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Christine L. Williams, Chair CLA 3.306, Mailcode A1700, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-232-6300

Jacqueline L. Angel

Ph.D., Rutgers University

Professor, LBJ School of Public Affairs (Affiliated)
Jacqueline L. Angel

Contact

Biography

Jacqueline L. Angel is a Professor of Sociology and Public Policy at the LBJ School of Public Affairs and Faculty Affiliate in the Population Research Center, the Center for Health and Social Policy, and the Center for Women and Gender Studies at The University of Texas at Austin. She received her PhD from Rutgers University and completed an NIA Postdoctoral Fellow in the Demography of Aging Training Program at The Pennsylvania State University in 1990-92. Her research addresses the relationships linking family structures, inequality, and health across the life course.

Professor Jacqueline Angel has published extensively in the area of aging and the life course and she has served as an advisor to non-governmental organizations and other agencies that provide basic services to the elderly. Her work focuses on the impact of social policy on the well-being of aging Latinos and other vulnerable groups. She has served on several governmental and professional committees and is currently developing a long-term research agenda that focuses on the role of civil society and non-governmental organizations on the care of low-income elderly in the United States and Latin America.

She has published five books, including, Health and Living Arrangements of the Elderly (Garland Publishing, 1991), Painful Inheritance: Health and the New Generation of Fatherless Families (University of Wisconsin Press, 1993), Who Will Care for Us? Aging and Long-Term Care in Multicultural America (New York University Press, 1997), jointly with Ronald Angel, and The Health of Aging Hispanics: The Mexican-Origin Population, Co-Edited with Keith Whitfield (Springer, 2007), and most recently: Inheritance in Contemporary America: The Social Dimensions of Giving Across Generations (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2008).

Dr. Angel was appointed to the U.S. Public Health Service, National Institutes of Health NIA Behavior and Social Science of Aging Review Committee between 2004-07 which she also chaired for two years. She is also past Board President of Family Eldercare, Inc. and was appointed to the President's Council in 2003. At the LBJ School, she teaches courses on policy development with respect to gender, health, and social welfare programs.

In 2000, Dr. Angel was elected a Fellow of The Gerontological Society of America. She is also currently chair of the NIA Behavior and Social Science of Aging Review Committee.

NIH Biosketch

SOC 395J • Gender, Health, And Society

46450 • Fall 2014
Meets W 900am-1200pm SRH 3.124
(also listed as WGS 393 )
show description

COURSE DESCRIPTION    

This course examines the gender dimensions of health, illness, and the medical care industry in the United States and other developed nations.  It is motivated by the fact that health, disease, and medical care have important gender-specific dimensions that are affected by economics, politics, and culture.  Because of gender-based disadvantages in the labor force women, and especially minority women, are more likely than men to have low incomes and little wealth, particularly if they are unmarried with children. Poor women and families have often had to do without the medical care they need even as their children qualify for Medicaid.  The passage of health reform legislation has potentially important implications for poor women’s access to medical care since by 2014 all poor Americans will qualify for Medicaid or subsidized public insurance. During the course we will follow and discuss issues related to the implementation of health care reform and determine how our health care delivery system will be affected in the years to come.  In the past the medical care system often ignored gender, as well as race-based differences in health care needs. Early studies of heart disease risks were, for example, based on samples of white men.  Today, the National Institutes of Health and other funding agencies are aware of these shortcomings and are addressing these issues head on.  During the course we will examine these initiatives in detail.

These gaps in knowledge concerning risks and appropriate treatments have very specific consequences that we will investigate.  The collection of readings will allow us to examine the social institutions that shape men’s and women’s health and health care.  Specific topics will include reproductive health, single motherhood and the stress of raising children alone, welfare and health care, divorce and changes in health, certain illnesses that women experience including breast and ovarian cancer, drug and alcohol abuse, and the forces that influence research into women’s health problems. In addition, we examine the role of women as major actors in changing the health care system, reducing health risks for themselves and their families, and their roles as health care providers, public administrators, and leaders in the health care establishment. We will also touch upon the role of local, state and federal agencies in health policy formulation and implementation, the politics of the medicalization of women’s issues including childbirth, refugee and immigrant women's health, and more.

The second objective of the course is for students to develop an understanding of the major sources of health data (e.g., demographic statistics, administrative records, health surveys, etc.).  Our objective is to develop a critical understanding of the appropriate use of health-related data and to determine how they can best be used to evaluate a broad array of public policies related to men and women’s health care. 

Finally, the course will examine the role of different levels and branches of government, including the presidency, Congress, the courts, and the bureaucracy, in the formation of public policy.  Alternative political ideologies regarding state and private responsibility for health care will be compared and contrasted.  Similarly we will assess the relative power of key non-governmental actors, such as interest groups, health care NPOs, researchers, and the media in the definition and framing of our health agenda.

REQUIRED TEXT

Bird, C.E. and P.P. Rieker. 2008. Gender and Health: The Effects of Constrained Choices and Social

 Policies. New York: Cambridge University Press.

Miles, T.P. 2012. Health Care Reform and Disparities: History, Hype, and Hope. Santa Barbara,

     CA: ABC-Clio.

Stone, D.  2001.  Policy Paradox: The Art of Political Decision Making. New York:  W.W.

Norton and Company.

RECOMMENDED

Dan, A. (Ed.). 1994. Reframing Women's Health: Multidisciplinary Research and Practice.

Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.

Miles, T.P. 2012. Health Care Reform and Disparities: History, Hype, and Hope. Santa Barbara, CA: Praeger.

Sargent, C.F. and C.B. Brettell.  1996. Gender and Health:  An International Perspective. Upper

            Saddle River, NJ:Prentice Hall.

Weir, M. Shola Orloff, and T. Skocpol (eds.). 1988. The Politics of Social Policy in the United States.

Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.

Wilkinson, Richard and Kate Pickett. 2010. The Spirit Level: Why Greater Equality Makes Societies

Stronger. London: Allen Lane.

The required books are available for purchase at the University Co-op East, 2902 Medical Arts Street.  Recommended books are available at the Perry-CasteñdaLibrary (PCL).  In addition, a set of supplemental readings is required. Nearly all of these materials are readily accessible through the U.T. Canvas or archives such as JSTOR, http://www.jstor.org.ezproxy.lib.utexas.edu/?cookieSet=1, OCLC First Search, Expanded Academic Index, etc. 

COURSE STRUCTURE

The format of the course will consist of overview lectures, class discussion, and guest speakers.  Because this is a lecture-discussion course, participation by students is essential to its success.  Student involvement is important since it contributes to a more stimulating and interesting class and since learning occurs through interaction and exchange.  In order to encourage participation, I will expect that you become familiar with the assignments listed in the schedule of readings by the time we begin discussing them and keep a diary of notes, comments, and questions germane to the topic of the week.  The readings will serve as the foundation for class discussion and are primarily designed to achieve the desideratum at the heart of the course, that is, class debate and dialogue.  I will assign these materials routinely for oral discussion, and occasionally for informal symposiums and briefings on social policy.

SPECIFIC REQUIREMENTS

 Assignments:

 (1) Term Project.  A succinct, 15-20 double-spaced page position paper exploring in depth, a topic of your choice related to social policy and programs, with emphasis on U.S. health care, education, children and families, including housing supports.  I encourage international students to write about analogous issues in their home countries.  In addition to a summary of pertinent background material, research for the paper must include an analytical literature review based on at least ten scholarly articles, contemporary reports, government documents, and personal interviews.  Details of this assignment, including a list of suggested topics, format, and analytical strategy, will be addressed during the second week of classes.  The specific guidelines of this assignment and principles applicable to acknowledgement of sources will be distributed during the second week of classes. 

(a) Project Overview.  The written outline should contain a brief introduction that explains the objectives of your research and analysis.  You should explain concisely exactly what you propose to accomplish.  The strategy of your presentation is up to you, but clearly state your chief objective (questions you plan to pursue) so the class will know your intentions.

(b)  Oral Briefing.  You will prepare a brief summary of the major findings of your policy analysis.  

The above assignments together will make up approximately one-half of your final grade. Each assignment will be evaluated on the basis of content (50 percent) and writing style (50 percent).  Thus to make an A on any assignment, you must have something to say and you must say it well.  This is what an employer will expect of you once you leave the Graduate School.  Content criteria include overall policy relevance, coherence of reasoning, and sufficiency of evidence. Stylistic criteria will include clarity, conciseness, organization, spelling, and basic grammar.

 Although I will give extensive stylistic feedback on the writing assignments throughout the course of the semester, students will also have the option of participating in writing workshops to be conducted by the LBJ School Writing Tutor during the first few weeks of class. These optional sessions will be outside the normal class time. (Day, time, and place to be announced later.)  The LBJ School of Public Affairs Graduate Writing Center’s website is at http://www.utexas.edu/lbj/students/writing/.

In addition to reviewing basic grammar rules, the workshops will also cover:

  • how to structure a paper;
  • how to distinguish between fact and opinion (it’s not as easy as you think), and how to use subjectivity constructively and honestly;
  • how to distill a narrative from a table of raw data; and
  • how to give and receive peer feedback.

Unless you’re someone with professional writing experience, it would be a good idea to sit in on the workshops. The reading for these sessions will be Strunk and White’s Elements of Style. (Own it. Read it cover to cover.)

 (c) Essay Exam.  Instead of the term project, you have the option to take an essay exam. This essay test will test your fundamental knowledge of policy development, analysis and related concepts in your readings and as discussed in class during the first part of the course. 

 (3) Collective Discussion.  Your participation in classroom discussion will be taken into account in determining the final grade.  Participation means attending class each week, reading assigned material prior to class time, and demonstrating that you have spent some quality time thinking about and synthesizing the issues in each article.  Participation will also include various activities, such as regular presentations on an assigned weekly topic that involve either a legislative briefing, testimony, individual student's discussion of key points from weekly readings, team presentations for conducting an examination of a section of readings, and point-counterpoint exchanges.   

ASSESSMENT

Your final course grade will be determined by completion of the following assignments:  

WRITTEN

 

Weight

One page Memo–Project Overview

 

10%;S/U

Point-Counterpoint Exchange

 

20%

Oral Presentation of Policy Brief Review/Take-home Essay Exam

 

20%

Term Project Issues Briefing/Essay Exam due

 

30%

Class Discussion

 

20%

Note:  Assignments are to be submitted electronically on the class canvas. Click on the "assignment" tab and label it with your Last Name. Be sure to select "Attach Document" before clicking on "Submit" document.

 I will use the following scale to determine your letter grade as follows:

A: 90-100

B: 80-89

C: 60-79

D: 40-59

F: 0-40

Plus and minus grades will be given for grades near the boundaries.

SOC 395G • Women & Changing World Of Work

46638 • Spring 2014
Meets W 200pm-500pm SRH 3.220
(also listed as WGS 393 )
show description

Course Description: 

This seminar is designed to help students understand of the nature and causes of gender stratification in industrial societies. In this seminar we examine both theoretical and empirical issues regarding gender inequality in the labor market. Topics to be discussed include changes in female labor force participation, gender segregation in the workplace, gender gaps in earnings and promotions, as well as gender differences in career processes. Because many articles we will read involve statistical analyses, students are expected to be able to read and understand quantitative sociological research at the level of SOC385L or the equivalent. While a large proportion of the readings are based on research in the United States, international comparisons of women’s economic roles also constitute an important part of this seminar. In particular, we address how social institutions that vary from one country to another shape men’s and women’s economic opportunities and thus the degree of gender inequality in the society.    Students are expected to attend class regularly and read the assigned readings prior to the class period during which we will discuss the material. Active participation in class discussions is also required. 

Texts:

The required texts for this course includes books and articles from peer-reviewed sociological journals. The list below shows some of the books required for this course:  

Goldin, Claudia. 1990. Understanding the Gender Gap: An Economic History of American Women. Oxford University Press.

Charles, Maria. and David B. Grusky. 2004. Occupational Ghetto: The Worldwide Segregation of Men and Women. Stanford University Press.

Ogasawara, Yuko. 1998. Office Ladies and Salaried Men: Power, Gender, and Work in Japanese Companies. University of California. 

SOC 395J • Gender, Health, And Society

46655 • Spring 2014
Meets W 900am-1200pm SRH 3.216
(also listed as WGS 393 )
show description

This course examines the gender dimensions of health, illness, and the medical care industry in the United States and other developed nations.  It is motivated by the fact that health, disease, and medical care have important gender-specific dimensions that are affected by economics, politics, and culture. In the past the medical care system often ignored gender, as well as race-based differences in health care needs. These gaps in knowledge concerning risks and appropriate treatments have very specific consequences that we will investigate.  The collection of readings will allow us to examine the social institutions that shape men’s and women’s health and health care.  Specific topics will include reproductive health, single motherhood and the stress of raising children alone, welfare and health care, divorce and changes in health, certain illnesses that women experience including breast and ovarian cancer, drug and alcohol abuse, and the forces that influence research into women’s health problems. In addition, we examine the role of women as major actors in changing the health care system, reducing health risks for themselves and their families, and their roles as health care providers, public administrators, and leaders in the health care establishment. We will also touch upon the role of local, state and federal agencies in health policy formulation and implementation, the politics of the medicalization of women’s issues including childbirth, refugee and immigrant women's health, and more. The course will also examine the role of different levels and branches of government, including the presidency, Congress, the courts, and the bureaucracy, in the formation of public policy.  Alternative political ideologies regarding state and private responsibility for women’s health will be compared and contrasted.  Similarly we will assess the relative power of key non-governmental actors, such as interest groups, health care NPOs, researchers, and the media in the definition and framing of our health agenda. The course deals with rapidly evolving issues and readings will be assigned as current events warrant.

SOC 395J • Gender, Health, And Society

46420 • Fall 2013
Meets W 900am-1200pm SRH 3.124
(also listed as WGS 393 )
show description

COURSE DESCRIPTION

This course examines the gender dimensions of health, illness, and the medical care industry in the United States and other developed nations.  It is motivated by the fact that health, disease, and medical care have important gender-specific dimensions that are affected by economics, politics, and culture. In the past the medical care system often ignored gender, as well as race-based differences in health care needs. These gaps in knowledge concerning risks and appropriate treatments have very specific consequences that we will investigate.  The collection of readings will allow us to examine the social institutions that shape men’s and women’s health and health care.  Specific topics will include reproductive health, single motherhood and the stress of raising children alone, welfare and health care, divorce and changes in health, certain illnesses that women experience including breast and ovarian cancer, drug and alcohol abuse, and the forces that influence research into women’s health problems. In addition, we examine the role of women as major actors in changing the health care system, reducing health risks for themselves and their families, and their roles as health care providers, public administrators, and leaders in the health care establishment. We will also touch upon the role of local, state and federal agencies in health policy formulation and implementation, the politics of the medicalization of women’s issues including childbirth, refugee and immigrant women's health, and more. The course will also examine the role of different levels and branches of government, including the presidency, Congress, the courts, and the bureaucracy, in the formation of public policy.  Alternative political ideologies regarding state and private responsibility for women’s health will be compared and contrasted.  Similarly we will assess the relative power of key non-governmental actors, such as interest groups, health care NPOs, researchers, and the media in the definition and framing of our health agenda. The course deals with rapidly evolving issues and readings will be assigned as current events warrant. 

 

EVALUATION

Assignments include a policy issue brief (50%), article or government report review (20%), point-counterpoint exchange, legislative briefing (20%). Attendance and participation are integral parts of the course and will count towards the final grade (10%).

 

REQUIRED TEXT AND SELECTED READINGS TO BE ASSIGNED

Bird, C.E. and P.P. Rieker. 2008. Gender and Health: The Effects of Constrained Choices and Social

 Policies. New York: Cambridge University Press.

Stone, D.  2001.  Policy Paradox: The Art of Political Decision Making. New York:  W.W.

Norton and Company.

 

SOC 395J • Gender, Health, And Society

45995 • Spring 2013
Meets W 900am-1200pm SRH 3.216
(also listed as WGS 393 )
show description

Course Description

This course examines the gender dimensions of health, illness, and the medical care industry in the United States and other developed nations.  It is motivated by the fact that health, disease, and medical care have important gender-specific dimensions that are affected by economics, politics, and culture. In the past the medical care system often ignored gender, as well as race-based differences in health care needs. These gaps in knowledge concerning risks and appropriate treatments have very specific consequences that we will investigate.  The collection of readings will allow us to examine the social institutions that shape men’s and women’s health and health care.  Specific topics will include reproductive health, single motherhood and the stress of raising children alone, welfare and health care, divorce and changes in health, certain illnesses that women experience including breast and ovarian cancer, drug and alcohol abuse, and the forces that influence research into women’s health problems. In addition, we examine the role of women as major actors in changing the health care system, reducing health risks for themselves and their families, and their roles as health care providers, public administrators, and leaders in the health care establishment. We will also touch upon the role of local, state and federal agencies in health policy formulation and implementation, the politics of the medicalization of women’s issues including childbirth, refugee and immigrant women's health, and more. The course will also examine the role of different levels and branches of government, including the presidency, Congress, the courts, and the bureaucracy, in the formation of public policy.  Alternative political ideologies regarding state and private responsibility for women’s health will be compared and contrasted.  Similarly we will assess the relative power of key non-governmental actors, such as interest groups, health care NPOs, researchers, and the media in the definition and framing of our health agenda. The course deals with rapidly evolving issues and readings will be assigned as current events warrant. 

Grading and Requirements

Policy issue brief 50%

Article or government report review 20%

Point-counterpoint exchange, legislative briefing 20%

Attendance and participation 10%

Required Texts and Readings

Bird, C.E. and P.P. Rieker. 2008. Gender and Health: The Effects of Constrained Choices and Social  Policies. New York: Cambridge University Press.

Stone, D.  2001.  Policy Paradox: The Art of Political Decision Making. New York:  W.W.Norton and Company.

 

SOC 395G • Women & Changing World Of Work

45775 • Spring 2012
Meets TH 900am-1200pm SRH 3.355
(also listed as WGS 393 )
show description

Course Objectives:

This course deals with the dramatic impact of social, demographic, and labor force changes on social policies related to women and family. The seminar will consist of an examination of policies focused on aspects of marriage, family and work for adult women, minorities, and the elderly. In previous generations, a women's welfare was based upon her husband's earnings. That world has changed profoundly. Increasingly, a women's economic security is her own responsibility, and social policies including retirement policies, must change to reflect that new reality. In barely two generations norms and expectations concerning work and family have altered greatly. Women who are today in their fifties and sixties have grown up in a world in which marital disruption has become common. Unlike their grandmothers, younger generations of women, especially the more educated, cannot count on their husbands or guarantee their economic security. Women no longer work to simply supplement their income but to build their own nest egg. As a result, many single women find themselves at a serious disadvantage in the event their marriage or work fails. This course is offered to all graduate students at the University of Texas at Austin. The seminar is one of the topical electives in The University of Texas LBJ School of Public Affairs, Sociology Department, and fulfills requirements for the LBJ School specialization in economics and social policy.

Requirements and grading

The class will follow a fairly standard seminar format.  You will be responsible for familiarizing yourself with all listed readings and for participating in class discussions.  Material to be emphasized during class discussions will be announced prior to each class meeting.  Readings may occasionally be modified to suit the needs of the class, and additional material may be distributed during the course of the semester depending on student interest and the availability of time.  The course will be organized as a combination of lecture, peer discussion, and application sessions.  Your course grade will be determined on the basis of a seminar paper and class participation. 

 

SOC 395J • Gender, Health, And Society

45790 • Spring 2012
Meets W 900am-1200pm SRH 3.216
(also listed as WGS 393 )
show description

COURSE DESCRIPTION

This course examines the gender dimensions of health, illness, and the medical care industry in the United States and other developed nations.  It is motivated by the fact that health, disease, and medical care have important gender-specific dimensions that are affected by economics, politics, and culture.  Because of gender-based disadvantages in the labor force women, and especially minority women, are more likely than men to have low incomes and little wealth, particularly if they are unmarried with children. Poor women and families have often had to do without the medical care they need even as their children quality for Medicaid.  The passage of health reform legislation has potentially important implications for poor women’s access to medical care since by 2014 all poor Americans will qualify for Medicaid or subsidized public insurance. During the course we will follow and discuss issues related to the implementation of health care reform and determine how our health care delivery system will be affected in the years to come.  In the past the medical care system often ignored gender, as well as race-based differences in health care needs. Early studies of heart disease risks were, for example, based on samples of white men.  Today, the National Institutes of Health and other funding agencies are aware of these shortcomings and are addressing these issues head on.  During the course we will examine these initiatives in detail.

These gaps in knowledge concerning risks and appropriate treatments have very specific consequences that we will investigate.  The collection of readings will allow us to examine the social institutions that shape men’s and women’s health and health care.  Specific topics will include reproductive health, single motherhood and the stress of raising children alone, welfare and health care, divorce and changes in health, certain illnesses that women experience including breast and ovarian cancer, drug and alcohol abuse, and the forces that influence research into women’s health problems. In addition, we examine the role of women as major actors in changing the health care system, reducing health risks for themselves and their families, and their roles as health care providers, public administrators, and leaders in the health care establishment. We will also touch upon the role of local, state and federal agencies in health policy formulation and implementation, the politics of the medicalization of women’s issues including childbirth, refugee and immigrant women's health, and more.

 

SOC 395J • Gender, Health, And Society

45630 • Fall 2011
Meets W 900am-1200pm SRH 3.216
(also listed as WGS 393 )
show description

                

COURSE DESCRIPTION

 This course examines the gender dimensions of health, illness, and the medical care industry in the United States and other developed nations.  It is motivated by the fact that health, disease, and medical care have important gender-specific dimensions that are affected by economics, politics, and culture.  Because of gender-based disadvantages in the labor force women, and especially minority women, are more likely than men to have low incomes and little wealth, particularly if they are unmarried with children. Poor women and families have often had to do without the medical care they need even as their children quality for Medicaid.  The passage of health reform legislation has potentially important implications for poor women’s access to medical care since by 2014 all poor Americans will qualify for Medicaid or subsidized public insurance. During the course we will follow and discuss issues related to the implementation of health care reform and determine how our health care delivery system will be affected in the years to come.  In the past the medical care system often ignored gender, as well as race-based differences in health care needs. Early studies of heart disease risks were, for example, based on samples of white men.  Today, the National Institutes of Health and other funding agencies are aware of these shortcomings and are addressing these issues head on.  During the course we will examine these initiatives in detail.

 These gaps in knowledge concerning risks and appropriate treatments have very specific consequences that we will investigate.  The collection of readings will allow us to examine the social institutions that shape men’s and women’s health and health care.  Specific topics will include reproductive health, single motherhood and the stress of raising children alone, welfare and health care, divorce and changes in health, certain illnesses that women experience including breast and ovarian cancer, drug and alcohol abuse, and the forces that influence research into women’s health problems. In addition, we examine the role of women as major actors in changing the health care system, reducing health risks for themselves and their families, and their roles as health care providers, public administrators, and leaders in the health care establishment. We will also touch upon the role of local, state and federal agencies in health policy formulation and implementation, the politics of the medicalization of women’s issues including childbirth, refugee and immigrant women's health, and more.

 The second objective of the course is for students to develop an understanding of the major sources of health data (e.g., demographic statistics, administrative records, health surveys, etc.).  Our objective is to develop a critical understanding of the appropriate use of health-related data and to determine how they can best be used to evaluate a broad array of public policies related to women’s health care. 

 Finally, the course will examine the role of different levels and branches of government, including the presidency, Congress, the courts, and the bureaucracy, in the formation of public policy.  Alternative political ideologies regarding state and private responsibility for women’s health will be compared and contrasted.  Similarly we will assess the relative power of key non-governmental actors, such as interest groups, health care NPOs, researchers, and the media in the definition and framing of our health agenda.

 EVAVLUATION

Class sessions will consist of lectures and collective discussions. Written requirements include a policy issue brief (50%), article or government report review (20%), point-counterpoint exchange, legislative briefing (20%). Attendance and participation are integral parts of the course and will count towards the final grade (10%).  

REQUIRED TEXT

Bird, C.E. and P.P. Rieker. 2008. Gender and Health: The Effects of Constrained Choices and Social  Policies. New York: Cambridge University Press.

 

Freund, P., B. McGuire, and L. Podhurst.  2003.  Health, Illness, and the Social Body: A Critical Sociology (4thed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall.

Kingdon, J.W. 2010.  Agendas, Alternatives, and Public Policies. Boston, MA:  Longman.

Stone, D.  2001.  Policy Paradox: The Art of Political Decision Making. New York:  W.W. Norton and Company.

For more information, contact Dr. Jacqueline Angel at jangel@austin.utexas.edu

 

SOC 395G • Women & Changing World Of Work

46342 • Spring 2011
Meets TH 900am-1200pm SRH 3.219
(also listed as WGS 393 )
show description

This course deals with the dramatic impact of social, demographic, and labor force changes on social policies related to women and family. The seminar will consist of an examination of policies focused on aspects of marriage, family and work for adult women, minorities, and the elderly. In previous generations, a women's welfare was based upon her husband's earnings. That world has changed profoundly. Increasingly, a women's economic security is her own responsibility, and social policies including retirement policies, must change to reflect that new reality. In barely two generations norms and expectations concerning work and family have altered greatly. Women who are today in their fifties and sixties have grown up in a world in which marital disruption has become common. Unlike their grandmothers, younger generations of women, especially the more educated, can not count on their husbands or guarantee their economic security. Women no longer work to simply supplement their income but to build their own nest egg. As a result, many single women find themselves at a serious disadvantage in the event their marriage or work fails.

SOC 395J • Gender, Health, And Society

46345 • Spring 2011
Meets W 900am-1200pm SRH 3.216
(also listed as WGS 393 )
show description

Spring 2011, Soc 395J

Women and the Changing World of Work: New Policies for a New Century

Instructor(s):

Angel, Jacqueline J.

Day & Time:

Th 9:00 - 12:00 pm

Room:

SRH 3.216/219

Course Overview

Topics for these policy seminars have included environmental and natural resources policy, health-service delivery policy, social welfare policy, transportation policy, science and technology policy, international affairs, national security, urban and regional growth policy, and political campaigns.

 

Section Description

This course deals with the dramatic impact of social, demographic, and labor force changes on social policies related to women and family. The seminar will consist of an examination of policies focused on aspects of marriage, family and work for adult women, minorities, and the elderly. In previous generations, a women's welfare was based upon her husband's earnings. That world has changed profoundly. Increasingly, a women's economic security is her own responsibility, and social policies including retirement policies, must change to reflect that new reality. In barely two generations norms and expectations concerning work and family have altered greatly. Women who are today in their fifties and sixties have grown up in a world in which marital disruption has become common. Unlike their grandmothers, younger generations of women, especially the more educated, can not count on their husbands or guarantee their economic security. Women no longer work to simply supplement their income but to build their own nest egg. As a result, many single women find themselves at a serious disadvantage in the event their marriage or work fails.

This course is offered to all graduate students at the University of Texas at Austin. The seminar is one of the topical electives in The University of Texas LBJ School of Public Affairs, Sociology Department,and fulfills requirements for the LBJ School specialization in economics and social policy.

Requirements and grading

The class will follow a fairly standard seminar format. You will be responsible for familiarizing yourself with all listed readings and for participating in class discussions. Material to be emphasized during class discussions will be announced prior to each class meeting. Readings may occasionally be modified to suit the needs of the class, and additional material may be distributed during the course of the semester depending on student interest and the availability of time. The course will be organized as a combination of lecture, peer discussion, and application sessions. Your course grade will be determined on the basis of a seminar paper and class participation. 

 

SOC 395G • Women & Changing World Of Work

46625 • Spring 2010
Meets TH 900-1200 SRH 3.350
(also listed as WGS 393, P A 388K, S W 395K )
show description

Course Description: 

This seminar is designed to help students understand of the nature and causes of gender stratification in industrial societies. In this seminar we examine both theoretical and empirical issues regarding gender inequality in the labor market. Topics to be discussed include changes in female labor force participation, gender segregation in the workplace, gender gaps in earnings and promotions, as well as gender differences in career processes. Because many articles we will read involve statistical analyses, students are expected to be able to read and understand quantitative sociological research at the level of SOC385L or the equivalent. While a large proportion of the readings are based on research in the United States, international comparisons of women’s economic roles also constitute an important part of this seminar. In particular, we address how social institutions that vary from one country to another shape men’s and women’s economic opportunities and thus the degree of gender inequality in the society.    Students are expected to attend class regularly and read the assigned readings prior to the class period during which we will discuss the material. Active participation in class discussions is also required. 

Texts:

The required texts for this course includes books and articles from peer-reviewed sociological journals. The list below shows some of the books required for this course:  

Goldin, Claudia. 1990. Understanding the Gender Gap: An Economic History of American Women. Oxford University Press.

Charles, Maria. and David B. Grusky. 2004. Occupational Ghetto: The Worldwide Segregation of Men and Women. Stanford University Press.

Ogasawara, Yuko. 1998. Office Ladies and Salaried Men: Power, Gender, and Work in Japanese Companies. University of California. 

SOC 395G • Women & Changing World Of Work

45915 • Spring 2009
Meets TH 900-1200 SRH 3.111
(also listed as WGS 393, P A 388K, S W 395K )
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Course Syllabus
Spring 2009
Women and the Changing World of Work:  
New Policies for a New Century (388K)

Instructor : Jacqueline L. Angel, Ph.D.
Meeting time :  Thursday, 9 – 12 pm
Meeting place : SRH
Unique #:  
Course Objectives:
This course deals with the dramatic impact of social, demographic, and labor force changes on social policies related to women and family. The seminar will consist of an examination of policies focused on aspects of marriage, family and work for adult women, minorities, and the elderly. In previous generations, a women's welfare was based upon her husband's earnings. That world has changed profoundly. Increasingly, a women's economic security is her own responsibility, and social policies including retirement policies, must change to reflect that new reality. In barely two generations norms and expectations concerning work and family have altered greatly. Women who are today in their fifties and sixties have grown up in a world in which marital disruption has become common. Unlike their grandmothers, younger generations of women, especially the more educated, can not count on their husbands or guarantee their economic security. Women no longer work to simply supplement their income but to build their own nest egg. As a result, many single women find themselves at a serious disadvantage in the event their marriage or work fails.

This course is offered to all graduate students at the University of Texas at Austin. The seminar is one of the topical electives in The University of Texas LBJ School of Public Affairs, Sociology Department, and fulfills requirements for the LBJ School specialization in economics and social policy.
Course Requirements and Grading:  The course will be organized as a combination of lecture, peer discussion, and application sessions.  Course grades will be based on three major requirements, including (1) a final policy analysis paper and oral presentation (50%); (2) leading a discussion section (25%); and (3) participation in weekly seminar discussions (25%).  

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