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Robert Crosnoe, Chair CLA 3.306, Mailcode A1700, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-232-6300

Jiwon Jeon

Ph.D., University of Wisconsin-Madison

Lecturer

Contact

SOC 321G • Global Health Issues/Systems

46167 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm CBA 4.344
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 Course Description

 This course provides an overview of global health challenges in the world today. It is essential to understand the links between health and education, poverty, and development with an appreciation of the values, beliefs, and cultures of diverse groups. The first half of the course will review critical global health issues from biosocial, cultural and environmental perspectives. A biosocial approach to global health equity is the underlying theme. The second half of the course will review various health systems in the World Health Organization geographic regions and will compare and contrast the various regions, as well as countries within regions, with regard to the specific health challenges they face.

This course carries both the Writing Flag and Global Cultures flag. We will use writing to improve on critical thinking skills and understanding of global health issues as well as to improve on ability to formulate ideas with an emphasis on the ASA writing style.  In this class, you can expect to write regularly during the semester, complete substantial writing projects, and receive feedback from your instructor to help you improve your writing. You will also have the opportunity to revise one or more assignments, and you may be asked to read and discuss your peer’s work. Global Cultures courses are designed to increase your familiarity with cultural groups outside the United States. You should therefore expect a substantial portion of your grade to come from writing assignments covering the practices, beliefs, and histories of at least one non-U.S. cultural group.

Course Objectives

 Describe global health issues, trends, and policies

  1. Understand how population growth, disease, environmental changes, and economic and political activities impact global health
  2. Assess and analyze global health program interventions and their impacts
  3. Compare and contrast health issues and policies between economically developed countries and developing countries
  4. Synthesize findings to highlight common patterns and unique differences in health challenges between and within major world regions

 Required Text and Readings

Farmer, Paul., J.Y. Kim, A. Kleinman and M. Basilico. 2013. Reimagining Global Health: An Introduction, University of California Press

Skolnik, Richard. 2011. Global Health 101. Sudbury, MA: Jones and Bartlett Publishers

Recommended readings

 Kidder, Tracy. 2009 Mountains Beyond Mountains: The quest of Dr. Paul Farmer, A man who would cure the world, Random House

Reid, T.R. 2010 The Healing of America, Penguin Books

Additional readings:  In addition to above textbooks, other course materials including additional readings will be posted on Blackboard each week.  Readings should be completed for the week they are assigned.

Course requirements

There are two major paper assignments and one exam. The assignments are due at the beginning of the class and must be turned in as hard copies.  Please do not submit papers as e-mail attachments. Late papers will be marked down one letter grade for each day past the deadline. Papers more than one week late will not be accepted.

Assignment 1 (25%)

Each student is required to write a research paper (5-6 pages) about global health issues. This assignment should allow the student to examine the rise and fall of global health issues with a more critical view.  There will be peer reviews (5%) as well as instructor comments on this assignment.  You will submit a memo detailing your revision with the final draft.  Detailed instructions and criteria for evaluation will be posted on Blackboard

                                

  • Assignment 2: Group Project Paper & Presentation (30%)
    • Paper (15%)
    • Presentation (10%)
    • Peer evaluation (5%)

Students are required to form a group to prepare a short presentation at the end of the semester and to write a research paper (not more than 10 pages). Students should work together as a team to analyze the political, social and economic determinants of health and analyze how delivery systems for preventive and curative health services might be strengthened in developing countries. Group members will conduct an evaluation of their fellow group members for the final project and presentation. Detailed instructions and criteria for the group project and criteria for evaluation will be posted on Blackboard

 Exam 20%

Class Participation 25%

Discussion group summary 15%

Class participation: contribution during class discussions 10%

Assignment 1 (mentioned above) 25%

Assignment 2 (mentioned above) 30%

There will be small group discussions during class and each student will submit a short written summary report.  Each member will be encouraged to participate and contribute substantially to small group discussi

SOC 354K • Sociology Of Health & Illness

46288 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm ART 1.110
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Course Description

This course provides an introduction to central topics in the sociology of health and illness. The material covered in this course will encompass individual, institutional and theoretical approaches to health & illness.  The course is designed to provide a critical framework for exploring how social, political, economic and cultural forces shape the understanding and experience of health and illness.  We will explore the following themes: 1) the social production and distribution of disease and illness; 2) the meaning and experience of illness; 3) the social organization of medical care; 4) health politics and health systems.

Course Objectives

At the completion of this course, the student will learn and understand:

  1. how the concepts of health and illness are socially constructed
  2. how social, political and economic factors shape an individual’s experience of health and illness
  3. the major methods and theories used to understand the distribution of health and illness in society
  4. the structure and organization of the health care system and the construction of medical knowledge from a critical perspective

Required Text and Readings

Conrad, Peter & Valerie Leiter. 2013.  The Sociology of Health and Illness: Critical Perspectives (9th Ed.) Worth Publishers (ISBN-10: 1-4292-5527-7).

Additional readings:  In addition to above textbooks, other course materials including additional readings will be posted to Blackboard each week.  Readings should be completed for the week they are assigned.

Course requirements

Your grade will be determined by three criteria:

1) Three exams 75%

2) assignment: short paper 15%

3) class participation 10%

Exams: three in-class exams (75%)

 There will be three in-class exams worth 75 points each.  The in-class exams will cover the readings and lecture materials covered prior to that exam. The format of the in-class exams will be multiple-choice, true and false, and short/medium-answer questions. Missed exams will be counted as zero unless arrangements are made in advance.  Make-up exams will be given only if a physician’s note or other verifiable document is provided.

Assignment: short paper (15%)

 Each student is required to write a paper no more than 5 double-spaced pages in length involving a sociological perspective of health, illness and health care.  Papers must be presented in ASA format and be based upon a review of the appropriate literature.  The information and guidelines for the assignment will be posted on Blackboard.

 The paper assignment is due by the beginning of class.  Late paper grades will be deducted 10% each day beyond the due date, and papers more than one week late will not be accepted.  In such an incidence, a grade of zero will be given and factored into the final grade.

 Class participation: In-class discussions and quizzes (10%)

The in-class components will be measured by pop quizzes and class participation.  There will be several pop quizzes given periodically at the instructor’s discretion, based on weekly readings, class discussions, and films shown during class.  In addition, students will engage in short discussions or working sessions as a group during class and will submit a written report.  This report will include the discussion results and the names of students who participated in the discussion sessions.  There will be NO in-class make-up quizzes and discussion reports regardless of the reasons for absence.

 Attendance and Participation Policy

 Attendance: Class attendance will not be formally taken. However, participation in class discussions will be a proxy for attendance and this may influence your final grade. You are allowed three non-penalized absences during the semester.  Students who miss more than three classes, regardless of the reason, will have their semester grade reduced by one grade. In the event of absence, you will be responsible for all information presented in class.

Student conduct: Every student will be actively involved in classroom discussions.  In order for everyone to feel comfortable voicing opinions or asking questions, a climate of tolerance and respect is essential. 

 

  • Use of laptops in class for taking notes: Use of laptops in class is allowed for taking notes only.  Other uses—like surfing the web or checking email—can be a distraction to those around you and are not permitted.

 

SOC 321K • Global Health Issues & Systems

46390 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm SAC 5.102
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Course Description

This course provides an overview of global health challenges in the world today. It is essential to understand the links between health and education, poverty, equity, and development with an appreciation of the values, beliefs, and cultures of diverse groups. The first half of the course will review critical global health issues from biological, cultural and environmental perspectives. The second half of the course will review various health systems in the six World Health Organization geographic regions and will compare and contrast the various regions, as well as countries within regions, with regard to the specific health challenges they face.

This course carries the Global Cultures flag. Global Cultures courses are designed to increase your familiarity with cultural groups outside the United States. You should therefore expect a substantial portion of your grade to come from assignments covering the practices, beliefs, and histories of at least one non-U.S. cultural group, past or present.

 Course Objectives

  1. Describe global health issues, trends, and policies
  2. Understand how population growth, food supply, disease, environmental changes, and political activities impact global health
  3. Assess and analyze global health program interventions and their impacts
  4. Compare and contrast health issues and policies between economically developed countries and developing countries
  5. Synthesize findings to highlight common patterns and unique differences in health challenges between and within major world regions

Required Text and Readings

Skolnik, Richard. (2011)  Global Health 101.  Sudbury, MA: Jones and Bartlett Publishers

Kidder, Tracy (2009) Mountains Beyond Mountains: The quest for Dr. Paul Farmer, A Man who would cure the world, Random House

Additional readings:  In addition to above textbooks, other course materials including additional readings will be posted to Blackboard each week.  Readings should be completed for the week they are assigned.

Course requirements

There are two major term papers.  One paper is an individual paper and the other is to be undertaken as a group project.

Individual Paper (30%)

Each student is required to write a paper no more than 10 double-spaced pages in length about global health issues.  Topics should be relevant to global health either chosen from the materials covered in the course, reading list, or on a subject of your choice.  Examples include, but are not limited to:

  1. Climate change and global health
  2. Reproductive health in developing countries
  3. Safe drinking water in low-income countries
  4. Emerging and reemerging diseases
  5. Making essential medicines available in low income countries
  6. Health manpower crises
  7. Role of public and private organizations in improving global health

                   

Group Project Paper & Presentation (30%)

Students are encouraged to form a group (maximum of 3 students per group) to prepare a short presentation at the end of the semester and to write a paper. Students should work together as a team to analyze the political, social and economic determinants of health and analyze how delivery systems for preventive and curative health services might be strengthened in developing countries.

Peer evaluation and feedback (5%)

In-class presentation (5%)

First draft (10%)

Final version of draft (10%)

Class Components (20%)

Each group will have short discussions or working sessions during class and will submit a short progress report.  This report will include the project progress and the name of students who participated in the discussion sessions. Each member will be required to participate and contribute substantially to the research and writing of the student team paper.

IN-Class Exam (20%)

Attendance and Participation Policy

Class attendance will not formally be taken. However, the participation in team project will be a proxy for attendance and this may influence your final grade. In the event of absence, you will be responsible for all information presented in the class.

 

 

SOC 336D • Race, Class, And Health

46225 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm CLA 1.104
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Course Description

This course critically examines health status and health care disparities among racial/ethnic minority groups in the United States. We focus on the patterned ways in which the health of these groups is embedded in the social, cultural, political, and economic context of the U.S. We review the complex relationship between social class (socioeconomic status) and health status, the effect of race/ethnicity on health outcomes and access to healthcare, as well as specific health issues facing major racial/ethnic minority groups in the U.S. Topics include conceptual issues central to understanding  how low socioeconomic status leads to poor health, how conscious, unconscious, and institutionalized racial bias affects medical care and health outcomes, as well as a consideration of policies for reducing health disparities among racial/ethnic minorities.

 Course Objectives

  1. Define concepts of population health, social class, and race/ethnicity
  2. Describe social determinants of health
  3. Understand biological and psycho-social mechanisms through which the determinants of population health operate
  4. Analyze the interaction effect of race/ethnicity and social class in predicting health outcomes
  5. Examine policies that address health disparities in the United States

Required Text and Readings

Barr, Donald A. (2008) Health Disparities in the United States: Social Class, Race, Ethnicity, and Health.  The Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore.

LaVeist, Thomas A. (2005) Minority Populations and Health: An Introduction to Health Disparities in the United States. Jossey-Bass, A Wiley Imprint.

Additional readings: In addition to the above textbooks, other course materials, including additional readings, will be posted to blackboard each week.  Readings should be completed for the week they are assigned.

Course requirements and Exams:

Exams (total 300 points/60% of the grade):There will be three in-class exams worth 100 points each.  The in-class exams will cover the readings and lecture materials covered prior to that exam. The format of the in-class exams will be multiple-choice, true/false, and short/medium-answer questions. Missed exams will be counted as zero unless arrangements are made in advance.  Make-up exams will be given only if a physician’s note or other verifiable document is provided.

Essay (total 100 points/20% of the grade):In addition to exams, students will write one short paper designed to assess the understanding of current health status and causes of health disparities among racial/ethnic minorities in the U.S. and the complex relationship between socioeconomic status and race in U.S. health care systems. This paper should be no longer than 5 pages (double spaced) and must returned in person in class.  E-mail attachments will not be accepted.

Class Components (total 100 points/20% of the grade): The in-class component will be measured by pop quizzes and class participation.  There will be 10 pop quizzes given periodically at the instructor’s discretion, based on weekly readings, class discussions, and short-films shown during class.

 

SOC 354K • Sociology Of Health & Illness

46260 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm CLA 0.102
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COURSE DESCRIPTION

This course introduces students to the sociological study of health and illness. More specifically, this course examines the ways in which key sociological variables shape and explain the health and illness of the US population. This course covers following topics: socioeconomic status, race/ethnicity, gender, family, and psychosocial factors. 

COURSE MATERIALS

Books:   Mirowsky, John and Catherine Ross. 2003. Social Causes of Psychological Distress.

Hawthorne, NY: Aldine de Gruyter/Transaction.

 Mirowsky, John and Catherine Ross. 2003. Education, Social Status, and Health.

Hawthorne, NY: Aldine de Gruyter/Transaction.

Journal articles and book chapters: See course calendar. (Available through the course website)

GRADING

Your grade will be determined by the three grading criteria. First, you will have three in-class exams. Each exam is worth 25% of the final grade and is going to be administered during regular class meetings. Next, you will have two take-home assignments. Each assignment is worth 10% of the final grade. The detail will be provided. Finally, 5% of your final grade will be determined by attendance.

3 exams  25% each

2 take home assignments  10% each

Attendance 5%

EXTRA CREDIT

In addition to these three grading criteria, a couple of students will have a chance of upgrading the grade to the next level (awarded up to 3 grade points) if they choose and are being selected to present the combined assignment. The detail will be provided as the semester progresses. 

 

SOC 321K • Global Hlth Iss And Systems

45745 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm WAG 308
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Course Description

This course provides an overview of global health challenges in the world today. It is essential to understand the links between health and education, poverty, equity, and development with an appreciation of the values, beliefs, and cultures of diverse groups. The first half of the course will review critical global health issues from biological, cultural and environmental perspectives. The second half of the course will review various health systems in the six World Health Organization geographic regions and will compare and contrast the various regions, as well as countries within regions, with regard to the specific health challenges they face.

This course carries the Global Cultures flag. Global Cultures courses are designed to increase your familiarity with cultural groups outside the United States. You should therefore expect a substantial portion of your grade to come from assignments covering the practices, beliefs, and histories of at least one non-U.S. cultural group, past or present.

 Course Objectives

  1. Describe global health issues, trends, and policies
  2. Understand how population growth, food supply, disease, environmental changes, and political activities impact global health
  3. Assess and analyze global health program interventions and their impacts
  4. Compare and contrast health issues and policies between economically developed countries and developing countries
  5. Synthesize findings to highlight common patterns and unique differences in health challenges between and within major world regions

Required Text and Readings

Skolnik, Richard. (2011)  Global Health 101.  Sudbury, MA: Jones and Bartlett Publishers

Kidder, Tracy (2009) Mountains Beyond Mountains: The quest for Dr. Paul Farmer, A Man who would cure the world, Random House

Additional readings:  In addition to above textbooks, other course materials including additional readings will be posted to Blackboard each week.  Readings should be completed for the week they are assigned.

Course requirements

There are two major term papers.  One paper is an individual paper and the other is to be undertaken as a group project.

Individual Paper (30%)

Each student is required to write a paper no more than 10 double-spaced pages in length about global health issues.  Topics should be relevant to global health either chosen from the materials covered in the course, reading list, or on a subject of your choice.  Examples include, but are not limited to:

  1. Climate change and global health
  2. Reproductive health in developing countries
  3. Safe drinking water in low-income countries
  4. Emerging and reemerging diseases
  5. Making essential medicines available in low income countries
  6. Health manpower crises
  7. Role of public and private organizations in improving global health

                   

Group Project Paper & Presentation (30%)

Students are encouraged to form a group (maximum of 3 students per group) to prepare a short presentation at the end of the semester and to write a paper. Students should work together as a team to analyze the political, social and economic determinants of health and analyze how delivery systems for preventive and curative health services might be strengthened in developing countries.

Peer evaluation and feedback (5%)

In-class presentation (5%)

First draft (10%)

Final version of draft (10%)

Class Components (20%)

Each group will have short discussions or working sessions during class and will submit a short progress report.  This report will include the project progress and the name of students who participated in the discussion sessions. Each member will be required to participate and contribute substantially to the research and writing of the student team paper.

IN-Class Exam (20%)

Attendance and Participation Policy

Class attendance will not formally be taken. However, the participation in team project will be a proxy for attendance and this may influence your final grade. In the event of absence, you will be responsible for all information presented in the class.

 

 

SOC 336D • Race, Class, And Health

45600 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm BUR 112
show description

Course Description

This course examines health status and health care disparities among racial/ethnic minority groups in the United States.  We will review the complex relationship between social class (socioeconomic status) and health status, the effect of race/ethnicity on health outcomes and access to healthcare, and specific health issues for major racial/ethnic minority groups in the U.S. The topics include conceptual issues central to understanding how low socioeconomic status leads to poor health, understanding how conscious, unconscious, and institutionalized racial bias affects medical care and health outcomes, and addressing ideas for reducing health disparities among racial/ethnic minorities.

Course Objectives

At the completion of this course, the student will learn and understand:

  • the patterns of racial/ethnic differences in health status,  in access to health care, in quality of health care
  • the hypotheses and theories that seek to explain health disparities among different racial/ethnic minorities
  • the social and environmental factors that are prominent in the perpetuation of  health disparities across the life span

Required Text and Readings

Barr, Donald A. (2008)  Health Disparities in the United States: Social Class, Race, Ethnicity, and Health.  The Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore (ISBN 13: 978-0-8018-8821-2, ISBN 10: 0-8018-8821-2)

LaVeist, Thomas A. (2005)  Minority Populations and Health: An Introduction to Health Disparities in the United States.  Jossey-Bass, A Wiley Imprint (ISBN 0-7879-6413-1)

Additional readings: In addition to above textbooks, other course materials including additional readings will be posted to blackboard each week.  Readings should be completed for the week they are assigned.

Course requirements and exams:

Exams (total 300 points): There will be three in-class exams worth 100 points each.  The in-class exams will cover the readings and lecture materials covered prior to that exam. The format of the in-class exams will be multiple-choice, true and false, and short/medium-answer questions. Missed exams will be counted as zero unless arrangements are made in advance.  Make-up exams will be given only if a physician’s note or other verifiable document is provided.

Essay (total 100 points): In addition to exams, students will write one short paper designed to assess the understanding of current health status and causes of health disparities among racial/ethnic minorities in the US and the complex relationship between socioeconomic status and race in US health care systems. This paper should be no longer than 5 pages (double spaced) and must returned in person in class.  E-mail attachments will not be accepted.

Class Components (total 100 points): The in-class component will be measured by pop quizzes and class participation.  There will be 10 pop quizzes given periodically at the instructor’s discretion, based on weekly readings, class discussions, and short-films shown during class, and should last no more than 10 minutes.

 

SOC 321K • Global Hlth Iss And Systems

45520 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm UTC 4.110
show description

Description

This course provides an overview of global health challenges in the world today. It is essential to understand the links between health and education, poverty, equity, and development with an appreciation of the values, beliefs, and cultures of diverse groups. The first half of the course will review critical global health issues from biological, cultural and environmental perspectives. The second half of the course will review various health systems in the six World Health Organization geographic regions and will compare and contrast the various regions, as well as countries within regions, with regard to the specific health challenges they face.

 Course Objectives

1.     Describe global health issues, trends, and policies

2.     Understand how population growth, food supply, disease, environmental changes, and political activities impact global health

3.     Assess and analyze global health program interventions and their impacts

4.     Compare and contrast health issues and policies between economically developed countries and developing countries

5.     Synthesize findings to highlight common patterns and unique differences in health challenges between and within major world regions

Required Texts

Skolnik, Richard. (2008) Essentials of Global Health, Sudbury, MA: Jones and Bartlett Publishers

 Jacobsen K. H. (2008) Introduction to Global Health, Sudbury, MA: Jones and Bartlett Publishers

 Additional readings:  In addition to above textbooks, other course materials including additional readings will be posted to Blackboard each week.  Readings should be completed for the week they are assigned.

 Grading Policy

 The course grade will be determined based on the clarity of writing, the depth of reasoning, and quality of analysis on two major term papers.  One paper is an individual paper and the other is to be undertaken as a group project. The final grade will be based on individual paper (40%), group project and presentation (40%), and class discussion and attendance (20%). 

 

 

SOC 336D • Race, Class, And Health

45430 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm UTC 3.124
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Course Description

This course critically examines health status and health care disparities among racial/ethnic minority groups in the United States.  We will review the complex relationship between social class (socioeconomic status) and health status, the effect of race/ethnicity on health outcomes and access to healthcare, and specific health issues for major racial/ethnic minority groups in the U.S. The topics include conceptual issues central to understanding how low socioeconomic status leads to poor health, understanding how conscious, unconscious, and institutionalized racial bias affects medical care and health outcomes, and addressing ideas for reducing health disparities among racial/ethnic minorities.

 

Required Text and Readings:

Barr, Donald A. (2008)  Health Disparities in the United States: Social Class, Race,Ethnicity, and Health.  The Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore

 

LaVeist, Thomas A. (2005)  Minority Populations and Health: An Introduction to Health Disparities in the United States.  Jossey-Bass, A Wiley Imprint

SOC 336D • Race, Class, And Health

45585 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm BUR 108
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Course Description

This course critically examines health status and health care disparities among racial/ethnic minority groups in the United States.  We will review the complex relationship between social class (socioeconomic status) and health status, the effect of race/ethnicity on health outcomes and access to healthcare, and specific health issues for major racial/ethnic minority groups in the U.S. The topics include conceptual issues central to understanding how low socioeconomic status leads to poor health, understanding how conscious, unconscious, and institutionalized racial bias affects medical care and health outcomes, and addressing ideas for reducing health disparities among racial/ethnic minorities.

 

Required Text and Readings:

Barr, Donald A. (2008)  Health Disparities in the United States: Social Class, Race,Ethnicity, and Health.  The Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore

 

LaVeist, Thomas A. (2005)  Minority Populations and Health: An Introduction to Health Disparities in the United States.  Jossey-Bass, A Wiley Imprint

 

Additional readings: In addition to above textbooks, other course materials including additional readings will be posted to blackboard each week.  Readings should be completed for the week they are assigned.

 

Course requirements and Exams:

Class activities will include lectures and discussions of various topics.  All examinations cover assigned reading materials, topics covered in lectures, and class discussions.

 

Exams (total 300 points): There will be three in-class exams worth 100 points each.  The in-class exams will cover the readings and lecture materials covered prior to that exam. The format of the in-class exams will be multiple-choice, true and false, and short/medium-answer questions. Missed exams will be counted as zero unless arrangements are made in advance.  Make-up exams will be given only if a physician’s note or other verifiable document is provided.

 

Essay (total 100 points): In addition to exams, students will write one short paper designed to assess the understanding of current health status and causes of health disparities among racial/ethnic minorities in the US and the complex relationship between socioeconomic status and race in US health care systems. This paper should be no longer than 5 pages (double spaced) and must returned in person in class.  E-mail attachments will not be accepted.

 

Class Components (total 100 points): The in-class component will be measured by pop quizzes and class participation.  There will be 10 pop quizzes given periodically at the instructor’s discretion, based on weekly readings, class discussions, and short-films shown during class.  Pop quizzes will be given at the start of class and should last no more than 5 to 10 minutes.

 

Attendance and Participation Policy

Class attendance will not formally be taken. However, the participation in pop quizzes will be a proxy for attendance and this may influence your final grade. In the event of absence, you will be responsible for all information presented in the class.

 

Religious Holy Days

If a class or exam must be missed due to a religious holyday, you must notify me of your pending absence at least fourteen days prior to the date of observance of a religious holy day.  If you must miss a class, an examination, a work assignment, I will give you an opportunity to complete the missed work within a reasonable time after the absence.

 

Academic Integrity

All students are expected to conform to the standards of academic integrity. Any person suspected of academic dishonesty will be dealt with in accordance with the policies and procedures set forth by the University of Texas at Austin.

 

Academic Accommodations

The University makes reasonable accommodations for students with documented disabilities. Any students with a documented disability should contact Services for Student with Disabilities and the instructor about any special needs.  More information is available by calling 471-6259 (voice) or 471-4641(TTY).

 

SOC 336D • Race, Class, And Health

46430 • Spring 2010
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm BUR 216
show description

Soc 336D: RACE, CLASS, AND HEALTH

                        Spring 2010

 

 

Meeting Time and Place: T.TH.  2:00-3:30PM, BUR 216      

 

 

Instructor: Jiwon Jeon, Ph.D.

Email Address: jiwonjeon@austin.utexas.edu

Office Hours: T.TH 12:30 - 1:30PM (and by appointment)

Office and Phone: BUR 486 (phone: 471-4825)

 

 

Teaching Assistant: Pei Yin Chein

Email Address: MyPei@mail.utexas.edu

Office hour: TH. 11:00AM – 2:00PM (and by appointment)

Office and Phone: Bur 602 (phone: 471-8473)

 

 

Course Description

 

This course critically examines Health Status and Health Care Disparities among Racial/Ethnic minority groups in the United States.  We will review the complex relationship between social class (socioeconomic status) and health status, the effect of race/ethnicity on health outcomes and access to healthcare, and specific health issues for major racial/ethnic minority groups in the U.S. The topics include conceptual issues central to understanding how low socioeconomic status leads to poor health, understanding how conscious, unconscious, and institutionalized racial bias affects medical care and health outcomes, and addressing ideas for reducing health disparities among racial/ethnic minorities.

 

 

Required Text and Readings:

 

Barr, Donald A. (2008)  Health Disparities in the United States: Social Class, Race,

Ethnicity, and Health.  The Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore

 

LaVeist, Thomas A. (2005)  Minority Populations and Health: An Introduction to Health Disparities in the United States.  Jossey-Bass, A Wiley Imprint

 

Smedley, Brian D., A.Y. Stith, A.R. Nelson, (2003)  Summary Abstract of Unequal Treatment: Confronting Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Health Care,  Institute of Medicine, The National Academic Press (pdf file on blackboard)

 

 

Course requirements and Exams:

 

Class activities will include lectures and discussions of various topics.  All examinations cover assigned reading materials, topics covered in lectures, additional readings, and class discussions.

 

There will be three in-class exams worth 100 points each.  The in-class exams will cover the readings and lecture materials covered prior to that exam. The format of the in-class exams will be multiple-choice, true and false, and short-answer questions.  In addition to exams, students will write two short essays (400-500 words).  Each essay is worth 50 points.  These essays are designed to assess the understanding of current status and cause of health disparities among racial/ethnic minorities in the US and the complex relationship between socioeconomic status and race in US health care systems. Missed exams will be counted as zero unless arrangements are made in advance.  Make-up exams will be given only if a physician’s note or other verifiable document is provided.

 

Attendance Policy

 

Class attendance will not formally be taken, but there will be random attendance taken during the semester, and this may influence your final grade. In the event of absence, you will be responsible for all information presented in the class.

 

Academic Accommodations

 

The University makes reasonable accommodations for students with documented disabilities. Any students with a documented disability should contact Service for Student with Disabilities and instructor of any special needs.  More information is available by calling 471-6259 (voice) or 471-4641(TTY)

 

Course Outline and Reading Schedule

 

The following is a tentative schedule of topics. Changes of dates may occur during the course of the semester and will be announced in advance.  Students will be responsible for all changes announced in class or posted on blackboard. Readings should be completed for the week they are assigned.

 

Week                          Topic                                                              Readings

______________________________________________________________________________

 

Week 1                       Introduction and Overview                                    Barr, chapter 1

                                                                                                            LaViest, chapter 1

 

Week 2                       Health and Health Disparities                 Barr, chapter 2

Why do we care?                                          LaViest, chapter 3 & 4

 

Week 3                       Socioeconomic Status and Health:                      Barr, chapter 3

                                    Social determinants of Health                 LaViest, chapter 8

 

Week 4                       How low SES leads to Poor Health:                      Barr, chapter 4

                                    Inequality and Stress

 

Week 5                       View Film “Stress: Portrait of a killer”

                                    Exam one (Feb. 18, Thursday)

 

Week 6                       Race, Ethnicity, and Health: Race as a    Barr, chapter 5

                                    Social construct and its effect on health            LaViest, chapter 2

 

Week 7                       Race, Ethnicity, SES and Health:  Which  Barr, chapter 6                     

                                    Is more important?

 

March 9                      First Essay Due

 

Week 8                       Theories of Racial/Ethnic differences                 LeViest, chapter 7 & 9

                                    In Health: Socio-environmental,

                                    Psychosocial/Behavioral factors             

 

Week 9                       Specific Health Issues among                              LaViest, chapter 10

Racial/Ethnic Minorities: African Americans                            

 

Week 10                     Specific Health Issues: American Indians/        LaViest, chapter 11 & 12

Alaska Natives, Asian and Pacific           

                                    Islanders

 

Week 11                     Specific Health Issues: Hispanics/Latinos         LaViest, chapter 13

Exam Two (April 8, Thursday)

 

Week 12                     Healthcare Disparities                                           Smedley et. al. Abstract                                                                                                                  LaViest, chapter 6

 

Week 13                     Unequal treatment:  stereotyping, bias,             Barr, chapter 7 & 8

                                    racism

 

Week 14                     Reducing health disparities:                                Barr, chapter 9 &10

Issues and questions                                             LaViest, chapter 14

 

May 4                          Second Essay Due

 

Week 15                     Review and Exam Three (May 6, Thursday)

 

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