has been androcentric but women’s studies intellectuals have facilitated the emergence of a critical analysis and study of men as men. This course is devoted to a sociological examination of the most important debates and discussions about men’s experiences of masculinity in contemporary patriarchal societies. In this course, we will examine social and individual meanings of masculinity, the dominant paradigms of masculinity that we take as the norm, and the problems, contradictions and paradoxes men experience in modern society. We will examine these themes while looking at the social and cultural dynamics shaped by class, race/ethncity, sexuality, age, and culture in a variety of social contexts and arrangements. Although we will study men representing the diverse cultural groups in the United States, we will pay special attention to the experiences of African American and Latino men. We will examine the privileges as well as the costs of rigid expressions of masculinity. In our discussions we will explore avenues for social justice and change.

REQUIRED TEXTS:     

Kimmel & Messner, Men’s Lives, 7th. Edition, Allyn and Bacon

Additional readings are available in Blackboard (Bb) and the UT Library System

COURSE REQUIREMENTS:

(1) Class participation and attendance 10%

Students are responsible for the following: a) attending all class meetings; b) completing reading assignments on time; and c) participating in small group exercises, and class discussions and assignments.  I will run this class in a way that is similar to graduate seminars.  Therefore, I will deliver a lecture and we will spend a good deal of time discussing the assigned reading.  You are required to analyze materials and lectures as you develop your own critical thinking and views of men’s lives, culture and society.   

(2) Exams 60%

The Exam # 1 (30%) and Exam # 2 (30%) will consist of both multiple choice and short essay questions.  The exams will include all assigned readings, lectures and guest lectures, and any film or video clips covered in class.  The student must obtain the  professor’s permission one week in advance if she/he is not able to attend class on the day of the exam. She/he will then be assigned an alternate day and time to take the exam. Excuses for missing an exam will not be accepted unless the student offers a physician statement or other valid documentation as required by university policies and regulations.  

(3) Final Paper 30%

SOC 321K • Sociology Of Masculinities

46405 • Spring 2014
Meets MW 500pm-630pm CLA 0.122
(also listed as WGS 322 )
show description

DESCRIPTION:

Why do we study men and masculinity? Isn’t traditional academic knowledge male biased, anyway? Yes, most scholarship has been androcentric but women’s studies intellectuals have facilitated the emergence of a critical analysis and study of men as men. This course is devoted to a sociological examination of the most important debates and discussions about men’s experiences of masculinity in contemporary patriarchal societies. In this course, we will examine social and individual meanings of masculinity, the dominant paradigms of masculinity that we take as the norm, and the problems, contradictions and paradoxes men experience in modern society. We will examine these themes while looking at the social and cultural dynamics shaped by class, race/ethncity, sexuality, age, and culture in a variety of social contexts and arrangements. Although we will study men representing the diverse cultural groups in the United States, we will pay special attention to the experiences of African American and Latino men. We will examine the privileges as well as the costs of rigid expressions of masculinity. In our discussions we will explore avenues for social justice and change.

REQUIRED TEXTS:     

Kimmel & Messner, Men’s Lives, 7th. Edition, Allyn and Bacon

Additional readings are available in Blackboard (Bb) and the UT Library System

COURSE REQUIREMENTS:

(1) Class participation and attendance 10%

Students are responsible for the following: a) attending all class meetings; b) completing reading assignments on time; and c) participating in small group exercises, and class discussions and assignments.  I will run this class in a way that is similar to graduate seminars.  Therefore, I will deliver a lecture and we will spend a good deal of time discussing the assigned reading.  You are required to analyze materials and lectures as you develop your own critical thinking and views of men’s lives, culture and society.   

(2) Exams 60%

The Exam # 1 (30%) and Exam # 2 (30%) will consist of both multiple choice and short essay questions.  The exams will include all assigned readings, lectures and guest lectures, and any film or video clips covered in class.  The student must obtain the  professor’s permission one week in advance if she/he is not able to attend class on the day of the exam. She/he will then be assigned an alternate day and time to take the exam. Excuses for missing an exam will not be accepted unless the student offers a physician statement or other valid documentation as required by university policies and regulations.  

(3) Final Paper 30%

 

SOC 395G • Sociology Of Sexual Violence

46415 • Fall 2013
Meets T 300pm-600pm CLA 0.124
(also listed as WGS 393 )
show description

Description

This course examines the different social forces and dynamics responsible for a variety of expressions of sexual violence existing in contemporary society. The goals of this graduate seminar are: (1) to examine these processes promoting sexual violence from feminist-informed sociological perspectives; (2) to explore and analyze the historical, economic, and socio-cultural contexts responsible for these processes; (3) to study the issues and concerns with regard (but not limited) to gender, race and ethnicity, class, sexuality, and political activism associated with sexual violence research in the social sciences; and (4) to discuss and critique published sexual violence research based on qualitative methodologies across disciplines.

Required Texts

Patricia Y. Martin, Rape Work (Routledge)

Josie Mendez-Negrete, Las hijas de Juan (Duke)

Julia O’Connell Davidson, Children in the Global Sex Trade (Polity)

Peggy R. Sanday, Fraternity Gang Rape (NYU Press)

Andrea Smith, Conquest (South End Press)

Kathleen Staudt, Violence and Activism at the Border (UT Press)

Books are available at the University CO-OP.

Additional readings are available in Blackboard (Bb) and the UT Library System.

Grading and Requirements

1)      CLASS PARTICIPATION (20% of grade)

Students are responsible for attending all class meetings, completing all reading assignments on time, and leading their pre-assigned class discussions. We will organize a schedule to ensure that a rotating set of participants comes to class with their reactions to the readings assigned for every day we meet. For their presentations, students will prepare a handout which will include the following: a) the core argument of the assigned book and/or articles; b) their critical opinion/reaction to the readings by examining theoretical paradigms, contributions, limitations, and controversial issues and concerns; and, c) three thought provoking questions that might help promote class discussion. Students in charge of discussion will make copies of their handouts for distribution in class. The handout should not exceed 1 page (2 sides, double space), and it should be 12-point font.

2)      BRIEF PROPOSAL (10% of grade)

Students are required to write a 2-page proposal of their research project (final paper).  Students will bring 2 copies of their 2-page individual proposals (one copy for the professor and one copy for a previously assigned classmate). Papers will be exchanged between both students for feedback purposes. Then, each team will schedule a meeting with the professor to discuss their individual projects and receive her guidance and support. 

 3)      Final paper (70% of grade).

SOC 321K • Sociology Of Masculinities

45765 • Spring 2013
Meets MW 500pm-630pm CLA 0.104
(also listed as WGS 322 )
show description

DESCRIPTION:

Why do we study men and masculinity? Isn’t traditional academic knowledge male biased, anyway? Yes, most scholarship has been androcentric but women’s studies intellectuals have facilitated the emergence of a critical analysis and study of men as men. This course is devoted to a sociological examination of the most important debates and discussions about men’s experiences of masculinity in contemporary patriarchal societies. In this course, we will examine social and individual meanings of masculinity, the dominant paradigms of masculinity that we take as the norm, and the problems, contradictions and paradoxes men experience in modern society. We will examine these themes while looking at the social and cultural dynamics shaped by class, race/ethncity, sexuality, age, and culture in a variety of social contexts and arrangements. Although we will study men representing the diverse cultural groups in the United States, we will pay special attention to the experiences of African American and Latino men. We will examine the privileges as well as the costs of rigid expressions of masculinity. In our discussions we will explore avenues for social justice and change.

REQUIRED TEXTS:     

Kimmel & Messner, Men’s Lives, 7th. Edition, Allyn and Bacon

Additional readings are available in Blackboard (Bb) and the UT Library System

COURSE REQUIREMENTS:

(1) Class participation and attendance 10%

Students are responsible for the following: a) attending all class meetings; b) completing reading assignments on time; and c) participating in small group exercises, and class discussions and assignments.  I will run this class in a way that is similar to graduate seminars.  Therefore, I will deliver a lecture and we will spend a good deal of time discussing the assigned reading.  You are required to analyze materials and lectures as you develop your own critical thinking and views of men’s lives, culture and society.   

(2) Exams 60%

The Exam # 1 (30%) and Exam # 2 (30%) will consist of both multiple choice and short essay questions.  The exams will include all assigned readings, lectures and guest lectures, and any film or video clips covered in class.  The student must obtain the  professor’s permission one week in advance if she/he is not able to attend class on the day of the exam. She/he will then be assigned an alternate day and time to take the exam. Excuses for missing an exam will not be accepted unless the student offers a physician statement or other valid documentation as required by university policies and regulations.  

(3) Final Paper 30%

 

SOC 395G • Sociology Of Sexual Violence

45780 • Fall 2012
Meets T 300pm-600pm BUR 480
(also listed as WGS 393 )
show description

Description

This course examines the different social forces and dynamics responsible for a variety of expressions of sexual violence existing in contemporary society. The goals of this graduate seminar are: (1) to examine these processes promoting sexual violence from feminist-informed sociological perspectives; (2) to explore and analyze the historical, economic, and socio-cultural contexts responsible for these processes; (3) to study the issues and concerns with regard (but not limited) to gender, race and ethnicity, class, sexuality, and political activism associated with sexual violence research in the social sciences; and (4) to discuss and critique published sexual violence research based on qualitative methodologies across disciplines.

Required Texts

Patricia Y. Martin, Rape Work (Routledge)

Josie Mendez-Negrete, Las hijas de Juan (Duke)

Julia O’Connell Davidson, Children in the Global Sex Trade (Polity)

Peggy R. Sanday, Fraternity Gang Rape (NYU Press)

Andrea Smith, Conquest (South End Press)

Kathleen Staudt, Violence and Activism at the Border (UT Press)

Books are available at the University CO-OP.

Additional readings are available in Blackboard (Bb) and the UT Library System.

Grading and Requirements

1)      CLASS PARTICIPATION (20% of grade)

Students are responsible for attending all class meetings, completing all reading assignments on time, and leading their pre-assigned class discussions. We will organize a schedule to ensure that a rotating set of participants comes to class with their reactions to the readings assigned for every day we meet. For their presentations, students will prepare a handout which will include the following: a) the core argument of the assigned book and/or articles; b) their critical opinion/reaction to the readings by examining theoretical paradigms, contributions, limitations, and controversial issues and concerns; and, c) three thought provoking questions that might help promote class discussion. Students in charge of discussion will make copies of their handouts for distribution in class. The handout should not exceed 1 page (2 sides, double space), and it should be 12-point font.

 

2)      BRIEF PROPOSAL (10% of grade)

Students are required to write a 2-page proposal of their research project (final paper). Due date: October 12. Students will bring 2 copies of their 2-page individual proposals (one copy for the professor and one copy for a previously assigned classmate). Papers will be exchanged between both students for feedback purposes. Then, each team will schedule a meeting with the professor to discuss their individual projects and receive her guidance and support. Meetings will take place during the last 2 weeks of October. On September 14, the professor will offer specific instructions on this assignment.

 

3)      Final paper (70% of grade).

SOC 321K • Sociology Of Masculinities

45546 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm BUR 208
(also listed as WGS 322 )
show description

DESCRIPTION:

Why do we study men and masculinity? Isn’t traditional academic knowledge male biased, anyway? Yes, most scholarship has been androcentric but women’s studies intellectuals have facilitated the emergence of a critical analysis and study of men as men. This course is devoted to a sociological examination of the most important debates and discussions about men’s experiences of masculinity in contemporary patriarchal societies. In this course, we will examine social and individual meanings of masculinity, the dominant paradigms of masculinity that we take as the norm, and the problems, contradictions and paradoxes men experience in modern society. We will examine these themes while looking at the social and cultural dynamics shaped by class, race/ethncity, sexuality, age, and culture in a variety of social contexts and arrangements. Although we will study men representing the diverse cultural groups in the United States, we will pay special attention to the experiences of African American and Latino men. We will examine the privileges as well as the costs of rigid expressions of masculinity. In our discussions we will explore avenues for social justice and change.

REQUIRED TEXTS:     

Kimmel & Messner, Men’s Lives, 7th. Edition, Allyn and Bacon

Additional readings are available in Blackboard (Bb) and the UT Library System

COURSE REQUIREMENTS:

Class participation and attendance 10%

Students are responsible for the following: a) attending all class meetings; b) completing reading assignments on time; and c) participating in small group exercises, and class discussions and assignments.  I will run this class in a way that is similar to graduate seminars.  Therefore, I will deliver a lecture and we will spend a good deal of time discussing the assigned reading.  You are required to analyze materials and lectures as you develop your own critical thinking and views of men’s lives, culture and society.   

(2) Exams 60%

The Exam # 1 (30%) and Exam # 2 (30%) will consist of both multiple choice and short essay questions.  The exams will include all assigned readings, lectures and guest lectures, and any film or video clips covered in class.  The student must obtain the  professor’s permission one week in advance if she/he is not able to attend class on the day of the exam. She/he will then be assigned an alternate day and time to take the exam. Excuses for missing an exam will not be accepted unless the student offers a physician statement or other valid documentation as required by university policies and regulations.  

(3) Final Paper 30%

SOC 395G • Sociology Of Sexual Violence

45615 • Fall 2011
Meets W 300pm-600pm BUR 480
(also listed as WGS 393 )
show description

Professor Consent Required

 

This course examines the different social forces and dynamics responsible for a variety of expressions of sexual violence existing in contemporary society. The goals of this graduate seminar are: (1) to examine these processes promoting social violence from feminist-informed sociological perspectives; (2) to explore and analyze the historical, economic, and socio-cultural contexts responsible for these processes; (3) to study the issues and concerns with regard (but not limited) to gender, race and ethnicity, class, sexuality, and political activism associated with sexual violence research in the social sciences; and (4) to discuss and critique published sexual violence research based on qualitative methodologies across disciplines.

SOC 395G • Sociology Of Sexual Violence

46763 • Fall 2009
Meets W 300pm-600pm BUR 480
(also listed as WGS 393 )
show description

Course Description: 

This seminar is designed to help students understand of the nature and causes of gender stratification in industrial societies. In this seminar we examine both theoretical and empirical issues regarding gender inequality in the labor market. Topics to be discussed include changes in female labor force participation, gender segregation in the workplace, gender gaps in earnings and promotions, as well as gender differences in career processes. Because many articles we will read involve statistical analyses, students are expected to be able to read and understand quantitative sociological research at the level of SOC385L or the equivalent. While a large proportion of the readings are based on research in the United States, international comparisons of women’s economic roles also constitute an important part of this seminar. In particular, we address how social institutions that vary from one country to another shape men’s and women’s economic opportunities and thus the degree of gender inequality in the society.    Students are expected to attend class regularly and read the assigned readings prior to the class period during which we will discuss the material. Active participation in class discussions is also required. 

Texts:

The required texts for this course includes books and articles from peer-reviewed sociological journals. The list below shows some of the books required for this course:  

Goldin, Claudia. 1990. Understanding the Gender Gap: An Economic History of American Women. Oxford University Press.

Charles, Maria. and David B. Grusky. 2004. Occupational Ghetto: The Worldwide Segregation of Men and Women. Stanford University Press.

Ogasawara, Yuko. 1998. Office Ladies and Salaried Men: Power, Gender, and Work in Japanese Companies. University of California. 

SOC 395G • Soc Of Sexualities & Methodol

45912 • Spring 2009
Meets T 1200-300pm BUR 231
(also listed as WGS 393 )
show description

Course Description: 

This seminar is designed to help students understand of the nature and causes of gender stratification in industrial societies. In this seminar we examine both theoretical and empirical issues regarding gender inequality in the labor market. Topics to be discussed include changes in female labor force participation, gender segregation in the workplace, gender gaps in earnings and promotions, as well as gender differences in career processes. Because many articles we will read involve statistical analyses, students are expected to be able to read and understand quantitative sociological research at the level of SOC385L or the equivalent. While a large proportion of the readings are based on research in the United States, international comparisons of women’s economic roles also constitute an important part of this seminar. In particular, we address how social institutions that vary from one country to another shape men’s and women’s economic opportunities and thus the degree of gender inequality in the society.    Students are expected to attend class regularly and read the assigned readings prior to the class period during which we will discuss the material. Active participation in class discussions is also required. 

Texts:

The required texts for this course includes books and articles from peer-reviewed sociological journals. The list below shows some of the books required for this course:  

Goldin, Claudia. 1990. Understanding the Gender Gap: An Economic History of American Women. Oxford University Press.

Charles, Maria. and David B. Grusky. 2004. Occupational Ghetto: The Worldwide Segregation of Men and Women. Stanford University Press.

Ogasawara, Yuko. 1998. Office Ladies and Salaried Men: Power, Gender, and Work in Japanese Companies. University of California. 

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