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Robert Crosnoe, Chair CLA 3.306, Mailcode A1700, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-232-6300

Mark Regnerus

Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Associate Professor
Mark Regnerus

Contact

Biography

Mark Regnerus is an associate professor of sociology at the University of Texas at Austin (PhD, 2000, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill) and a faculty associate at the university’s Population Research Center. Author of over 30 published articles and book chapters, his research is in the areas of sexual behavior, religion, and family. His book Premarital Sex in America: How Young Americans Meet, Mate, and Think about Marrying (Oxford, 2011) is available beginning in December 2010. His previous book Forbidden Fruit: Sex and Religion in the Lives of American Teenagers (Oxford University Press, 2007)tells the story of the sexual values and practices of American teenagers, paying particular attention to how participating in organized religion shapes sexual decision-making. Mark's research and opinion pieces have been featured in numerous media outlets in the US and elsewhere. Forbidden Fruit has been reviewed in Slate, the Dallas Morning News, Atlanta Journal-Constitution, and The New Yorker. His op-ed on marital timing norms appeared in the Washington Post on April 26, 2009.

NIH Biosketch

SOC 302 • Intro To The Study Of Society

44745-44770 • Spring 2015
Meets TTH 930am-1030am MEZ 1.306
show description

Description

Sociology 302 will offer insights to understand how social forces in society shape our behavior and influence our being. After all, we are the product of our society and vice versa. Our identity, hopes, fears, grievances and satisfactions derive from the patterns of socialization orchestrated within human groups. In this class, you will become familiar with the nature of sociology, macro-micro perspectives, sociological approaches, and concepts such as culture, socialization, social structures, social interaction, self and society, institutions, stratification, gender inequality, love, marriage, and divorce. Finally, we explore the sociology of health and the mind-body connection. In this course, we will: a) create an environment that encourages active participation and discussion in the learning process; b) Use a variety of techniques in the teaching and learning process, and c) we will assess and evaluate your work and give timely feedback.

Grading Policy

A short project paper (4-5 pages) 20% 

Three exams 20% each

Class participation and group projects 10%

Pop quizzes 10%

Class Attendance: Regular attendance is required. The repercussion of being absent a total of 4 or more classes, without justifiable reason, is that the final grade will automatically be lowered by one letter.

Texts

James M. Henslin, Sociology: A Down to Earth Approach, 2007, (seventh or eight editions)

Reading Packet: in addition to your general sociology text, you are provided with more readings on certain topics for in-depth analysis and discussion. These readings are photocopied articles available as a packet under my name at: Paradigm (407 W. 24th St)

SOC 302 • Intro To The Study Of Society

46185-46210 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 930am-1030am MEZ 1.306
show description

Description

Sociology 302 will offer insights to understand how social forces in society shape our behavior and influence our being. After all, we are the product of our society and vice versa. Our identity, hopes, fears, grievances and satisfactions derive from the patterns of socialization orchestrated within human groups. In this class, you will become familiar with the nature of sociology, macro-micro perspectives, sociological approaches, and concepts such as culture, socialization, social structures, social interaction, self and society, institutions, stratification, gender inequality, love, marriage, and divorce. Finally, we explore the sociology of health and the mind-body connection. In this course, we will: a) create an environment that encourages active participation and discussion in the learning process; b) Use a variety of techniques in the teaching and learning process, and c) we will assess and evaluate your work and give timely feedback.

Grading Policy

A short project paper (4-5 pages) 20% 

Three exams 20% each

Class participation and group projects 10%

Pop quizzes 10%

Class Attendance: Regular attendance is required. The repercussion of being absent a total of 4 or more classes, without justifiable reason, is that the final grade will automatically be lowered by one letter.

Texts

James M. Henslin, Sociology: A Down to Earth Approach, 2007, (seventh or eight editions)

Reading Packet: in addition to your general sociology text, you are provided with more readings on certain topics for in-depth analysis and discussion. These readings are photocopied articles available as a packet under my name at: Paradigm (407 W. 24th St)

SOC 302 • Intro To The Study Of Society

45895-46020 • Fall 2013
Meets MW 900am-1000am ART 1.102
show description

Description

Sociology 302 will offer insights to understand how social forces in society shape our behavior and influence our being. After all, we are the product of our society and vice versa. Our identity, hopes, fears, grievances and satisfactions derive from the patterns of socialization orchestrated within human groups. In this class, you will become familiar with the nature of sociology, macro-micro perspectives, sociological approaches, and concepts such as culture, socialization, social structures, social interaction, self and society, institutions, stratification, gender inequality, love, marriage, and divorce. Finally, we explore the sociology of health and the mind-body connection. In this course, we will: a) create an environment that encourages active participation and discussion in the learning process; b) Use a variety of techniques in the teaching and learning process, and c) we will assess and evaluate your work and give timely feedback.

Grading Policy

A short project paper (4-5 pages) 20% 

Three exams 20% each

Class participation and group projects 10%

Pop quizzes 10%

Class Attendance: Regular attendance is required. The repercussion of being absent a total of 4 or more classes, without justifiable reason, is that the final grade will automatically be lowered by one letter.

Texts

James M. Henslin, Sociology: A Down to Earth Approach, 2007, (seventh or eight editions)

Reading Packet: in addition to your general sociology text, you are provided with more readings on certain topics for in-depth analysis and discussion. These readings are photocopied articles available as a packet under my name at: Paradigm (407 W. 24th St)

SOC 302 • Intro To The Study Of Society

45515-45540 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 930am-1030am WEL 2.246
show description

Description

This course is an introduction to sociological perspectives on social life. Our major course objective is to learn how to "think sociologically" about our lives and the world around us. This means cultivating in ourselves a "sociological imagination" by way of investigating what culture is, how social structures work, how certain ways of thinking and acting become "normal," how institutions shape our lives, and how social change happens. This may sound abstract and dull, but it's really a fascinating and important way of seeing and thinking about the world and our own lives.Along the way we will also be asking ourselves questions like: What actually makes a person "human?" What is morality, where does it come from, and how does it affect our actions? In what sense are individuals really "free?" How important are stories for shaping behavior? How scientific are our actions? How is life in modern society different from the past? How can social structures be invisible yet powerfully affect our lives? What or who determines what is "normal?" How does getting married or divorced affect outcomes in your own life and others' lives? Why is it that all over the world for all of known history people have been religious? How and why does being religious influence our behavior? What are our sexual behavior norms and how and why have they changed? How do others' sexual relationships affect how we think about and enter such relationships? And so on. Those who apply themselves to wrestling with these kinds of issues and questions will discover how interesting and important sociological analysis can be. And in the process they will come to understand much more fully their own personal life experiences.The broader purpose of the course is not unlike that of the best of the liberal arts: to see and think sociologically about their own lives and the social worlds around them, to read more critically, to understand how the world has come to be, how it can be different, and yet how it is difficult-but not impossible-to fashion real, enduring change.

Grading Policy

Exam #1 25%

Four quizzes 5% each

Two written assignments 10% each

Final Exam 35%

Texts

Lynn Davidman, Tradition in a Rootless World

Christian Smith, Moral, Believing Animals: Human Personhood and Culture

Mark Regnerus, Forbidden Fruit: Sex and Religion in the Lives of American Teenagers

Elaine Tyler May, Great Expectations: Marriage & Divorce in Post-Victorian America

Arlie Hochschild, The Time Bind: When Work Becomes Home & Home Becomes Work

SOC 302 • Intro To The Study Of Society

45310-45315 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 930am-1030am CAL 100
show description

Description

This course is an introduction to sociological perspectives on social life. Our major course objective is to learn how to "think sociologically" about our lives and the world around us. This means cultivating in ourselves a "sociological imagination" by way of investigating what culture is, how social structures work, how certain ways of thinking and acting become "normal," how institutions shape our lives, and how social change happens. This may sound abstract and dull, but it's really a fascinating and important way of seeing and thinking about the world and our own lives.Along the way we will also be asking ourselves questions like: What actually makes a person "human?" What is morality, where does it come from, and how does it affect our actions? In what sense are individuals really "free?" How important are stories for shaping behavior? How scientific are our actions? How is life in modern society different from the past? How can social structures be invisible yet powerfully affect our lives? What or who determines what is "normal?" How does getting married or divorced affect outcomes in your own life and others' lives? Why is it that all over the world for all of known history people have been religious? How and why does being religious influence our behavior? What are our sexual behavior norms and how and why have they changed? How do others' sexual relationships affect how we think about and enter such relationships? And so on. Those who apply themselves to wrestling with these kinds of issues and questions will discover how interesting and important sociological analysis can be. And in the process they will come to understand much more fully their own personal life experiences.The broader purpose of the course is not unlike that of the best of the liberal arts: to see and think sociologically about their own lives and the social worlds around them, to read more critically, to understand how the world has come to be, how it can be different, and yet how it is difficult-but not impossible-to fashion real, enduring change.

Grading Policy

Exam #1 25%

Four quizzes 5% each

Two written assignments 10% each

Final Exam 35%

Texts

Lynn Davidman, Tradition in a Rootless World

Christian Smith, Moral, Believing Animals: Human Personhood and Culture

Mark Regnerus, Forbidden Fruit: Sex and Religion in the Lives of American Teenagers

Elaine Tyler May, Great Expectations: Marriage & Divorce in Post-Victorian America

Arlie Hochschild, The Time Bind: When Work Becomes Home & Home Becomes Work

SOC 302 • Intro To The Study Of Society

45130-45155 • Fall 2011
Meets MW 900am-1000am CMA A2.320
show description

Description

This course is an introduction to sociological perspectives on social life. Our major course objective is to learn how to "think sociologically" about our lives and the world around us. This means cultivating in ourselves a "sociological imagination" by way of investigating what culture is, how social structures work, how certain ways of thinking and acting become "normal," how institutions shape our lives, and how social change happens. This may sound abstract and dull, but it's really a fascinating and important way of seeing and thinking about the world and our own lives.Along the way we will also be asking ourselves questions like: What actually makes a person "human?" What is morality, where does it come from, and how does it affect our actions? In what sense are individuals really "free?" How important are stories for shaping behavior? How scientific are our actions? How is life in modern society different from the past? How can social structures be invisible yet powerfully affect our lives? What or who determines what is "normal?" How does getting married or divorced affect outcomes in your own life and others' lives? Why is it that all over the world for all of known history people have been religious? How and why does being religious influence our behavior? What are our sexual behavior norms and how and why have they changed? How do others' sexual relationships affect how we think about and enter such relationships? And so on. Those who apply themselves to wrestling with these kinds of issues and questions will discover how interesting and important sociological analysis can be. And in the process they will come to understand much more fully their own personal life experiences.The broader purpose of the course is not unlike that of the best of the liberal arts: to see and think sociologically about their own lives and the social worlds around them, to read more critically, to understand how the world has come to be, how it can be different, and yet how it is difficult-but not impossible-to fashion real, enduring change.

Grading Policy

Exam #1 25%

Four quizzes 5% each

Two written assignments 10% each

Final Exam 35%

Texts

Lynn Davidman, Tradition in a Rootless World

Christian Smith, Moral, Believing Animals: Human Personhood and Culture

Mark Regnerus, Forbidden Fruit: Sex and Religion in the Lives of American Teenagers

Elaine Tyler May, Great Expectations: Marriage & Divorce in Post-Victorian America

Arlie Hochschild, The Time Bind: When Work Becomes Home & Home Becomes Work

SOC 397D • Publishing Papers In Sociology

45645 • Fall 2011
Meets W 1200pm-300pm BUR 480
show description

SOC 397D • Publishing Papers in Sociology (unique #46380)

 

Special Emphasis:

JHSB Graduate Student Editorial Board

Publishing & reviewing on sociology of health and illness

 

Professor Debra Umberson

Wednesdays 12-2:30, Main Building 1703
Office hours: Wednesdays 2:30-3:30



COURSE DESCRIPTION
This course is designed for graduate students with an interest in publishing and reviewing research in the area of sociology of health and illness. This course addresses: (1) how to write and publish an article in an academic journal, (2) the review process and instruction on how to review articles for scholarly journals, and (3) special topics related to the editorial process.

 

Goals:

  1. Deepen substantive expertise with immersion in the most recent cutting edge research in medical sociology.
  2. Engage in critical and constructive discussion of the field of medical sociology.
  3. Develop skills and knowledge to facilitate the successful submission of a research article for editorial review and publication. Learn what reviewers are looking for in a research article.
  4. Develop skills that qualify you to evaluate and review articles for scholarly journals.  
  5. Learn about the editorial process involved in publishing research articles in Journal of Health & Social Behavior (JHSB).
  6. Help to shape and improve JHSB as a print and online mechanism for disseminating cutting edge research on the sociology of health.

 

This course may be taken for a grade, pass/fail, or by audit. Please contact the instructor if you would like to have additional information: umberson@prc.utexas.edu

 


MISSION STATEMENT OF JHSB

The Journal of Health and Social Behavior is a medical sociology journal that publishes empirical and theoretical articles that apply sociological concepts and methods to the understanding of health and illness and the organization of medicine and health care. Its editorial policy favors manuscripts that are grounded in important theoretical issues in medical sociology or the sociology of mental health and that advance our theoretical understanding of the processes by which social factors and human health are interrelated.

JHSB GRAD STUDENT EDITORIAL BOARD

Individual Editorial Assignments

  • Web/Pod Editor
  • Podcast Editor
  • Graphics Editor
  • Policy Brief Editor
  • Social Media Editor
  • Abstracts Editor
  • Teaching Contents Editor
  • Copy Editor
  • Editor In Chief

 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

Final grades will be based on:

  • Weekly participation and journal development: 25%
  • Editorial reviews: 25%
  • Research paper: 50%

 

Weekly participation and journal development:

  • Journal development. Share responsibility for one of JHSB’s major online or print areas, such as development of policy briefs, abstracting, graphics and images, teaching resources, web development, media coverage, development of social media, strategizing for reduced review time and increasing journal visibility and impact. 
  • Participate in weekly editorial board meetings. Participate in editorial discussions and observe decision-making and revision processes.

Editorial reviews:

  • Prepare reviews of article submissions to supplement those of experts in the field. Students should expect to review 4 to 5 articles over the course the semester (approximately one article every two to three weeks).

Prepare a research paper for editorial review:

  • Prepare your own paper for editorial review. This can be a new paper or a paper that has already been reviewed by a journal. The goal is to revise your paper, submit it for publication, and to have your article accepted for publication. The course is designed to demystify the review process and convey the ingredients for success in publishing your work. You will be benefit from editorial review (by your classmates) and concrete suggestions for revising your paper.

 

FRIENDLY REMINDERS

  • Deadlines. The course functions as both an academic seminar and as a working editorial board. We will often be working under tight deadline pressure and we will often disagree about the appropriate course of action.
  • Confidentiality. What happens in seminar, stays in seminar -- students must keep authors’ names, reviewers’ names and other identifying information strictly confidential.
  • Grading. You will be evaluated on the basis of your overall contributions to the seminar and to JHSB. You may take the course on a pass/fail or letter-grade basis.
  • Attendance. You are expected to attend each weekly meeting. 

SOC 397D • Publishing Papers in Sociology (unique #46380)

 

Special Emphasis:

JHSB Graduate Student Editorial Board

Publishing & reviewing on sociology of health and illness

 

Professor Debra Umberson

Wednesdays 12-2:30, Main Building 1703
Office hours: Wednesdays 2:30-3:30



COURSE DESCRIPTION
This course is designed for graduate students with an interest in publishing and reviewing research in the area of sociology of health and illness. This course addresses: (1) how to write and publish an article in an academic journal, (2) the review process and instruction on how to review articles for scholarly journals, and (3) special topics related to the editorial process.

 

Goals:

  1. Deepen substantive expertise with immersion in the most recent cutting edge research in medical sociology.
  2. Engage in critical and constructive discussion of the field of medical sociology.
  3. Develop skills and knowledge to facilitate the successful submission of a research article for editorial review and publication. Learn what reviewers are looking for in a research article.
  4. Develop skills that qualify you to evaluate and review articles for scholarly journals.  
  5. Learn about the editorial process involved in publishing research articles in Journal of Health & Social Behavior (JHSB).
  6. Help to shape and improve JHSB as a print and online mechanism for disseminating cutting edge research on the sociology of health.

 

This course may be taken for a grade, pass/fail, or by audit. Please contact the instructor if you would like to have additional information: umberson@prc.utexas.edu

 


MISSION STATEMENT OF JHSB

The Journal of Health and Social Behavior is a medical sociology journal that publishes empirical and theoretical articles that apply sociological concepts and methods to the understanding of health and illness and the organization of medicine and health care. Its editorial policy favors manuscripts that are grounded in important theoretical issues in medical sociology or the sociology of mental health and that advance our theoretical understanding of the processes by which social factors and human health are interrelated.

JHSB GRAD STUDENT EDITORIAL BOARD

Individual Editorial Assignments

  • Web/Pod Editor
  • Podcast Editor
  • Graphics Editor
  • Policy Brief Editor
  • Social Media Editor
  • Abstracts Editor
  • Teaching Contents Editor
  • Copy Editor
  • Editor In Chief

 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

Final grades will be based on:

  • Weekly participation and journal development: 25%
  • Editorial reviews: 25%
  • Research paper: 50%

 

Weekly participation and journal development:

  • Journal development. Share responsibility for one of JHSB’s major online or print areas, such as development of policy briefs, abstracting, graphics and images, teaching resources, web development, media coverage, development of social media, strategizing for reduced review time and increasing journal visibility and impact. 
  • Participate in weekly editorial board meetings. Participate in editorial discussions and observe decision-making and revision processes.

Editorial reviews:

  • Prepare reviews of article submissions to supplement those of experts in the field. Students should expect to review 4 to 5 articles over the course the semester (approximately one article every two to three weeks).

Prepare a research paper for editorial review:

  • Prepare your own paper for editorial review. This can be a new paper or a paper that has already been reviewed by a journal. The goal is to revise your paper, submit it for publication, and to have your article accepted for publication. The course is designed to demystify the review process and convey the ingredients for success in publishing your work. You will be benefit from editorial review (by your classmates) and concrete suggestions for revising your paper.

 

FRIENDLY REMINDERS

  • Deadlines. The course functions as both an academic seminar and as a working editorial board. We will often be working under tight deadline pressure and we will often disagree about the appropriate course of action.
  • Confidentiality. What happens in seminar, stays in seminar -- students must keep authors’ names, reviewers’ names and other identifying information strictly confidential.
  • Grading. You will be evaluated on the basis of your overall contributions to the seminar and to JHSB. You may take the course on a pass/fail or letter-grade basis.
  • Attendance. You are expected to attend each weekly meeting. 

SOC 308 • Judaism/Christianity:soc Persp

46000 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm BUR 216
(also listed as CTI 304 )
show description

Cross listed with CTI 304

 

Course Description

While a majority of Americans still identify as Christians, many know little about its historic roots in Judaism, about the texts that Jews and Christians share, about what Jews believe, how and why the two faiths diverged and evolved, how institutionalized Christianity addresses—or more aptly, fails to seriously consider—its Jewish origins, and about how Jews and Christians have gotten along throughout history. This course is an introduction to these themes, with particular attention paid to the social, historical, and intellectual contexts and forces which have shaped these processes up to the present day. Particular attention is paid to religious evolution—how systems and ways of thought and action change, why, and how Christians and Jews have dealt with such changes.

Contacting the instructor: The best way to reach me is by email at regnerus@prc.utexas.edu. In general the TA can answer most course-related technical questions. I enjoy personal and course material conversations, however, so please don’t hesitate to drop by during office hours or make an appointment.

Course Requirements: Final grade is determined as follows: Exam #1= 20%, Exam #2= 25%, Final Exam = 30%

5 quizzes worth 5% each=25%.

Lectures: Course lectures are on Mondays and Wednesdays, led by Dr. Regnerus. This is very important to state—there will be lots of material that will only be covered in class, and that will be on the three exams.

Exams: the three exams will consist of multiple choice and true/false questions, short answer questions, and perhaps an essay question. They are all closed book. The final exam (#3) is comprehensive; the other two cover their respective sections of the course. Please do not ask to take them at a time other than the scheduled date and time. The first exam will be administered on Wednesday, February 24, and the second exam will be administered on Wednesday, April 14. The final exam is comprehensive; its date will be announced when it becomes known. To prepare for them, first make sure that you understand the meaning and function of all of the terms and concepts covered in the unit that the exam tests. That is, you should be able both to define each concept accurately and to demonstrate how it is related to the rest of the material in that unit. Second, you should be able to use the specific content of the unit the exam tests to illustrate or illuminate the general themes developed in the course. When studying and note-taking, always distinguish the centrally important issue or argument in the reading or lecture from the less-important details, facts, and other data that are only meant to illustrate or support the central issue or argument. The danger of not doing so is treating all material as equally important, becoming overwhelmed with information, and failing to see and grasp the major point. It’s not that supporting details and illustrations are unimportant and can be disregarded, just that they should not be cognitively processed in a way that obscures the reading or lecture’s main argument. I give makeup exams only in what I consider extreme circumstances (e.g., hospitalization, death of a family member) and only if I am informed before the exam.

Quizzes: Five quizzes will be administered during the semester, approximately every two weeks. The quizzed will cover assigned readings since the last quiz (or exam). They will consist of 2-3 short essay questions simply designed to decipher whether the student has read the material. Each will count for five percent of the course grade. They are scheduled for five Wednesdays: Feb 3, Feb 17, March 10, March 31, and April 28.

Accommodations: The University of Texas at Austin provides upon request appropriate academic adjustments for qualified students with disabilities. For more information, contact the Division of Diversity and Community Engagement, Services for Students with Disabilities at (512) 471-6259. At the beginning of the semester, students who need special accommodations should notify me and present a letter prepared by the Services for Students with Disabilities Office.

Professor Profile: Dr. Regnerus received his PhD in Sociology in 2000 from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and has taught at UT since 2002. He also teaches an Intro-to-Sociology course (Soc 302) and occasionally research methods (Soc 317m). His published research concerns sexual decision- making, family formation, and the influence of religion on human behavior. His first book (assigned here) was published in 2007, entitled Forbidden Fruit: Sex and Religion in the Lives of American Teenagers. He is currently finishing a second book project, entitled Premarital Sex in America.

Required Readings:

The Source, by James Michener (Random House, 2002, although any edition will suffice).

Each student should have access to a good, modern version of the Bible (including the Apocrypha). The recommended versions are the New International Version (NIV), the Revised Standard Version (RSV), or the New Revised Standard Version (NRSV). A copy of the Tanakh (or Old Testament) published the Jewish Publication Society (New JPS) can also prove helpful. I will be using the NRSV for course purposes.

All other required readings will be posted on Blackboard.

SOC 302 • Intro To The Study Of Society

45225-45250 • Fall 2010
Meets MW 900am-1000am JES A121A
show description

Description

This course is an introduction to sociological perspectives on social life. Our major course objective is to learn how to "think sociologically" about our lives and the world around us. This means cultivating in ourselves a "sociological imagination" by way of investigating what culture is, how social structures work, how certain ways of thinking and acting become "normal," how institutions shape our lives, and how social change happens. This may sound abstract and dull, but it's really a fascinating and important way of seeing and thinking about the world and our own lives.

Along the way we will also be asking ourselves questions like: What actually makes a person "human?" What is morality, where does it come from, and how does it affect our actions? In what sense are individuals really "free?" How important are stories for shaping behavior? How scientific are our actions? How is life in modern society different from the past? How can social structures be invisible yet powerfully affect our lives? What or who determines what is "normal?" How does getting married or divorced affect outcomes in your own life and others' lives? Why is it that all over the world for all of known history people have been religious? How and why does being religious influence our behavior? What are our sexual behavior norms and how and why have they changed? How do others' sexual relationships affect how we think about and enter such relationships? And so on. Those who apply themselves to wrestling with these kinds of issues and questions will discover how interesting and important sociological analysis can be. And in the process they will come to understand much more fully their own personal life experiences.

The broader purpose of the course is not unlike that of the best of the liberal arts: to see and think sociologically about their own lives and the social worlds around them, to read more critically, to understand how the world has come to be, how it can be different, and yet how it is difficult-but not impossible-to fashion real, enduring change.

Grading Policy

Exam #1 25%
Four quizzes 5% each
Two written assignments 10% each
Final Exam 35%

Texts

Lynn Davidman, Tradition in a Rootless World
Christian Smith, Moral, Believing Animals: Human Personhood and Culture
Mark Regnerus, Forbidden Fruit: Sex and Religion in the Lives of American Teenagers
Elaine Tyler May, Great Expectations: Marriage & Divorce in Post-Victorian America
Arlie Hochschild, The Time Bind: When Work Becomes Home & Home Becomes Work

SOC 308 • Judaism/Christianity:soc Persp

46245 • Spring 2010
Meets MW 330pm-500pm RLM 7.104
(also listed as WCV 303 )
show description

Course Description

While a majority of Americans still identify as Christians, many know little about its historic roots in Judaism, about the texts that Jews and Christians share, about what Jews believe, how and why the two faiths diverged and evolved, how institutionalized Christianity addresses—or more aptly, fails to seriously consider—its Jewish origins, and about how Jews and Christians have gotten along throughout history. This course is an introduction to these themes, with particular attention paid to the social, historical, and intellectual contexts and forces which have shaped these processes up to the present day. Particular attention is paid to religious evolution—how systems and ways of thought and action change, why, and how Christians and Jews have dealt with such changes.

Contacting the instructor: The best way to reach me is by email at regnerus@prc.utexas.edu. In general the TA can answer most course-related technical questions. I enjoy personal and course material conversations, however, so please don’t hesitate to drop by during office hours or make an appointment.

Course Requirements: Final grade is determined as follows: Exam #1= 20%, Exam #2= 25%, Final Exam = 30%

5 quizzes worth 5% each=25%.

Lectures: Course lectures are on Mondays and Wednesdays, led by Dr. Regnerus. This is very important to state—there will be lots of material that will only be covered in class, and that will be on the three exams.

Exams: the three exams will consist of multiple choice and true/false questions, short answer questions, and perhaps an essay question. They are all closed book. The final exam (#3) is comprehensive; the other two cover their respective sections of the course. Please do not ask to take them at a time other than the scheduled date and time. The first exam will be administered on Wednesday, February 24, and the second exam will be administered on Wednesday, April 14. The final exam is comprehensive; its date will be announced when it becomes known. To prepare for them, first make sure that you understand the meaning and function of all of the terms and concepts covered in the unit that the exam tests. That is, you should be able both to define each concept accurately and to demonstrate how it is related to the rest of the material in that unit. Second, you should be able to use the specific content of the unit the exam tests to illustrate or illuminate the general themes developed in the course. When studying and note-taking, always distinguish the centrally important issue or argument in the reading or lecture from the less-important details, facts, and other data that are only meant to illustrate or support the central issue or argument. The danger of not doing so is treating all material as equally important, becoming overwhelmed with information, and failing to see and grasp the major point. It’s not that supporting details and illustrations are unimportant and can be disregarded, just that they should not be cognitively processed in a way that obscures the reading or lecture’s main argument. I give makeup exams only in what I consider extreme circumstances (e.g., hospitalization, death of a family member) and only if I am informed before the exam.

Quizzes: Five quizzes will be administered during the semester, approximately every two weeks. The quizzed will cover assigned readings since the last quiz (or exam). They will consist of 2-3 short essay questions simply designed to decipher whether the student has read the material. Each will count for five percent of the course grade. They are scheduled for five Wednesdays: Feb 3, Feb 17, March 10, March 31, and April 28.

Accommodations: The University of Texas at Austin provides upon request appropriate academic adjustments for qualified students with disabilities. For more information, contact the Division of Diversity and Community Engagement, Services for Students with Disabilities at (512) 471-6259. At the beginning of the semester, students who need special accommodations should notify me and present a letter prepared by the Services for Students with Disabilities Office.

Professor Profile: Dr. Regnerus received his PhD in Sociology in 2000 from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and has taught at UT since 2002. He also teaches an Intro-to-Sociology course (Soc 302) and occasionally research methods (Soc 317m). His published research concerns sexual decision- making, family formation, and the influence of religion on human behavior. His first book (assigned here) was published in 2007, entitled Forbidden Fruit: Sex and Religion in the Lives of American Teenagers. He is currently finishing a second book project, entitled Premarital Sex in America.

Required Readings:

The Source, by James Michener (Random House, 2002, although any edition will suffice).

Each student should have access to a good, modern version of the Bible (including the Apocrypha). The recommended versions are the New International Version (NIV), the Revised Standard Version (RSV), or the New Revised Standard Version (NRSV). A copy of the Tanakh (or Old Testament) published the Jewish Publication Society (New JPS) can also prove helpful. I will be using the NRSV for course purposes.

All other required readings will be posted on Blackboard.

SOC 317m • Intro To Social Research

46315 • Spring 2010
Meets MW 1000-1100 BUR 224
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See attached syllabus

SOC 302 • Intro To The Study Of Society

46260-46285 • Fall 2009
Meets MW 900-1000 CMA A2.320
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 UT-Austin Unique Course #s 46260, 46265, 46270, 46275, 46280, 46285 

Course Description: This course is an introduction to sociological perspectives on social life. Our major course objective is to learn how to “think sociologically” about our lives and the world around us. This means cultivating in ourselves a “sociological imagination” by way of investigating what culture is, how social structures work, how certain ways of thinking and acting become “normal,” how institutions shape our lives, and how social change happens. This may sound abstract and dull, but it’s really a fascinating and important way of seeing and thinking about the world and our own lives. 

Along the way we will also be asking ourselves questions like: What actually makes a person “human?” What is morality, where does it come from, and how does it affect our actions? In what sense are individuals really “free?” How important are stories for shaping behavior? How scientific are our actions? How is life in modern society different from the past? How can social structures be invisible yet powerfully affect our lives? What or who determines what is “normal?” How does getting married or divorced affect outcomes in your own life and others’ lives? Why is it that all over the world for all of known history people have been religious? How and why does being religious influence our behavior? What are our sexual behavior norms and how and why have they changed? How do others’ sexual relationships affect how we think about and enter such relationships? And so on. Those who apply themselves to wrestling with these kinds of issues and questions will discover how interesting and important sociological analysis can be. And in the process they will come to understand much more fully their own personal life experiences. 

The broader purpose of the course is not unlike that of the best of the liberal arts: to see and think sociologically about their own lives and the social worlds around them, to read more critically, to understand how the world has come to be, how it can be different, and yet how it is difficult—but not impossible—to fashion real, enduring change. 

This is not quite like some other introduction-to-sociology courses, especially those which rely on a textbook and neatly cover 15 topics in 15 weeks. Instead, we will spend extended time on several themes—like socialization, the self, morality, institutions, sexuality, family, and religion—rather than provide a brief overview of lots of different themes. Some very important subjects are just not covered directly or extensively here, including issues of race/ethnicity, gender, and inequality. 

Contacting the instructor: The best way to reach me is by email at regnerus@prc.utexas.edu. In general the two TAs can answer most course-related technical questions. I enjoy personal conversations, however, so please don’t hesitate to drop by during office hours or make an appointment. 

Course Requirements: Final grade is determined as follows: 

 

Class Time: Monday and Wednesday 9-10, various discussion sections on Wednesdays and Fridays 

Location: CMA A2.320 

Instructor: Dr. Mark Regnerus, Burdine 572. Email: regnerus@prc.utexas.edu 

Office Hours: Monday and Wednesday 10-11, 3-4, and by appointment 

Teaching Assistants: Jorge Derpic, Burdine 602 Email: jderpic@mail.utexas.edu 

Isaac Sasson, Burdine 602 Email: saisaac@gmail.com 

Jennifer Storch, Burdine 602 Email: jenniferstorch@hotmail.com 

TA office hrs: Derpic: Tue 130-230, Fri 1045-1245; Sasson: Wed 12-2, Thu 3-4; Storch: Mon 1-3, Fri 11-12 

1 2 

Exam #1= 15% 

Three quizzes (at 5% each) = 15% 

Two written assignments (at 10% each) = 20% 

Exam #2= 20% 

Exam #3=30% 

Lectures: on Mondays and Wednesdays, the class will be led by Dr. Regnerus in a traditional lecture format. This is very important to state—there will be lots of lecture material that will only be covered in class, and that will be on the exams. I have elected not to assign one comprehensive textbook, so my lectures will cover material that is not written down for you. So while you may not wish to attend class much, it’s difficult to fare well in the course if you don’t. So, consistent attendance is both important and very practical. An education is what you make of it. At the University of Texas at Austin, you have great resources from which to draw, but if you wish to ignore them, you can succeed in getting a poor education here. Assigned readings should be done before attending your discussion section for the week it is assigned. Note: Please turn off the cell phones during class. Lecture notes will be posted on Blackboard in a small number of sets over the course of the semester, probably just prior to exams. 

Discussions: the discussion sections (which are on Wednesdays or Fridays) will be led by a teaching assistant. This will offer a forum for students to discuss lecture material from earlier in the week, explore topics in greater depth, and link the lectures with the assigned books and readings. In fact, most of the book discussions will occur here, and book material will be on all exams. 

Quizzes: Three quizzes will be given over the assigned readings, and will account for a total of 15 percent of the course grade (5 percent apiece). Each will be comprised of 10 true/false and/or multiple choice questions, and will be administered by the TAs during the discussion sections on the weeks of Oct 5, Oct 19, and Nov 9. Different versions of the quiz will be administered to different discussion sections. 

Written Assignments: two written assignments will be given over the course of the semester, and will account for a total of 20 percent of your total course grade. The first written assignment, worth 10 percent, is due to your TA (in your respective discussion sections) the week of October 12, and the second, also worth 10 percent, is due to your TA during the week of November 16. No make-up written assignments will be given. All writing assignments must: (1) use either a Times New Roman or CG Roman font in 12pt; (2) be formatted with 1” margins on each side; (3) include the name of the student and the assignment number in the upper left-hand corner of the first page; and (4) be stapled. A document describing each assignment is posted on Blackboard in the “Assignments” folder. Because clarity of thought and clarity of writing are inseparable and important, you are advised to pay close attention to your prose. Poor grammar and writing will invariably result in a lower grade. 

Exams: the three exams will consist of multiple choice, true/false, and several short answer questions, and will be closed book. The third exam is comprehensive; the first two are not. Note: the exams will not be re-scheduled; please do not ask to take them at a special time. The first exam will be given in class on Monday, September 28, the second exam will be on Wednesday, October 28, and the third (and last) exam on Wednesday, December 2. There is no exam scheduled during finals week. To prepare for them, first make sure that you understand the meaning and function of all of the terms and concepts covered in the unit that the exam tests. That is, you should be able both to define each concept accurately and to demonstrate how it is related to the rest of the material in that unit. Second, you should be able to use the specific content of the unit the exam tests to illustrate or illuminate the general themes developed in the course. When studying and note-taking, always distinguish the centrally important issue or argument in the reading or lecture from the less-important details, facts, and other data that are only meant to illustrate or support the central issue or 3 

argument. The danger of not doing so is treating all material as equally important, becoming overwhelmed with information, and failing to see and grasp the major point. It’s not that supporting details and illustrations are unimportant and can be disregarded, just that they should not be cognitively processed in a way that obscures the reading or lecture’s main argument. I give makeup exams only in what I consider extreme circumstances (e.g., hospitalization, death of a family member) and only if I am informed before the exam. 

Accommodations: The University of Texas at Austin provides upon request appropriate academic adjustments for qualified students with disabilities. For more information, contact the Division of Diversity and Community Engagement, Services for Students with Disabilities at (512) 471-6259. At the beginning of the semester, students who need special accommodations should notify me and present a letter prepared by the Services for Students with Disabilities Office. 

Professor Profile: Dr. Regnerus received his PhD in Sociology in 2000 from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and has taught at UT since 2002. He also teaches courses on the sociology of religion, including a Spring 2010 course entitled “Judaism and Christianity.” His research concerns sexual decision-making, family formation, and the influence of religion on human behavior. His first book (assigned here) was published in 2007, entitled Forbidden Fruit: Sex and Religion in the Lives of American Teenagers. He is currently working on a second book project, this one about the sexual behavior of young adults. 

Required Readings: Required books for purchase (at University Co-op or online): 

  1. Tradition in a Rootless World, by Lynn Davidman. 
  2. Moral, Believing Animals: Human Personhood and Culture, by Christian Smith. 
  3. Forbidden Fruit: Sex and Religion in the Lives of American Teenagers, by Mark Regnerus
  4. The Time Bind: When Work Becomes Home & Home Becomes Work, by Arlie Hochschild. 

 

All other required readings are posted on Blackboard, in the “Course Documents” folder. 

Course Outline and Reading Schedule 

Week 1 Introduction 

Aug 26 No discussion section first week; the first discussion section is Sept 2/4. 

Read “What is Sociology,” pages 3-13, 22-24 on Blackboard. 

Week 2 How Sociologists Study People 

Aug 31, Sept 2 Read “What is Sociology,” pages 29-46 on Blackboard. 

Week 3 Culture and Social Structure 

Sept 9 Read Tradition in a Rootless World, pages 1-73. 

Week 4 Socialization 

Sept 14, 16 Read Tradition in a Rootless World, pages 74-135. 

Week 5 Socialization and the Self in Society 

Sept 21, 23 Read Tradition in a Rootless World, pages 136-190. 

Week 6 Morality and Human Narratives 

Sept 28, 30 Exam #1 on Monday, Sept 28 

Read Moral Believing Animals pages 3-94. 

Week 7 The Role of Stories in Human Behavior 

Oct 5, 7 Quiz 1 on Moral Believing Animals this week. 

Week 8 Social Institutions, Organizations, and Networks 

Oct 12, 14 Read The Time Bind, pages 3-132. 

Assignment #1 due in your discussion section to your TA. 

Week 9 Religion I: What is it? 

Oct 19, 21 Read The Time Bind, pages 133-259. 

Quiz 2 on The Time Bind this week. 

Week 10 Religion II: Is the world becoming less religious? 

Oct 26, 28 Read “How Corrosive Is College to Religious Faith and Practice?” on Blackboard. 

Exam #2 on Wednesday, Oct 28 

Week 11 Sexual Economics 

Nov 2, 4 Read Forbidden Fruit, pages 3-118. 

Week 12 Sex in Adolescence & Emerging Adulthood 

Nov 9, 11 Read Forbidden Fruit, pages 119-214. 

Quiz 3 on Forbidden Fruit this week. 

Week 13 Marriage and Divorce 

Nov 16, 18 Read Gottman chapter on marriage and divorce on Blackboard. 

Assignment #2 due in your discussion section to your TA. 

Week 14 Families and Demographic Change 

Nov 23, 25 Read “The Global Baby Bust” on Blackboard. 

Week 15 Love and Course Conclusions 

Nov 30, Dec 2 Exam #3 on Wednesday, Dec 2. 

There is NO exam scheduled during Finals Week. 

Academic Integrity 

Students who violate University rules on scholastic dishonesty are subject to disciplinary penalties, including possible failure in the course and/or dismissal from the University. Since such dishonesty harms the individual, all students, and the integrity of the University, policies on scholastic dishonesty will be strictly enforced. Refer to the Student Judicial Services website for policies and procedures on scholastic dishonesty. 

Grading Scale: At the end of the term, you will receive a letter grade, based on the following performance levels: A (94-100), A- (90-93), B+ (87-89), B (83-86), B- (80-82), C+ (77-79), C (73-76), C- (70-72), 

D+ (67-69), D (63-66), D- (60-62), F (<60) 

SOC 397D • Publishing Papers In Sociology

46795 • Fall 2009
Meets W 1200-300pm BUR 480
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Sociology 397D –Graduate Seminar on Publishing and Writing, Fall 2009

UT-Austin Unique # 46795








“Whichever it is you sit down to, the process is much the same. Writing, thinking, remembering, praying—you need words for all of them. Words are put together out of letters, all twenty-six of them. So the alphabet is your instrument. Everything you have it in you to say must be said by means of A’s and B’s and C’s and D’s. By means of vowels and consonants, you must put together the best words you can—words that, if possible, not only mean something but evoke something, call something forth from the person you address with your words.”

                                    ~ Frederick Buechner

COURSE DESCRIPTION

The ability to publish in professional journals and books is an important skill for sociologists and other social scientists, and the demonstration of this skill is increasingly a key to success on the academic job market. The central goals of this seminar are threefold: (1) to provide an introduction to the process of publishing articles and books in sociology; (2) to aid students in honing their own work for submission to a peer-reviewed journal or comparable outlet; and (3) to improve students’ writing skills.

Students who take this course for credit should already have in mind a manuscript (dissertation/book chapter or article) they plan to revise for submission by the end of the semester. Much of our effort during the semester will be devoted to the process of critiquing and revising (and in some cases, completely overhauling) these manuscripts.

There are three parts to the course. During the first few meetings, we will explore a wide range of publication issues, including: the production and successful marketing of journal articles; the peer-review process; editorial decision-making; handling revise/resubmit verdicts; book publishing; and a host of others. Next we will spend time learning about the craft and art of writing, regardless of topic or outlet. We will read and discuss two short books on writing, and will edit samples of our own work, applying what we’ve learned. During the final segment of the course, students will concentrate solely on revising their own manuscripts, in consultation with the instructor.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

The course grade is determined as follows:  final course paper = 50 percent; journal reconnaissance = 10 percent; trajectory of improvement and effort in writing = 20 percent; attendance and participation = 20 percent.




REQUIRED COURSE TEXTS

1. Howard S. Becker, Writing for Social Scientists. Chicago, 2007.
2. William Zinsser, On Writing Well. Harper, 2006.

These two books are available for purchase at the University Co-op. All other assigned manuscripts will be either emailed to you or posted on Blackboard.

COURSE SCHEDULE AND ASSIGNED READINGS

August 26: Introduction

•    Review of syllabus, course design, goals, and requirements
•    General housekeeping issues
•    Begin thinking about which paper will be revised
•    Outline assignment, reconnaissance of two journals

September 2: What makes a successful article or manuscript?

•    Various types of articles
•    Clarifying goals and objectives of author
•    Marketing, clarifying the intended audience
•    Issues of form
•    Logistics of writing, collaboration issues

September 9: Overview of the editorial process

•    Reporting on reconnaissance assignment
•    Considerations before sending
•    Submission
•    Dynamics of peer review process
•    Overview of book publishing

September 16: Read On Writing Well (Part 1)

September 23: Read On Writing Well (Part 2)

•    Bring a few pages of really good social science writing you’ve read in the past couple of years

September 30: Read Writing for Social Scientists (Chapters 1-4)

October 7: Read Writing for Social Scientists (Chapters 5-7)

October 14: Read Writing for Social Scientists (Chapters 8-10)

October 21: Peer review process case studies

•    What to do with reviews, how to handle editors and their various decisions, how to respond to reviews, etc.

October 28: No class

November 4: Individual conferences with instructor (one hour each)

November 11: Individual conferences with instructor (one hour each)

November 18: Individual conferences with instructor (one hour each)

November 25: No class (Thanksgiving)

December 2: Final class

•    Wrap up, discussion of the revision process, and addressing final topics and questions

December 4: (Friday) Course paper due in instructor’s office or mailbox, 4pm.

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