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Christine L. Williams, Chair CLA 3.306, Mailcode A1700, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-232-6300

Kelly Raley

Ph.D., University of Wisconsin - Madison

Professor
Kelly Raley

Contact

Biography

R. Kelly Raley is Professor of Sociology and Training Director at the Population Research Center, University of Texas at Austin. Her research investigates family trends, the social determinants of family formation, and the impact of family change on social stratification. As part of a larger agenda examining the economic, social, and cultural contributors to marriage disparities in the United States, she has recently completed a project investigating the influence of social contextual factors on adolescent relationship formation. Much of her work in this area has addressed racial and ethnic differences in marriage and cohabitation, but her current line of inquiry focuses on educational variation in family formation.

NIH Biosketch

Interests

Demography, Family, Race and Ethnic Relations, Education, Work Occupations and Organizations, Gender

SOC 317M • Intro To Social Research

46140 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 1230pm-130pm CLA 0.122
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Descripton:

The purpose of this course is to teach basic research skills. You can use these skills in a wide variety of settings (not just the ivory towers of academia).  Specifically, students will learn 1) basic research approaches, 2) how to recognize the strengths and weaknesses of these approaches and 3) how to apply these methods to a research problem.

To achieve these goals this course takes a "hands on" approach.  This means that often class time will involve your active participation.  It is essential that you come to class (and labs) having read the assigned material.

Course Grades are calculated as a weighted average of grades on assignments, papers, and exams. A=93-100; A-90-92; B+=87-89; B=83-86; B-=80-82; C+=77-79; C=73-76; C-70-72; D+=67-69; D=63-66; D-=60-62; F < 60.

Exam 1           10%

Exam 2           15%

Exam 3           15%

No make-up exams except in extreme circumstances.  Make ups will be 100% essay.

 

Analysis paper (20%) 

Review Paper (20%) 

Assignments (20% of your grade)-- There will be approximately 7. You may

drop one. All assignments should be word processed unless instructed otherwise.

Note: All late assignments will receive a grade of 0.  If for any reason you are unable to complete one assignment on time you may drop this assignment grade. 

Note Also: Class attendance is required.  Excessive absences will result in a lower grade.

Policy on Scholastic Dishonesty: Students who violate University rules on scholastic dishonesty are subject to disciplinary penalties, including the possibility of failure in the course and/or dismissal from The University.  Since such dishonesty harms the individual, all students, and the integrity of The University, policies on scholastic dishonesty will be strictly enforced. For more information on University policies check the web page: www.utexas.edu/depts/dos/sjs.  Unauthorized collaboration is considered scholastic dishonesty.

Text 

Babbie, Earl. 2007. The Practice of Social Research, 11th edition

Lab -- Most weeks the Thursday lab, held from 9-11, will meet and often an assignment grade will be related to work conducted during the lab.  For some lab assignments you may work as a group, but you should assume that collaboration is not allowed unless you are told specifically that the work is a group effort.  Usually, if you miss a lab you can get the assignment from the T.A., another student, or off of the course website.  However, if you miss the lab you may not collaborate with anyone.  NOTE: The exams occur during lab hours.

Analysis paper -- The purpose of this paper is to teach you how to analyze data, present results, and form a conclusion.  You will use the computer to analyze data from a secondary source (i.e. the General Social Survey). I will supply the data.  You will present your analyses in tables and/or graphs and discuss your findings.  Four to five pages of text, plus tables/graphs, title page and optional bibliography should be sufficient.

Review paper -- The purpose of this paper is to help you learn how to evaluate and improve on research.  You will identify a paper to review through a search of the literature and will write a paper describing this research, evaluating measurement validity, generalizability, and causal validity. 

SOC 389K • Family And Household Demog

46585 • Spring 2014
Meets TH 1200pm-300pm CLA 1.302F
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Description:

This seminar offers you the opportunity to learn more about trends in behavior, theories about family change, and analytical techniques for studying families and households. 

Course requirements:

Class participation (30%).  To help you get the most out of this seminar, you and your peers will lead class discussion.  I will provide a reading list, some (hopefully) thought provoking questions, and occasionally a question or comment during class.  Obviously, this means that coming to class prepared (having completed assigned readings and considered how they are interrelated) is essential, even for those not leading the class discussion.  Skimming the articles 1 or 2 hours before class does not constitute preparation.  Weekly attendance is required.  I will provide students feedback on their participation at the midpoint of the semester.

Research Proposal (60%). In addition to class participation, you will complete a proposal for research in the broadly defined area of family demography.   Data analysis is not required for this assignment, but a description of how you will empirically investigate your research question is necessary.  The hope is that this will serve as a start to a publishable paper and/or the acquisition of outside funding.  You will present your proposal to the class at the end of the semester. 

 

Texts:

TBA

 

 

Final (10%). Towards the end of the semester, I will administer a 1 hour exam worth 10% of your grade.  This exam will ask basic questions about family demography (e.g. What are 3 explanations for the decline in marriage?  Name one sociologist who has provided evidence for or against each explanation.)  I will use this exam primarily to evaluate the course strengths and weaknesses.  Students who keep up with class and keep good notes should not spend more than an hour or two preparing for this exam.

 

Tentative outline and reading list.  This list gives you an idea of the kinds of things we will cover in this class and the amount of reading that is required.  I may cancel or substitute a different reading for one on this list. Readings with a * are required.

SOC 389K • Gen Approach To Study Of Pop

45710 • Spring 2012
Meets T 300pm-600pm BUR 480
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DESCRIPTION

The purpose of this course is to provide an overview of the field of demography. We cover the basic processes of the field--mortality, fertility, migration, and population distribution, along with several sub-fields. The two main goals of this course are to 1) introduce students to both classic and current literature in the field of social demography, 2) teach students to critically assess the major theories associated with population change. By the end of the semester, students should also know general trends in global population development and have an appreciation of the inter-related nature of migration, fertility, mortality, and age structure. Note that, for those of you who plan a career in social demography, this course provides only a starting point. Students should keep abreast of developments in the literature by reading the leading journals (Demography, Population and Development Review, Population Studies, Population Bulletin, Population Research and Policy Review, and Demographic Research). 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS 

The course meets once a week (Tuesday afternoons), and attendance is expected. I also expect that you will have read the assigned reading for that week and will actively participate in class discussions. Note that I may slightly change the reading list for some section of the course later. You will know the required readings no later than a week before the class they will be discussed. 

GRADING AND REQUIREMENTS

There will be a mid-term exam administered in class  and a take home, cumulative final.

In-class midterm exam  30%

Class participation 40%

Take-home cumulative final 30%. 

Class participation is a core portion of the course. Attendance is mandatory, but not sufficient. Each class session we will discuss 4-6 related readings on a core topic. This discussion will begin with a summary by a student discussion leader. For the discussion leaders and the rest of the class it is a good idea to take notes while you read so that you are prepared for this discussion. After identifying the main points of each article, class members should discuss its strengths, weaknesses, and contributions – and discuss ways in which it may or may not stimulate further research. Again, student preparation and active contribution will be the key to making this work. It is not simply the discussion leader’s responsibility to do all the talking. The class participation portion of your grade will be determined by attendance, the sessions you lead, and your participation in the discussion during sessions you do not lead. 

Examinations will have you answer several questions that ask you to synthesize literature in the area, as well as summarize and evaluate some of the key theories/findings of the field. These exams will also aid in your preparation for the comprehensive examination in demography, if that is your specialization. For the take-home final, your answers must be word-processed. Late examinations will result in a one-letter-grade penalty for each day beyond the due date. 

SOC 317M • Intro To Social Research

46060 • Spring 2011
Meets MW 1000am-1100am GAR 0.120
show description

Description

The purpose of this course is to teach basic research skills. You can use these skills in a wide variety of settings (not just the ivory towers of academia). Specifically, students will learn 
1) basic research approaches
2) how to recognize the strengths and weaknesses of these approaches 
3) how to apply these methods to a research problem.
To achieve these goals this course takes a

Grading Policy

Course Grades are calculated as a weighted average of grades on assignments, papers, and exams. 
3 Quizzes:
September 24 10% 
October 29th 15%
December 5th 15%
Be sure to mark your calendar! No make-up quizzes except in extreme circumstances. Make ups will be 100% essay. October 15th--Analysis paper 15%
Design Paper 25% (Due Dec 7th--start early!!)
(Optional first draft due Nov 12th)
Assignments 20% 
(There will be approximately 7. You may drop one. All assignments should be word processed unless instructed otherwise.)

Note: All late assignments will receive a grade of 0. If (for any reason) you are unable to complete one assignment on time you may drop this assignment grade. However, you must complete all assignments. If you do not turn in all assignments by December 7th, I will assign you a letter grade one lower than you would have received otherwise. Note Also: Class attendance is required. Excessive absences will result in a lower grade.

Texts

Schutt, Russell K., Investigating the Social World, Fifth Edition, Pine Forge Press, 2006

SOC 389K • Gen Approach To Study Of Pop

46270 • Spring 2011
Meets T 300pm-600pm BUR 480
show description

The purpose of this course is to provide an overview of the field of demography.  We cover the basic processes of the field--mortality, fertility, migration, and population distribution, along with several sub-fields. The two main goals of this course are to 1) introduce students to both classic and current literature in the field of social demography, 2) teach students to critically assess the major theories associated with population change.  By the end of the semester, students should also know general trends in global population development and have an appreciation of the inter-related nature of migration, fertility, mortality, and age structure. Note that, for those of you who plan a career in social demography, this course provides only a starting point. Students should keep abreast of developments in the literature by reading the leading journals (Demography, Population and Development Review, Population Studies, Population Bulletin, Population Research and Policy Review, and Demographic Research).

 

Course Requirements

The course meets once a week (Tuesday afternoons), and attendance is expected.  I also expect that you will have read the assigned reading for that week and will actively participate in class discussions.  Note that I may slightly change the reading list for some section of the course later.  You will know the required readings no later than a week before the class they will be discussed.

There will be a mid-term exam administered in class on Tuesday March 22 and a take home, cumulative final due at noon on Wednesday May 11.  Grades are calculated by the following formula: an in class midterm exam – 30%; class participation - 40 %; take-home cumulative final 30 - %.

Class participation is a core portion of the course.  Attendance is mandatory, but not sufficient. Each class session we will discuss 4-6 related readings on a core topic. This discussion will begin with a summary by a student discussion leader.  For the discussion leaders and the rest of the class it is a good idea to take notes while you read so that you are prepared for this discussion.  After identifying the main points of each article, class members should discuss its strengths, weaknesses, and contributions – and discuss ways in which it may or may not stimulate further research.  Again, student preparation and active contribution will be the key to making this work.  It is not simply the discussion leader’s responsibility to do all the talking.  The class participation portion of your grade will be determined by attendance, the sessions you lead, and your participation in the discussion during sessions you do not lead.

Examinations will have you answer several questions that ask you to synthesize literature in the area, as well as summarize and evaluate some of the key theories/findings of the field.  These exams will also aid in your preparation for the comprehensive examination in demography, if that is your specialization. For the take-home final, your answers must be word-processed. Late examinations will result in a one-letter-grade penalty for each day beyond the due date.

SOC 389K.1 • Gen Approach To Study Of Pop

46545 • Spring 2010
Meets M 1200-300pm BUR 480
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General Statement

The purpose of this course is to provide an overview of the field of demography.  We cover the basic processes of the field--mortality, fertility, migration, and population distribution, along with several sub-fields. The two main goals of this course are to 1) introduce students to both classic and current literature in the field of social demography, 2) teach students to critically assess the major theories associated with population change.  By the end of the semester, students should also know general trends in global population development and have an appreciation of the inter-related nature of migration, fertility, mortality, and age structure. Note that, for those of you who plan a career in social demography, this course provides only a starting point. Students should keep abreast of developments in the literature by reading the leading journals (Demography, Population and Development Review, Population Studies, Population Bulletin, Population Research and Policy Review, and Demographic Research).

Course Requirements

The course meets once a week (Monday afternoons), and attendance is expected.  I also expect that you will have read the assigned reading for that week and will actively participate in class discussions.  Note that I may slightly change the reading list for some section of the course later.  You will know the required readings no later than a week before the class they will be discussed.

There will be a mid-term exam administered in class on Wednesday March 22 and a take home, cumulative final due at noon on Friday May 14.  Grades are calculated by the following formula: an in class midterm exam - 35 percent; class participation - 30 percent; take-home cumulative final 35 - percent.

Class participation is a core portion of the course.  Attendance is mandatory, but not sufficient. To begin class I will discuss the main questions and themes of the week. After this, the discussion leaders will take over to quickly review the main points of each of the rest of the articles and generate a discussion of each.  For the discussion leaders and the rest of the class it is a good idea to take notes while you read so that you are prepared for this discussion.  After identifying the main points of each article, class members should discuss its strengths, weaknesses, and contributions – and discuss ways in which it may or may not stimulate further research.  Again, student preparation and active contribution will be the key to making this work.  It is not simply the discussion leader’s responsibility to do all the talking.  The class participation portion of your grade will be determined by attendance, the two sessions you lead, and your participation in the discussion during sessions you do not lead.

Examinations will have you answer several questions that ask you to synthesize literature in the area, as well as summarize and evaluate some of the key theories/findings of the field.  These exams will also aid in your preparation for the comprehensive examination in demography, if that is your specialization. For the take-home final, your answers must be word-processed. Late examinations will result in a one-letter-grade penalty for each day beyond the due date.

Notes on UT Policies

Note on Students with Disabilities. The University of Texas at Austin provides upon request appropriate academic accommodations for qualified students with disabilities.  For more information, contact the Office of the Dean of Students at 471-6259, 471-6441 TTY. 

Policy on Scholastic Dishonesty. Students who violate University rules on scholastic dishonesty are subject to disciplinary penalties, including the possibility of failure in the course and/or dismissal from the University.  Since such dishonesty harms the individual, all students, and the integrity of the University, policies on scholastic dishonesty will be strictly enforced.  For further information, please visit the Student Judicial Services website at: http://deanofstudents.utexas.edu/sjs

Course Schedule and Readings are in the attachment.

The Course website is http://courses.utexas.edu

SOC 389K.6 • Training Smnr In Demography

46555 • Spring 2010
Meets F 1030-130pm BUR 214
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Summary and Goals:
The main purpose of this course is to serve as a practical guide to a launching professional career  in social demography.  We cover issues such as collaboration,  research ethics, publishing, grants, and interviewing for jobs.  The training seminar is held Friday mornings.  For one hour of the course, we are joined by colleagues throughout the University for the Brown Bag Lecture.  On some weeks this lecture will be followed by lunch and an informal meeting with the brownbag speaker.  Students are welcomed to repeat the course. 

Requirements:
For credit, students are required to attend all classes and participate in class discussion.  All absences must be cleared, preferably in advance.  To prepare for class discussion, students will occasionally be required to read an article.  The listed readings are to be completed prior to our meeting.  Additionally, students will have an opportunity to prepare a C.V. and research agenda for comments.  Finally, I recommend everyone to complete the NIH human subjects review certification, although again this is not required.

Credit will be determined as follows:

Consistent attendance and participation are required for credit.

Publications

Augustine, Jennifer March and R. Kelly Raley. Forthcoming. “Multigenerational Households and the School Readiness of Children Born to Unmarried Mothers.” Journal of Family Issues.

Sullivan, M. Kate, R. Kelly Raley, Robert A. Hummer, and Emily Schiefelbein.  Forthcoming. The Potential Contribution of Marital-Cohabitation Status to Racial, Ethnic, and Nativity Differentials in Birth Outcomes in Texas.” Maternal and Child Health Journal.

Raley, R. Kelly. 2011. In Booth et al (Eds). “I just want your kiss? Sexual Relationships in Young Adulthood”  Early Adulthood in a Family Context. New York. Springer

Raley, R. Kelly. 2011. “Family and Household Composition of the Population”. In M. Anderson, C. Citro, and J. Salvo (Eds) Encyclopedia of the U.S. Census: Second Edition.  Washington D.C.: CQ Press.

download

McNamee, Catherine M. and R. Kelly Raley. 2011. “A Note on Race, Ethnicity and Nativity Differentials in Remarriage in the United States.” Demographic Research.

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Raley, R. Kelly and Charles E. Stokes. 2010. Kin Connection: Kin Involvement While Growing Up and Marriage in Adulthood. Social Science Research

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Raley, R. Kelly and M. Kate Sullivan. 2010. Social-Contextual influences on Adolescent Romantic and Sexual Activity. Sociological Spectrum, 30: 65-89.

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Raley, R. Kelly and Megan M. Sweeney. 2009. Explaining race and ethnic variation in marriage: Directions for future research. Race and Social Problems, 1:132-142.

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Choi, Kate H., R. Kelly Raley, Chandra Muller, and Catherine Riegle-Crumb. 2008. “A Longitudinal Analysis of Exposure to Peers with College Educated Parents and Student’s College Enrollment.” Social Science Quarterly, 89: 846-866

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Cavanagh, Shannon, Sarah Crissey, and Kelly Raley.  2008. Family Structure and Adolescent Opposite Sex Relationships. Journal of Marriage and Family. 70: 698-714.

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Stokes, Charles E. and R. Kelly Raley. Cohabitation. In D. Carr et al. (Eds). Encyclopedia of the Life Course and Human Development. Farmington Hills, MI: Gale

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Raley, R. Kelly, Sarah Crissey, & Chandra Muller. 2007. “Of Sex and Romance: Adolescent relationships in the transition to adulthood.” Journal of Marriage and Family 69: 1210-1226.

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Wildsmith, Elizabeth and R. Kelly Raley. 2006. “Race-Ethnic Differences in Nonmarital Fertility: A Focus on Mexican American Women.” Journal of Marriage and Family. 68: 491-508

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Raley, R. Kelly, Michelle Frisco, & Elizabeth Wildsmith. 2005. “Maternal Cohabitation and Educational Success” Sociology of Education. 78: 144-164.

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Woo, Hyeyoung & and R. Kelly Raley. 2005. A Small Extension to “Costs and Rewards of Children: The Effects of Becoming a Parent on Adults’ Lives.” Journal of Marriage and Family 67: 216–221

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Raley, R. Kelly, T. Elizabeth Durden, & Elizabeth Wildsmith. 2004.  “Understanding Mexican American Marriage Patterns Using a Life Course ApproachSocial Science Quarterly. 85 (4): 872-890.

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Raley, R. Kelly and Jenifer Bratter. 2004."Not Even if You Were the Last Person on Earth!  How Marital Search Constraints Affect the Likelihood of Marriage.”  Journal of Family Issues. 25: 167-181.

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Raley, R. Kelly and Wildsmith, Elizabeth. 2004.  “Cohabitation and Children’s Family Instability” Journal of Marriage and the Family. 66:210-219

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Working Papers

Young Adults Fertility Expectations and Events, Associations with College Enrollment and Persistence

The analyses described in this paper investigate the association between adolescent fertility expectations and college enrollment (N=7,838). Additionally, they explore the potential impact of fertility expectations and events on college persistence among four-year (n=2,605) and two-year (n=1,962) college students. Our analysis using the NLSY 1997 cohort shows a significant association between expectations for early parenthood and the likelihood of going to a four-year college or two-year college for both men and women. Additionally, we find that pregnancies are associated with an increased risk of college drop out for women. Yet, if all of the estimated effect of pregnancies on the risk of drop out were causal, they would still not be a major factor contributing to educational attainment because fertile pregnancies among college women are so rare.

 

Forthcoming in Journal of Marriage and Family

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