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Robert Crosnoe, Chair CLA 3.306, Mailcode A1700, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-232-6300

Hossein Haghshenas

Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin

Senior Lecturer
Hossein Haghshenas

Contact

SOC 302 • Intro To Study Of Society-Hon

45860 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm CLA 0.120
show description

Course Description

This course will closely examine how social forces in society shape our behavior and penetrate our being. After all, we are all the product of our society and vice versa. Our identities, hopes, fears, grievances and satisfactions derive from the patterns of socialization orchestrated within human groups. In this class, students will be introduced to the basic concept of sociological imagination and principles of sociological reasoning. Many societal issues will be examined through the practice of classical theories and sociological perspectives. As we journey through the course, students will become more familiar with the nature of sociology, social construction of reality, micro and macro sociological analysis, and concepts such as culture, socialization, social structures, self and society, stratification, gender inequality, love, marriage, and divorce. Finally, the course will explore the sociology of health, medicine, and the mind-body connection.

Grading Policy

Research paper 24% Three exams 60%Cass project and participation 8%Quiz 8 %

Texts

James M. Henslin, Sociology: A Down to Earth Approach (eighth or ninth edition), 2008Reading packet available at Paradigm (407 W. 24th St.)

SOC 302 • Intro To The Study Of Society

45985-46010 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 100pm-200pm WCH 1.120
show description

Course Description

This course will closely examine how social forces in society shape our behavior and penetrate our being. After all, we are all the product of our society and vice versa. Our identities, hopes, fears, grievances and satisfactions derive from the patterns of socialization orchestrated within human groups. In this class, students will be introduced to the basic concept of sociological imagination and principles of sociological reasoning. Many societal issues will be examined through the practice of classical theories and sociological perspectives. As we journey through the course, students will become more familiar with the nature of sociology, social construction of reality, micro and macro sociological analysis, and concepts such as culture, socialization, social structures, self and society, stratification, gender inequality, love, marriage, and divorce. Finally, the course will explore the sociology of health, medicine, and the mind-body connection.

Grading Policy

Research paper 24% Three exams 60%Cass project and participation 8%Quiz 8 %

Texts

James M. Henslin, Sociology: A Down to Earth Approach (eighth or ninth edition), 2008Reading packet available at Paradigm (407 W. 24th St.)

SOC 302 • Intro To The Study Of Society

46215-46240 • Spring 2014
Meets MW 1000am-1100am GDC 2.216
show description

Course Description

This course will closely examine how social forces in society shape our behavior and penetrate our being. After all, we are all the product of our society and vice versa. Our identities, hopes, fears, grievances and satisfactions derive from the patterns of socialization orchestrated within human groups. In this class, students will be introduced to the basic concept of sociological imagination and principles of sociological reasoning. Many societal issues will be examined through the practice of classical theories and sociological perspectives. As we journey through the course, students will become more familiar with the nature of sociology, social construction of reality, micro and macro sociological analysis, and concepts such as culture, socialization, social structures, self and society, stratification, gender inequality, love, marriage, and divorce. Finally, the course will explore the sociology of health, medicine, and the mind-body connection.

Grading Policy

Research paper 24% Three exams 60%Cass project and participation 8%Quiz 8 %

Texts

James M. Henslin, Sociology: A Down to Earth Approach (eighth or ninth edition), 2008Reading packet available at Paradigm (407 W. 24th St.)

SOC 308 • Socl Transformatn Of Love/Rels

46315 • Spring 2014
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm WAG 214
(also listed as MES 310 )
show description

“All the particles of the world are in love and looking for lovers.” --Rumi

 OBJECTIVES

Sociology 308 examines the social, psychological, spiritual, and historical perspectives toward love and intimacy. It focuses on the cross-cultural diversity of passionate love and sexuality from early civilization in the East and West to the modern era. The course will offer insights to understand how love and intimacy interact with rapid social, economic, and cultural change, and how the subsequent change transformed the social world and the meaning of love. As we journey through this course, you will become familiar with: the aspects of self and identity; differentiation in the context of love in the modern age; the family and the individual; the impact of industrialization and capitalism on private lives and the public order; gender, love, and communication; love, health, and socialization; intercultural love and intimacy; personal choice and arranged marriages. Finally, we will look at the current state of love and aggression in modern democracies.  This course brings some of the current research and thinking, not only from the social perspective, but also from a wide variety of intellectual disciplines. Artistic films, documentaries, and other media will be presented as technical methods of representation of "social reality" to better understand and experience the subject.

 Readings: Course Packet – a selection of articles has been prepared in a packet available at Paradigm (407 W. 24thSt.)

*Assigned readings with asterisk below can be found on Blackboard: http://courses.utexas.edu          

Format and Attendance: This course will use a combination lecture-discussion style format, with more emphasis on discussion. Attendance will be taken on a regular basis. Regular attendance is required and I expect that students will come to all classes- both lectures and discussions. Please note that: the repercussion of being absent a total of 4 or more classes for the entire spring semester (without justifiable reason) is that your grade will automatically be lowered by one letter. Unexcused absences will count against your grade.

 Grades: Are assigned based on the standard scale: 93-100%= A; 90-92.9% = A-; 87-89.9% = B+; 83-86.9%=B; 80-82.9%= B-; 77-79.9% = C+; 73-76.9%= C; 70-72.9%=C-; 67-69.9% = D+; 63-66.9= D; 60-62.9%= D-; <60 = F.  There are no grading curves.

1) A research paper (4 – 5 pages) OR group paper (10 – 15 pages) on the subject of love, intimacy, relationships, or related issues. Course project and presentations constitute 25% of the final grade. The project is central to the course and the topic must be chosen by the student and/or the group and approved by the teaching assistant and the instructor.

2) Two exams 50% (each exam counts 25%)

3) Quizzes 9%

4) Class participation/group discussions 16%

 

SOC 321K • Sociology Of Creativity

46400 • Spring 2014
Meets MW 300pm-430pm CLA 0.118
show description

Description

This course will introduce the students to different aspects of creative insights, human consciousness, social processes, and the ‘invention of reality’.  The class will bring the intellectual abilities and intuitive inclinations together as a complementary process. We’ll pursue and encourage elements of mindfulness, intuition, and creativity at the individual, organizational, societal, and environmental levels.  The course will draw upon a wide range of sources- lectures, group discussions, books, articles, artistic films, documentaries–in order to better understand and appreciate the interconnectedness and interrelationship between ‘inner’ (personal) and the other (‘social’) reality. The media will be presented as technical methods of representation of "social reality" and socio-cultural phenomena. No technical aspects will be emphasized.

Required Texts

A selection of articles will be, prepared in a packet.

Michael Schwalbe. 2007. The Sociologically Examined Life: Pieces of the Conversation.

Otis Carney. 2002. Wars R’ Us: Taking Action for Peace.

Paulo Coelho. 1995. The Alchemist: A Fable About Following Your Dream   

Joseph Campbell. 2004. Pathways to Bliss: Mythological and Personal  Transformation                                   

Mitch Albon. Tuesday with Morrie.

 Grading Policy             

20%  Short essays--three pages every three weeks

20% Group Workshops and class participation--two--three pages a week

10%  Written Critiques of student paper--three pages

10% Oral Presentation

10% Final assessment--five to seven pages

30% Final course project--6 to 7 pages

 

SOC 302 • Intro To Study Of Society-Hon

45870 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm CLA 0.120
show description

Course Description

This course will closely examine how social forces in society shape our behavior and penetrate our being. After all, we are all the product of our society and vice versa. Our identities, hopes, fears, grievances and satisfactions derive from the patterns of socialization orchestrated within human groups. In this class, students will be introduced to the basic concept of sociological imagination and principles of sociological reasoning. Many societal issues will be examined through the practice of classical theories and sociological perspectives. As we journey through the course, students will become more familiar with the nature of sociology, social construction of reality, micro and macro sociological analysis, and concepts such as culture, socialization, social structures, self and society, stratification, gender inequality, love, marriage, and divorce. Finally, the course will explore the sociology of health, medicine, and the mind-body connection.

Grading Policy

Research paper 24% Three exams 60%Cass project and participation 8%Quiz 8 %

Texts

James M. Henslin, Sociology: A Down to Earth Approach (eighth or ninth edition), 2008Reading packet available at Paradigm (407 W. 24th St.)

SOC 302 • Intro To The Study Of Society

46010 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 100pm-200pm WCH 1.120
show description

Description

Sociology 302 will offer insights to understand how social forces in society shape our behavior and influence our being. After all, we are the product of our society and vice versa. Our identity, hopes, fears, grievances and satisfactions derive from the patterns of socialization orchestrated within human groups. In this class, you will become familiar with the nature of sociology, macro-micro perspectives, sociological approaches, and concepts such as culture, socialization, social structures, social interaction, self and society, institutions, stratification, gender inequality, love, marriage, and divorce. Finally, we explore the sociology of health and the mind-body connection. In this course, we will: a) create an environment that encourages active participation and discussion in the learning process; b) Use a variety of techniques in the teaching and learning process, and c) we will assess and evaluate your work and give timely feedback.

Grading Policy

A short project paper (4-5 pages) 20% 

Three exams 20% each

Class participation and group projects 10%

Pop quizzes 10%

Class Attendance: Regular attendance is required. The repercussion of being absent a total of 4 or more classes, without justifiable reason, is that the final grade will automatically be lowered by one letter.

Texts

James M. Henslin, Sociology: A Down to Earth Approach, 2007, (seventh or eight editions)

Reading Packet: in addition to your general sociology text, you are provided with more readings on certain topics for in-depth analysis and discussion. These readings are photocopied articles available as a packet under my name at: Paradigm (407 W. 24th St)

SOC 302 • Intro To The Study Of Society

45545-45570 • Spring 2013
Meets MW 1000am-1100am FAC 21
show description

Description

Sociology 302 will offer insights to understand how social forces in society shape our behavior and influence our being. After all, we are the product of our society and vice versa. Our identity, hopes, fears, grievances and satisfactions derive from the patterns of socialization orchestrated within human groups. In this class, you will become familiar with the nature of sociology, macro-micro perspectives, sociological approaches, and concepts such as culture, socialization, social structures, social interaction, self and society, institutions, stratification, gender inequality, love, marriage, and divorce. Finally, we explore the sociology of health and the mind-body connection. In this course, we will: a) create an environment that encourages active participation and discussion in the learning process; b) Use a variety of techniques in the teaching and learning process, and c) we will assess and evaluate your work and give timely feedback.

Grading Policy

A short project paper (4-5 pages) 20% 

Three exams 20% each

Class participation and group projects 10%

Pop quizzes 10%

Class Attendance: Regular attendance is required. The repercussion of being absent a total of 4 or more classes, without justifiable reason, is that the final grade will automatically be lowered by one letter.

Texts

James M. Henslin, Sociology: A Down to Earth Approach, 2007, (seventh or eight editions)

Reading Packet: in addition to your general sociology text, you are provided with more readings on certain topics for in-depth analysis and discussion. These readings are photocopied articles available as a packet under my name at: Paradigm (407 W. 24th St)

SOC 308 • Socl Transformatn Of Love/Rels

45670 • Spring 2013
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm WAG 214
show description

“All the particles of the world are in love and looking for lovers.” --Rumi

 OBJECTIVES

Sociology 308 examines the social, psychological, spiritual, and historical perspectives toward love and intimacy. It focuses on the cross-cultural diversity of passionate love and sexuality from early civilization in the East and West to the modern era. The course will offer insights to understand how love and intimacy interact with rapid social, economic, and cultural change, and how the subsequent change transformed the social world and the meaning of love. As we journey through this course, you will become familiar with: the aspects of self and identity; differentiation in the context of love in the modern age; the family and the individual; the impact of industrialization and capitalism on private lives and the public order; gender, love, and communication; love, health, and socialization; intercultural love and intimacy; personal choice and arranged marriages. Finally, we will look at the current state of love and aggression in modern democracies.  This course brings some of the current research and thinking, not only from the social perspective, but also from a wide variety of intellectual disciplines. Artistic films, documentaries, and other media will be presented as technical methods of representation of "social reality" to better understand and experience the subject.

 Readings: Course Packet – a selection of articles has been prepared in a packet available at Paradigm (407 W. 24thSt.)

*Assigned readings with asterisk below can be found on Blackboard: http://courses.utexas.edu          

Format and Attendance: This course will use a combination lecture-discussion style format, with more emphasis on discussion. Attendance will be taken on a regular basis. Regular attendance is required and I expect that students will come to all classes- both lectures and discussions. Please note that: the repercussion of being absent a total of 4 or more classes for the entire spring semester (without justifiable reason) is that your grade will automatically be lowered by one letter. Unexcused absences will count against your grade.

 Grades: Are assigned based on the standard scale: 93-100%= A; 90-92.9% = A-; 87-89.9% = B+; 83-86.9%=B; 80-82.9%= B-; 77-79.9% = C+; 73-76.9%= C; 70-72.9%=C-; 67-69.9% = D+; 63-66.9= D; 60-62.9%= D-; <60 = F.  There are no grading curves.

1) A research paper (4 – 5 pages) OR group paper (10 – 15 pages) on the subject of love, intimacy, relationships, or related issues. Course project and presentations constitute 25% of the final grade. The project is central to the course and the topic must be chosen by the student and/or the group and approved by the teaching assistant and the instructor.

2) Two exams 50% (each exam counts 25%)

3) Quizzes 9%

4) Class participation/group discussions 16%

 

SOC 321K • Sociology Of Creativity

45760 • Spring 2013
Meets MW 300pm-430pm CLA 0.122
show description

Description

This course will introduce the students to different aspects of creative insights, human consciousness, social processes, and the ‘invention of reality’.  The class will bring the intellectual abilities and intuitive inclinations together as a complementary process. We’ll pursue and encourage elements of mindfulness, intuition, and creativity at the individual, organizational, societal, and environmental levels.  The course will draw upon a wide range of sources- lectures, group discussions, books, articles, artistic films, documentaries–in order to better understand and appreciate the interconnectedness and interrelationship between ‘inner’ (personal) and the other (‘social’) reality. The media will be presented as technical methods of representation of "social reality" and socio-cultural phenomena. No technical aspects will be emphasized.

Required Texts

A selection of articles will be, prepared in a packet.

Michael Schwalbe. 2007. The Sociologically Examined Life: Pieces of the Conversation.

Otis Carney. 2002. Wars R’ Us: Taking Action for Peace.

Paulo Coelho. 1995. The Alchemist: A Fable About Following Your Dream   

Joseph Campbell. 2004. Pathways to Bliss: Mythological and Personal  Transformation                                   

Mitch Albon. Tuesday with Morrie.

 Grading Policy             

20%  Short essays / Journal entries

20% Group Workshops and class participation

10%  Written Critiques of student paper

10% Oral Presentation

10% Final assessment

30% Final course project

 

SOC 302 • Intro To Study Of Society-Hon

45305 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm BUR 231
show description

Course Description

This course will closely examine how social forces in society shape our behavior and penetrate our being. After all, we are all the product of our society and vice versa. Our identities, hopes, fears, grievances and satisfactions derive from the patterns of socialization orchestrated within human groups. In this class, students will be introduced to the basic concept of sociological imagination and principles of sociological reasoning. Many societal issues will be examined through the practice of classical theories and sociological perspectives. As we journey through the course, students will become more familiar with the nature of sociology, social construction of reality, micro and macro sociological analysis, and concepts such as culture, socialization, social structures, self and society, stratification, gender inequality, love, marriage, and divorce. Finally, the course will explore the sociology of health, medicine, and the mind-body connection.

Grading Policy

Research paper 24% Three exams 60%Cass project and participation 8%Quiz 8 %

Texts

James M. Henslin, Sociology: A Down to Earth Approach (eighth or ninth edition), 2008Reading packet available at Paradigm (407 W. 24th St.)

SOC 302 • Intro To The Study Of Society

45400-45425 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 100pm-200pm WCH 1.120
show description

Description

Sociology 302 will offer insights to understand how social forces in society shape our behavior and influence our being. After all, we are the product of our society and vice versa. Our identity, hopes, fears, grievances and satisfactions derive from the patterns of socialization orchestrated within human groups. In this class, you will become familiar with the nature of sociology, macro-micro perspectives, sociological approaches, and concepts such as culture, socialization, social structures, social interaction, self and society, institutions, stratification, gender inequality, love, marriage, and divorce. Finally, we explore the sociology of health and the mind-body connection. In this course, we will: a) create an environment that encourages active participation and discussion in the learning process; b) Use a variety of techniques in the teaching and learning process, and c) we will assess and evaluate your work and give timely feedback.

Grading Policy

A short project paper (4-5 pages) 20% 

Three exams 20% each

Class participation and group projects 10%

Pop quizzes 10%

Class Attendance: Regular attendance is required. The repercussion of being absent a total of 4 or more classes, without justifiable reason, is that the final grade will automatically be lowered by one letter.

Texts

James M. Henslin, Sociology: A Down to Earth Approach, 2007, (seventh or eight editions)

Reading Packet: in addition to your general sociology text, you are provided with more readings on certain topics for in-depth analysis and discussion. These readings are photocopied articles available as a packet under my name at: Paradigm (407 W. 24th St)

SOC F302 • Intro To The Study Of Society

88455 • Summer 2012
Meets MTWTHF 1000am-1130am BUR 212
show description

Description

Sociology 302 will offer insights to understand how social forces in society shape our behavior and influence our being. After all, we are the product of our society and vice versa. Our identity, hopes, fears, grievances and satisfactions derive from the patterns of socialization orchestrated within human groups. In this class, you will become familiar with the nature of sociology, macro-micro perspectives, sociological approaches, and concepts such as culture, socialization, social structures, social interaction, self and society, institutions, stratification, gender inequality, love, marriage, and divorce. Finally, we explore the sociology of health and the mind-body connection. In this course, we will: a) create an environment that encourages active participation and discussion in the learning process; b) Use a variety of techniques in the teaching and learning process, and c) we will assess and evaluate your work and give timely feedback.

Grading Policy

A short project paper (4-5 pages) 20% 

Three exams 20% each

Class participation and group projects 10%

Pop quizzes 10%

Class Attendance: Regular attendance is required. The repercussion of being absent a total of 4 or more classes, without justifiable reason, is that the final grade will automatically be lowered by one letter.

Texts

James M. Henslin, Sociology: A Down to Earth Approach, 2007, (seventh or eight editions)

Reading Packet: in addition to your general sociology text, you are provided with more readings on certain topics for in-depth analysis and discussion. These readings are photocopied articles available as a packet under my name at: Paradigm (407 W. 24th St)

SOC 302 • Intro To The Study Of Society

45320-45345 • Spring 2012
Meets MW 1000am-1100am CMA A2.320
show description

Description

Sociology 302 will offer insights to understand how social forces in society shape our behavior and influence our being. After all, we are the product of our society and vice versa. Our identity, hopes, fears, grievances and satisfactions derive from the patterns of socialization orchestrated within human groups. In this class, you will become familiar with the nature of sociology, macro-micro perspectives, sociological approaches, and concepts such as culture, socialization, social structures, social interaction, self and society, institutions, stratification, gender inequality, love, marriage, and divorce. Finally, we explore the sociology of health and the mind-body connection. In this course, we will: a) create an environment that encourages active participation and discussion in the learning process; b) Use a variety of techniques in the teaching and learning process, and c) we will assess and evaluate your work and give timely feedback.

Grading Policy

A short project paper (4-5 pages) 20% Three exams 20% eachClass participation and group projects 10%Pop quizzes 10%Class Attendance: Regular attendance is required. The repercussion of being absent a total of 4 or more classes, without justifiable reason, is that the final grade will automatically be lowered by one letter.

Texts

James M. Henslin, Sociology: A Down to Earth Approach, 2007, (seventh or eight editions)Reading Packet: in addition to your general sociology text, you are provided with more readings on certain topics for in-depth analysis and discussion. These readings are photocopied articles available as a packet under my name at: Paradigm (407 W. 24th St)

SOC 308 • Socl Transformatn Of Love/Rels

45445 • Spring 2012
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm BUR 224
(also listed as MES 310 )
show description

“All the particles of the world are in love and looking for lovers.” --Rumi

 OBJECTIVES

Sociology 308 examines the social, psychological, spiritual, and historical perspectives toward love and intimacy. It focuses on the cross-cultural diversity of passionate love and sexuality from early civilization in the East and West to the modern era. The course will offer insights to understand how love and intimacy interact with rapid social, economic, and cultural change, and how the subsequent change transformed the social world and the meaning of love. As we journey through this course, you will become familiar with: the aspects of self and identity; differentiation in the context of love in the modern age; the family and the individual; the impact of industrialization and capitalism on private lives and the public order; gender, love, and communication; love, health, and socialization; intercultural love and intimacy; personal choice and arranged marriages. Finally, we will look at the current state of love and aggression in modern democracies.  This course brings some of the current research and thinking, not only from the social perspective, but also from a wide variety of intellectual disciplines. Artistic films, documentaries, and other media will be presented as technical methods of representation of "social reality" to better understand and experience the subject.

 Readings: Course Packet – a selection of articles has been prepared in a packet available at Paradigm (407 W. 24thSt.)

*Assigned readings with asterisk below can be found on Blackboard: http://courses.utexas.edu          

Format and Attendance: This course will use a combination lecture-discussion style format, with more emphasis on discussion. Attendance will be taken on a regular basis. Regular attendance is required and I expect that students will come to all classes- both lectures and discussions. Please note that: the repercussion of being absent a total of 4 or more classes for the entire spring semester (without justifiable reason) is that your grade will automatically be lowered by one letter. Unexcused absences will count against your grade.

 Grades: Are assigned based on the standard scale: 93-100%= A; 90-92.9% = A-; 87-89.9% = B+; 83-86.9%=B; 80-82.9%= B-; 77-79.9% = C+; 73-76.9%= C; 70-72.9%=C-; 67-69.9% = D+; 63-66.9= D; 60-62.9%= D-; <60 = F.  There are no grading curves.

1) A research paper (4 – 5 pages) OR group paper (10 – 15 pages) on the subject of love, intimacy, relationships, or related issues. Course project and presentations constitute 25% of the final grade. The project is central to the course and the topic must be chosen by the student and/or the group and approved by the teaching assistant and the instructor.

2) Two exams 50% (each exam counts 25%)

3) Quizzes 9%

4) Class participation/group discussions 16%

SOC 321K • Sociology Of Creativity

45540 • Spring 2012
Meets MW 300pm-430pm MEZ 2.202
show description

Description

This course will introduce the students to different aspects of creative insights, human consciousness, social processes, and the ‘invention of reality’.  The class will bring the intellectual abilities and intuitive inclinations together as a complementary process. We’ll pursue and encourage elements of mindfulness, intuition, and creativity at the individual, organizational, societal, and environmental levels.  The course will draw upon a wide range of sources- lectures, group discussions, books, articles, artistic films, documentaries–in order to better understand and appreciate the interconnectedness and interrelationship between ‘inner’ (personal) and the other (‘social’) reality. The media will be presented as technical methods of representation of "social reality" and socio-cultural phenomena. No technical aspects will be emphasized.

Required Texts

 

A selection of articles will be, prepared in a packet.

Michael Schwalbe. 2007. The Sociologically Examined Life: Pieces of the Conversation.

Otis Carney. 2002. Wars R’ Us: Taking Action for Peace.

Paulo Coelho. 1995. The Alchemist: A Fable About Following Your Dream   

Joseph Campbell. 2004. Pathways to Bliss: Mythological and Personal  Transformation                                   

Mitch Albon. Tuesday with Morrie.

 Grading Policy             

  1. 20% - Short essays / Journal entries
  2. 20% –Group Workshops and class participation
  3. 10%- Written Critiques of student paper
  4. 10%-- Oral Presentation
  5. 10%-- Final assessment
  6. 30%--- Final course project

 

SOC 302 • Intro To The Study Of Society

45160-45185 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 930am-1030am BUR 106
show description

Description

Sociology 302 will offer insights to understand how social forces in society shape our behavior and influence our being. After all, we are the product of our society and vice versa. Our identity, hopes, fears, grievances and satisfactions derive from the patterns of socialization orchestrated within human groups. In this class, you will become familiar with the nature of sociology, macro-micro perspectives, sociological approaches, and concepts such as culture, socialization, social structures, social interaction, self and society, institutions, stratification, gender inequality, love, marriage, and divorce. Finally, we explore the sociology of health and the mind-body connection. In this course, we will: a) create an environment that encourages active participation and discussion in the learning process; b) Use a variety of techniques in the teaching and learning process, and c) we will assess and evaluate your work and give timely feedback.

Grading Policy

A short project paper (4-5 pages) 20% Three exams 20% eachClass participation and group projects 10%Pop quizzes 10%Class Attendance: Regular attendance is required. The repercussion of being absent a total of 4 or more classes, without justifiable reason, is that the final grade will automatically be lowered by one letter.

Texts

James M. Henslin, Sociology: A Down to Earth Approach, 2007, (seventh or eight editions)Reading Packet: in addition to your general sociology text, you are provided with more readings on certain topics for in-depth analysis and discussion. These readings are photocopied articles available as a packet under my name at: Paradigm (407 W. 24th St)

SOC S302 • Intro To The Study Of Society

88665 • Summer 2011
Meets MTWTHF 1130am-100pm BUR 130
show description

Description:

This course will offer insights to understand how social forces in society shape our behavior and penetrate our being. After all, we are the product of our society and vice versa. Our identity, hopes, fears, grieves and satisfactions derive from the patterns of socialization orchestrated within human groups. In this class, you will become familiar with the nature of sociology, sociological approaches, and concepts such as culture, socialization, social structures, social interaction, institutions, stratification, gender inequality, love, marriage, and divorce. Finally, we explore the sociology of health and the mind-body connection.

Required Text:

James M. Henslin. 2010. Sociology:  A Down to Earth Approach (eight or ninth editions). Reading packet.

Grading Policy:

3 exams       65%

Group discussions/participation    20%

Quiz       15%

Regular attendance is required

SOC 302 • Intro To Study Of Society-Hon

45830 • Spring 2011
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm BUR 480
show description

Course Description

This course will closely examine how social forces in society shape our behavior and penetrate our being. After all, we are all the product of our society and vice versa. Our identities, hopes, fears, grievances and satisfactions derive from the patterns of socialization orchestrated within human groups. In this class, students will be introduced to the basic concept of sociological imagination and principles of sociological reasoning. Many societal issues will be examined through the practice of classical theories and sociological perspectives. As we journey through the course, students will become more familiar with the nature of sociology, social construction of reality, micro and macro sociological analysis, and concepts such as culture, socialization, social structures, self and society, stratification, gender inequality, love, marriage, and divorce. Finally, the course will explore the sociology of health, medicine, and the mind-body connection.

Grading Policy

Research paper 24% 
Three exams 60%
Cass project and participation 8%
Quiz 8 %

Texts

James M. Henslin, Sociology: A Down to Earth Approach (eighth or ninth edition), 2008
Reading packet available at Paradigm (407 W. 24th St.)

SOC 302 • Intro To The Study Of Society

45855-45880 • Spring 2011
Meets MW 1000am-1100am CMA A2.320
show description

Description

Sociology 302 will offer insights to understand how social forces in society shape our behavior and influence our being. After all, we are the product of our society and vice versa. Our identity, hopes, fears, grievances and satisfactions derive from the patterns of socialization orchestrated within human groups. In this class, you will become familiar with the nature of sociology, macro-micro perspectives, sociological approaches, and concepts such as culture, socialization, social structures, social interaction, self and society, institutions, stratification, gender inequality, love, marriage, and divorce. Finally, we explore the sociology of health and the mind-body connection. In this course, we will: a) create an environment that encourages active participation and discussion in the learning process; b) Use a variety of techniques in the teaching and learning process, and c) we will assess and evaluate your work and give timely feedback.

Grading Policy
A short project paper (4-5 pages) 20% 
Three exams 20% each
Class participation and group projects 10%
Pop quizzes 10%

Class Attendance: Regular attendance is required. The repercussion of being absent a total of 4 or more classes, without justifiable reason, is that the final grade will automatically be lowered by one letter.

Texts
James M. Henslin, Sociology: A Down to Earth Approach, 2007, (seventh or eight editions)
Reading Packet: in addition to your general sociology text, you are provided with more readings on certain topics for in-depth analysis and discussion. These readings are photocopied articles available as a packet under my name at: Paradigm (407 W. 24th St)

SOC 308 • Socl Transformatn Of Love/Rels

46020 • Spring 2011
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm BUR 224
(also listed as MES 310 )
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“All the particles of the world are in love and looking for lovers.” --Rumi

 

OBJECTIVES

Sociology 308 examines the social, psychological, spiritual, and historical perspectives toward love and intimacy. It focuses on the cross-cultural diversity of passionate love and sexuality from early civilization in the East and West to the modern era. The course will offer insights to understand how love and intimacy interact with rapid social, economic, and cultural change, and how the subsequent change transformed the social world and the meaning of love. As we journey through this course, you will become familiar with: the aspects of self and identity; differentiation in the context of love in the modern age; the family and the individual; the impact of industrialization and capitalism on private lives and the public order; gender, love, and communication; love, health, and socialization; intercultural love and intimacy; personal choice and arranged marriages. Finally, we will look at the current state of love and aggression in modern democracies.  This course brings some of the current research and thinking, not only from the social perspective, but also from a wide variety of intellectual disciplines. Artistic films, documentaries, and other media will be presented as technical methods of representation of "social reality" to better understand and experience the subject.

 

Readings: Course Packet – a selection of articles has been prepared in a packet available at Paradigm (407 W. 24thSt.)

*Assigned readings with asterisk below can be found on Blackboard: http://courses.utexas.edu

            

Format and Attendance: This course will use a combination lecture-discussion style format, with more emphasis on discussion. Attendance will be taken on a regular basis. Regular attendance is required and I expect that students will come to all classes- both lectures and discussions. Please note that: the repercussion of being absent a total of 4 or more classes for the entire spring semester (without justifiable reason) is that your grade will automatically be lowered by one letter. Unexcused absences will count against your grade.

 Grades: Are assigned based on the standard scale: 93-100%= A; 90-92.9% = A-; 87-89.9% = B+; 83-86.9%=B; 80-82.9%= B-; 77-79.9% = C+; 73-76.9%= C; 70-72.9%=C-; 67-69.9% = D+; 63-66.9= D; 60-62.9%= D-; <60 = F.  There are no grading curves.

SOC 302 • Intro To The Study Of Society

45285-45310 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 1230pm-130pm WCH 1.120
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Description:

Sociology 302 will offer insights to understand how social forces in society shape our behavior and influence our being. After all, we are the product of our society and vice versa. Our identity, hopes, fears, grievances and satisfactions derive from the patterns of socialization orchestrated within human groups. In this class, you will become familiar with the nature of sociology, macro-micro perspectives, sociological approaches, and concepts such as culture, socialization, social structures, social interaction, self and society, institutions, stratification, gender inequality, love, marriage, and divorce. Finally, we explore the sociology of health and the mind-body connection. In this course, we will: a) create an environment that encourages active participation and discussion in the learning process; b) Use a variety of techniques in the teaching and learning process, and c) we will assess and evaluate your work and give timely feedback.

Grading Policy
A short project paper (4-5 pages) 20%
Three exams 20% each
Class participation and group projects 10%
Pop quizzes 10%

Class Attendance: Regular attendance is required. The repercussion of being absent a total of 4 or more classes, without justifiable reason, is that the final grade will automatically be lowered by one letter.

Texts
James M. Henslin, Sociology: A Down to Earth Approach,2007, (seventh or eight editions)
Reading Packet: in addition to your general sociology text, you are provided with more readings on certain topics for in-depth analysis and discussion. These readings are photocopied articles available as a packet under my name at: Paradigm (407 W. 24th St)


SOC 302 • Intro To The Study Of Society

88125 • Summer 2010
Meets MTWTHF 1130am-100pm BUR 130
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        This course will offer insights to understand how social forces in society shape our behavior and penetrate our being. After all, we are the product of our society and vice versa. Our identity, hopes, fears, grieves and satisfactions derive from the patterns of socialization orchestrated within human groups. In this class, you will become familiar with the nature of sociology, sociological approaches, and concepts such as culture, socialization, social structures, social interaction, institutions, stratification, gender inequality, love, marriage, and divorce. Finally, we explore the sociology of health and the mind-body connection.

Text Book: James M. Henslin. 2010. Sociology:  A Down to Earth Approach (eight or ninth editions).
Reading packet.

Evaluation:
3 exams    65%
Group discussions/participation    20%
Quiz    15%

Regular attendance is required

SOC 302 • Intro To The Study Of Society

46150-46175 • Spring 2010
Meets MW 1000-1100 FAC 21
show description

Introduction to the Study of Society (SOC 302)

Spring 2010

 

Time and Place: MW 10:00-11:00, FAC 21 (Lecture)

F 10:00-11:00, BUR 128 (Discussion/Lab) (46150)
W 1:00-2:00, RLM 6.116 (Discussion/Lab) (46155)

TH 1:00-2:00, BUR 134 (Discussion/Lab)(46160)

F 1:00-2:00, WEL 3.402 (Discussion/Lab)(46165)

W 2:00-3:00, BEN 1.124 (Discussion/Lab)(46170)

TH 2:00-3:00, MEZ 1.102 (Discussion/Lab)(46175)

 

Instructor: Mehdi Haghshenas                        Colleagues: Ying-Ting Wang: ytwang@mail.utexas.edu

Office: Burdine 539                                    Office/office hours: Bur 602 / M: 2:00-4:00; T:3:00-4:00

Office hours: MW: 11:00-11:50                        Marcos Perez: marcosperez@mail.utexas.edu

Phone: 232-8064                                    Office/office hours: Bur 602/M: 1:30-2:30; Th10:00-12:00           

                                                            Branden Winn: bwinn@mail.utexas.edu

Office/office hours: Bur 554/M: 3:30-4:30; Th:11:00-1:00

           

                                                                       

  Objectives

 Sociology 302 will offer insights to understand how social forces in society shape our behavior and influence our being. After all, we are the product of our society and vice versa. Our identities, hopes, fears, grievances and satisfactions can be derived from the patterns of socialization orchestrated within human groups.  In this class, you will be introduced to the basic concept of sociological imagination, mindfulness, and principles of sociological reasoning. Many societal issues will be examined through the practice of classical theories and sociological perspectives. In this course, you will become more familiar with the nature of sociology, social construction of reality, micro and macro sociological analysis, and concepts such as culture, socialization, social structures, self and society, stratification, gender inequality, love, marriage, and divorce. Finally, we will explore the sociology of health, medicine, and the mind-body connection. In this course, we will: a) create an environment that encourages active participation, group interaction, and discussion in the learning process; b) actively encourage critical thinking; c) use different techniques in the teaching and learning process, and d) we will assess and evaluate your work and give timely feedback.

 

  Reading List:

Text Book: James M. Henslin. 2009. Sociology:  A Down to Earth Approach (Eight or ninth edition).

Reading Packet:  in addition to your general sociology text, you are provided with more readings on certain topics for in-depth analysis and discussion. These readings are photocopied articles available as a packet under my name at: Paradigm (407 W. 24th St.)

*Assigned readings with asterisk below can be found on Blackboard (BB): http://courses.utexas.edu

 

  Format and Evaluation:

This course will use a combination lecture-discussion style format. Regular attendance is required and I expect that students will come to all classes- both lectures and discussions. Please note that: the repercussion of being absent a total of 4 or more classes for the entire spring semester (without justifiable reason) is that your grade will automatically be lowered by one letter. Unexcused absences will count against your grade.

Participants' performance in the course will be based on (a) three one hour examinations (each exams counts 20%); (b) one short project paper of 3-4 pages (20%); (c) Pop quizzes (6%); class participation and group discussions (12%); individual assignments (2%). Taken together, the exams will amount 60% of the course grade. They will include multiple choice, and short answer questions. The tests are reviews of material covered in the class, group discussions, films, and readings. Exams will be taken in class. NO MAKE- UP QUIZ.

MAKE UP EXAMS: Will not be given without prior notice and a written excuse from a physician or other verified emergency situation. Failure to take a scheduled examination without making prior arrangements will result in an automatic zero for that exam.

 

Your paper may be a collaborative effort of 2 or 3 students. The topic must be chosen by the students and approved by the instructor and the TAs. The paper is to be typed only with 12 pt. Times or Courier font, 1.5 line spacing format, 1 to 1.25 inch margins, and numbered pages.   More content and formatting guidelines will be provided closer to the due date. Papers should be submitted in-person. Email submissions will not be permitted with the exception of prior approval. Late papers will not be accepted.  If a paper is not turned in by the assigned date, the grade will automatically be an F. Please keep copies of your assignments you turn in and keep track of your grades until the end of the semester. Group discussion projects and other assignments are due during the class period marked on the schedule.

Quizzes and Exercises will be given occasionally as the measures of class attendance, discussion and participation. We will use them to get input and participation from all class members. Therefore,

 

** ASSIGNED READINGS SHOULD BE COMPLETED BY THE DATES INDICATED.

IF YOU CANNOT REGULARLY MAKE IT TO THIS CLASS, OR CANNOT READ THE TEXTS FOR THE DATES THAT ARE ASSIGNED, PLEASE DO NOT TAKE THIS CLASS.

 

  ** No emailed assignments or papers will be accepted without prior arrangement having been made with the TA.

 

** Classroom civility: With all respect, please turn off your cell phones and do not read/eat/wearing earphones/and work on your other class assignments while in class.

 

  TEST DATES:

  Test 1:  M, March 1

  Test 2:  W, April 7

  Test 3:  W, May 5

  PAPER DUE DATEMarch 24 

Grades: Are assigned based on the standard scale: 93-100%= A; 90-92.9% = A-; 87-89.9% = B+; 83-86.9%=B; 80-82.9%= B-; 77-79.9% = C+; 73-76.9%= C; 70-72.9%=C-; 67-69.9% = D+; 63-66.9= D; 60-62.9%= D-; <60 = F.  There are no grading curves.

 

Withdrawals:  As we journey into this course, if you are unsure of your status (especially if your grades are below average), please let us assist you to clarify your position. With all respect, if you decide to withdraw, do not miss the enforced deadline.

 

Accommodations: Students with disabilities who need special accommodations should notify us by presenting a letter prepared by the Services for Students with Disabilities (SSD) Office. For more information, please call 471-6259(voice) or 232-2937 (video phone). http://www.utexas.edu/diversity/ddce/ssd/

 

Academic Integrity: During the coursework, you should maintain a high standard of individual honor in your scholastic work. Students who violate University rules on scholastic dishonesty are subject to disciplinary penalties, including the possibility of failure in the course and / or dismissal from the University. Cheating or plagiarism (including signing others’ names on attendance sheets) will not be tolerated.

 

Religious Holy Days: If you miss the class for the observance of a religious holy day, please inform the instructor and your TA as far in advance.

 

Course outline

  Please pay attention to the course schedule and complete reading assignments before coming to class.    

1/20    Introduction to Course

 

1/25

Topic:  Taking a New Look at the Familiar World: The Insights of Sociology

Readings:

1.  Peter Berger, "Invitation to Sociology"

2.  C. Wright Mills, "The Sociological Imagination"

3.  Michael Schwalbe, Selections from “The Sociologically Examined Life” * Chapter One: "Making Sense of the World Differently”.

 

1/27; 2/1-8

Topic:  The Classical Tradition and Sociological Perspectives (Group Discussion 1)

Readings:

1.  Chapter 1, James Henslin, "The sociological perspective"

2.  Emile Durkheim, “ What Make Sociology Different?” From The Rules of Sociological Method

3.  Emile Durkheim, "Egoistic suicide"

4.  Karl Marx, "The working of social class"

5.  Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels, “The Communist Manifesto”

6.  Karl Marx, "Alienation in work"

7.  Max Weber, “the Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism”

 

2/10, 15, 17 (Group Discussion 2)

Topic:  Culture

Readings:

1.  Chapter 2;  James Henslin, "Culture"

2.  E.W. Fernea and R. Fernea, "A look behind the veil"

3.  Fatema Mernissi, “The Western Woman’s Harem”

4.  Horace Miner, "Body ritual among the Nacirema,"

5.  Edward T. Hall & M.R. Hall, "The sounds of silence”

6.  Marvin Harris, "India's sacred cow"

7.  Robert Levine, “A Geography of Time”

8.  E. Richard Sorenson, “Growing up as a Fore is to be in touch and free”

 

2/22, 24 (Exam Review)

Topic:  Social Construction of Reality, Building Identity, and Socialization

Readings:

1.  Chapter 3, James Henslin, "Socialization"

2.  Robert B. Moore, “Racism in the English Language”

3.  George H. Mead, “The Self as Social Structure,"    

4.  Patricia A. Adler & Peter Adler, “the Glorified Self.”

5.  Henry A. Giroux, “Disney, Casino Capitalism and the Exploitation of Young Boys: Beyond the Politics of Innocence”. *

March 1

FIRST EXAM

 

3/3, 8 (Group Discussion 3)

Topic:  Social Structure, Social Interaction, and Presentation of Self

Readings:

  1. Chapter 4, J. Henslin

2. Philip Meyer, "If Hitler asked you to electrocute a stranger, would you?                                    Probably"

3. Herbert Kelman and V. Lee Hamilton, “The My Lai Massacre: A Military Crime of Obedience”

4. Ervin Goffman, “The Presentation of Self in Everyday Life: Selection”

5. Eugenia Kaw, “ ‘Opening’ Faces: The politics of Cosmetic Surgery and Asian American       Women”

6. Sharlene Hesse-Biber, “Becoming a Certain Body”

 

3/10 Paper discussion

 

March 15-19     Spring Break

 

March 24---Paper Due

 

 

 

 

 

 

3/ 22, 24 (PAPER DUE)

Topic:  Organizations, Bureaucracy, and Work

Readings:

  1. Chapters 7 and 14, J. Henslin
  2. Max Weber, "Bureaucracy and Modern Society,"
  3. Max Weber, “The Disenchantment of Modern Life”
  4. Juliet B. Schor, “The Overworked American”
  5. George Ritzer, "The McDonald's System”
  6. John Van Maanen, “The Smile Factory: Work at Disneyland”

 

3/ 29 / 31; APR 2(Exam Review)

Topic:  Social Stratification (The Global Perspective), Power, Class, and Privileged

Readings:

1.  Chapters 9 and 10, J. Henslin

  1. Herbert Gans, “The Uses of Povery: The Poor Pay All”
  2. Jonathan Kozol, “Savage Inequality”
  3. G. William Domhoff, “The Bohemian Grove”
  4. Gregory Mantsios, “Media Magic: Making Class Invisible”
  5. John Isbister, “The foundations of Third World Poverty”
  6. William Greider, “These Dark Satanic Mills”

 

4/ 5 (Exam Review)

April  7   Second Exam

 

4/ 12, 14 (Group Discussion 4)

Topic:  Social Inequality  (Continued); Gender Inequality and Work Force

Readings:

  1. Chapter 11, J. Henslin
  2. Arlie Hochschild & Anne Machung, "Men who share the second shift"
  3. Ruth Sidel, “Mixed Messages”
  4. Barrie Thorne, “Boys and Girls Together But Mostly Apart”
  5. Allan Johnson, “Unraveling the Gender Knot”

 

4/19, 21

Topic:  Institutions:  Sociology of Love/ Marriage, Family, and Divorce

 Readings:

1.Chapter 16, J. Henslin

  1. Giri R. Gupta, "Love, arranged marriage, and the Indian social structure"
  2. N. Glenn, “Summery of National Survey On Marriage in America”
  3.  Frank Furstenberg, “The future of Marriage”
  4. Karla Hackstaff, “Divorce culture: a quest for relational equality in marriage”
  5. S. Coontz, “Where are the good old days”
  6. Arlene and Jerome Skolnick, “Family in Transition”
  7. Fred M. Hechinger, "Why France outstrips the United States in nurturing its children"

 

 

 

4/26, 28

Topic: The Sociology of the Body: Mind-body connection

Chapter 19, J. Henslin

1.  John H. Evans “A Brave New World? How Genetic Technology Could Change Us

2.  Keith J. Karren et al, “ Pshchoneuronimmunology: The Connection Between the Mind and the Body”*  On BB

3.  Keith J. Karren et al, “Social Support, Relationships, and Health”* On BB

4.  David A. Karp, “Depression, disconnection, and the Meanings of Illness”

 

5/ 3 Exam Review—5/6 Third Exam

May 7 wrap up

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SOC 308 • Socl Transformatn Of Love/Rels

46270 • Spring 2010
Meets MWF 1200-100pm GEA 114
(also listed as MES 310 )
show description

Social Transformation of Love and Relationships

SOC. 308 Unique # 46270; MES 310 Unique # 42165

Time and Place: MWF 12:00-1:00 Location: GEA 114

Spring 2010

                                                                       

Instructor: Mehdi Haghshenas                       

Office Hours: MW 11:00 – 11:50 & by appt. (Burdine 539)

Phone: 232-8064

Colleague: Sharon Avital                       

Office and Office Hours:W:2:00-4:00 ( BUR 554)

Email: avitalsharon.shineon@gmail.com

 

“All the particles of the world are in love and looking for lovers.” --Rumi

 

OBJECTIVES

Sociology 308 examines the social, psychological, spiritual, and historical perspectives toward love and intimacy. It focuses on the cross-cultural diversity of passionate love and sexuality from early civilization in the East and West to the modern era. The course will offer insights to understand how love and intimacy interact with rapid social, economic, and cultural change, and how the subsequent change transformed the social world and the meaning of love. As we journey through this course, you will become familiar with: the aspects of self and identity; differentiation in the context of love in the modern age; the family and the individual; the impact of industrialization and capitalism on private lives and the public order; gender, love, and communication; love, health, and socialization; intercultural love and intimacy; personal choice and arranged marriages. Finally, we will look at the current state of love and aggression in modern democracies.  This course brings some of the current research and thinking, not only from the social perspective, but also from a wide variety of intellectual disciplines. Artistic films, documentaries, and other media will be presented as technical methods of representation of "social reality" to better understand and experience the subject.

 

Readings: Course Packet – a selection of articles has been prepared in a packet available at Paradigm (407 W. 24th St.)

*Assigned readings with asterisk below can be found on Blackboard: http://courses.utexas.edu

             

Format and Attendance: This course will use a combination lecture-discussion style format, with more emphasis on discussion. Attendance will be taken on a regular basis. Regular attendance is required and I expect that students will come to all classes- both lectures and discussions. Please note that: the repercussion of being absent a total of 4 or more classes for the entire spring semester (without justifiable reason) is that your grade will automatically be lowered by one letter. Unexcused absences will count against your grade.

 

 

 

Grades: Are assigned based on the standard scale: 93-100%= A; 90-92.9% = A-; 87-89.9% = B+; 83-86.9%=B; 80-82.9%= B-; 77-79.9% = C+; 73-76.9%= C; 70-72.9%=C-; 67-69.9% = D+; 63-66.9= D; 60-62.9%= D-; <60 = F.  There are no grading curves.

 

Withdrawals:  As we journey into this course, if you are unsure of your status (especially if your grades are below average), please let us assist you to clarify your position. With all respect, if you decide to withdraw, do not miss the enforced deadline.

 

Accommodations: Students with disabilities who need special accommodations should notify us within the first two weeks of class by presenting a letter prepared by the Services for Students with Disabilities (SSD) Office. For more information, please call 471-6259(voice) or 232-2937 (video phone). http://www.utexas.edu/diversity/ddce/ssd/

 

Academic Integrity: During the coursework, you should maintain a high standard of individual honor in your scholastic work. Students who violate University rules on scholastic dishonesty are subject to disciplinary penalties, including the possibility of failure in the course and / or dismissal from the University.

 

Religious Holy Days: If you miss the class for the observance of a religious holy day, please inform the instructor and your TA as far in advance.

 

ASSIGNED READINGS: SHOULD BE COMPLETED BY THE DATES INDICATED. IF YOU CANNOT REGULARLY MAKE IT TO THIS CLASS, OR CANNOT READ THE ARTICLES FOR THE DATES THAT ARE ASSIGNED, DO NOT TAKE THIS CLASS.

 

MAKE UP EXAMS: Will not be given without prior notice and a written excuse from a physician or other verified emergency situation. Failure to take a scheduled examination without making prior arrangements will result in an automatic zero for that exam.

 

PAPER & PRESENTATION: The paper is to be typed only with 12 pt. Times or Courier font, 1.5 line spacing format, 1 to 1.25 inch margins, and numbered pages.   More content and formatting guidelines will be provided closer to the due date.  Late papers will not be accepted.  If a paper is not turned in by the assigned date, the grade will automatically be an ‘F’. The oral Presentation is required and is part of the graded portion of the assignment. You must limit your presentation to not more than 15 minutes. For affective presentation, you may use power point, transparencies, short films, audio aids, and/or other creative tools.

 

**No emailed assignments or papers will be accepted without prior arrangement having been made with the TA.

 

** Classroom civility: With all respect, please turn off your cell phones and do not read/eat/wearing earphones/and work on your other class assignments while in class.

TEST DATES:

FIRST EXAM:            MARCH 10

SECOND EXAM:             MAY 5

Paper Due:                        March 24

 

Course Evaluation

 

1)    A research paper (4 – 5 pages) OR group paper (10 – 15 pages) on the subject of love, intimacy, relationships, or related issues. Course project and presentations constitute 25% of the final grade. The project is central to the course and the topic must be chosen by the student and/or the group and approved by the teaching assistant and the instructor.

2)    Two exams 50% (each exam counts 25%).

3)    Quizzes 9%.

4)    Class participation and group discussions 16%.

 

Course Schedule and Reading Assignments

Please pay attention to the course schedule and complete reading assignments before coming to class.

 

TOPICS and READINGS:

January 20th: Introduction to Course description, objectives, overview of readings and assignments.

 

January 22 /25: Concepts and Perspectives; Biology of Love

Readings:

  • David Buss, “The Evolutionary Biology of Love,”
  • Helen Fisher, “The Nature and Evolutionary of Romantic Love,”
  • Helen Fisher et. al “Defining the Brain System of Lust, Romantic Attraction and Attachment”

 

January 27 /29; Feb 1 The mythological and spiritual aspects of love;

Form and Formless (lecture)

 

Feb 1/3: Theories of Love; Types of Love; Features of Romantic Love

Readings:

  • Anne. E. Beall & R.J. Sternberg, “The Social Construction of Love,”
  • R. Sternberg, “A Triangular Theory of Love,”
  • P. R. Shaver et al, “Is Love a Basic Emotion?”
  • Nathaniel Branden, “ A Vision of Romantic Love,”
  • Phyllis Krystal, “What is Love,”

 

February 5th: Sex and love in early Eastern civilizations: Innana, love, and the pairs of opposite

 

 

Readings:

  • T. Jacobson, from Sumerian poetry in translation: “Introduction; and Royal   Love Songs, “

 

February 8/10: Sex and love in ancient Eastern and Western civilizations: the Egyptians, the Greeks, and the Romans. Plato’s Symposium.

Readings:

  • Singer, “Concept of Love in the West,”
  • L. Stone, “Passionate Attachments in the West in Historical Perspective,”
  • Plato’s ‘Symposium’
  • Sappho, poems
  • Ovid, “the art of love,”

 

February 12/15 Plato’s symposium [Group Discussion 1]

 

February 17/19: Love in the Middle Ages: The

Persian tale of Khosrow and Shirin; and the Western courtly love of Tristan and Isolde: Pathways to the modern era.

Readings:

  • Nizami, “Khosrow and Shirin,”           
  • J. Campbell, "A Noble Heart, the Courtly Love of Tristan and Isolde:,"
  • A. Capellanus, “On Love.”

 

FEBRUARY 22nd: paper discussion

 

February 24/26: Love and capitalism—private lives and public order: the intimate relationships in American social history.

                                    [Group Discussion 2]

Readings:

  • E. From, " Love and Economic Competition,"
  • K. Marx and F. Engels, “Women in Capitalist Society,”
  • H. Gadlin, “Private Lives & Public Order: A Critical View of the History of Intimate Relations in the United States,”
  • Ann Swidler, “Love & Adulthood in American Culture,”

 

February Mar 1--8: Topic continues. Love, intimacy, Dating, and Sexuality in Modern societies. College women and mating in the U.S. (EXAM REVIEW)

Readings:           

  • Beth Bailey, “Sexual Revolution(s),”
  • Mary Evans, “The Language of Love,”
  • Barbara Risman and p. Schwartz, “After the sexual revolution: gender politics in the teen dating” *(BB)
  • Ghadal al-Samman, “The Sexual Revolution and the Total Revolution,”
  • Giddens, "Ch. 1,3,4"
  • College Women and Dating. N. Glenn and E. Marquardt, “Hooking up, Hanging out, and Hoping for Mr. Right: college women on dating and mating today”

 

March 9th: FIRST EXAM

March 12th: Selective topic: College women and mating in the U.S.

 

March 15th – 19th: Spring Break

March 22nd  – 26th:  Love and marriage beyond western culture: Collectivistic and individualistic societies; comparative studies of personal choice and arranged marriage.

Readings:

  • W.R. Jankowiak, “A Cross-Cultural Perspective on Romantic Love,”
  • K. Dion and K. L. Dion, “Cultural Perspectives on Romantic Love,”
  • B. B. Ingoldsby, “Mate Selection and Marriage Around the World,”
  • W. Jankowiak , "Romantic Passion in the People’s Republic of China,"
  • Stephanie Coontz: “The Radical Idea of Marrying for Love
  • Johanna Lessinger, Asian Indian Marriages----Arranged, Semi-Arranged or          Based on Love?”
  • Balmurli Natarajan, Notes Towards a (Re)Arranged of Love,”

 

March 26th : Paper Due

 

March 29 /31tst: Intercultural and Interracial relationships [PROJECT PRESENTATIONS]

Readings:

  • L. Page, "Denmark’s a Prison,"
  • N. Egan, "Crossing Cultures: the Story of a Chinese Man and an American Woman,"
  • Egon Mayer, “Two can make a Revolution”
  • D. S. Wilson & C.K. Jacobson, "White Attitudes Towards Black and White Interracial Marriage,"
  • Zhenchao Qian, “Breaking the last taboo: interracial marriage in America” *(BB)
  • Shirley A. Hill, “Black Intimacy---Love, Sex, and Relationships---the Pursuit of Intimacy”

 

April 2/5: Self Identity and Intimacy in the Middle

 [PROJECT PRESENTATIONS]

Readings:

  • Nawa Al-Sadawi, “Growing Up Female in Egypt,”
  • W. N. Njambi and W.E. O’Brien, “Revisiting Woman-Woman Marriage”
  • Mahnaz Kousha, “A Man or a Woman? Which is Better Off?
  • Simin Bihbihani, “Oh, I Made Love,”

 

April 7th: Selective topic: Objectification and gender

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

April 9/12: Gender, love, and intimacy [GROUP DISCUSSION 3 & PROJECT PRESENTATIONS]

 

Readings:

  • S. de Beauvoir, "The Second Sex,"
  • F.M. Cancian, “The Feminization of Love”
  • M. Kimmel, “Masculinity as Homophobia: Fear, Shame, and Silence in the Construction of Gender Identity,”
  • J.W. Sattel, “The Inexpressive Male:  Tragedy or Sexual Politics”
  • J. Wood, “Gendered Close Relationships”
  • Judith Levine, “ What is Wanting? Gender, Equality, and Desire,”
  • L. Rubin, “The Approach-Avoidance Dance:  Men, Women, and Intimacy

                 

 

April 14th- - 16th [PROJECT PRESENTATIONS]

April 19th- - 23th [PROJECT PRESENTATIONS]                                   

 

April 26-30 : Meeting the shadow: self and love (GROUP DISCUSSION 4) and presentations.

Readings:

  • R. C. Solomon, "The Self in Love,"
  • D. Schnarch,       “Differentiation: Developing a Self–in-Relationship,”
  • Ann Swidler, ch. 7 “Ties That Do Not Bind”
  • J. Cherlin, I’m o.k., you’re selfish,”
  • R. Bly, "The Long Bag We Drag Behind Us,"
  • C. Whitmont, “The Evolution of the Shadow,             
  • M. Scott Peck, "Healing Human Evil,"
  • Ken Wilber, “Taking Responsibility for Your Shadow,”
  • R. Bly, "Eating the Shadow,"             

 

May 3rd : Love and Violence: Searching for the New

Eves and the New Adams. [PROJECT PRESENTATIONS]

EXAM REVIEW

Readings:

  • F.S. Christopher and S. A. Lloyd, “Physical & Sexual Aggression in Relationships,”
  • Neil S. Jacobson & J.M. Gottman, “Anatomy of a Violent Relationships,”
  • Riane T. Eisler, "The New Eves and the New Adams: The Courage to Question and to Choose, and the Power to Love,"
  • Elaine Hatfield, “From Male Supremacy to Gender Equality,”

 

May 5th:            SECOND EXAM

 

May 7th            Selective topic

 

 

 

 

 

 

SOC 302 • Intro To The Study Of Society

46380-46405 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 200pm-300pm CMA A2.320
show description

 

Time and Place: TTH 2:00-3:00, CMA A2.320 (Lecture)

F 9:00-10:00, BUR 220 (Discussion/Lab) (46380)
F 10:00-11:00, CBA 4.4328 (Discussion/Lab) (46385)

F 11:00-12:00, BUR 130 (Discussion/Lab)(46390)

F 1:00-2:00, MEZ 1.206 (Discussion/Lab)(46395)

F 2:00-3:00, WEL 3.402 (Discussion/Lab)(46400)

TH 3:30-4:30, RAS 211B (Discussion/Lab)(46405)

 

Instructor: Mehdi Haghshenas                  TA Colleagues: Amin Shafeek:

Office: Burdine 539                                Office/office hours:

Office hours: TTH: 11:00-12:30             Yujin Kim: yjkim@mail.utexas.edu

Phone: 232-8064                                   Office/office hours:

                                                            Bob Sitko:

                                                            Office/Office hours:       

                                                                       

  Objectives

 Sociology 302 will offer insights to understand how social forces in society shape our behavior and influence our being. After all, we are the product of our society and vice versa. Our identities, hopes, fears, grievances and satisfactions derive from the patterns of socialization orchestrated within human groups.  In this class, you will be introduced to the basic concept of sociological imagination, mindfulness, and principles of sociological reasoning. Many societal issues will be examined through the practice of classical theories and sociological perspectives. In this course, you will become more familiar with the nature of sociology, social construction of reality, micro and macro sociological analysis, and concepts such as culture, socialization, social structures, self and society, stratification, gender inequality, love, marriage, and divorce. Finally, we will explore the sociology of health, medicine, and the mind-body connection. In this course, we will: a) create an environment that encourages active participation, group interaction, and discussion in the learning process; b) actively encourage critical thinking through mindfulness and sociological imagination; c) use a variety of techniques in the teaching and learning process to develop a deep understanding of social-psychological reasoning, and d) we will assess and evaluate your work and give timely feedback.

 

 

  Reading List:

Text Book: James M. Henslin. 2009. Sociology:  A Down to Earth Approach (Eight or ninth edition).

Reading Packet:  in addition to your general sociology text, you are provided with more readings on certain topics for in-depth analysis and discussion. These readings are photocopied articles available as a packet under my name at: Paradigm (407 W. 24th St.)

*Assigned readings with asterisk below can be found on Blackboard (BB): http://courses.utexas.edu

  Format and Evaluation:

This course will use a combination lecture-discussion style format. Regular attendance is required. The repercussion of being absent a total of 4 or more classes for the entire Fall semester, without justifiable reason, is that your grade will automatically be lowered by one letter.
Participants' performance in the course will be based on (a) three one hour examinations (each exams counts 20%); (b) one short project paper of 3-4 pages (20%); (c) Pop quizzes (6%); class participation and group projects (12%); individual assignments (2%). Taken together, the exams will amount 60% of the course grade. They will include multiple choice, and short answer questions. The tests are reviews of material covered in the class, group discussions, films, and readings. Exams will be taken in class. NO MAKE- UP QUIZ.

MAKE UP EXAMS: Will not be given without prior notice and a written excuse from a physician or other verified emergency situation.

 

Your paper may be a collaborative effort of 2 or 3 students. The topic must be chosen by the students and approved by the instructor and the TAs. The paper is to be typed only with 12 pt. Times or Courier font, 1.5 line spacing format, 1 to 1.25 inch margins, and numbered pages.   More content and formatting guidelines will be provided closer to the due date. Papers should be submitted in-person. Email submissions will not be permitted with the exception of prior approval. Late papers will not be accepted.  If a paper is not turned in by the assigned date, the grade will automatically be an F.

Quizzes and Exercises will be given occasionally as the measures of class attendance, discussion and participation. We will use them to get input and participation from all class members. Therefore,

ASSIGNED READINGS SHOULD BE COMPLETED BY THE DATES INDICATED.

IF YOU CANNOT REGULARLY MAKE IT TO THIS CLASS, OR CANNOT READ THE TEXTS FOR THE DATES THAT ARE ASSIGNED, PLEASE DO NOT TAKE THIS CLASS.

 

  With all respect, please turn off your cell phones and do not read/work on your other class assignments while in class.

 

  TEST DATES:

  Test 1:  T, October 6

  Test 2:  T, November 3

  Test 3:  Th, December 3

  PAPER DUE DATEOctober 29   

 

Grades: Are assigned based on the standard scale: 90-92% = A-; 93-100%= A+; 80-82%= B-; 83-86%=B; 87-89.9% = B+; 70-72%=C-; 73-76%= C; 77-79.9% = C+; 60-62%= D-; 63-66= D; 67-69.9% = D+; <60 = F.  There are no grading curves or bonus opportunities.

 

Withdrawals:  As we journey into this course, if you are unsure of your status (especially if your grades are below average), please let us assist you to clarify your position. With all respect, if you decide to withdraw, do not miss the enforced deadline.

 

  Accommodations: Students with disabilities who need special accommodations should notify us by presenting a letter prepared by the Services for Students with Disabilities (SSD) Office.

 

  Academic Integrity: During the coursework, you should maintain a high standard of individual honor in your scholastic work. Students who violate University rules on scholastic dishonesty are subject to disciplinary penalties, including the possibility of failure in the course and / or dismissal from the University.

 

  Course outline

  Please pay attention to the course schedule and complete reading assignments before coming to class.   

8/27

Introduction to Course

 

9/1

Topic:  Taking a New Look at the Familiar World: The Insights of Sociology

Readings:

1.  Peter Berger, "Invitation to Sociology"

2.  C. Wright Mills, "The Sociological Imagination"

3.  Michael Schwalbe, Selections from “The Sociologically Examined Life” * Chapter One: "Making Sense of the World Differently"

 

9/3-15

Topic:  The Classical Tradition and Sociological Perspectives (group discussion)

Readings:

1.  Chapter 1, James Henslin, "The sociological perspective"

2.  Emile Durkheim, “ What Make Sociology Different?” From The Rules of Sociological Method

3.  Emile Durkheim, "Egoistic suicide"

4.  Karl Marx, "The working of social class"

5.  Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels, “The Communist Manifesto”

6.  Karl Marx, "Alienation in work"

7.  Max Weber, “the Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism”

 

9/17, 22, 24 (group discussion)

Topic:  Culture

Readings:

1.  Chapter 2;  James Henslin, "Culture"

2.  E.W. Fernea and R. Fernea, "A look behind the veil"

3.  Fatema Mernissi, “The Western Woman’s Harem”

4.  Horace Miner, "Body ritual among the Nacirema,"

5.  Edward T. Hall & M.R. Hall, "The sounds of silence”

6.  Marvin Harris, "India's sacred cow"

7.  Robert Levine, “A Geography of Time”

8.  E. Richard Sorenson, “Growing up as a Fore is to be in touch and free”

 

9/29;10, 1 (Exam Review)

Topic:  Social Construction of Reality, Building Identity, and Socialization

Readings:

1.  Chapter 3, James Henslin, "Socialization"

2.  Robert B. Moore, “Racism in the English Language”

3.  George H. Mead, “The Self as Social Structure,"   

4.  Patricia A. Adler & Peter Adler, “the Glorified Self.”

5.  Henry A. Giroux, “Disney, Casino Capitalism and the Exploitation of Young Boys: Beyond the Politics of Innocence”. *

 

October 6  (FIRST  EXAM)

 

10/8, 13 (group discussion)

Topic:  Social Structure, Social Interaction, and Presentation of Self

Readings:

  1. Chapter 4, J. Henslin

2. Philip Meyer, "If Hitler asked you to electrocute a stranger, would you?                                    Probably"

3. Herbert Kelman and V. Lee Hamilton, “The My Lai Massacre: A Military Crime of Obedience”

4. Ervin Goffman, “The Presentation of Self in Everyday Life: Selection”

5. Eugenia Kaw, “ ‘Opening’ Faces: The politics of Cosmetic Surgery and Asian American                        Women”

6. Sharlene Hesse-Biber, “Becoming a Certain Body”

 

10/ 15, 20

Topic:  Organizations, Bureaucracy, and Work

Readings:

  1. Chapters 7 and 14, J. Henslin
  2. Max Weber, "Bureaucracy and Modern Society,"
  3. Max Weber, “The Disenchantment of Modern Life”
  4. Juliet B. Schor, “The Overworked American”
  5. George Ritzer, "The McDonald's System”
  6. John Van Maanen, “The Smile Factory: Work at Disneyland”
  7. Arthur Levine & Jeanette Cureton, “When Hope and Fear Collide: A Portrait of Today’s College Student”

 

10/ 22, 27 (Paper Due October 29)

Topic:  Social Stratification (The Global Perspective), Power, Class, and Privileged

Readings:

1.  Chapters 9 and 10, J. Henslin

  1. Herbert Gans, “The Uses of Povery: The Poor Pay All”
  2. Jonathan Kozol, “Savage Inequality”
  3. G. William Domhoff, “The Bohemian Grove”
  4. Gregory Mantsios, “Media Magic: Making Class Invisible”
  5. John Isbister, “The foundations of Third World Poverty”
  6. William Greider, “These Dark Satanic Mills”

 

10/ 29 (Exam Review)

November 3      Second Exam

 

11/ 5 (group discussion), 10

Topic:  Social Inequality  (Continued); Gender Inequality and Work Force

Readings:

  1. Chapter 11, J. Henslin
  2. Arlie Hochschild & Anne Machung, "Men who share the second shift"
  3. Ruth Sidel, “Mixed Messages”
  4. Barrie Thorne, “Boys and Girls Together But Mostly Apart”
  5. Allan Johnson, “Unraveling the Gender Knot”

 

11/12, 17

Topic:  Institutions:  Sociology of Love/ Marriage, Family, and Divorce

 Readings:

1.  Chapter 16, J. Henslin

  1. Giri R. Gupta, "Love, arranged marriage, and the Indian social structure"
  2. Frank Furstenberg, “The future of Marriage”
  3. Karla Hackstaff, “Divorce culture: a quest for relational equality in marriage”
  4. S. Coontz, “Where are the good old days”
  5. Arlene and Jerome Skolnick, “Family in Transition”
  6. Fred M. Hechinger, "Why France outstrips the United States in nurturing its children"

 

11/19, 24

Topic: The Sociology of the Body: Mind-body connection

Chapter 19, J. Henslin

1.  John H. Evans “A Brave New World? How Genetic Technology Could Change Us

2.  Keith J. Karren et al, “ Pshchoneuronimmunology: The Connection Between the Mind and the Body”*  On: BB

3.  Keith J. Karren et al, “Social Support, Relationships, and Health”* On: BB

4.  David A. Karp, “Depression, disconnection, and the Meanings of Illness”

 

12/ 1

Exam Review

December 3

Third Exam

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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