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Robert Crosnoe, Chair CLA 3.306, Mailcode A1700, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-232-6300

Keith Robinson

Ph.D., 2006, Sociology, University of Michigan

Assistant Professor
Keith Robinson

Contact

Biography

Keith Robinson's research focuses on the determinants and implications of test score (achievement) inequality in K-12 education. With the enactment of the No Child Left Behind Act the push to equalize achievement differences among poor performing groups has garnered considerable attention from policy makers and the general public. Specifically, there is wide interest in identifying factors that lead some groups of students to perform better than others. D. Robinson's work highlights the extent to which family and school factors contribute to achievement inequality, and suggests ways to equalize these differences. Much can be learned by examining the various stages of K-12 education since the determinants of achievement disparities change as children progress through schooling.

NIH Biosketch

SOC 317M • Intro To Social Research

44960 • Spring 2015
Meets MW 1200pm-100pm CLA 0.118
show description

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Sociology 317M is a general introduction to social research methods.  It is designed to introduce students to the intent and procedures of contemporary research methods.  For instance, we will discuss the factors determining the selection of particular data gathering techniques, their strengths and weaknesses, and the ethical and political issues that researchers may encounter during the research process.  A large part of the course will focus on the various methods used in research and data analysis.    

REQUIRED READINGS

Russell K. Schutt.  Investigating the Social World (5th edition, Pine Forge).  It is available at the Co-op bookstore. 

GRADING

Your overall grade for this course will be based on your performance on three in-class exams, five assignments (one of which is a final research paper), class participation and a presentation based on your final paper.  There will be a total of 250 available points for this course. No extra credit points will be available.

 A = 225-250                        D = 150-174                       

B = 200-224                        F = 149 and below                       

C = 175-199          

Exams                                     

There will be three in-class exams: the first will cover Chapters 1, 3, and 4; the second will cover Chapters 5, 6, and 8; the third will be considered a final exam and will cover Chapters 7, 9, 10, 14.  Exams will not be cumulative. 

POINT BREAKDOWN:

Assign 1= 5

Assign 2 = 20  

Assign 3 = 25

Assign 4 = 35 

Assign 5 (Final Paper) = 55

Exam 1 = 25  

Exam 2 = 35  

Exam 3 (Final) = 40

Participation = 10

Extra Credit = 5, 10 (see below)

Assignment #1: (5 points)

Group activity on validity. 

Assignment #2: Take-Home (20 points)

The focus of this assignment is the development of a preliminary research question for the final paper.  This assignment will be 1.5-2 pages in length double spaced. 

Assignment #3: Sampling (25 points)

 Assignment #4: Take-Home (35 points)

This assignment is meant to further develop your final research paper.  It will involve expanding what you did on assignment #2.  Paper length will be 5 pages. 

Assignment #5: Final Research Paper (55 points)

Students will be required to write a 10-page research paper.  Guidelines for the research paper will be distributed later in the semester.  

PARTICIPATION (10 points)

Participation points are part of the total 250 points.  Participation points have to be earned.  Simply coming to class is not considered participating.  Rather, receiving points is based on the contribution you make to a particular lecture discussion.  Asking questions (excluding ones for clarification), furthering the discussion with relevant points, answering questions posed by classmates or myself are ways to gain participation points. A maximum of 1 point per lecture can be gained through participation.  Only excused absences from lecture that constitute an emergency will allow you to make up points that were lost due to your absence. 

EXTRA CREDIT - PRESENTATIONS (10 points for presenters)

12 students will present an 8-10 minute Powerpoint slide on their research paper.  More details will be given during the course.

EXTRA CREDIT DURING PRESENTATIONS (5 points for non-presenters)

Non-presenters can gain a total of 5 points by contributing to the presentation discussion.  More details will be given in week 11. 

LATE ASSIGNMENTS & LATE RESEARCH PAPER

Will be marked down 5 points for every day the assignment is late unless a valid excuse is provided.  Assignments are officially late if not turned in by the end of the lab session in which they are due.  Late final papers will be accepted, but with a penalty for each day late.  Papers turned in after 3:00pm will be reduced by 5 points. Each day thereafter (a day ends at 3:00pm) will result in an additional 5 point deduction.  Papers that have not been turned in within four days of the due date will count for 0 points.

PLAGIARISM

Do not do it.

SOC 395E • Poverty, Race, And Schools

45205 • Spring 2015
Meets W 300pm-600pm CLA 3.214F
show description

Course Description

This seminar will focus on children's academic outcomes within the contexts of poverty, race/ethnicity, and schools in K-12 education. As part of the effort to understand why some children have higher quality schooling experiences than others, we will assess a number of student groups including, poor children, Latino/as, Asian Americans, and African Americans. We will also use the contexts of poverty, race, and schools to discuss the roles of teachers and parents in affecting children’s academic outcomes, with a primary emphasis placed on their importance in elementary and middle schooling. The majority of the course is based on contemporary readings by scholars in the fields of sociology and education. Each student is expected to take part in classroom discussions and also lead the class by presenting a selected set of readings. Assignments and grading will be announced on the first day of class.

Course Requirements

The course requirements include completing: two response papers each worth 30 points. Answers should be 2-3 pages per question single-spaced. Participation in this class is paramount. Students will be required to lead lecture at least twice over the semester. Students will also need to play an active role in classroom discussion each week. I expect each student to be well-read even when they are not presenting, and ready to contribute to the conversation. Participation will be worth 50 points. 

GRADING

Grading will be based on a 110-point scale derived as follows:

Reaction papers   60

Participation        50

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Total                    110

SOC 317M • Intro To Social Research

46154 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 1230pm-130pm CLA 2.606
show description

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Sociology 317M is a general introduction to social research methods.  It is designed to introduce students to the intent and procedures of contemporary research methods.  For instance, we will discuss the factors determining the selection of particular data gathering techniques, their strengths and weaknesses, and the ethical and political issues that researchers may encounter during the research process.  A large part of the course will focus on the various methods used in research and data analysis.    

REQUIRED READINGS

Russell K. Schutt.  Investigating the Social World (5th edition, Pine Forge).  It is available at the Co-op bookstore. 

GRADING

Your overall grade for this course will be based on your performance on three in-class exams, five assignments (one of which is a final research paper), class participation and a presentation based on your final paper.  There will be a total of 250 available points for this course. No extra credit points will be available.

 A = 225-250                        D = 150-174                       

B = 200-224                        F = 149 and below                       

C = 175-199          

Exams                                     

There will be three in-class exams: the first will cover Chapters 1, 3, and 4; the second will cover Chapters 5, 6, and 8; the third will be considered a final exam and will cover Chapters 7, 9, 10, 14.  Exams will not be cumulative. 

POINT BREAKDOWN:

Assign 1= 5

Assign 2 = 20  

Assign 3 = 25

Assign 4 = 35 

Assign 5 (Final Paper) = 55

Exam 1 = 25  

Exam 2 = 35  

Exam 3 (Final) = 40

Participation = 10

Extra Credit = 5, 10 (see below)

Assignment #1: (5 points)

Group activity on validity. 

Assignment #2: Take-Home (20 points)

The focus of this assignment is the development of a preliminary research question for the final paper.  This assignment will be 1.5-2 pages in length double spaced. 

Assignment #3: Sampling (25 points)

 Assignment #4: Take-Home (35 points)

This assignment is meant to further develop your final research paper.  It will involve expanding what you did on assignment #2.  Paper length will be 5 pages. 

Assignment #5: Final Research Paper (55 points)

Students will be required to write a 10-page research paper.  Guidelines for the research paper will be distributed later in the semester.  

PARTICIPATION (10 points)

Participation points are part of the total 250 points.  Participation points have to be earned.  Simply coming to class is not considered participating.  Rather, receiving points is based on the contribution you make to a particular lecture discussion.  Asking questions (excluding ones for clarification), furthering the discussion with relevant points, answering questions posed by classmates or myself are ways to gain participation points. A maximum of 1 point per lecture can be gained through participation.  Only excused absences from lecture that constitute an emergency will allow you to make up points that were lost due to your absence. 

EXTRA CREDIT - PRESENTATIONS (10 points for presenters)

12 students will present an 8-10 minute Powerpoint slide on their research paper.  More details will be given during the course.

EXTRA CREDIT DURING PRESENTATIONS (5 points for non-presenters)

Non-presenters can gain a total of 5 points by contributing to the presentation discussion.  More details will be given in week 11. 

LATE ASSIGNMENTS & LATE RESEARCH PAPER

Will be marked down 5 points for every day the assignment is late unless a valid excuse is provided.  Assignments are officially late if not turned in by the end of the lab session in which they are due.  Late final papers will be accepted, but with a penalty for each day late.  Papers turned in after 3:00pm will be reduced by 5 points. Each day thereafter (a day ends at 3:00pm) will result in an additional 5 point deduction.  Papers that have not been turned in within four days of the due date will count for 0 points.

PLAGIARISM

Do not do it.

SOC 395E • Poverty, Race, And Schools

46435 • Fall 2014
Meets TH 300pm-600pm CLA 3.106
show description

Course Description

This seminar will focus on children's academic outcomes within the contexts of poverty, race/ethnicity, and schools in K-12 education. As part of the effort to understand why some children have higher quality schooling experiences than others, we will assess a number of student groups including, poor children, Latino/as, Asian Americans, and African Americans. We will also use the contexts of poverty, race, and schools to discuss the roles of teachers and parents in affecting children’s academic outcomes, with a primary emphasis placed on their importance in elementary and middle schooling. The majority of the course is based on contemporary readings by scholars in the fields of sociology and education. Each student is expected to take part in classroom discussions and also lead the class by presenting a selected set of readings. Assignments and grading will be announced on the first day of class.

Course Requirements

The course requirements include completing: two response papers each worth 30 points. Answers should be 2-3 pages per question single-spaced. Participation in this class is paramount. Students will be required to lead lecture at least twice over the semester. Students will also need to play an active role in classroom discussion each week. I expect each student to be well-read even when they are not presenting, and ready to contribute to the conversation. Participation will be worth 50 points. 

GRADING

Grading will be based on a 110-point scale derived as follows:

Reaction papers   60

Participation        50

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Total                    110

SOC 317M • Intro To Social Research

46365 • Spring 2014
Meets MW 1200pm-100pm CLA 1.102
show description

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Sociology 317M is a general introduction to social research methods.  It is designed to introduce students to the intent and procedures of contemporary research methods.  For instance, we will discuss the factors determining the selection of particular data gathering techniques, their strengths and weaknesses, and the ethical and political issues that researchers may encounter during the research process.  A large part of the course will focus on the various methods used in research and data analysis.    

REQUIRED READINGS

Russell K. Schutt.  Investigating the Social World (5th edition, Pine Forge).  It is available at the Co-op bookstore. 

GRADING

Your overall grade for this course will be based on your performance on three in-class exams, five assignments (one of which is a final research paper), class participation and a presentation based on your final paper.  There will be a total of 250 available points for this course. No extra credit points will be available.

 A = 225-250                        D = 150-174                       

B = 200-224                        F = 149 and below                       

C = 175-199          

Exams                                     

There will be three in-class exams: the first will cover Chapters 1, 3, and 4; the second will cover Chapters 5, 6, and 8; the third will be considered a final exam and will cover Chapters 7, 9, 10, 14.  Exams will not be cumulative. 

POINT BREAKDOWN:

Assign 1= 5

Assign 2 = 20  

Assign 3 = 25

Assign 4 = 35 

Assign 5 (Final Paper) = 55

Exam 1 = 25  

Exam 2 = 35  

Exam 3 (Final) = 40

Participation = 10

Extra Credit = 5, 10 (see below)

Assignment #1: (5 points)

Group activity on validity. 

Assignment #2: Take-Home (20 points)

The focus of this assignment is the development of a preliminary research question for the final paper.  This assignment will be 1.5-2 pages in length double spaced. 

Assignment #3: Sampling (25 points)

 Assignment #4: Take-Home (35 points)

This assignment is meant to further develop your final research paper.  It will involve expanding what you did on assignment #2.  Paper length will be 5 pages. 

Assignment #5: Final Research Paper (55 points)

Students will be required to write a 10-page research paper.  Guidelines for the research paper will be distributed later in the semester.  

PARTICIPATION (10 points)

Participation points are part of the total 250 points.  Participation points have to be earned.  Simply coming to class is not considered participating.  Rather, receiving points is based on the contribution you make to a particular lecture discussion.  Asking questions (excluding ones for clarification), furthering the discussion with relevant points, answering questions posed by classmates or myself are ways to gain participation points. A maximum of 1 point per lecture can be gained through participation.  Only excused absences from lecture that constitute an emergency will allow you to make up points that were lost due to your absence. 

EXTRA CREDIT - PRESENTATIONS (10 points for presenters)

12 students will present an 8-10 minute Powerpoint slide on their research paper.  More details will be given during the course.

EXTRA CREDIT DURING PRESENTATIONS (5 points for non-presenters)

Non-presenters can gain a total of 5 points by contributing to the presentation discussion.  More details will be given in week 11. 

LATE ASSIGNMENTS & LATE RESEARCH PAPER

Will be marked down 5 points for every day the assignment is late unless a valid excuse is provided.  Assignments are officially late if not turned in by the end of the lab session in which they are due.  Late final papers will be accepted, but with a penalty for each day late.  Papers turned in after 3:00pm will be reduced by 5 points. Each day thereafter (a day ends at 3:00pm) will result in an additional 5 point deduction.  Papers that have not been turned in within four days of the due date will count for 0 points.

PLAGIARISM

Do not do it.

 

SOC 395E • Poverty, Race, And Schools

46635 • Spring 2014
Meets W 300pm-600pm CLA 4.106
show description

Description:

This seminar will focus on children's academic outcomes within the contexts of poverty, race, and schools in K-12 education.  As part of the effort to understand why some children have higher quality schooling experiences than others, we will assess a number of student groups including, poor children, Latino/as, Asian Americans, and African Americans.  We will also use these contexts to discuss the roles of teachers and parents in affecting children’s academic outcomes, with a primary emphasis placed on their importance in elementary and middle schooling.   Much of the course is based on contemporary readings by scholars in the fields of sociology and education.  Recognizing that schools play an important role in the quality of education individuals receive, this course will devote considerable attention to the dynamics of schools that have both positive and negative implications for student outcomes.  Currently, there are wide differences among schools in the types of classroom experiences schools provide students.   As we will discuss, these differences are linked to the ways in which schools are funded and in the ways in which teachers are distributed across schools. 

Grading and Requirements:

Each student is expected to take part in classroom discussions and also lead the class by presenting a selected set of readings.  Students will be graded on two reaction papers, two exams, and their participation.   

 

SOC 317M • Intro To Social Research

46125 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm PAR 310
show description

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Sociology 317M is a general introduction to social research methods.  It is designed to introduce students to the intent and procedures of contemporary research methods.  For instance, we will discuss the factors determining the selection of particular data gathering techniques, their strengths and weaknesses, and the ethical and political issues that researchers may encounter during the research process.  A large part of the course will focus on the various methods used in research and data analysis.    

REQUIRED READINGS

Russell K. Schutt.  Investigating the Social World (5th edition, Pine Forge).  It is available at the Co-op bookstore. 

GRADING

Your overall grade for this course will be based on your performance on three in-class exams, five assignments (one of which is a final research paper), class participation and a presentation based on your final paper.  There will be a total of 250 available points for this course. No extra credit points will be available.

 A = 225-250                        D = 150-174                       

B = 200-224                        F = 149 and below                       

C = 175-199          

Exams                                     

There will be three in-class exams: the first will cover Chapters 1, 3, and 4; the second will cover Chapters 5, 6, and 8; the third will be considered a final exam and will cover Chapters 7, 9, 10, 14.  Exams will not be cumulative. 

POINT BREAKDOWN:

Assign 1= 5

Assign 2 = 20  

Assign 3 = 25

Assign 4 = 35 

Assign 5 (Final Paper) = 55

Exam 1 = 25  

Exam 2 = 35  

Exam 3 (Final) = 40

Participation = 10

Extra Credit = 5, 10 (see below)

Assignment #1: (5 points)

Group activity on validity. 

Assignment #2: Take-Home (20 points)

The focus of this assignment is the development of a preliminary research question for the final paper.  This assignment will be 1.5-2 pages in length double spaced. 

Assignment #3: Sampling (25 points)

 Assignment #4: Take-Home (35 points)

This assignment is meant to further develop your final research paper.  It will involve expanding what you did on assignment #2.  Paper length will be 5 pages. 

Assignment #5: Final Research Paper (55 points)

Students will be required to write a 10-page research paper.  Guidelines for the research paper will be distributed later in the semester.  

PARTICIPATION (10 points)

Participation points are part of the total 250 points.  Participation points have to be earned.  Simply coming to class is not considered participating.  Rather, receiving points is based on the contribution you make to a particular lecture discussion.  Asking questions (excluding ones for clarification), furthering the discussion with relevant points, answering questions posed by classmates or myself are ways to gain participation points. A maximum of 1 point per lecture can be gained through participation.  Only excused absences from lecture that constitute an emergency will allow you to make up points that were lost due to your absence. 

EXTRA CREDIT - PRESENTATIONS (10 points for presenters)

12 students will present an 8-10 minute Powerpoint slide on their research paper.  More details will be given during the course.

EXTRA CREDIT DURING PRESENTATIONS (5 points for non-presenters)

Non-presenters can gain a total of 5 points by contributing to the presentation discussion.  More details will be given in week 11. 

LATE ASSIGNMENTS & LATE RESEARCH PAPER

Will be marked down 5 points for every day the assignment is late unless a valid excuse is provided.  Assignments are officially late if not turned in by the end of the lab session in which they are due.  Late final papers will be accepted, but with a penalty for each day late.  Papers turned in after 3:00pm will be reduced by 5 points. Each day thereafter (a day ends at 3:00pm) will result in an additional 5 point deduction.  Papers that have not been turned in within four days of the due date will count for 0 points.

PLAGIARISM

Do not do it.

 

SOC 317L • Intro To Social Statistics

45690 • Spring 2013
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm CLA 1.106
show description

Course Description

The goal of this course is to help students develop statistical literacy. The course will examine data analysis, inference; graphical and numerical summaries of numerical and categorical data; correlation and regression; and estimation, confidence intervals, and significance tests. There will be an emphasis social science examples and cases.

The course is divided into three main sections: (1) Descriptive Statistics; (2) Inferential Statistics; and (3) Applied Techniques. Descriptive statistics will allow you to summarize and describe data. Inferential Statistics will allow you to make estimates about a population (e.g., this entire class) based on a sample (e.g., 10 or 12 students in the class). The third section of the course will help you understand and interpret commonly used social science techniques that will help you to understand sociological research.

Texts

James Levin, James Alan Fox, and David R. Forde, Elementary Statistics in Social Research, (11th Edition), Pearson Press, ISBN 978-0-205-57069-0

Grading Policy

Grades: Grading for this class is very straight forward. Final grades are based on students' total point score as determined by performance on exams, problem sets, and class participation. Grades are based on a percentage of 200 points: 1 midterm (35 points) and 1 final exam (65 points); 5 lab assignments (15 points each); and class participation (25 points).

Exams: Exams will be cumulative. Exams are progressively weighted in recognition of the cumulative nature of the course and to allow you a chance to "get your head into the course" before final grades are determined.

Problem Sets: There will be 5 problem sets in the class worth 15 points each. Each assignment will be turned in during lab. No credit will be given for assignments turned in late.

Class Participation: Worth 25 points. TBD

Course grades will be assigned in the following manner based on a 200 point system:
A+ 193-200
A 186-192
A- 180-185
B+ 174-179
B 166-173
B- 160-165
C+ 154-159
C 146-153
C- 140-145
D+ 134-139
D 126-133
D- 120-125
F <120

Attendance and participation is MANDATORY. It is very unlikely that you'll do well or even pass this class if you do not regularly attend (i.e. miss only 1 or 2 class meetings) class. You must attend at least once during the first week of class to guarantee your place in it. If you fail to do so, you may be administratively dropped at the discretion of the course instructor and/or department.

 

SOC 395E • Poverty, Race, And Schools

45980 • Spring 2013
Meets W 300pm-600pm CLA 1.302A
show description

Description:

This seminar will focus on children's academic outcomes within the contexts of poverty, race, and schools in K-12 education.  As part of the effort to understand why some children have higher quality schooling experiences than others, we will assess a number of student groups including, poor children, Latino/as, Asian Americans, and African Americans.  We will also use these contexts to discuss the roles of teachers and parents in affecting children’s academic outcomes, with a primary emphasis placed on their importance in elementary and middle schooling.   Much of the course is based on contemporary readings by scholars in the fields of sociology and education.  Recognizing that schools play an important role in the quality of education individuals receive, this course will devote considerable attention to the dynamics of schools that have both positive and negative implications for student outcomes.  Currently, there are wide differences among schools in the types of classroom experiences schools provide students.   As we will discuss, these differences are linked to the ways in which schools are funded and in the ways in which teachers are distributed across schools. 

Grading and Requirements:

Each student is expected to take part in classroom discussions and also lead the class by presenting a selected set of readings.  Students will be graded on two reaction papers, two exams, and their participation.   

 

SOC 317L • Intro To Social Statistics

45485 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm BUR 136
show description

Course Description

The goal of this course is to help students develop statistical literacy. The course will examine data analysis, inference; graphical and numerical summaries of numerical and categorical data; correlation and regression; and estimation, confidence intervals, and significance tests. There will be an emphasis social science examples and cases.

The course is divided into three main sections: (1) Descriptive Statistics; (2) Inferential Statistics; and (3) Applied Techniques. Descriptive statistics will allow you to summarize and describe data. Inferential Statistics will allow you to make estimates about a population (e.g., this entire class) based on a sample (e.g., 10 or 12 students in the class). The third section of the course will help you understand and interpret commonly used social science techniques that will help you to understand sociological research.

Grading Policy

Grades: Grading for this class is very straight forward. Final grades are based on students' total point score as determined by performance on exams, problem sets, and class participation. Grades are based on a percentage of 200 points: 1 midterm (35 points) and 1 final exam (65 points); 5 lab assignments (15 points each); and class participation (25 points).

Exams: Exams will be cumulative. Exams are progressively weighted in recognition of the cumulative nature of the course and to allow you a chance to "get your head into the course" before final grades are determined.

Problem Sets: There will be 5 problem sets in the class worth 15 points each. Each assignment will be turned in during lab. No credit will be given for assignments turned in late.

Class Participation: Worth 25 points. TBD

Course grades will be assigned in the following manner based on a 200 point system:
A+ 193-200
A 186-192
A- 180-185
B+ 174-179
B 166-173
B- 160-165
C+ 154-159
C 146-153
C- 140-145
D+ 134-139
D 126-133
D- 120-125
F <120

Attendance and participation is MANDATORY. It is very unlikely that you'll do well or even pass this class if you do not regularly attend (i.e. miss only 1 or 2 class meetings) class. You must attend at least once during the first week of class to guarantee your place in it. If you fail to do so, you may be administratively dropped at the discretion of the course instructor and/or department.

Texts

James Levin, James Alan Fox, and David R. Forde, Elementary Statistics in Social Research, (11th Edition), Pearson Press, ISBN 978-0-205-57069-0

SOC 317L • Intro To Social Statistics

45490 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm BUR 220
show description

Course Description

The goal of this course is to help students develop statistical literacy. The course will examine data analysis, inference; graphical and numerical summaries of numerical and categorical data; correlation and regression; and estimation, confidence intervals, and significance tests. There will be an emphasis social science examples and cases.

The course is divided into three main sections: (1) Descriptive Statistics; (2) Inferential Statistics; and (3) Applied Techniques. Descriptive statistics will allow you to summarize and describe data. Inferential Statistics will allow you to make estimates about a population (e.g., this entire class) based on a sample (e.g., 10 or 12 students in the class). The third section of the course will help you understand and interpret commonly used social science techniques that will help you to understand sociological research.

Grading Policy

Grades: Grading for this class is very straight forward. Final grades are based on students' total point score as determined by performance on exams, problem sets, and class participation. Grades are based on a percentage of 200 points: 1 midterm (35 points) and 1 final exam (65 points); 5 lab assignments (15 points each); and class participation (25 points).

Exams: Exams will be cumulative. Exams are progressively weighted in recognition of the cumulative nature of the course and to allow you a chance to "get your head into the course" before final grades are determined.

Problem Sets: There will be 5 problem sets in the class worth 15 points each. Each assignment will be turned in during lab. No credit will be given for assignments turned in late.

Class Participation: Worth 25 points. TBD

Course grades will be assigned in the following manner based on a 200 point system:
A+ 193-200
A 186-192
A- 180-185
B+ 174-179
B 166-173
B- 160-165
C+ 154-159
C 146-153
C- 140-145
D+ 134-139
D 126-133
D- 120-125
F <120

Attendance and participation is MANDATORY. It is very unlikely that you'll do well or even pass this class if you do not regularly attend (i.e. miss only 1 or 2 class meetings) class. You must attend at least once during the first week of class to guarantee your place in it. If you fail to do so, you may be administratively dropped at the discretion of the course instructor and/or department.

Texts

James Levin, James Alan Fox, and David R. Forde, Elementary Statistics in Social Research, (11th Edition), Pearson Press, ISBN 978-0-205-57069-0

SOC 317L • Intro To Social Statistics

45460 • Spring 2012
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am GEA 114
show description

Course Description

The goal of this course is to help students develop statistical literacy. The course will examine data analysis, inference; graphical and numerical summaries of numerical and categorical data; correlation and regression; and estimation, confidence intervals, and significance tests. There will be an emphasis social science examples and cases.

The course is divided into three main sections: (1) Descriptive Statistics; (2) Inferential Statistics; and (3) Applied Techniques. Descriptive statistics will allow you to summarize and describe data. Inferential Statistics will allow you to make estimates about a population (e.g., this entire class) based on a sample (e.g., 10 or 12 students in the class). The third section of the course will help you understand and interpret commonly used social science techniques that will help you to understand sociological research.

Grading Policy

Grades: Grading for this class is very straight forward. Final grades are based on students' total point score as determined by performance on exams, problem sets, and class participation. Grades are based on a percentage of 200 points: 1 midterm (35 points) and 1 final exam (65 points); 5 lab assignments (15 points each); and class participation (25 points).

Exams: Exams will be cumulative. Exams are progressively weighted in recognition of the cumulative nature of the course and to allow you a chance to "get your head into the course" before final grades are determined.

Problem Sets: There will be 5 problem sets in the class worth 15 points each. Each assignment will be turned in during lab. No credit will be given for assignments turned in late.

Class Participation: Worth 25 points. TBD

Course grades will be assigned in the following manner based on a 200 point system:
A+ 193-200
A 186-192
A- 180-185
B+ 174-179
B 166-173
B- 160-165
C+ 154-159
C 146-153
C- 140-145
D+ 134-139
D 126-133
D- 120-125
F <120

Attendance and participation is MANDATORY. It is very unlikely that you'll do well or even pass this class if you do not regularly attend (i.e. miss only 1 or 2 class meetings) class. You must attend at least once during the first week of class to guarantee your place in it. If you fail to do so, you may be administratively dropped at the discretion of the course instructor and/or department.

Texts

James Levin, James Alan Fox, and David R. Forde, Elementary Statistics in Social Research, (11th Edition), Pearson Press, ISBN 978-0-205-57069-0

 

SOC 317L • Intro To Social Statistics

45465 • Spring 2012
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm NOA 1.116
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Course Description

The goal of this course is to help students develop statistical literacy. The course will examine data analysis, inference; graphical and numerical summaries of numerical and categorical data; correlation and regression; and estimation, confidence intervals, and significance tests. There will be an emphasis social science examples and cases.

The course is divided into three main sections: (1) Descriptive Statistics; (2) Inferential Statistics; and (3) Applied Techniques. Descriptive statistics will allow you to summarize and describe data. Inferential Statistics will allow you to make estimates about a population (e.g., this entire class) based on a sample (e.g., 10 or 12 students in the class). The third section of the course will help you understand and interpret commonly used social science techniques that will help you to understand sociological research.

Grading Policy

Grades: Grading for this class is very straight forward. Final grades are based on students' total point score as determined by performance on exams, problem sets, and class participation. Grades are based on a percentage of 200 points: 1 midterm (35 points) and 1 final exam (65 points); 5 lab assignments (15 points each); and class participation (25 points).

Exams: Exams will be cumulative. Exams are progressively weighted in recognition of the cumulative nature of the course and to allow you a chance to "get your head into the course" before final grades are determined.

Problem Sets: There will be 5 problem sets in the class worth 15 points each. Each assignment will be turned in during lab. No credit will be given for assignments turned in late.

Class Participation: Worth 25 points. TBD

Course grades will be assigned in the following manner based on a 200 point system:
A+ 193-200
A 186-192
A- 180-185
B+ 174-179
B 166-173
B- 160-165
C+ 154-159
C 146-153
C- 140-145
D+ 134-139
D 126-133
D- 120-125
F <120

Attendance and participation is MANDATORY. It is very unlikely that you'll do well or even pass this class if you do not regularly attend (i.e. miss only 1 or 2 class meetings) class. You must attend at least once during the first week of class to guarantee your place in it. If you fail to do so, you may be administratively dropped at the discretion of the course instructor and/or department.

Texts

James Levin, James Alan Fox, and David R. Forde, Elementary Statistics in Social Research, (11th Edition), Pearson Press, ISBN 978-0-205-57069-0

 

SOC 317M • Intro To Social Research

45315 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 1100am-1200pm BUR 214
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COURSE DESCRIPTION

Sociology 317M is a general introduction to social research methods.  It is designed to introduce students to the intent and procedures of contemporary research methods.  For instance, we will discuss the factors determining the selection of particular data gathering techniques, their strengths and weaknesses, and the ethical and political issues that researchers may encounter during the research process.  A large part of the course will focus on the various methods used in research and data analysis.    

REQUIRED READINGS

Russell K. Schutt.  Investigating the Social World (5th edition, Pine Forge).  It is available at the Co-op bookstore. 

GRADING

Your overall grade for this course will be based on your performance on three in-class exams, five assignments (one of which is a final research paper), class participation and a presentation based on your final paper.  There will be a total of 250 available points for this course. No extra credit points will be available.

 A = 225-250                        D = 150-174                       

B = 200-224                        F = 149 and below                       

C = 175-199          

Exams                                     

There will be three in-class exams: the first will cover Chapters 1, 3, and 4; the second will cover Chapters 5, 6, and 8; the third will be considered a final exam and will cover Chapters 7, 9, 10, 14.  Exams will not be cumulative. 

POINT BREAKDOWN:

Assign 1= 5

Assign 2 = 20  

Assign 3 = 25

Assign 4 = 35 

Assign 5 (Final Paper) = 55

Exam 1 = 25  

Exam 2 = 35  

Exam 3 (Final) = 40

Participation = 10

Extra Credit = 5, 10 (see below)

Assignment #1: (5 points)

Group activity on validity. 

Assignment #2: Take-Home (20 points)

The focus of this assignment is the development of a preliminary research question for the final paper.  This assignment will be 1.5-2 pages in length double spaced. 

Assignment #3: Sampling (25 points)

 Assignment #4: Take-Home (35 points)

This assignment is meant to further develop your final research paper.  It will involve expanding what you did on assignment #2.  Paper length will be 5 pages. 

Assignment #5: Final Research Paper (55 points)

Students will be required to write a 10-page research paper.  Guidelines for the research paper will be distributed later in the semester.  

PARTICIPATION (10 points)

Participation points are part of the total 250 points.  Participation points have to be earned.  Simply coming to class is not considered participating.  Rather, receiving points is based on the contribution you make to a particular lecture discussion.  Asking questions (excluding ones for clarification), furthering the discussion with relevant points, answering questions posed by classmates or myself are ways to gain participation points. A maximum of 1 point per lecture can be gained through participation.  Only excused absences from lecture that constitute an emergency will allow you to make up points that were lost due to your absence. 

EXTRA CREDIT - PRESENTATIONS (10 points for presenters)

12 students will present an 8-10 minute Powerpoint slide on their research paper.  More details will be given during the course.

EXTRA CREDIT DURING PRESENTATIONS (5 points for non-presenters)

Non-presenters can gain a total of 5 points by contributing to the presentation discussion.  More details will be given in week 11. 

LATE ASSIGNMENTS & LATE RESEARCH PAPER

Will be marked down 5 points for every day the assignment is late unless a valid excuse is provided.  Assignments are officially late if not turned in by the end of the lab session in which they are due.  Late final papers will be accepted, but with a penalty for each day late.  Papers turned in after 3:00pm will be reduced by 5 points. Each day thereafter (a day ends at 3:00pm) will result in an additional 5 point deduction.  Papers that have not been turned in within four days of the due date will count for 0 points.

PLAGIARISM

Do not do it.

 

 

SOC 395E • Poverty, Race, And Schools

45595 • Fall 2011
Meets T 300pm-600pm BUR 231
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Description:

This seminar will focus on children's academic outcomes within the contexts of poverty, race, and schools in K-12 education.  As part of the effort to understand why some children have higher quality schooling experiences than others, we will assess a number of student groups including, poor children, Latino/as, Asian Americans, and African Americans.  We will also use these contexts to discuss the roles of teachers and parents in affecting children’s academic outcomes, with a primary emphasis placed on their importance in elementary and middle schooling.   Much of the course is based on contemporary readings by scholars in the fields of sociology and education.  Recognizing that schools play an important role in the quality of education individuals receive, this course will devote considerable attention to the dynamics of schools that have both positive and negative implications for student outcomes.  Currently, there are wide differences among schools in the types of classroom experiences schools provide students.   As we will discuss, these differences are linked to the ways in which schools are funded and in the ways in which teachers are distributed across schools. 

 

Grading and Requirements:

Each student is expected to take part in classroom discussions and also lead the class by presenting a selected set of readings.  Students will be graded on two reaction papers, two exams, and their participation.   

 

SOC 317L • Intro To Social Statistics

46035 • Spring 2011
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am GEA 114
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Course Description

The goal of this course is to help students develop statistical literacy. The course will examine data analysis, inference; graphical and numerical summaries of numerical and categorical data; correlation and regression; and estimation, confidence intervals, and significance tests. There will be an emphasis social science examples and cases.

The course is divided into three main sections: (1) Descriptive Statistics; (2) Inferential Statistics; and (3) Applied Techniques. Descriptive statistics will allow you to summarize and describe data. Inferential Statistics will allow you to make estimates about a population (e.g., this entire class) based on a sample (e.g., 10 or 12 students in the class). The third section of the course will help you understand and interpret commonly used social science techniques that will help you to understand sociological research.

Grading Policy

Grades: Grading for this class is very straight forward. Final grades are based on students' total point score as determined by performance on exams, problem sets, and class participation. Grades are based on a percentage of 200 points: 1 midterm (35 points) and 1 final exam (65 points); 5 lab assignments (15 points each); and class participation (25 points).

Exams: Exams will be cumulative. Exams are progressively weighted in recognition of the cumulative nature of the course and to allow you a chance to "get your head into the course" before final grades are determined.

Problem Sets: There will be 5 problem sets in the class worth 15 points each. Each assignment will be turned in during lab. No credit will be given for assignments turned in late.

Class Participation: Worth 25 points. TBD

Course grades will be assigned in the following manner based on a 200 point system:
A+ 193-200
A 186-192
A- 180-185
B+ 174-179
B 166-173
B- 160-165
C+ 154-159
C 146-153
C- 140-145
D+ 134-139
D 126-133
D- 120-125
F <120

Attendance and participation is MANDATORY. It is very unlikely that you'll do well or even pass this class if you do not regularly attend (i.e. miss only 1 or 2 class meetings) class. You must attend at least once during the first week of class to guarantee your place in it. If you fail to do so, you may be administratively dropped at the discretion of the course instructor and/or department.

 

Texts

James Levin, James Alan Fox, and David R. Forde, Elementary Statistics in Social Research, (11th Edition), Pearson Press, ISBN 978-0-205-57069-0

 

 

SOC 317L • Intro To Social Statistics

46040 • Spring 2011
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm NOA 1.116
show description

Course Description

The goal of this course is to help students develop statistical literacy. The course will examine data analysis, inference; graphical and numerical summaries of numerical and categorical data; correlation and regression; and estimation, confidence intervals, and significance tests. There will be an emphasis social science examples and cases.

The course is divided into three main sections: (1) Descriptive Statistics; (2) Inferential Statistics; and (3) Applied Techniques. Descriptive statistics will allow you to summarize and describe data. Inferential Statistics will allow you to make estimates about a population (e.g., this entire class) based on a sample (e.g., 10 or 12 students in the class). The third section of the course will help you understand and interpret commonly used social science techniques that will help you to understand sociological research.

Grading Policy

Grades: Grading for this class is very straight forward. Final grades are based on students' total point score as determined by performance on exams, problem sets, and class participation. Grades are based on a percentage of 200 points: 1 midterm (35 points) and 1 final exam (65 points); 5 lab assignments (15 points each); and class participation (25 points).

Exams: Exams will be cumulative. Exams are progressively weighted in recognition of the cumulative nature of the course and to allow you a chance to "get your head into the course" before final grades are determined.

Problem Sets: There will be 5 problem sets in the class worth 15 points each. Each assignment will be turned in during lab. No credit will be given for assignments turned in late.

Class Participation: Worth 25 points. TBD

Course grades will be assigned in the following manner based on a 200 point system:
A+ 193-200
A 186-192
A- 180-185
B+ 174-179
B 166-173
B- 160-165
C+ 154-159
C 146-153
C- 140-145
D+ 134-139
D 126-133
D- 120-125
F <120

Attendance and participation is MANDATORY. It is very unlikely that you'll do well or even pass this class if you do not regularly attend (i.e. miss only 1 or 2 class meetings) class. You must attend at least once during the first week of class to guarantee your place in it. If you fail to do so, you may be administratively dropped at the discretion of the course instructor and/or department.

 

Texts

James Levin, James Alan Fox, and David R. Forde, Elementary Statistics in Social Research, (11th Edition), Pearson Press, ISBN 978-0-205-57069-0

 

 

Publications

Robinson, Keith and Angel L. Harris.  Forthcoming. The Broken Compass: Is Promoting Parental Involvement Leading Parents in the Wrong Direction? Harvard Press.

Robinson, Keith.  Accepted. “Early Disparities in Mathematics Gains among Poor and Non-Poor Children: Examining the Role of Behavioral Engagement in Learning.” The Elementary School Journal.

Robinson, Keith and Angel L. Harris. Accepted. “Racial and Social Class Differences in How Parents Respond to Inadequate Achievement: Consequences for Children's Future Achievement.”  Social Science Quarterly. 

Robinson, Keith. 2010. “Black-White Inequality in Reading and Math across K-12 Schooling: A Synthetic Cohort Perspective.” Review of Black Political Economy 37(3-4): 263-273.

Harris, Angel L. and Keith Robinson. 2007.  “Schooling Behaviors or Prior Skills?: A Cautionary Tale of Omitted Variable Bias within Oppositional Culture Theory.” Sociology of Education 80:139-57.

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