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Robert Crosnoe, Chair CLA 3.306, Mailcode A1700, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-232-6300

Penny A Green

Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin

Senior Lecturer
Penny A Green

Contact

  • Phone: 512-232-6306
  • Office: CLA 3.602
  • Office Hours: MT 1:00-2:30 and by appointment
  • Campus Mail Code: A1700

Interests

Classical Sociological and Modern Evolutionary Theory, Globalization, Widening Income Inequality

SOC 302 • Intro To The Study Of Society

46015-46040 • Fall 2014
Meets MW 100pm-200pm ART 1.102
show description

Description:  

This course introduces the science of Sociology by focusing on five broad topics: (1) What is Sociology? (2) The Individual and Society, (3) Social Institutions, (4) Social Inequality, and (5) Globalization and Social Change.  In the process, we’ll examine important concepts, theories, and methodologies used by sociologists working on both the micro and macro levels.  We’ll look at interconnections between social institutions (i.e., the family, education, the economy), as well as the way in which institutional change has caused widening income inequality in the U.S. and around the world.  Widening inequality has had particularly negative consequences for men of color and women of all races and ethnicities.  Finally, we’ll examine the process of globalization and some of its economic, political, and cultural consequences.  Much of the data that we look at will focus on the U.S., but given our increasingly interconnected world, other societies will be considered as well.  Class format will be primarily lecture, due to class size.  We’ll try to demonstrate Sociology’s relevance to everyday life, as well as public policy making.

Required Readings: 

Introduction to Sociology (2014, 9th ed.) by Giddens, Duneier, Appelbaum, and Carr. W.W. Norton.

Any additional readings will be made available in a packet and/or on Blackboard

Attendance Policy:

 Good academic performance requires regular attendance and punctuality.  Students are allowed three (3) non-penalized absences during the semester (excluding our introductory class meeting), regardless of whether these absences are from lecture or lab.  These non-penalized absences are intended to cover such circumstances as illness, family emergencies, university scheduled events, etc.  Students who miss more than three classes, regardless of the reason, will have their semester grades reduced by one full percentage points for each absence beyond the three allowed.  The one exception to this policy concerns absences for religious reasons, assuming advance, written notification is given. 

Grading Policy:

 Exams (4)             70%               

Pop Quizzes:          15%               

Paper (2-3 pages)  15%

SOC 336C • American Dilemmas

46255 • Fall 2014
Meets MWF 900am-1000am CLA 1.108
(also listed as WGS 345 )
show description

Description:  

This course examines critical American social problems that threaten the very fabric of our collective life as a nation.  These include problems in the economy and political system, social class and income inequality, racial/ethnic inequality, gender inequality and heterosexism, problems in education, and problems of illness and health care.  The course has three main objectives.  One involves providing students with the theoretical and methodological tools needed to critically analyze these problems from a sociological perspective.  A second involves providing students with current data and other information documenting the seriousness of these problems.  The final objective focuses on evaluating social policies addressing these problems (e.g., welfare-to-work programs, pay equity legislation), with special reference to questions of social justice, the common good, as well as public and individual responsibility.  Class format will be a mixture of lecture and discussion, with a strong emphasis upon the latter. 

Required Readings: 

A packet of readings to be purchased from Austin Text Books at 2116 Guadalupe (i.e., the Drag)

Additional readings will be made available on Blackboard

Attendance Policy:

Regular attendance and punctuality are expected.  You’re allowed three absences without penalty during the semester (excluding our introductory class meeting).  The nonpenalized absences are intended to cover such situations as illness, family emergencies, university sponsored trips, etc.  Students who miss more than three classes, regardless of the reason, will have their semester grades reduced by one full percentage points for each absence beyond the three allowed.  The one exception to this policy concerns absences for religious reasons, assuming advance, written notification is given.

Grading Policy:

Four Short Papers (2-3 pages)            65%

Class Participation                             20%

Pop Quizzes                                     15%

SOC S340C • Globalization

87990 • Summer 2014
Meets MTWTHF 1130am-100pm CLA 1.106
(also listed as EUS S346 )
show description

Description:

This course provides a broad overview of the interrelated processes of economic, political, and cultural globalization.  Under the heading of economic globalization, we’ll look at multinational corporations, international financial and trade institutions (i.e., the International Monetary Fund, the World Bank, and the World Trade Organization), and how they facilitate globalization.  We’ll also consider their impact on global inequality.  Moving toward the political, we’ll examine important global problems (e.g., human trafficking, human rights violations, global warming, water privatization), as well as strategies for addressing them.  We’ll pay particular attention to need for cooperation between nation states, intergovernmental organizations, nongovernmental organizations, and grassroots social movements.  Addressing the cultural side of globalization, we’ll  consider how economic and political changes impact national cultures, as well as how these external influences are “localized” when filtered through diverse cultural lenses.  Throughout the course, we’ll pay particular attention to the United States’ role in the global arena, given its status an important economic, political, and cultural force.  Class format will be a mixture of lecture and discussion, with a healthy sprinkling of videos and DVDs.

Required Readings:

 Stiglitz, Joseph E. (2003) Globalization and Its Discontents,  Norton.   (paperback) (tentative)

Smith, Jackie (2008) Social Movements for Global Democracy, Johns Hopkins (paperback) Hopper, Paul (2007) Understanding Cultural Globaliation,  Polity (paperback)

A packet of readings to be purchased from Austin Text Books at 2116 Guadalupe (i.e., the Drag)

Additional readings will be posted on Blackboard.

Attendance Policy:

You’re allowed three (3) non-penalized absences during the session.  If you miss more than three classes, regardless of the reason for the absences, your semester grade will be reduced by one full percentage point for each absence beyond the three allowed.  This policy excepts absences for religious holidays, assuming advance, written notification is given. 

Grading Policy (depending upon class enrollment):

three exams:                      80%                 OR                    three 3-4 page papers:      70%         

pop quizzes:                       20%                                          class participation:            15%                                                                                         pop quizzes:                    15% 

SOC 302 • Intro To The Study Of Society

46245-46270 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 200pm-300pm WCH 1.120
show description

Description:  

This course introduces the science of Sociology by focusing on five broad topics: (1) What is Sociology? (2) The Individual and Society, (3) Social Institutions, (4) Social Inequality, and (5) Globalization and Social Change.  In the process, we’ll examine important concepts, theories, and methodologies used by sociologists working on both the micro and macro levels.  We’ll look at interconnections between social institutions (i.e., the family, education, the economy), as well as the way in which institutional change has caused widening income inequality in the U.S. and around the world.  Widening inequality has had particularly negative consequences for men of color and women of all races and ethnicities.  Finally, we’ll examine the process of globalization and some of its economic, political, and cultural consequences.  Much of the data that we look at will focus on the U.S., but given our increasingly interconnected world, other societies will be considered as well.  Class format will be primarily lecture, due to class size.  We’ll try to demonstrate Sociology’s relevance to everyday life, as well as public policy making.

Required Readings: 

Introduction to Sociology (2009, 8th ed.) by Giddens, Duneier, Appelbaum, and Carr. W.W. Norton.

Any additional readings will be made available in a packet and/or on Blackboard

Attendance Policy:

Good academic performance requires regular attendance and punctuality.  Students are allowed three (3) non-penalized absences during the semester (excluding our introductory class meeting), regardless of whether these absences are from lecture or lab.  These non-penalized absences are intended to cover such circumstances as illness, family emergencies, university scheduled events, etc.  Students who miss more than three classes, regardless of the reason, will have their semester grades reduced by one full percentage points for each absence beyond the three allowed.  The one exception to this policy concerns absences for religious reasons, assuming advance, written notification is given. 

Grading Policy:

Exams (4)            70%              

Pop Quizzes:        15%               

Paper (2-3 pages)  15%                                                       

SOC 302 • Intro To The Study Of Society

45960-46035 • Fall 2013
Meets MW 100pm-200pm ART 1.102
show description

Description:  

This course introduces the science of Sociology by focusing on five broad topics: (1) What is Sociology? (2) The Individual and Society, (3) Social Institutions, (4) Social Inequality, and (5) Globalization and Social Change.  In the process, we’ll examine important concepts, theories, and methodologies used by sociologists working on both the micro and macro levels.  We’ll look at interconnections between social institutions (i.e., the family, education, the economy), as well as the way in which institutional change has caused widening income inequality in the U.S. and around the world.  Widening inequality has had particularly negative consequences for men of color and women of all races and ethnicities.  Finally, we’ll examine the process of globalization and some of its economic, political, and cultural consequences.  Much of the data that we look at will focus on the U.S., but given our increasingly interconnected world, other societies will be considered as well.  Class format will be primarily lecture, due to class size.  We’ll try to demonstrate Sociology’s relevance to everyday life, as well as public policy making.

Required Readings: 

Introduction to Sociology (2009, 8th ed.) by Giddens, Duneier, Appelbaum, and Carr. W.W. Norton.

Any additional readings will be made available in a packet and/or on Blackboard

Attendance Policy:

Good academic performance requires regular attendance and punctuality.  Students are allowed three (3) non-penalized absences during the semester (excluding our introductory class meeting), regardless of whether these absences are from lecture or lab.  These non-penalized absences are intended to cover such circumstances as illness, family emergencies, university scheduled events, etc.  Students who miss more than three classes, regardless of the reason, will have their semester grades reduced by one full percentage points for each absence beyond the three allowed.  The one exception to this policy concerns absences for religious reasons, assuming advance, written notification is given. 

Grading Policy:

Exams (4)            70%              

Pop Quizzes:        15%               

Paper (2-3 pages)  15%                                                       

SOC 336C • American Dilemmas

46220 • Fall 2013
Meets MWF 900am-1000am CLA 0.118
(also listed as URB 354, WGS 345 )
show description

Description:  

This course examines critical American social problems that threaten the very fabric of our collective life as a nation.  These include problems in the economy and political system, social class and income inequality, racial/ethnic inequality, gender inequality and heterosexism, problems in education, and problems of illness and health care.  The course has three main objectives.  One involves providing students with the theoretical and methodological tools needed to critically analyze these problems from a sociological perspective.  A second involves providing students with current data and other information documenting the seriousness of these problems.  The final objective focuses on evaluating social policies addressing these problems (e.g., welfare-to-work programs, pay equity legislation), with special reference to questions of social justice, the common good, as well as public and individual responsibility.  Class format will be a mixture of lecture and discussion, with a strong emphasis upon the latter.  This course carries a writing flag.

Required Readings: 

A packet of readings to be purchased from Austin Text Books at 2116 Guadalupe (i.e., the Drag)

Additional readings will be made available on Blackboard

Attendance Policy:

Regular attendance and punctuality are expected.  You’re allowed three absences without penalty during the semester (excluding our introductory class meeting).  The nonpenalized absences are intended to cover such situations as illness, family emergencies, university sponsored trips, etc.  Students who miss more than three classes, regardless of the reason, will have their semester grades reduced by one full percentage points for each absence beyond the three allowed.  The one exception to this policy concerns absences for religious reasons, assuming advance, written notification is given.

Grading Policy:

Four Short Papers (2-3 pages)               65%

Class Participation                                20%

Pop Quizzes                                        15%

 

SOC S340C • Globalization

88300 • Summer 2013
Meets MTWTHF 1130am-100pm CLA 1.106
(also listed as EUS S346 )
show description

Description:

 This course provides a broad overview of the interrelated processes of economic, political, and cultural globalization.  Under the heading of economic globalization, we’ll look at multinational corporations, international financial and trade institutions (i.e., the International Monetary Fund, the World Bank, and the World Trade Organization), and how they facilitate globalization.  We’ll also consider their impact on global inequality.  Moving toward the political, we’ll examine important global problems (e.g., human trafficking, human rights violations, global warming, water privatization), as well as strategies for addressing them.  We’ll pay particular attention to need for cooperation between nation states, intergovernmental organizations, nongovernmental organizations, and grassroots social movements.  Addressing the cultural side of globalization, we’ll  consider how economic and political changes impact national cultures, as well as how these external influences are “localized” when filtered through diverse cultural lenses.  Throughout the course, we’ll pay particular attention to the United States’ role in the global arena, given its status an important economic, political, and cultural force.  Class format will be a mixture of lecture and discussion, with a healthy sprinkling of videos and DVDs.

Required Readings:

Stiglitz, Joseph E. (2003) Globalization and Its Discontents. Norton.   (paperback)

Smith, Jackie (2008) Social Movements for Global Democracy. Johns Hopkins (paperback) Hopper, Paul (2007) Understanding Cultural Globalization. Polity (paperback)

A packet of readings to be purchased from Austin Text Books at 2116 Guadalupe (i.e., the Drag)

Additional readings will be posted on Blackboard.

Attendance Policy:

 You’re allowed three (3) non-penalized absences during the session.  If you miss more than three classes, regardless of the reason for the absences, your semester grade will be reduced by one full percentage point for each absence beyond the three allowed.  This policy excepts absences for religious holidays, assuming advance, written notification is given. 

Grading Policy (depending upon class enrollment):

Three exams                    80%                         

Pop quizzes:                    20%     

OR                   

Three 3-4 page papers      70%

Class participation             15%

Pop quizzes                     15% 

SOC 302 • Intro To The Study Of Society

45575-45600 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 200pm-300pm WCH 1.120
show description

Course Description

This course introduces the science of Sociology by focusing on five broad topics: (1) What is Sociology?, (2) The Individual and Society, (3) Social Institutions, (4) Social Inequality, and (5) Globalization and Social Change. In the process, we'll examine important concepts, theories, and methodologies used by sociologists working on both the micro and macro levels. We'll look at interconnections between social institutions (i.e., the family, education, the economy), as well as the way in which institutional change has caused widening income inequality in the U.S. and around the world. Widening inequality has had particularly negative consequences for men of color and women of all races and ethnicities. Finally, we'll examine the process of globalization and some of its economic, political, and cultural consequences. Much of the data that we look at will focus on the U.S., but given our increasingly interconnected world, other societies will be considered as well. Class format will be primarily lecture, due to class size. We'll try to demonstrate Sociology's relevance to everyday life, as well as public policy making.

Grading Policy

4 exams 70%


Pop quizzes 15%


Paper (2-3 pages) 15%

Good academic performance requires regular attendance and punctuality. Students are allowed three (3) absences during the semester without penalty (excluding our introductory class meeting), regardless of whether these absences are from lecture or lab. These non-penalized absences are intended to cover such circumstances as illness, family emergencies, university scheduled events, etc. Students who miss more than three classes, regardless of the reason, will have their semester grades reduced by one full percentage points for each absence beyond the three allowed. The one exception to this policy concerns absences for religious reasons, assuming proper notification is given.

Texts

Introduction to Sociology,, 6th ed., Giddens, Duneier, and Appelbaum. W.W. Norton, 2007
Any additional readings will be made available in a packet and/or on Blackboard

SOC 302 • Intro To The Study Of Society

45445-45455 • Fall 2012
Meets MW 100pm-200pm ART 1.102
show description

Course Description

This course introduces the science of Sociology by focusing on five broad topics: (1) What is Sociology?, (2) The Individual and Society, (3) Social Institutions, (4) Social Inequality, and (5) Globalization and Social Change. In the process, we'll examine important concepts, theories, and methodologies used by sociologists working on both the micro and macro levels. We'll look at interconnections between social institutions (i.e., the family, education, the economy), as well as the way in which institutional change has caused widening income inequality in the U.S. and around the world. Widening inequality has had particularly negative consequences for men of color and women of all races and ethnicities. Finally, we'll examine the process of globalization and some of its economic, political, and cultural consequences. Much of the data that we look at will focus on the U.S., but given our increasingly interconnected world, other societies will be considered as well. Class format will be primarily lecture, due to class size. We'll try to demonstrate Sociology's relevance to everyday life, as well as public policy making.

Grading Policy

4 exams 70% 
Pop quizzes 15% 
Paper (2-3 pages) 15%

Good academic performance requires regular attendance and punctuality. Students are allowed three (3) absences during the semester without penalty (excluding our introductory class meeting), regardless of whether these absences are from lecture or lab. These non-penalized absences are intended to cover such circumstances as illness, family emergencies, university scheduled events, etc. Students who miss more than three classes, regardless of the reason, will have their semester grades reduced by one full percentage points for each absence beyond the three allowed. The one exception to this policy concerns absences for religious reasons, assuming proper notification is given.

Texts

Introduction to Sociology,, 6th ed., Giddens, Duneier, and Appelbaum. W.W. Norton, 2007
Any additional readings will be made available in a packet and/or on Blackboard

SOC 321K • Applied Sociology

45525 • Fall 2012
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm BUR 136
show description

Description:

This course provides an introduction to applied sociology, with an emphasis on helping students learn about applications of sociological knowledge and methods in the nonacademic world.  The course will be divided into five basic parts.  The first will address the question of what applied sociology is and why it’s important.  The second will examine the relationship between theory and applied sociology.  In the third part of the course, we’ll look at examples of applied sociology in the areas of criminal justice, the environment, education, health care, community organizing, and diversity in the workplace, among others.  The fourth part of the course will examine careers in applied sociology, both freelance and within the context of organizations.  Finally, we’ll consider some important challenges faced by applied sociologists.  These include working with the media, client interests, political influences, public perceptions, as well as the role of values and ethics.  Class format will be a mixture of lecture, discussion, and group activities.  Speakers from the community will be invited where appropriate.

Required Texts:

Solution Centered Sociology: Addressing Problems Through Applied Sociology (1998) by Stephen F. Steele, Anne Marie Scarisbrick-Hauser, and William J. Hauser. Sage.  (free online in PDF format.)

Applied Sociology: Terms, Topics, Tools, and Tasks (2008) Second Edition.  Steven F. Steele and Jammie Price. Centage.

Doing Sociology: Case Studies in Sociological Practice (2009) edited by Jammie Price, Jeff Breese, and Roger Straus. Lexington Books (tentative)

Attendance Policy:  You’re allowed three (3) absences during the semester without penalty (excluding our introductory class meeting).  These non-penalized absences are intended to cover such circumstances as illness, family emergencies, university scheduled events, etc.  If you miss more than three classes, your semester grade will be reduced by one full percentage points for each absence beyond the three allowed.  The one exception to this policy concerns absences for religious holidays, assuming proper advance notification is given. 

 Grading Policy:  

 Average of two exams 50%

 Average of group projects 35%

 Average of pop quizzes 15%

 

SOC 336C • American Dilemmas

45595 • Fall 2012
Meets MWF 900am-1000am BUR 231
(also listed as URB 354, WGS 345 )
show description

Description:

This course examines critical American social problems that threaten the very fabric of our collective life as a nation.  These include problems in the economy and political system, social class and income inequality, racial/ethnic inequality, gender inequality and heterosexism, problems in education, and problems of illness and health care.  The course has three main objectives.  One involves providing students with the theoretical and methodological tools needed to critically analyze these problems from a sociological perspective.  A second involves providing students with current data and other information documenting the seriousness of these problems.  The final objective focuses on evaluating social policies addressing these problems (e.g., welfare-to-work programs, pay equity legislation), with special reference to questions of social justice, the common good, as well as public and individual responsibility.  Class format will be a mixture of lecture and discussion, with a strong emphasis upon the latter.  This course carries a writing flag.

Required Readings: 

A packet of readings to be purchased from Paradigm at 407 W. 24th St.

Additional readings will be made available on Blackboard

Attendance Policy:

Regular attendance and punctuality are expected.  You’re allowed three absences without penalty during the semester (excluding our introductory class meeting).  The nonpenalized absences are intended to cover such situations as illness, family emergencies, university sponsored trips, etc.  Students who miss more than three classes, regardless of the reason, will have their semester grades reduced by one full percentage points for each absence beyond the three allowed.  The one exception to this policy concerns absences for religious reasons, assuming proper notification is given.

Grading Policy:

Four Short Papers (2-3 pages) 65%

Class Participation 20%

Pop Quizzes 15%

 

SOC S340C • Globalization

88640 • Summer 2012
Meets MTWTHF 1130am-100pm BUR 136
(also listed as EUS S346 )
show description

Description:

This course provides an overview of the interrelated processes of economic, political, and cultural globalization.  Under the heading of economic globalization, we will focus on multinational corporations, international financial and trade institutions (i.e., the International Monetary Fund, the World Bank, and the World Trade Organization), and the manner in which they facilitate globalization.  We will also consider these economic entities’ impact on global inequality and its consequences, including the potential for political instability and terrorism.  Continuing with a political focus, we will examine strategies for addressing global problems (e.g., widening inequality, human trafficking, human rights, global warming, water privatization), paying particular attention to need for cooperation between nation states, NGOs, and especially grassroots social movements.  Addressing the cultural side of globalization, we will look at some of the ways in which economic and political changes impact national cultures, as well as how these changes are localized when filtered through diverse cultural lenses.  In each of the aforesaid areas, we will examine the role of the United States in the global arena, given its status an important economic, political, and cultural force.  Class format will be a mixture of lecture and discussion, with a healthy sprinkling of videos and DVDs.

Required Readings:

Stiglitz, Joseph E. (2003) Globalization and Its Discontents. Norton.   (paperback)

Smith, Jackie (2008) Social Movements for Global Democracy. Johns Hopkins (paperback) Berger, Peter L. and Samuel P. Huntington (2003) Many Globalizations. Oxford.  (paperback) (tentative)

A small packet of prepared readings (To be purchased at Paradigm on 24th St.)

Additional readings on Blackboard will be assigned.

Attendance Policy:

You’re allowed three (3) absences during the session without penalty (excluding our introductory class meeting).  If you miss more than three classes, your semester grade will be reduced by one full percentage point for each absence beyond the three allowed.  The one exception to this policy concerns absences for religious holidays, assuming proper notification is given. 

Grading Policy (depending upon class enrollment):

Three exams 80%

Pop QUizzes   20%

OR

Three 3-4 page papers 70%

Class participation 15%

Pop Quizzes 15%

 

SOC 302 • Intro To The Study Of Society

45385-45405 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 200pm-300pm WCH 1.120
show description

Course Description

This course introduces the science of Sociology by focusing on five broad topics: (1) What is Sociology?, (2) The Individual and Society, (3) Social Institutions, (4) Social Inequality, and (5) Globalization and Social Change. In the process, we'll examine important concepts, theories, and methodologies used by sociologists working on both the micro and macro levels. We'll look at interconnections between social institutions (i.e., the family, education, the economy), as well as the way in which institutional change has caused widening income inequality in the U.S. and around the world. Widening inequality has had particularly negative consequences for men of color and women of all races and ethnicities. Finally, we'll examine the process of globalization and some of its economic, political, and cultural consequences. Much of the data that we look at will focus on the U.S., but given our increasingly interconnected world, other societies will be considered as well. Class format will be primarily lecture, due to class size. We'll try to demonstrate Sociology's relevance to everyday life, as well as public policy making.

Grading Policy

4 exams 70% 
Pop quizzes 15% 
Paper (2-3 pages) 15%

Good academic performance requires regular attendance and punctuality. Students are allowed three (3) absences during the semester without penalty (excluding our introductory class meeting), regardless of whether these absences are from lecture or lab. These non-penalized absences are intended to cover such circumstances as illness, family emergencies, university scheduled events, etc. Students who miss more than three classes, regardless of the reason, will have their semester grades reduced by one full percentage points for each absence beyond the three allowed. The one exception to this policy concerns absences for religious reasons, assuming proper notification is given.

Texts

Introduction to Sociology,, 6th ed., Giddens, Duneier, and Appelbaum. W.W. Norton, 2007
Any additional readings will be made available in a packet and/or on Blackboard

SOC 350M • Sociology Internship Seminar

45620 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm MEZ 1.122
show description

Description:  

 This course provides an opportunity for you to apply the knowledge and skills learned in your sociology and other Liberal Arts classes by serving as an unpaid intern in an agency, organization, or business in the Austin area.  As an intern, you’ll work under the supervision of someone at your agency/organization/business for a minimum of 130 hours during the semester (approximately 10-12 hours per week).  The internship will provide a substantive educational experience that will enable you to utilize your academic training in a real world setting. 

 You’re ultimately responsible for securing your own internship, although the instructor is available suggest possibilities and help you contact people.  The sooner you get started, the better.  You’re strongly encouraged to discuss your proposed internship with the instructor, as she has to approve all placements.  You’ll work with your instructor and supervisor to complete a service learning agreement outlining your learning objectives, duties, and responsibilities. 

 As part of the internship, you’ll attend a seminar aimed at helping you utilize sociological knowledge to analyze your field experiences.   An important objective is cultivating the “sociological imagination” and learning to use it in an applied setting.  The seminar will also provide a forum where your can discuss your field experiences, including problematic ones, with your peers and the instructor.   Several representatives from community organizations will address the seminar.

 Required Readings: 

 Required and optional readings will be made available in a packet and/or on Blackboard.     

 Attendance Policy:

You’re allowed two (2) absences without penalty during the semester.  If you miss more than two classes, your semester grade will be reduced by one percentage point for each absence beyond the two allowed.  There are two exceptions to this policy.  One concerns absences for religious holidays, assuming advance notification is given.  The second involves internship related absences.  If you’re absent due to an exceptional internship requirement, and if you bring a note from your supervisor, I won’t count the absence.  But as a general rule, your supervisor needs to understand that regular seminar attendance is expected.    

Grading Policy:

5 Short Written Assignments (2-3 pages)   25%           Final Paper (8-10 pages)  40%

Seminar participation                               15%           Oral Paper Presentation    10%

Supervisor’s Evaluation                             10%

SOC 302 • Intro To The Study Of Society

45220-45245 • Fall 2011
Meets MW 100pm-200pm ART 1.102
show description

Course Description

This course introduces the science of Sociology by focusing on five broad topics: (1) What is Sociology?, (2) The Individual and Society, (3) Social Institutions, (4) Social Inequality, and (5) Globalization and Social Change. In the process, we'll examine important concepts, theories, and methodologies used by sociologists working on both the micro and macro levels. We'll look at interconnections between social institutions (i.e., the family, education, the economy), as well as the way in which institutional change has caused widening income inequality in the U.S. and around the world. Widening inequality has had particularly negative consequences for men of color and women of all races and ethnicities. Finally, we'll examine the process of globalization and some of its economic, political, and cultural consequences. Much of the data that we look at will focus on the U.S., but given our increasingly interconnected world, other societies will be considered as well. Class format will be primarily lecture, due to class size. We'll try to demonstrate Sociology's relevance to everyday life, as well as public policy making.

Grading Policy

4 exams 70% 
Pop quizzes 15% 
Paper (2-3 pages) 15%

Good academic performance requires regular attendance and punctuality. Students are allowed three (3) absences during the semester without penalty (excluding our introductory class meeting), regardless of whether these absences are from lecture or lab. These non-penalized absences are intended to cover such circumstances as illness, family emergencies, university scheduled events, etc. Students who miss more than three classes, regardless of the reason, will have their semester grades reduced by one full percentage points for each absence beyond the three allowed. The one exception to this policy concerns absences for religious reasons, assuming proper notification is given.

Texts

Introduction to Sociology,, 6th ed., Giddens, Duneier, and Appelbaum. W.W. Norton, 2007
Any additional readings will be made available in a packet and/or on Blackboard

SOC 321K • Applied Sociology

45355 • Fall 2011
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm BUR 208
show description

Description:

This course provides an introduction to applied sociology, with an emphasis on helping students learn about applications of sociological knowledge and methods in the nonacademic world.  The course will be divided into five basic parts.  The first will address the question of what applied sociology is and why it’s important.  The second will examine the relationship between theory and applied sociology.  In the third part of the course, we’ll look at examples of applied sociology in the areas of criminal justice, the environment, education, health care, community organizing, and diversity in the workplace, among others.  The fourth part of the course will examine careers in applied sociology, both freelance and within the context of organizations.  Finally, we’ll consider some important challenges faced by applied sociologists.  These include working with the media, client interests, political influences, public perceptions, as well as the role of values and ethics.  Class format will be a mixture of lecture, discussion, and group activities.  Speakers from the community will be invited where appropriate.

Required Texts:

Solution Centered Sociology: Addressing Problems Through Applied Sociology (1998) by Stephen F. Steele, Anne Marie Scarisbrick-Hauser, and William J. Hauser. Sage.  (free online in PDF format.) Applied Sociology: Terms, Topics, Tools, and Tasks (2008) Second Edition.  Steven F. Steele and Jammie Price. Centage. Doing Sociology: Case Studies in Sociological Practice (2009) edited by Jammie Price, Jeff Breese, and Roger Straus. Lexington Books.

Attendance Policy:  You’re allowed three (3) absences during the semester without penalty (excluding our introductory class meeting).  These non-penalized absences are intended to cover such circumstances as illness, family emergencies, university scheduled events, etc.  If you miss more than three classes, your semester grade will be reduced by one full percentage points for each absence beyond the three allowed.  The one exception to this policy concerns absences for religious holidays, assuming proper advance notification is given. 

Grading Policy:   

Average of two exams       50%

Average of group projects   35%

Average of pop quizzes      15%

SOC 336C • American Dilemmas

45425 • Fall 2011
Meets MWF 900am-1000am BUR 231
(also listed as URB 354, WGS 345 )
show description

This course examines critical American social problems that threaten the very fabric of our collective life as a nation.  These include problems in the economy and political system, social class and income inequality, racial/ethnic inequality, gender inequality and heterosexism, problems in education, and problems of illness and health care.  Special emphasis will be placed on showing how these problems have a disproportionately negative impact on men of color and women.    The course has three main objectives.  One involves providing students with the theoretical and methodological tools needed to critically analyze these problems from a sociological perspective.  A second involves providing students with current data and other information documenting the seriousness of these problems, especially for men of color and women.  The final objective focuses on evaluating social policies addressing these problems (e.g., affirmative action, welfare-to-work programs, pay equity legislation), with special reference to questions of social justice, the common good, as well as public and individual responsibility.  Class format will be a mixture of lecture and discussion, with a strong emphasis upon the latter.  Guest speakers from the community will be invited where applicable.

SOC S340C • Globalization

88695 • Summer 2011
Meets MTWTHF 1130am-100pm BUR 136
(also listed as EUS S346 )
show description

Description:

This course provides an overview of the interrelated processes of economic, political, and cultural globalization.  Under the heading of economic globalization, we will focus on multinational corporations, international financial and trade institutions (i.e., the International Monetary Fund, the World Bank, and the World Trade Organization), and the manner in which they facilitate globalization.  We will also consider these economic entities’ impact on global inequality and its consequences, including the potential for political instability and terrorism.  Continuing with a political focus, we will examine strategies for addressing global problems (e.g., widening inequality, human trafficking, human rights, global warming, water privatization), paying particular attention to need for cooperation between nation states, NGOs, and especially grassroots social movements.  Addressing the cultural side of globalization, we will look at some of the ways in which economic and political changes impact national cultures, as well as how these changes are localized when filtered through diverse cultural lenses.  In each of the aforesaid areas, we will examine the role of the United States in the global arena, given its status an important economic, political, and cultural force.  Class format will be a mixture of lecture and discussion, with a healthy sprinkling of videos and DVDs.

Required Readings:

Stiglitz, Joseph E. (2003) Globalization and Its Discontents. Norton.   (paperback)

Smith, Jackie (2008) Social Movements for Global Democracy. Johns Hopkins (paperback)Berger, Peter L. and Samuel P. Huntington (2003) Many Globalizations. Oxford.  (paperback) (tentative)

 A small packet of prepared readings (To be purchased at Paradigm on 24th St.)

 Additional readings on Blackboard will be assigned.

 Attendance Policy:

You’re allowed three (3) absences during the session without penalty (excluding our introductory class meeting).  If you miss more than three classes, your semester grade will be reduced by one full percentage point for each absence beyond the three allowed.  The one exception to this policy concerns absences for religious holidays, assuming proper notification is given. 

 Grading Policy (depending upon class enrollment):

 three exams:                     80%                 OR                    three 3-4 page papers:      70%         

 pop quizzes:                       20%                                        class participation:           15%                                                                                                            pop quizzes:                    15%  

SOC 302 • Intro To The Study Of Society

45920-45950 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 200pm-300pm WCH 1.120
show description

Course Description

This course introduces the science of Sociology by focusing on five broad topics: (1) What is Sociology?, (2) The Individual and Society, (3) Social Institutions, (4) Social Inequality, and (5) Globalization and Social Change. In the process, we'll examine important concepts, theories, and methodologies used by sociologists working on both the micro and macro levels. We'll look at interconnections between social institutions (i.e., the family, education, the economy), as well as the way in which institutional change has caused widening income inequality in the U.S. and around the world. Widening inequality has had particularly negative consequences for men of color and women of all races and ethnicities. Finally, we'll examine the process of globalization and some of its economic, political, and cultural consequences. Much of the data that we look at will focus on the U.S., but given our increasingly interconnected world, other societies will be considered as well. Class format will be primarily lecture, due to class size. We'll try to demonstrate Sociology's relevance to everyday life, as well as public policy making.

Grading Policy

4 exams 70% 
Pop quizzes 15% 
Paper (2-3 pages) 15%

Good academic performance requires regular attendance and punctuality. Students are allowed three (3) absences during the semester without penalty (excluding our introductory class meeting), regardless of whether these absences are from lecture or lab. These non-penalized absences are intended to cover such circumstances as illness, family emergencies, university scheduled events, etc. Students who miss more than three classes, regardless of the reason, will have their semester grades reduced by one full percentage points for each absence beyond the three allowed. The one exception to this policy concerns absences for religious reasons, assuming proper notification is given.

Texts

Introduction to Sociology,, 6th ed., Giddens, Duneier, and Appelbaum. W.W. Norton, 2007
Any additional readings will be made available in a packet and/or on Blackboard

 

 

SOC 350M • Sociology Internship Seminar

46170 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm MEZ 1.122
show description

Description:  

 

This course provides an opportunity for you to apply the knowledge and skills learned in your sociology and other Liberal Arts classes by serving as an unpaid intern in an agency, organization, or business in the Austin area.  As an intern, you’ll work under the supervision of someone at your agency/organization/business for a minimum of 130 hours during the semester (approximately 10-12 hours per week).  The internship will provide a substantive educational experience that will enable you to utilize your academic training in a real world setting. 

 

You’re ultimately responsible for securing your own internship, although the instructor is available suggest possibilities and help you contact people.  The sooner you get started, the better.  You’re strongly encouraged to discuss your proposed internship with the instructor, as she has to approve all placements.  You’ll work with your instructor and supervisor to complete a service learning agreement outlining your learning objectives, duties, and responsibilities. 

 

As part of the internship, you’ll attend a seminar aimed at helping you utilize sociological knowledge to analyze your field experiences.   An important objective is cultivating the “sociological imagination” and learning to use it in an applied setting.  The seminar will also provide a forum where your can discuss your field experiences, including problematic ones, with your peers and the instructor.   Several representatives from community organizations will address the seminar.

 

Required Readings: 

 

Required and optional readings will be made available in a packet and/or on Blackboard.     

 

Attendance Policy:

 

You’re allowed two (2) absences without penalty during the semester.  If you miss more than two classes, your semester grade will be reduced by one percentage point for each absence beyond the two allowed.  There are two exceptions to this policy.  One concerns absences for religious holidays, assuming advance notification is given.  The second involves internship related absences.  If you’re absent due to an exceptional internship requirement, and if you bring a note from your supervisor, I won’t count the absence.  But as a general rule, your supervisor needs to understand that regular seminar attendance is expected.    

 

Grading Policy:

 

5 Short Written Assignments (2-3 pages)   25%           Final Paper (8-10 pages)  40%

Seminar participation                                  15%           Oral Paper Presentation    10%

Supervisor’s Evaluation                              10%

SOC 321K • Applied Sociology

45495 • Fall 2010
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm BUR 208
show description

Description:

This course provides an introduction to applied sociology, with an emphasis on helping students learn about applications of sociological knowledge and methods in the nonacademic world.  The course will be divided into five basic parts.  The first will address the question of what applied sociology is and why it’s important.  The second will examine the relationship between theory and applied sociology.  In the third part of the course, we’ll look at examples of applied sociology in the areas of criminal justice, the environment, education, health care, community organizing, and diversity in the workplace, among others.  The fourth part of the course will examine careers in applied sociology, both freelance and within the context of organizations.  Finally, we’ll consider some important challenges faced by applied sociologists.  These include working with the media, client interests, political influences, public perceptions, as well as the role of values and ethics.  Class format will be a mixture of lecture, discussion, and group activities.  Speakers from the community will be invited where appropriate.

Required Texts:

Solution Centered Sociology: Addressing Problems Through Applied Sociology (1998) by Stephen F. Steele, Anne Marie Scarisbrick-Hauser, and William J. Hauser. Sage.  (free online in PDF format.)

Applied Sociology: Terms, Topics, Tools, and Tasks (2008) Second Edition.  Steven F. Steele and Jammie Price. Centage.

Doing Sociology: Case Studies in Sociological Practice (2009) edited by Jammie Price, Jeff Breese, and Roger Straus. Lexington Books.

Attendance Policy:  You’re allowed three (3) absences during the semester without penalty (excluding our introductory class meeting).  These non-penalized absences are intended to cover such circumstances as illness, family emergencies, university scheduled events, etc.  If you miss more than three classes, your semester grade will be reduced by one full percentage points for each absence beyond the three allowed.  The one exception to this policy concerns absences for religious holidays, assuming proper advance notification is given. 

Grading Policy:   Average of two exams:    50%
                              Average of two group projects:     35%
                              Average of pop quizzes:      15%
 

SOC 336C • American Dilemmas

45580 • Fall 2010
Meets MWF 900am-1000am BUR 231
(also listed as URB 354, WGS 345 )
show description

COURSE DESCRIPTION: 

This course examines critical American social problems that threaten the very fabric of our collective life as a nation.  These include problems in the economy and political system, social class and income inequality, racial/ethnic inequality, gender inequality and heterosexism, problems in education, and problems of illness and health care.  Special emphasis will be placed on showing how these problems have a disproportionately negative impact on men of color and women.   

The course has three main objectives.  One involves providing students with the theoretical and methodological tools needed to critically analyze these problems from a sociological perspective.  A second involves providing students with current data and other information documenting the seriousness of these problems, especially for men of color and women.  The final objective focuses on evaluating social policies addressing these problems (e.g., affirmative action, welfare-to-work programs, pay equity legislation), with special reference to questions of social justice, the common good, as well as public and individual responsibility.  Class format will be a mixture of lecture and discussion, with a strong emphasis upon the latter.  Guest speakers from the community will be invited where applicable.

SOC 302 • Intro To The Study Of Society

46180-46205 • Spring 2010
Meets TTH 200pm-300pm GSB 2.124
show description

INTRODUCTION TO THE STUDY OF SOCIETY (SOC 302)

Spring 2010

 

Time and Place:  

 

TTH 2:00-2:50 in GSB 2.124 and lab F 9:00-9:50 in JES A205A (46180)
TTH 2:00-2:50 in GSB 2.124 and lab F 10:00-10:50 in UTC 1.118 (46185)

TTH 2:00-2:50 in GSB 2.124 and lab F 11:00-11:50 in RLM 6.114 (46190)
TTH 2:00-2:50 in GSB 2.124 and lab F 1:00-1:50 in PHR 2.114 (46195)
TTH 2:00-2:50 in GSB 2.124 and lab F 2:00-2:50 in GAR 2.112 (46200)
TTH 2:00-2:50 in GSB 2.124 and lab TH 3:30-4:20 in JES A216A (46205)

 

Instructor Info:

 

Dr. Penny A. Green                                        Office Hours: TTH 11:00-12:00 and 5:00-5:30 and by appt.

Office: Burdine 540                                        Email: pennygreen@mail.utexas.edu
Phone:  232-6306 (office); 452-5109 (hm)       

 

Teaching Assistants:  Maria G. Davis, Janice Jeang, and Hyun Jeong Ha

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION

 

This course introduces the science of Sociology by focusing on five broad topics: (1) What is Sociology?,

(2) The Individual in Society, (3) Social Institutions, (4) Social Inequality, and (5) Globalization and Social Change.  In the process, we’ll examine important concepts, theories, and methodologies used by sociologists working on both the micro and macro levels.  We’ll look at interconnections between social institutions (i.e., the family, education, the economy), as well as the way in which institutional change has caused widening income inequality in the U.S. and around the world.  Widening inequality has particularly negative consequences for men of color and women of all races and ethnicities.  Finally, we’ll examine the process of globalization and some of its economic, political, and cultural consequences.  Much of the data that we look at will focus on the U.S., but given our increasingly interconnected world, other societies will be considered as well.  Class format will be a mixture of lecture and discussion, with a strong emphasis on lecture due to class size.   Regardless of the format, I’ll try to demonstrate Sociology’s relevance to everyday life, as well as to public policy making.

 

STUDENT RESPONSIBILITIES:

 

a)      Attendance:  Stellar academic performance requires regular attendance and punctuality.  You’re allowed three non-penalized absences during the semester (excluding our introductory class meeting on January 19th). Save these non-penalized absences to cover such circumstances as illnesses, family emergencies, participation in university sponsored events, and other situations over which you have no control, but which nonetheless cause you to miss class.  Students who miss more than three classes, regardless of the reason, will have their semester grades reduced by one percentage point for each absence beyond the three allowed. The one exception to this attendance policy concerns absences for religious holidays, assuming that proper advance, written notification is provided. Role will be taken on a regular basis, typically daily.  If you come to class or your discussion lab late and have been counted absent, it’s your responsibility to touch base that day with your graduate assistant to ensure you’re marked as present.  If you decide for whatever reason that you can no longer participate in the class, it’s your responsibility to drop the course.  You're free to leave class if I haven't arrived by 2:15, unless other arrangements are announced prior to that time. 

b)  Preparation:  You’re expected to come to class prepared to answer questions about and discuss the assigned readings.  For organized class discussions, you’ll be given questions to think about, which will then be discussed within your assigned group.  Your TAs and I will add between one and three full percentage points to the semester grades of students who distinguish themselves through class participation.    

 

GRADING:

 

a)  Exams:  You'll take four exams during the semester, which will cover my lectures, your group discussions, and your assigned readings.  Roughly half the questions will come from lecture/discussion and the other half will come from your readings.  If there’s a slant in terms of the selection of questions, the slant will be in the direction of material covered in lecture/discussion.  Exams will include multiple-choice and true/false questions, with a heavy emphasis on multiple-choice.  If you miss an exam, it's your responsibility to contact your graduate assistant ASAP to schedule a makeup.  You should plan on taking your makeup exam prior to the subsequent scheduled exam.  The average of your four exams will count for 70% of your semester grade.

 

b)  Short Paper: You’ll write a short (2-3 typed, double-spaced pages) research paper on a topic of your choice.  Your topic should be selected from the topics covered in the text, but it does not need to be a topic that we  cover in class.  Specific guidelines for writing you paper will be posted on Blackboard.  Your paper grade will count for 15% of your semester grade.  Papers are due on Tuesday, April 27th though they may be turned in sooner.  Late papers are penalized at the rate of one point per day, regardless of why they’re late.

 

c)  Pop Quizzes:  There’ll be an unspecified number of pop quizzes during the semester.  These will cover the previous day's lecture and/or the current reading assignment, typically both.  Makeups will not be given for missed pop quizzes, regardless of why the quiz was missed, but your lowest quiz grade will be dropped.  The average of your pop quizzes will count for 15% of your semester grade.

 

d)  Grading Scale:  93-100  A                   73-76  C

                               90-92    A-                  70-72  C-

                               87-89    B+                  67-69  D+
                               83-86    B                    63-66  D

                               80-82    B-                   60-62  D-

                               77-79    C+                  < 60    F

**Please note that you must earn at least a C in this class in order to meet the SOC 302 requirement for a major in Sociology.  A “C-“ will not meet the requirement for the major.**
                                                       

DEADLINES

 

Monday, March 15th is the last day to drop this or any other course without possible academic penalty.  Monday, March 29th is the last day to change registration in a course to or from the pass/fail basis.  It is also the last day that a student can, with the Dean’s approval, drop a course or withdraw from the university, except for urgent, substantiated, non-academic reasons.  (See General Information, Chapter Four)
 

SUGGESTIONS AND MATTERS OF POLICY: 

 

a)  If you run across a word that you don't know, look it up.  I strongly encourage using dictionaries. 

 

 

b)  You need to take good notes.  See me or your graduate assistant immediately if you suspect you might be having trouble.  Don't get behind.  It’s a good idea to review your notes at least once between class periods.  Getting into this habit will enable you to identify gaps and locate material you don't understand.  Touch base with me or your TA to fill in gaps and clarify problem areas. 

c)  There's no such thing as a stupid or inappropriate question.

 

d)     Neither I nor my TAs lend out our notes.  If you miss class, make arrangements to copy another student's notes.  We'll be happy to go over them with you and answer any questions you may have.

 

e)      You’re responsible for any material covered, as well as any assignments and/or announcements made during your absences.

 

f)       If you tell me or your TA that you’re going to miss a future class, we’ll acknowledge what you tell us.  This acknowledgment does not, however, excuse the absence.   It will count unless it’s for a religious holiday, in which case we’ll need advance, written notification.    

 

g)  Only one person talks at a time.  Whoever "has the floor" deserves the attention of the entire class.  If you have a question or if you need something repeated, please don’t ask your neighbor.  Raise your hand and ask me or your TA.  We’ll be happy to go back over it for you.

 

h)  Cheating is considered a very serious matter and will be dealt with appropriately.

 

i)  If you have a disability requiring accommodations, please let me know not later than Tuesday, January 26th.   Please be prepared at that time, or shortly thereafter, to provide appropriate documentation.  Otherwise, you’ll take exams and quizzes under the same conditions as everyone else.     

 

j)        If class is unexpectedly cancelled, the scheduled activity (e.g., reading assignment, discussion, exam) will automatically carry over to the next day of class.

 

k)  Please turn your cell phone off during class, unless you have a compelling reason to keep it on.

 

l)  I don’t give exams early.  Please don’t ask.

 

REQUIRED READINGS:

 

Anthony Giddens, Mitchell Duneier, Richard Appelbaum, and Deborah Carr  (2009) Introduction to Sociology (Seventh Edition)

Additional readings may be assigned.

 

Note:  Specific reading assignments will be made on a daily basis.

 

                                               TENTATIVE CLASS SCHEDULE

January        19                I.  Course Introduction

                                       II. Studying Sociology

 

                   21                  Chapt. 1: “What is Sociology?”

                   21 & 22         Organized Discussions

 

                   26                  Finish Chapt. 1 and Start Chapt. 2: “Asking and Answering Sociological Questions”   

 

                   28                  Finish Chapt. 2

        

                   28 & 29         Organized Discussions      

 

                                       III.  The Individual in Society 

 

February      2                   Chapt. 3: “Culture and Society”

 

           4                   Finish Chapt. 3

 

                   4 & 5            Organized Discussions

 

                   9                 Chapt. 5:  “Social Interaction and Everyday Life”

                   11                 Finish Chapt. 5

                   11 & 12        Organized Discussions and Review                 

 

                   16                 First Exam

 

                                       IV.  Social Institutions

 

                   18               Chapt. 14:  “Work and Economic Life”

 

                 18 & 19      Organized Discussions       

 

           23               Finish Chapt. 14

 

                    25               Start Chapt. 15:  “Family and Intimate Relationships”           

 

                   25 & 26       Organized Discussions

March           2                Finish Chapt. 15

 

                     4               Chapt. 16:  “Education and the Mass Media”

                    4 & 5         Organized Discussions

                    9               Finish Chapt. 16

                    11               Second Exam

                  
12 & 13       (go over exams)

 

                              Spring Break!!

                        V. Social Inequality

          23             Chapt. 8: “Stratification, Class, and Inequality”

          25             Finish Chapt. 8           

 

          25 & 26     Organized Discussions

 

          30              Chapt: 10:  “Gender Inequality”            

 

April    1              Finish Chapt. 10

 

           1 & 2       Organized Discussions                   

 

              6              Chapt.  11: “Ethnicity and Race”                   

 

            8              Finish Chapt. 11

            8 & 9     Organized Discussions and Review

 

                   13                Third Exam

 

                        VI.  Globalization and Social Change                      

 

                   15             Chapt. 19: “Urbanization, Population, and the Environment”

                   15 & 16     Organized Discussions                         

 

                   20             Finish Chapt. 19

                   22             Chapt: 20: “Globalization in a Changing World”

                   22 & 23    Organized Discussions

 

                   27             Finish Chapt. 20 (Due Date for Papers)

 

                   29             Chapt. 9  “ Global Inequality”                

 

May              4              Finish Chapt. 9 and course evaluation

                     6              Fourth Exam  

                     6 & 7        (no labs)                

SOC 317L • Intro To Social Statistics

46295 • Spring 2010
Meets TTH 930-1100 BUR 224
(also listed as SSC 305 )
show description

AN INTRODUCTION TO SOCIAL STATISTICS

 

SOC 317L /SSC 305                                                    Dr. Penny A. Green

Uniques: 46295/59184                                                 Office: Burdine 540

9:30-10:45 TTH, BUR 224                                          Office Hours: TTH 11:00-12:00, 5:00-5:30, and by appt.

Lab 3:30-4:20 T, BUR 116                                          Phone:  232-6306 (office), 452-5109 (hm)

Spring 2010                                                                  Email: pennygreen@mail.utexas.edu

                                                                                      TA:  Celia Hubert Lopez

 

                                                                                        

SYLLABUS

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

 

This course introduces you to the basics of both descriptive and inferential statistics, as well as the fundamentals of probability which connect the two.  Descriptive statistics involve organizing and summarizing important characteristics of a data set.  Inferential statistics involve making informed guesses about unknown population parameters based on information acquired from samples.  We’ll emphasize descriptive and inferential statistical procedures commonly used to inform social policy.  In the process, we’ll examine the assumptions underlying these procedures, the types of hypotheses that can be tested by using them, and the inferences that can be drawn from their results. This course emphasizes an understanding of statistics that goes beyond simple memorization.  This will be accomplished by engaging you in guided learning activities in the classroom, as well as providing opportunities to work with real data sets.   

                          

STUDENT RESPONSIBILITIES:

 

Attendance and Participation:  Regular attendance and punctuality are expected.  You're allowed a total of four non-penalized absences during the semester (excluding our introductory class meeting on January 19th), regardless of the reason for the absences, or whether the absences are from class or labStudents who miss more than four classes will have their semester grades reduced by one full percentage point for each absence beyond the four allowed.  In accordance with University policy, the one exception to this attendance policy concerns absences for religious holidays, assuming advance, written notification is given. 

 

Role will be taken in both class and lab.  If you’re late, it’s your responsibility to touch base with me or

my TA to make sure you’re counted as present.  You're free to leave class if I haven’t arrived by 9:45 or if Celia hasn’t arrived by 3:45, unless other arrangements are announced prior to those times.

 

*Celia and I will add between one and three full percentage points to the semester grades of students who distinguish themselves through exemplary class participation.     

 

GRADING:

 

a)  Exams:  You'll take three non-cumulative exams during the semester, plus a required, comprehensive final exam.  The three non-cumulative exams will have both a “take-home” and an “in-class” component.  The “take-home” part of your exams will require you to work with provided data sets.  You’ll have about a week to work on your take home exams.  They’re due on the date specified, with late submissions being penalized at the rate of one point per day, regardless of why they’re late.  The average of your three take-home exam components will count for 30% of your semester grade.

 

 

 

 

The “in-class” part of your exams will include short answer, fill-in-the-blank, true-false, multiple choice, interpretation and possibly calculation questions.  If calculations are included, the necessary formulas and tables will be provided, but you'll need to bring a calculator.  If you miss an in-class exam, contact Celia to schedule a makeup.  If at all possible, you should take your makeup exam before the exams are graded and gone over in lab, which will typically be about a week after the exam date.  The average of your three in-class exam components will count for 30% of your semester grade.

 

You’ll also take a comprehensive final exam given during the university scheduled final exam slot.  Your grade on this comprehensive final exam will count for 15% of your semester grade. 

 

b)  Homework:  You’ll turn in five homework assignments during the semester.  These homework assignments will assess your ability to work computational problems using small data sets.  In preparation for these homework problems, you’ll be given similar “practice problems” to work on your own.  You can check your work against the solutions to these practice problems, which will be provided.  You’ll be given about 3-4 days to complete your homework problems.  Your lowest homework grade will be dropped. The average of your four highest homework grades will count for 25% of your semester grade.

*Please note that the “take-home” components of your exams, as well as some of your practice and homework problems, will require that you work with Excel.  In lab, Celia will be showing you how to use Excel to organize data and run basic statistical analyses.  If you don’t have Excel on your computer, you can purchase Microsoft Office from the Campus Computer Store in FAC.  There are also many well written introductory books on Excel that you may find useful.

 

c)   Grading Scale:            93-100     A                                73-76      C                               
                                            90-92      A-                               70-72      C-

                                            87-89      B+                               67-69      D+
                                            83-86      B                                 63-66      D

                                            80-82      B-                                60-62      D-
                                            77-79      C+                                <60        F

 

**Please note that in order for this class to meet the Soc 317L requirement for a major in Sociology, you must earn at least a “C” in the class.  A “C-“ will not meet the requirement.** 

 

DEADLINES:

 

Wednesday, February 3rd is the last day to drop a course for a possible refund.  Monday, February 15th is the last day to drop this or any other course without possible academic penalty.  Monday, March 29th is the last day to change registration in a course to or from the pass/fail basis.  It is also the last day that a student can, with the Dean’s approval, drop a course or withdraw from the university, except for urgent, substantiated, non-academic reasons.  (See General Information, Chapter Four for qualifications concerning these deadlines). 

 

SUGGESTIONS AND MATTERS OF POLICY:

 

1.  Your text uses a number of symbols and definitions.  You need to learn these as you go along.  Otherwise, your reading won't make any sense.  Plan on reading each assignment at least twice before class. 

 

2.  You need to take good notes.  Touch base with me or Celia if you think you’re having a problem.  You should plan on reviewing your notes at least once between each class period.  This will enable you to identify gaps in your notes and locate material you don't understand.  Touch base with one of us to fill in the gaps and clarify problem areas. 

 

3.  There's no such thing as a stupid question, especially in statistics.  Statistics is a course that builds on previously learned material, so if you don’t understand something we’re covering now, subsequent material will be confusing as well.

4.  Neither I nor Celia lend out our notes.  If you miss class, arrange to copy another student's notes.  We'll be happy to go over them with you and answer any questions that you have. 

 

5.  You’re responsible for any material covered, as well as any assignments or announcements made during your absences. 

 

6.  Only one person talks at a time.  Whoever “has the floor” deserves the attention of the entire class. 

 

7.  Cheating is considered a very serious matter and will be dealt with accordingly.

 

8.  If you currently have a disability requiring accommodations, please let me know not later than Tuesday, January 26th.  Be prepared at that time, or shortly thereafter, to provide appropriate documentation.  Otherwise, you’ll be evaluated under the same conditions as everyone else.  You may request accommodations through Services for Students with Disabilities (471-6259).     

 

9.  If class is canceled unexpectedly, the scheduled activity (e.g., reading assignment, exam) will automatically carry over to the next day of class, unless you’re informed otherwise.

 

10.  I don’t give exams early; please don’t ask. 

 

11.  Please make backup copies of any work done on the computer.

 

12.   Please turn your cell phone off during class and lab, unless you have a compelling reason to leave it on.

 

13.   If you need to speak with me outside of office hours, the best place to reach me is at home (452-5109).  Anytime from about 9:00 AM ‘till 7:00 PM is OK.  If I’m not there when you call, leave a clear message; and I’ll get back with you promptly.

 

REQUIRED MATERIALS:

 

Robert Johnson and Patricia Kuby (2008) Just the Essentials of Elementary Statistics (10th ed.)

 

Specific reading assignments will be made on a daily basis.  Please bring your calculator to both class and lab.

 

TENTATIVE CLASS SCHEDULE

 

January 19                   I.  Course Introduction

 

                                    

 

                                    II.  Descriptive Statistics

             

21, 26                               J&K, Chapter 1: “Statistics”

 

28, February 2,               J&K, Chapter 2: “Descriptive Analysis and Presentation of Single Variable                                                                                                                                                                                                                

4                                     Data” (omit sections 2.2 and 2.6)

 

9                                     First Homework Due  (covering chapters 1 and 2)

 

9, 11, 16, 18                  J&K, Chapter 3: “Descriptive Analysis of Bivariate Data”

 

23                                   First “in class” Exam (covering chapters 1, 2, and 3)
                                       Second Homework Due by 4:30 pm (covering chapter 3)
 

 

25                                  First “take home” Exam Due by 4:30 pm (covering chapters 1, 2, and 3) (no class)

 

                                  III.  Probability                           

March 2, 4                   J&K, Chapter 4: “Probability” (omit section 4.7)

 

9, 11                            J&K, Chapter 6: “Normal Probability Distributions” (omit section 6.6)

16, 18                          J&K, Chapter 7: “Sample Variability”

 

23                                Second “in class” Exam (covering chapters 4, 6, and 7)
                                    Third Homework Due by 4:30 pm (covering chapters 4, 6, and 7)


25                                Second “take home” Exam Due by 4:30 pm (no class)   

 

                               IV.  Inferential Statistics

30, April 1                   J&K, Chapter 8: “Introduction to Statistical Inferences” (omit section 8.5)

6, 8, 13                        J&K, Chapter 9: “Inferences Involving One Population” (omit section 9.3)

15                                  Fourth Homework Due by 4:30 pm (covering chapters 8 and 9)

15, 20, 22                   J&K, Chapter 10: “Inferences Involving Two Populations”

27, 29, May 4            J&K, Chapter 11: “Applications of Chi Square”

6                                  Third “in class” Exam (covering chapters 8, 9, 10, 11)
                                    Fifth Homework Due by 4:30 pm (covering chapters 10 and 11)

11                                Third “take home” Exam Due by 4:30 pm (covering chapters 8, 9, 10, and 11)

13                                Comprehensive Final Exam (9:00-12:00)

                                    (This University scheduled date and time is tentative, though very probable.)

SOC 350N • Sociology Internship Seminar

46455 • Spring 2010
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm MEZ 1.122
show description

SOCIOLOGY INTERNSHIP SEMINAR

 

Sociology 350M                                                              Dr. Penny A. Green

Unique: 46455                                                                 Office: Burdine 540

TTH 3:30-4:45                                                                 Phone: 232-6306 (office); 452-5109 (hm)

MEZ 1.122                                                                      Office Hours:  TTH 11:00-12:00, 5:00-5:30 and by appt.                                                                                                  

Spring 2010                                                                     Email: pennygreen@mail.utexas.edu

                                                                                             

SYLLABUS


COURSE DESCRIPTION:

 

This course provides an opportunity for you to apply the knowledge and skills learned in your sociology and other Liberal Arts classes by serving as an unpaid intern in an agency, organization, or business in the Austin area.  As an intern, you’ll work under the supervision of someone at your agency/organization/business for a minimum of 130 hours during the semester (approximately 9-10 hours per week).  The internship will provide a substantive educational experience that will enable you to utilize your academic training in a real world setting. 

 

You’re ultimately responsible for securing your own internship, I’m available suggest possibilities and help you contact people.  The sooner you get started, the better.  You’re strongly encouraged to discuss your proposed internship with me, as I have to approve all placements.  You’ll work with me and your supervisor to complete a service learning agreement outlining your learning objectives, duties, and responsibilities. 

 

As part of the internship, you’ll attend a seminar aimed at helping you utilize sociological knowledge to analyze and understand your field experiences.   An important objective is cultivating the “sociological imagination” and learning to use it in an applied setting.  The seminar will also provide a forum where your can discuss your field experiences, including problematic ones, with your peers and the instructor.   Additionally, the seminar will help you translate your academic knowledge and internship experiences into an impressive, job relevant resume.  Several representatives from community organizations will address the seminar.

 

 

ATTENDANCE:

 

Regular attendance and punctuality are expected.  You’re allowed two (2) absences during the semester without penalty, excluding our introductory class meeting on January 19th.  These non-penalized absences are intended to cover such circumstances as illnesses, family emergencies, job interviews, etc.  Students who miss more than two classes, regardless of the reason for the absences, will have their semester grades reduced by one percentage point for each absence beyond the two allowed.  There are two exceptions to this attendance policy.  The first concerns absences for religious holidays, assuming that proper advance, written notification is given.  This is University policy.  The second concerns internship related absences.  If you miss class because of an exceptional internship requirement, and if you bring me a signed note from your supervisor verifying why you were not in class, I will not count the absence.  As a general rule, however, your internship supervisor needs to understand that in order to receive course credit, you are expected to be in class on a regular basis. 

 

You're free to leave if I haven't arrived by 3:45, unless other arrangements are announced prior to that time.

 

GRADING:

 

a.  Five (5) journal assignments:  The purpose of these assignments is to encourage you to reflect upon your internship and how your work experiences are relevant to material you have learned in the classroom.   Each journal assignment will run 2-3 typed, double-spaced pages.  Late assignments are penalized at the rate of one point per day, regardless of why they are late.  The average of your five assignments will count for 25% of your semester grade.

 

b.  Seminar participation:  You’re expected to come to class prepared to discuss any assigned readings, as well as relevant experiences in your internship.  Emphasis will be placed on what you have learned and how this learning relates to sociological, and where applicable, other social science knowledge that you have acquired in the classroom or through your own readings.  Your contributions will be evaluated in terms of quality and quantity.  Seminar participation will count for 15% of your semester grade.

 

c.  Final paper:  You’ll write a paper that incorporates some aspect of your internship with relevant sociological and, if applicable, other social science knowledge.  Papers should be between 8-10 typed, double-spaced pages, plus references.  Paper topics should be discussed with and approved by your professor in advance.

Final papers are due on May 7th, with late papers being penalized at the rate of one point per day, regardless of why they are late.  Your final paper will count for 40% of your semester grade.

 

d.  Presentation of final paper:  You will make an 8-10 minute presentation of your paper to the seminar.  Your presentations will be evaluated in terms of both content and style.  Content will account for 70% of your presentation grade; style will account for 30%.  Your paper presentation will account for 10% of your semester grade.

 

e.  Evaluation by Agency/Organization Supervisor:  Near the end of the semester, your supervisor will be given an evaluation form to complete and return to your instructor.  Part of that evaluation will involve assigning a numerical grade to your overall performance.  That numerical grade will account for 10% of your semester grade. 

 

f)  Grading Scale:       93-100   A                             73-76  C

                                    90-92    A-                            70-72  C-

                                    87-89    B+                           67-69  D+

                                    83-86    B                             63-66  D

                                    80-82    B-                            60-62  D+

                                    77-79    C+                           < 60    F

                       

 DEADLINES

 

Monday, February 15th is the last day to drop this or any other course without possible academic penalty.  Monday, March 29th is the last day to change registration in a course to or from the pass/fail basis.  It is also the last day that a student can, with the Dean’s approval, drop a course or withdraw from the university, except for urgent, substantiated, non-academic reasons.  (See General Information, Chapter Four for qualifications concerning these deadlines). 

 

 

SUGGESTIONS AND MATTERS OF POLICY: 

 

 1.  As a student intern, you are representing The University of Texas at Austin.  Please take this responsibility very seriously.  You’re expected to behave professionally and maintain the highest standards for your work.

 

2.  There's no such thing as a stupid or inappropriate question.  When discussing controversial issues, we will show respect for each other and our opinions, even if we do not share those opinions. 

 

3.  You’re responsible for any material covered, as well as any assignments and/or announcements made during your absences.

 

4.  If you tell me in advance that you’re going to miss class, I’ll acknowledge what you say.  This acknowledgment does not, however, excuse the absence.  It will be counted unless it’s for a religious holiday or concerns your internship, under the conditions indicated previously.

 

5.  Only one person talks at a time.  Whoever "has the floor" deserves everyone’s attention.

 

6.  If you have a disability requiring special accommodations, please let me know not later than Tuesday, January 26th or as soon as you receive your accommodations letter from SSD.  Otherwise, you’ll be evaluated under the same conditions as everyone else.     

 

7.  If class is unexpectedly cancelled, the scheduled activity (e.g., reading assignment, discussion) will automatically carry over to the next class, unless you are notified otherwise.

 

8.  Please turn your cell phone off during class, unless you have a compelling reason to keep it on.

 

9.  Cheating is considered a very serious matter and will be dealt with accordingly.

 

READINGS:

 

All required and optional reading will be made available in a very small course packet or on Blackboard.

 

                                               TENTATIVE CLASS SCHEDULE

 

January 19      Course Introduction:  internship sites and service learning agreements

 

             21     Work with students still needing to secure internships (no seminar for students with internships)

             26     Work with students with internships on service learning agreements  (no seminar for students                               without internships)


             28     The value of service learning and its relationship to classroom experiences.

Feb         2     Work with students to finalize service learning agreements.
 

 

 4   Review major theoretical perspectives in Sociology, with an emphasis on their applicability in            applied settings.

 

              9    In-class exercise and/or discuss assigned reading


             11    Guest speaker

           
             16   First Journal Entry Due—reflection and discussion (deadline for submitting signed service                            learning agreements)

 

             18   In-class exercise and/or discuss assigned reading

             23   Guest speaker

             25    Second Journal Entry Due—reflection and discussion

March     2    In-class exercise and/or discuss assigned reading

               4    Guest speaker              

               

March  9   Third Journal Entry Due—reflection and discussion

             11    Midterm progress assessment meetings with students  (no seminar)

                                      SPRING BREAK!!

              23   Midterm progress assessment meetings with students  (no seminar)

              25   In-class exercise and/or discuss assigned reading

              30   Guest speaker

April        1   Fourth Journal Entry Due—reflection and discussion

                 6   In-class exercise and/or discuss reading assignment

                 8  Meet individually with students to discuss paper topics  (no seminar)

                13  Meet individually with students to discuss paper topics  (no seminar)

                15   Fifth Journal Entry Due—reflection and discussion

                20  Making an effective presentation

                22  Paper presentations and discussion

 

                27  Paper presentations and discussion

                29  Paper presentations and discussion

May           4  Class discussion critiquing organizations’ procedures for carrying out their missions.

                  6  Class discussion critiquing organizations’ procedures for carrying out their missions.  

                      (Final Papers Due)

 

                                   

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