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Robert Crosnoe, Chair CLA 3.306, Mailcode A1700, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-232-6300

Mark D. Hayward

Ph.D., Indiana University, Bloomington

Director, PRC; Professor of Sociology & Centennial Commission Professor in the Liberal Arts
Mark D. Hayward

Contact

Biography

Mark Hayward is a professor of sociology, Centennial Commission Professor in the Liberal Arts, and director of the Population Research Center at the University of Texas at Austin. He recently served as the the president of the Southern Demographic Association and chair of the Aging and Life Course section of the American Sociological Association. He has served on the boards of the Population Association of America and the Society of Biodemography and Social Biology, and he was a member and then chair of the Inter-University Consortium for Political and Social Research council. Currently, he is a member of the Committee on Population, National Academy of Sciences, and the National Advisory Committee for the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation's Health and Society Scholars Program.  Professor Hayward received his Ph.D. in sociology from Indiana University in 1981.

His primary research addresses how life course exposures and events influence the morbidity and mortality experiences of the adult population. Recent studies have clarified how early life conditions influence socioeconomic, race and gender disparities in adult morbidity and mortality; the demography of race/ethnic and gender disparities in healthy life expectancy; social inequality in the biomarkers of aging, and the health consequences of marriage, divorce, and widowhood. Most recently, he has been investigating the fundamental inequalities in adult mortality in the United States arising from educational experience, differences in these associations by race and gender, and the growing educational inequality in mortality. His research on these topics has been by the National Institute on Aging and the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute on Child Health and Human Development. His recently published work has appeared in the American Journal of Public Health, Demography, the Journals of Gerontology: Social Sciences, the Journal of Health and Social Behavior, and Social Science and Medicine.

Professor Hayward has served on a number of scientific advisory boards at universities around the country as well as the National Institutes of Health. He has a long-standing interest in enhancing the measurement and collection of population health data, particularly longitudinal data, and has served on the advisory boards of a number of national studies of population health.

NIH Biosketch

Interests

Life course origins of health disparities, morbidity and mortality, biodemography

SOC 389K • Demography Hlth/Life Crse

46395 • Fall 2014
Meets M 1200pm-300pm CLA 3.106
show description

COURSE CONTENT:

This course is intended to provide an in-depth introduction to the major conceptual frameworks and empirical research examining distal and proximate social factors influencing adult health. The underlying question is – “Does the body forget insults and exposures from adverse social conditions over the life course?” In grappling with this question, we will pay close attention to the intersection between the etiology of adult health conditions and the major life-course trajectories of socioeconomic position and family. Of major importance will be the assessment of key social and biological pathways linking social conditions at particular points in the life course with adult health outcomes. 

REQUIREMENTS:

The course is organized as a seminar. Although I will provide overviews and/or supplemental material in lecture, much instruction takes place in the context of guided discussion and exchanges focused on the readings. Students are expected to attend each class and to have read all of the assigned material thoroughly and critically before the class meeting. Reading critically means not only being able to describe the content of an assigned piece, but also to evaluate the scientific issues motivating the research question, the conceptual/theoretical strengths of the research, the adequacy of the study’s methods, the scientific implications of the study’s findings, and the study’s relation to other course material). Students are strongly encouraged to contribute to the discussion both their insights and/or questions from the readings and their own experiences. There are two major tasks to be accomplished in this graduate seminar:

1) The first task involves preparation of the reading for class presentation and discussion. All students are responsible for all of the assigned readings. Class discussions will be oriented around informal student presentations based on the assigned readings. For each class meeting, a student will be assigned an article, and the student will informally present the scientific factors motivating a study, the key gaps in knowledge being addressed, the major findings, and the conceptual/methodological strengths and weaknesses of the study. An outline of the presentation’s key points (1 page) should be distributed to the class on the Tuesday prior to class. The informal presentations should not be longer than 15 minutes – and 10 minutes is desirable!

(20% of grade)

2) The second task is an empirical study on a topic that is relevant to the course’s overall aim. Two assignments are required in accomplishing this task: a poster presentation and a term paper. The empirical study may overlap with research being done either as part of a student’s thesis/dissertation research, in conjunction with work being done in another course (with the permission). The study should be original research, with the aims of making a scientific contribution to the literature and eventual publication in a scientific outlet. Given the time constraints imposed by the semester, I recommend that students rely on publicly accessible datasets (e.g., the Health and Retirement Survey, the National Health Interview Surveys, the National Longitudinal Surveys, Americans’ Changing Lives, and Aging, Status, Sense of Control). Other rich datasets are available from NACDA and ICPSR, two major electronic data archives. Students are required to discuss their topic with me before moving forward. Students should submit 1-page abstracts. . I will use the abstract to gauge the paper’s topic  relevance to the course aims, and as a basis to provide critical feedback to refine conceptual ideas and focus the analysis.

1) Poster presentation:  These sessions will give students a chance to present their work to their colleagues, to field comments,and to refine their ideas and analysis prior to submitting the term paper. Posters should followthe format that one would use if presenting the results at a major scientific meetings such as the Population Association of America. However, you do not actually need to construct an actualposter. Poster “pages” should be constructed using Powerpoint for presentation to the class.

(30% of grade)

2) Term paper  should aim to be a publishable scientific work suitable for submission to a scientific journal such as Demography. Students should review articles in Demography or other major journals for guidance on presentation styles and organizational format. (50% of grade)

SOC 389K • Event History Analysis

46360 • Fall 2013
Meets W 1200pm-300pm CLA 0.124
show description

DESCRIPTION: 

This course provides an in-depth introduction to survival methods for the analysis of change in time-dependent discrete dependent variables. The course draws on methodological and empirical research from the social sciences. Special attention is directed at the relationship between theories of social change, life course attainment and dynamic models. Moreover, we will examine alternative data collection strategies to obtain longitudinal data. Examples and homework assignments will draw principally on three data sets: the German Life History Study (GLHS), the National Longitudinal Survey of Older Men, and the National Health Interview Surveys. 

The course begins by focusing on simple stochastic processes for qualitative variables. We do so through the lens of non-parametric, discrete-time life table techniques. The topics include basic life table relations, single- and multiple-decrement life table models, and increment-decrement life table models. The purpose is to learn how to describe increasingly complex dynamic social processes. We then turn to continuous-time, discrete-state models. Parametric and partially parametric models will be introduced which allow for the dependency of rates on both explanatory factors and time. We will briefly examine some special topics including competing risk models, local hazard models, unobserved sources of heterogeneity in hazard models, and continuous state-space hazard models. The purpose of this aspect of the course is to communicate the variety and power of multivariate hazard models for hypothesis testing of social science processes. 

PREREQUISITES: 

Students should have completed the graduate statistics core sequence in sociology (or the equivalent) and have a thorough knowledge of the general linear model. A background in log-linear analysis and logistic regression is important, because hazard models are part of the class of log-linear models. Students must have a solid knowledge of a major spreadsheet package (e.g., EXCEL) for computing and graphing. 

REQUIREMENTS: 

In addition to reading required materials, attending class sessions, and contributing in class, students must complete three sets of written assignments. First, homework occasionally will be assigned. Homework assignments will involve both numerical problem solving and critical writing. The second and third written requirements are the mid-term and final exams. Both exams will be take-home exams involving longitudinal data analysis. The basic aim of the exams is to educate you about how one goes about formulating, estimating, and interpreting event history models. Grades will be based on the two exams (45% each) and the homework 

(10%). I also will evaluate the homework assignments to identify concepts or techniques that are problematic. 

I am also offering the option of writing an empirical paper using event history techniques in lieu of taking the final exam. If you choose this option, you will need to inform me immediately after the mid-term exam. 

READINGS: 

The technical literature on survival analysis is voluminous, spanning a variety of fields. For example, partial likelihood hazard models were developed primarily within biostatistics, while the much of the development of parametric hazard models took place within sociology and economics. Starting in the late 1980s, a literature emerged which places these different traditions within a more general survival analysis framework. A major work in this vein is the book, Event History Analysis (Blossfeld, Hamerle, and Mayer, 1989). This text also shows how to estimate hazard models using a variety of software packages (e.g., SAS). More recently Techniques of Event History Modeling was published (Blossfeld and Rohwer, 1995, 2002); this is a comprehensive introduction to continuous-time event history techniques. The 2002 2nd edition is the core text for this course. 

The textbook has been ordered by the UT bookstore. The full title is: 

Blossfeld, Hans-Peter, and Götz Rohwer. 2002. Techniques of Event History Modeling. Second Edition. Mahway, New Jersey: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates. 

If you are a Stata user and plan to use event history models extensively in your work, you might want to consider ordering a version of this text that uses Stata to generate the examples shown in the text. The text is: 

Blossfeld, Hans-Peter, Katrin Golsch, and Götz Rohwer. 2007. Event History Analysis with Stata. Mahway, New Yersey: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates. 

 

SOC 389K • Demography Hlth/Life Crse

45730 • Fall 2012
Meets M 1200pm-300pm MAI 1704
show description

COURSE CONTENT:

This course is intended to provide an in-depth introduction to the major conceptual frameworks and empirical research examining distal and proximate social factors influencing adult health. The underlying question is – “Does the body forget insults and exposures from adverse social conditions over the life course?” In grappling with this question, we will pay close attention to the intersection between the etiology of adult health conditions and the major life-course trajectories of socioeconomic position and family. Of major importance will be the assessment of key social and biological pathways linking social conditions at particular points in the life course with adult health outcomes. 

REQUIREMENTS:

The course is organized as a seminar. Although I will provide overviews and/or supplemental material in lecture, much instruction takes place in the context of guided discussion and exchanges focused on the readings. Students are expected to attend each class and to have read all of the assigned material thoroughly and critically before the class meeting. Reading critically means not only being able to describe the content of an assigned piece, but also to evaluate the scientific issues motivating the research question, the conceptual/theoretical strengths of the research, the adequacy of the study’s methods, the scientific implications of the study’s findings, and the study’s relation to other course material). Students are strongly encouraged to contribute to the discussion both their insights and/or questions from the readings and their own experiences. There are two major tasks to be accomplished in this graduate seminar:

1) The first task involves preparation of the reading for class presentation and discussion. All students are responsible for all of the assigned readings. Class discussions will be oriented around informal student presentations based on the assigned readings. For each class meeting, a student will be assigned an article, and the student will informally present the scientific factors motivating a study, the key gaps in knowledge being addressed, the major findings, and the conceptual/methodological strengths and weaknesses of the study. An outline of the presentation’s key points (1 page) should be distributed to the class on the Tuesday prior to class. The informal presentations should not be longer than 15 minutes – and 10 minutes is desirable!

(20% of grade)

2) The second task is an empirical study on a topic that is relevant to the course’s overall aim. Two assignments are required in accomplishing this task: a poster presentation and a term paper. The empirical study may overlap with research being done either as part of a student’s thesis/dissertation research, in conjunction with work being done in another course (with the permission). The study should be original research, with the aims of making a scientific contribution to the literature and eventual publication in a scientific outlet. Given the time constraints imposed by the semester, I recommend that students rely on publicly accessible datasets (e.g., the Health and Retirement Survey, the National Health Interview Surveys, the National Longitudinal Surveys, Americans’ Changing Lives, and Aging, Status, Sense of Control). Other rich datasets are available from NACDA and ICPSR, two major electronic data archives. Students are required to discuss their topic with me before moving forward. Students should submit 1-page abstracts. . I will use the abstract to gauge the paper’s topic  relevance to the course aims, and as a basis to provide critical feedback to refine conceptual ideas and focus the analysis.

1) Poster presentation:  These sessions will give students a chance to present their work to their colleagues, to field comments,and to refine their ideas and analysis prior to submitting the term paper. Posters should followthe format that one would use if presenting the results at a major scientific meetings such as the Population Association of America. However, you do not actually need to construct an actualposter. Poster “pages” should be constructed using Powerpoint for presentation to the class.

(30% of grade)

2) Term paper  should aim to be a publishable scientific work suitable for submission to a scientific journal such as Demography. Students should review articles in Demography or other major journals for guidance on presentation styles and organizational format. (50% of grade)

 

SOC 389K • Event History Analysis

45730 • Spring 2012
Meets W 300pm-600pm MAI 1704
show description

DESCRIPTION: 

This course provides an in-depth introduction to survival methods for the analysis of change in time-dependent discrete dependent variables. The course draws on methodological and empirical research from the social sciences. Special attention is directed at the relationship between theories of social change, life course attainment and dynamic models. Moreover, we will examine alternative data collection strategies to obtain longitudinal data. Examples and homework assignments will draw principally on three data sets: the German Life History Study (GLHS), the National Longitudinal Survey of Older Men, and the National Health Interview Surveys. 

The course begins by focusing on simple stochastic processes for qualitative variables. We do so through the lens of non-parametric, discrete-time life table techniques. The topics include basic life table relations, single- and multiple-decrement life table models, and increment-decrement life table models. The purpose is to learn how to describe increasingly complex dynamic social processes. We then turn to continuous-time, discrete-state models. Parametric and partially parametric models will be introduced which allow for the dependency of rates on both explanatory factors and time. We will briefly examine some special topics including competing risk models, local hazard models, unobserved sources of heterogeneity in hazard models, and continuous state-space hazard models. The purpose of this aspect of the course is to communicate the variety and power of multivariate hazard models for hypothesis testing of social science processes. 

PREREQUISITES: 

Students should have completed the graduate statistics core sequence in sociology (or the equivalent) and have a thorough knowledge of the general linear model. A background in log-linear analysis and logistic regression is important, because hazard models are part of the class of log-linear models. Students must have a solid knowledge of a major spreadsheet package (e.g., EXCEL) for computing and graphing. 

REQUIREMENTS: 

In addition to reading required materials, attending class sessions, and contributing in class, students must complete three sets of written assignments. First, homework occasionally will be assigned. Homework assignments will involve both numerical problem solving and critical writing. The second and third written requirements are the mid-term and final exams. Both exams will be take-home exams involving longitudinal data analysis. The basic aim of the exams is to educate you about how one goes about formulating, estimating, and interpreting event history models. Grades will be based on the two exams (45% each) and the homework 

(10%). I also will evaluate the homework assignments to identify concepts or techniques that are problematic. 

I am also offering the option of writing an empirical paper using event history techniques in lieu of taking the final exam. If you choose this option, you will need to inform me immediately after the mid-term exam. 

READINGS: 

The technical literature on survival analysis is voluminous, spanning a variety of fields. For example, partial likelihood hazard models were developed primarily within biostatistics, while the much of the development of parametric hazard models took place within sociology and economics. Starting in the late 1980s, a literature emerged which places these different traditions within a more general survival analysis framework. A major work in this vein is the book, Event History Analysis (Blossfeld, Hamerle, and Mayer, 1989). This text also shows how to estimate hazard models using a variety of software packages (e.g., SAS). More recently Techniques of Event History Modeling was published (Blossfeld and Rohwer, 1995, 2002); this is a comprehensive introduction to continuous-time event history techniques. The 2002 2nd edition is the core text for this course. 

The textbook has been ordered by the UT bookstore. The full title is: 

Blossfeld, Hans-Peter, and Götz Rohwer. 2002. Techniques of Event History Modeling. Second Edition. Mahway, New Jersey: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates. 

If you are a Stata user and plan to use event history models extensively in your work, you might want to consider ordering a version of this text that uses Stata to generate the examples shown in the text. The text is: 

Blossfeld, Hans-Peter, Katrin Golsch, and Götz Rohwer. 2007. Event History Analysis with Stata. Mahway, New Yersey: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates. 

SOC 389K • Demog Of Health & Life Course

46260 • Spring 2011
Meets W 300pm-600pm MAI 1704
show description

Course Description

This course provides an in-depth introduction to the major conceptual frameworks and empirical research examining distal and proximate social factors influencing adult health. The underlying question is – “Does the body forget insults and exposures from adverse social as well as beneficial conditions over the life course?” Close attention is paid to the intersection between the etiology of health conditions and the major life-course trajectories of socioeconomic status and family. Of major importance will be the assessment of key social and biological pathways linking social conditions at particular points in the life course with adult health outcomes.

REQUIREMENTS: The course is organized as a seminar. Most of the instruction takes place in the context of guided discussion and exchanges focused on the readings. Students are expected to attend each class and to have read all of the assigned material thoroughly and critically. Reading critically means not only being able to describe the content of an assigned piece, but also to evaluate the scientific issues motivating the research question, the conceptual/theoretical strengths of the research, the adequacy of the study’s methods, the scientific implications of the study’s findings, and the study’s relation to other course material). Students are strongly encouraged to contribute to the discussion both their insights and/or questions from the readings and their own experiences.

There are two major tasks to be accomplished in this graduate seminar: 1) The first task involves preparation of the reading for class presentation and discussion. All students are responsible for all of the assigned readings. Class discussions will be oriented around informal student presentations based on the assigned readings. For each class meeting, a student will be assigned an article, and the student will informally present the scientific factors motivating a study, the key gaps in knowledge being addressed, the major findings, and the conceptual/methodological strengths and weaknesses of the study. An outline of the presentation’s key points (1 page) should be distributed to the class on the Tuesday prior to class. The informal presentations should not be longer than 15 minutes – and 10 minutes is desirable! (20% of grade)

2) The second task is an empirical study on a topic that is relevant to the course’s overall aim. Two assignments are required in accomplishing this task: a poster presentation (30% of grade) and a term paper (50% of grade). The empirical study may overlap with research being done either as part of a student’s thesis/dissertation research, in conjunction with work being done in another course (with the professor’s permission), or as part of a student’s RA assignment (with the professor’s permission). The study should be original research, with the aims of making a scientific contribution to the literature and eventual publication in a scientific outlet.

Given the time constraints imposed by the semester, I recommend that students rely on publicly accessible datasets (e.g., the Health and Retirement Survey, the National Health Interview Surveys, the National Longitudinal Surveys, Americans’ Changing Lives, and Aging, Status, Sense of Control). Other rich datasets are available from NACDA and ICPSR, two major electronic data archives.

Publications

Recent Publications

Lariscy, Joseph T., Robert A. Hummer, and Mark D. Hayward. In press. “Hispanic Adult Mortality in the United States: A Review, New Estimates, and Comparisons to Other Population Groups.” Demography.

Hayward, Mark D., Robert A. Hummer, Chi-Tsun Chiu, César González-González, and Rebeca Wong. 2014. “Does the Hispanic Paradox in Mortality Extend to Disability?” Population Research and Policy Review 33:81-96.

Brown, Dustin, Robert A. Hummer, and Mark D. Hayward. 2014. “Spousal Education and Self-Rated Health in the United States.” Population Research and Policy Review 33:127-151. PubMed – in process.

McFarland, Michael J. and Mark D. Hayward. 2014. “Poverty and Awakening Cortisol in Adolescence: The Importance of Timing in Early Life.” Society and Mental Health 4:21-37.

Montez, Jennifer Karas, and Mark D. Hayward. 2014. “Cumulative Childhood Adversity, Education, and Active Life Expectancy among U.S. Adults.” Demography 51:413-435.

Cantu, Phillip A., Mark D. Hayward, Robert A. Hummer, and Chi-Tsun Chiu. 2013. “New Estimates of Racial/ethnic Differences in Life Expectancy with Chronic Morbidity and Functional Loss: Evidence from the National Health Interview Survey. Journal of Cross-Cultural Gerontology 28:283-297.

Pollack, Craig, Catherine Cubbin, Sania Avesha, Mark Hayward, Donna Vallone, Brian Flaherty, and Paula Braverman. 2013. “Do Wealth Disparities Contribute to Health Disparities within Racial/Ethnic Groups?” Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health 67:439-445.

McFarland, Michael J., Mark D. Hayward, and Dustin Brown. 2013. “I’ve Got You Under My Skin: Marital Biography and Biological Risk.” Journal of Marriage and the Family 75:363-380.

Lariscy, Joseph T., Robert A. Hummer, Jessica M. Rath, Andrea C. Villanti, Mark D. Hayward, and Donna M. Vallone. 2013. “Race/Ethnicity, Nativity, and Tobacco Use among U.S. Young Adults: Results from a Nationally Representative Survey.” Nicotine and Tobacco Research 15(8):1417-1426. PubMed – in Process.

Forman, Michele R., Lauren D. Mangini, Rosenie Thelus-Jean, and Mark D. Hayward. 2013. “Life-course Origins of the Ages at Menarche and Menopause.” Adolescent Health, Medicine and Theraputics 4:1-21.

 
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