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Robert Crosnoe, Chair CLA 3.306, Mailcode A1700, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-232-6300

Néstor P. Rodríguez

Ph.D., The University of Texas at Austin

Professor
Néstor P. Rodríguez

Contact

Biography

Nestor Rodriguez has conducted international research in Mexico, Guatemala and El Salvador, and has traveled and lectured in China and Japan. His present research focuses on Guatemalan migration, U.S. deportations to Mexico and Central America, the unauthorized migration of unaccompanied minors, evolving relations between Latinos and African Americans/Asian Americans, and ethical and human rights issues of border enforcement.

NIH Biosketch

SOC 321K • Border Control/Deaths

44985 • Spring 2015
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm CLA 0.102
(also listed as MAS 374 )
show description

Description

Each decade since the 1980s about 4,000 undocumented migrants have died trying to cross the US-Mexico border through dangerous terrain. This border mortality in the undocumented migrant flow raises important sociological, ethical, and legal issues about the formulation and implementation of border control strategies and resulting deaths.  Sociologist, criminologists, the GAO, the CDC, legal experts, forensic scientists, etc.—all have published since on the topic of border control and migrant deaths in journals (e.g., International Migration Review, Criminology & Public Policy, American Journal of Public Health, and law journals), government reports, and in numerous monographs.  The course will focus on the following related aspects of border control and migrant deaths: a) enactment of border control policies, b) policy implementation and death patterns at the US-Mexico border, c) patterns of unauthorized border crossings through dangerous border terrain, d) grassroots movements to support migrants and lessen deaths, and e) the ethics of coercive border control.  Basically the course will survey the public sentiments and attitudes that undergird new border control policies, the patterns of migrant deaths in deserts and in the Rio Grande River associated with border control strategies, movements and community efforts to support migrants in the Arizona border area, and legal and ethical arguments and concepts that frame discussions of migrant deaths at the US-Mexico border.  The course will enable me to delve into this important topic much deeper than in the “US Immigration” undergraduate course I presently teach.

Required Texts

Guerette, Rob. T.  2007.  Migrant Deaths:  Border Safety and Situational Crime Prevention on the U.S.-Mexico Border Divide.  El Paso, TX:  LFB Scholarly Publishing.

Haddal, Chad C. 2010.  Border Security:  The Role of the U.S. Border Patrol.  Congressional Research Service, 7-5700, RL32562. Washington, DC.

Meissner, Doris, Donald M. Kerwin, Muzaffar Chishti, and Claire Bergeron. 2013.  Immigration Enforcement in the United States:  The Rise of a Formidable Machinery.  Migration Policy Institute. Washington, DC. 

Nevins, Joseph.  Dying to Live:  A Story of U.S. Immigration in an Age of Global Apartheid.  San Francisco:  City Light Books, 2008.

Urrea, Luis Alberto. 2004.  The Devil’s Highway.  New York: Little, Brown and Company.

Grading Policy

  • Three (3) exams: multiple choice with short essay; 100 points each
  • Research report paper: short paper (5+ pages) summarizing and critiquing research report or journal article concerning an aspect of border control and migrant deaths; 50 points.

SOC 344 • Racial And Ethnic Relations

45055 • Spring 2015
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm CLA 1.106
show description

Description:

The study of racial and ethnic relations is a major teaching and research part of

sociology. Research on racial and ethnic relations helps us understand the constitution

and dynamics of societies according to conditions of different racial and ethnic groups.

II. Course Aims and Objectives

Aims

This course is designed to provide a sociological understanding concerning the nature

of racial and ethnic intergroup relations, as well as an understanding of how large

(macro) and small (micro) levels of social interaction affect these relations.

Specific Learning Objectives

• Gain background information on the formation of racial and ethnic groups in society

and discuss the social forces that drove, and continue to drive, this formation.

• Review and discuss different perceptions about racial and ethnic intergroup

relations.

• Review and analyze research reports concerning issues of racial and ethnic

relations.

• Develop an awareness of the significance and impacts of racial and ethnic relations

for society.

Cultural Diversity Objective:

“This course carries the flag for Cultural Diversity in the United States. Cultural Diversity

courses are designed to increase your familiarity with the variety and richness of the

American cultural experience. You should therefore expect a substantial portion of your

grade to come from assignments covering the practices, beliefs, and histories of at least

one U.S. cultural group that has experienced persistent marginalization.”

III. Format and Procedures

The course is designed with the expectation that it will follow a format of lectures and

class discussions. A key expectation is that students will come to class prepared to

discuss thematic issues covered in the class, or at least come to class with a curious

and critical predisposition to become intellectually engaged in the class. Class

attendance is expected and highly encouraged. All students are expect to contribute to

class discussion, with a high regard for an open academic dialogue, which values

respect for the ideas, opinions, and views of others.

IV. My Assumptions

My assumptions about the nature of racial and ethnic relations is that these relations a)

follow an historical course, b) flow from human agency and structure, c) follow paths of

division and accommodation, d) and are affected by social constructions regarding the

concepts of race and ethnicity.

V. Course Requirements

1. Class attendance and participation policy

To get the most out of this class you should attend all classes and arrive on time.

Also, you should review previous lecture notes and bring questions to class about

points you did not clearly understand—including points from the assigned readings.

Please be attentive in class (turn off phones). You are greatly encouraged to

participate in class discussion, and please do so in a manner that respects the rights

of others to also participate. If you have a problem hearing the lectures and

discussion, or viewing class presentations, please let me know immediately.

Religious Holidays

UT Austin policy requires that you notify course instructors at least 14 days in

advance if you plan to be absent due to a religious holiday. You will be given an

opportunity to make up activities (exams, assignments, etc.) that you miss because

of your absence due to a religious holiday. You will be given a reasonable time to

make up an exam or assignment after your absence.

Texts:

• Schaefer, Richard T. 2013. Race and Ethnicity in the United States.

Seventh edition. Boston: Pearson. (S)

3

• Gallagher, Charles A. 2012. Rethinking the Color Line: Race and

Ethnicity. Fifth edition. Columbus, OH: McGraw-Hill. (G)

b) Websites to review:

Census Bureau: http://www.census.gov/

Population Reference Bureau: http://www.prb.org/

U.S. Department of Homeland Security (Immigration Statistics):

http://www.dhs.gov/immigration-statistics

Migration Policy Institute: http://www.migrationpolicy.org/

UT Austin Center for Mexican American Studies:

http://www.utexas.edu/depts/cmas/

UT Austin Center for Asian American Studies:

http://www.utexas.edu/cola/centers/aas/

UT Austin Center for African and African American Studies:

http://www.utexas.edu/cola/centers/caaas/

Grading and Requirements:

a) Three regular exams (40 multiple-choice items and a take-home essay question):

100 points per exam x 3 regular exams = 300 points

c) Total possible points = 300 (or 315 with full extra credit).

d) Letter grades (A, B, C, D, F) based on percentage of total points: A (-) = 90%-100%,

B (-/+)= 80%-89.5%, C (-/+)= 70%-79.5%, D (-/+) = 60%- 69.5%, F = less than 60%

 

 

 

SOC 321K • Us Immigration

46185 • Fall 2014
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm CLA 1.106
(also listed as MAS 374 )
show description

 

II.  Course Aims and Objectives

Immigration patterns have significantly affected the development of U.S. society since its inception.  In the 1990s, the United States experienced a record number of new immigrants, and the present decade is maintaining a high volume of immigration, perhaps heading to another record.  This course uses a sociological perspective to address various impacts of immigration in U.S. society.

Aims

This course is designed to help students develop an awareness of the significance of immigration in U.S. society.  In the course, students learn to use sociological approaches to better understand the nature of immigration in U.S. society, including an understanding of how immigration affects large (macro) and small (micro) social units.

 Specific Learning Objectives

Gain background information on the development of immigration patterns in U.S. society and discuss the social forces that affect these patterns from the perspective of historical and recent immigration trends.

Review and discuss different social perceptions and attitudes about immigration trends in U.S. society.

Review and analyze government statistical reports concerning annual immigration conditions and characteristics.

Develop an awareness of the significance of immigration for the development of U.S. society.

Review major laws affecting immigration patterns in U.S. society

Gain an ability to analyze current immigration dynamics from a sociological perspective

Format and Procedures

The course is designed with the expectation that it will follow an intertwined format of lectures and class discussions.  A key expectation is that students will come to class prepared to discuss thematic issues covered in the class, or at least come to class with a curious and critical predisposition to become intellectually engaged in the class. All students are expect to contribute to class discussion, with a high regard for an open academic dialogue, which values respect for the ideas, opinions, and views of others. Class attendance is expected and highly encouraged.

During the course students will be asked to give formal and informal anonymous feedback regarding the teaching techniques and progress of the course.  The purpose of the student feedback is to help create an effective learning experience.

Assumptions

My assumptions about the nature of immigration in U.S. society is that it a) follows an historical course, b) flows from the interaction between human agency and social structures, c) takes normal paths of social division and degrees of accommodation and social incorporation, d) is partly affected by social constructions regarding different national-origin groups, and e) has its most profound significance within the dynamics of social reproduction.

Course Requirements

1. Class attendance and participation policy

To get the most out of this class you should attend all classes and arrive on time.  Also, you should review previous lecture notes and bring questions to class about points you did not clearly understand—including points from the assigned readings.  Please be attentive in class (turn off phones or set to vibration). You are greatly encouraged to participate in class discussion, and please do so in a manner that respects the rights of others to also participate.  If you have a problem hearing the lectures and discussion, or viewing class presentations, please let me know immediately. Class participation is taken into consideration (10%) for the final grade.

Texts

a) Required books/readings:

Portes, Alejandro, and Ruben Rumbaut.  2006.  Immigrant America:  A Portrait.  Berkeley, CA:  University of California Press. (PR)

Min, Pyong Gap.  2006.  Asian Americans:  Contemporary Trends. Thousand Oaks, CA: Pine Forge Press. (M)

 On-line articles (these are free on-line articles accessible through the UT library or other public sources)

 b) Websites to review: let’s make sure that these are the websites that are reviewed for each topic section.

Census Bureau: http://www.census.gov/

Population Reference Bureau: http://www.prb.org/

Office of Immigration Statistics: http://www.dhs.gov/ximgtn/statistics/

Migration Policy Institute: http://www.migrationpolicy.org/

Pew Hispanic Center: http://pewhispanic.org/

UT Austin Center for Mexican American Studies: http://www.utexas.edu/depts/cmas/

UT Austin Center for Asian American Studies: http://www.utexas.edu/cola/centers/aas/

UT Austin Center for African and African American Studies: http://www.utexas.edu/cola/centers/caaas/

Assignments, Assessments, Evaluation, Dates

a) The course contains three regular exams and a “replacement” final exam. Regular exams will consist of multiple-choice items and an essay question, and the final exam will consist of essay questions. The final exam can be taken to replace the grade of a regular exam.  All exams have to be taken on the dates specified; the only exception to this rule are cases involving a truly pressing situation (medical) or involving authorization by UT Austin.  In such exceptional cases, makeup exams for the first two regular exams have to be taken within a week after the originally designated dates in the sociology room for make-ups. In the rare possibility that a student needs to take a makeup for the third exam, arrangements with have to be made with me. Makeup exams will consist of essay questions. Students who miss a scheduled exam must alert me beforehand and consult with me regarding the makeup.  There is no procedure for making up the final exam outside of cases that are of a true exceptional and unusual personal pressing situation. Students have to take all exams on the dates and times specified.  Exams cannot be taken earlier or later than the dates and times specified.

 b) Students are required to submit a report (minimum of 6 pages double space) based on a review of two articles on immigration-related research that have been published in peer-reviewed journals.  Guidelines for writing this research report are given at the end of this syllabus.  I have selected the following journals for students to review and select the articles: International Migration Review, American Journal of SociologyAmerican Sociological Review,Ethnic and Racial StudiesBlack StudiesJournal of Asian American Studies, Social Forces, and Social Science Quarterly. Additional journals may be added to this list during the semester. Please consult the course schedule below for the due date of the research report.  Late research reports will be accepted up to one class meeting late, but will be assessed a 10-point late penalty. Students have to give the URL address of the articles if they are accessible on-line, or provide a copy of the first page of each article if they are not accessible on-line.

 c) All dates specified in this syllabus for course topics, exams, and papers are subject to change given unforeseen developments.

 4. Use of Blackboard

It is my intention to use Blackboard (http://courses.utexas.edu) to help manage the course and to pursue interaction with students.  I plan to use Blackboard to make announcements, distribute information, communicate with students, and post grades.  Students are encouraged to use Blackboard to communicate and share comments and information.  Please check your Blackboard site regularly to look for communications from me or from other students in the class.  Support for using Blackboard can be obtained from the ITS Help Desk at 475-9400, Monday through Friday, from 8am to 6pm. 

Grading

 a) Three regular exams (40 multiple-choice items and an essay question): 100 points per exam x 3 regular exams = 300 points

 b) Research report: 40 points

 c) Final course grades will be determined based on the percent of total points made out of a grand total of 340 points:  90%-100% = A, 80%-89.5% = B, 70%-79.5% = C, 60%-69.5% = D, below 60% = F.

 

SOC 389K • International Migration

46385 • Fall 2014
Meets M 300pm-600pm CLA 3.106
(also listed as MAS 392 )
show description

Seminar Description

This seminar focuses on diverse patterns of international migration (Latin American, Asian, etc.), how they are organized and how they affect societies and their populations across world regions.  The topics addressed in the seminar include the following:  historical and macro contexts of migration, the social organization of migration, gender/women and migration, impacts of economic restructuring, migration of highly skilled workers, levels of social incorporation, theories of international migration, state policies for immigration, restrictions against migrants, impacts of migration on sending communities and settlement areas.

Texts (tentative--one or two books will be replaced with new works)

Stephen Castles & Mark J. Miller.  2009.  The Age of Migration: International Population Movements in the Modern World.  Guilford Press.

Ruben Hernández-León.  2008.  Metropolitan Migrants: The Migration of Urban Mexicans to the United States. UC Press.

Pierrette Hondagneu-Sotelo (ed.).  2003.  Gender and U.S. Immigration: Contemporary Trends.  UC Press.

Anthony M. Messina & Gallya Lahav (eds.).  2006.  The Migration Reader: Exploring Politics and Policies.  Lynne Rienner.

United Nations.  2009.  Human Development Report: 2009, Overcoming Barriers:  Human Mobility and Development. United Nations Development Program (UNDP), Palgrave Macmillian. (FREE on-line!)

http://hdr.undp.org/en/reports/global/hdr2009/papers/

 Li Zhang.  2001.  Strangers in the City:  Reconfigurations of Space, Power, and Social Networks within China’s Floating Population.  Stanford University Press.

Grading

a) Five reaction papers, 3-5 pages (100 points; 45% of total grade)

b) Seminar paper (100 points; 45% of total grade)

c) Seminar participation (22 points; 10% of total grade)

SOC 344 • Racial And Ethnic Relations

46480 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm CLA 1.106
show description

Description

Immigration patterns have significantly affected the development of U.S. society since its inception.  In the 1990s, the United States experienced a record number of new immigrants, and the present decade is maintaining a high volume of immigration, perhaps heading to another record.  This course uses a sociological perspective to address various impacts of immigration in U.S. society.

Aims

This course is designed to help students develop an awareness of the significance of immigration in U.S. society.  In the course, students learn to use sociological approaches to better understand the nature of immigration in U.S. society, including an understanding of how immigration affects large (macro) and small (micro) social units.

 Specific Learning Objectives

Gain background information on the development of immigration patterns in U.S. society and discuss the social forces that affect these patterns from the perspective of historical and recent immigration trends.

Review and discuss different social perceptions and attitudes about immigration trends in U.S. society.

Review and analyze government statistical reports concerning annual immigration conditions and characteristics.

Develop an awareness of the significance of immigration for the development of U.S. society.

Review major laws affecting immigration patterns in U.S. society

Gain an ability to analyze current immigration dynamics from a sociological perspective

Format and Procedures

The course is designed with the expectation that it will follow an intertwined format of lectures and class discussions.  A key expectation is that students will come to class prepared to discuss thematic issues covered in the class, or at least come to class with a curious and critical predisposition to become intellectually engaged in the class. All students are expect to contribute to class discussion, with a high regard for an open academic dialogue, which values respect for the ideas, opinions, and views of others. Class attendance is expected and highly encouraged.

During the course students will be asked to give formal and informal anonymous feedback regarding the teaching techniques and progress of the course.  The purpose of the student feedback is to help create an effective learning experience.

Assumptions

My assumptions about the nature of immigration in U.S. society is that it a) follows an historical course, b) flows from the interaction between human agency and social structures, c) takes normal paths of social division and degrees of accommodation and social incorporation, d) is partly affected by social constructions regarding different national-origin groups, and e) has its most profound significance within the dynamics of social reproduction.

Texts (Subject to change)

a) Required books/readings:

Portes, Alejandro, and Ruben Rumbaut.  2006.  Immigrant America:  A Portrait.  Berkeley, CA:  University of California Press. (PR)

Min, Pyong Gap.  2006.  Asian Americans:  Contemporary Trends. Thousand Oaks, CA: Pine Forge Press. (M)

On-line articles (these are free on-line articles accessible through the UT library or other public sources)

b) Websites to review: let’s make sure that these are the websites that are reviewed for each topic section.

Census Bureau: http://www.census.gov/

Population Reference Bureau: http://www.prb.org/

Office of Immigration Statistics: http://www.dhs.gov/ximgtn/statistics/

Migration Policy Institute: http://www.migrationpolicy.org/

Pew Hispanic Center: http://pewhispanic.org/

UT Austin Center for Mexican American Studies: http://www.utexas.edu/depts/cmas/

UT Austin Center for Asian American Studies: http://www.utexas.edu/cola/centers/aas/

UT Austin Center for African and African American Studies: http://www.utexas.edu/cola/centers/caaas/

Grading and requirements

1. Class attendance and participation policy

To get the most out of this class you should attend all classes and arrive on time.  Also, you should review previous lecture notes and bring questions to class about points you did not clearly understand—including points from the assigned readings.  Please be attentive in class (turn off phones or set to vibration). You are greatly encouraged to participate in class discussion, and please do so in a manner that respects the rights of others to also participate.  If you have a problem hearing the lectures and discussion, or viewing class presentations, please let me know immediately. Class participation is taken into consideration (10%) for the final grade.

a) The course contains three regular exams and a “replacement” final exam. Regular exams will consist of multiple-choice items and an essay question, and the final exam will consist of essay questions. The final exam can be taken to replace the grade of a regular exam.  All exams have to be taken on the dates specified; the only exception to this rule are cases involving a truly pressing situation (medical) or involving authorization by UT Austin.  In such exceptional cases, makeup exams for the first two regular exams have to be taken within a week after the originally designated dates in the sociology room for make-ups. In the rare possibility that a student needs to take a makeup for the third exam, arrangements with have to be made with me. Makeup exams will consist of essay questions. Students who miss a scheduled exam must alert me beforehand and consult with me regarding the makeup.  There is no procedure for making up the final exam outside of cases that are of a true exceptional and unusual personal pressing situation. Students have to take all exams on the dates and times specified.  Exams cannot be taken earlier or later than the dates and times specified.

b) Students are required to submit a report (minimum of 6 pages double space) based on a review of two articles on immigration-related research that have been published in peer-reviewed journals.  Guidelines for writing this research report are given at the end of this syllabus.  I have selected the following journals for students to review and select the articles: International Migration Review, American Journal of SociologyAmerican Sociological Review,Ethnic and Racial StudiesBlack StudiesJournal of Asian American Studies, Social Forces, and Social Science Quarterly. Additional journals may be added to this list during the semester. Please consult the course schedule below for the due date of the research report.  Late research reports will be accepted up to one class meeting late, but will be assessed a 10-point late penalty. Students have to give the URL address of the articles if they are accessible on-line, or provide a copy of the first page of each article if they are not accessible on-line.

Three regular exams (40 multiple-choice items and an essay question): 100 points per exam x 3 regular exams = 300 points

Research report: 40 points

Final course grades will be determined based on the percent of total points made out of a grand total of 340 points:  90%-100% = A, 80%-89.5% = B, 70%-79.5% = C, 60%-69.5% = D, below 60% = F.

 

 

SOC 389K • International Migration

46575 • Spring 2014
Meets M 300pm-600pm CLA 3.106
show description

Seminar Description

This seminar focuses on diverse patterns of international migration (Latin American, Asian, etc.), how they are organized and how they affect societies and their populations across world regions.  The topics addressed in the seminar include the following:  historical and macro contexts of migration, the social organization of migration, gender/women and migration, impacts of economic restructuring, migration of highly skilled workers, levels of social incorporation, theories of international migration, state policies for immigration, restrictions against migrants, impacts of migration on sending communities and settlement areas.

Texts (tentative--one or two books will be replaced with new works)

Stephen Castles & Mark J. Miller.  2009.  The Age of Migration: International Population Movements in the Modern World.  Guilford Press.

Ruben Hernández-León.  2008.  Metropolitan Migrants: The Migration of Urban Mexicans to the United States. UC Press.

Pierrette Hondagneu-Sotelo (ed.).  2003.  Gender and U.S. Immigration: Contemporary Trends.  UC Press.

Anthony M. Messina & Gallya Lahav (eds.).  2006.  The Migration Reader: Exploring Politics and Policies.  Lynne Rienner.

United Nations.  2009.  Human Development Report: 2009, Overcoming Barriers:  Human Mobility and Development. United Nations Development Program (UNDP), Palgrave Macmillian. (FREE on-line!)

http://hdr.undp.org/en/reports/global/hdr2009/papers/

 Li Zhang.  2001.  Strangers in the City:  Reconfigurations of Space, Power, and Social Networks within China’s Floating Population.  Stanford University Press.

Grading

a) Five reaction papers, 3-5 pages (100 points; 45% of total grade)

b) Seminar paper (100 points; 45% of total grade)

c) Seminar participation (22 points; 10% of total grade)

 

SOC 321K • Us Immigration

46165 • Fall 2013
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm ART 1.120
(also listed as MAS 374 )
show description

Immigration patterns have significantly affected the development of U.S. society since its inception.  In the 1990s, the United States experienced a record number of new immigrants, and the present decade is maintaining a high volume of immigration, perhaps heading to another record.  This course uses a sociological perspective to address various impacts of immigration in U.S. society.

II.  Course Aims and Objectives

Aims

This course is designed to help students develop an awareness of the significance of immigration in U.S. society.  In the course, students learn to use sociological approaches to better understand the nature of immigration in U.S. society, including an understanding of how immigration affects large (macro) and small (micro) social units.

 Specific Learning Objectives

Gain background information on the development of immigration patterns in U.S. society and discuss the social forces that affect these patterns from the perspective of historical and recent immigration trends.

Review and discuss different social perceptions and attitudes about immigration trends in U.S. society.

Review and analyze government statistical reports concerning annual immigration conditions and characteristics.

Develop an awareness of the significance of immigration for the development of U.S. society.

Review major laws affecting immigration patterns in U.S. society

Gain an ability to analyze current immigration dynamics from a sociological perspective

Format and Procedures

The course is designed with the expectation that it will follow an intertwined format of lectures and class discussions.  A key expectation is that students will come to class prepared to discuss thematic issues covered in the class, or at least come to class with a curious and critical predisposition to become intellectually engaged in the class. All students are expect to contribute to class discussion, with a high regard for an open academic dialogue, which values respect for the ideas, opinions, and views of others. Class attendance is expected and highly encouraged.

During the course students will be asked to give formal and informal anonymous feedback regarding the teaching techniques and progress of the course.  The purpose of the student feedback is to help create an effective learning experience.

Assumptions

My assumptions about the nature of immigration in U.S. society is that it a) follows an historical course, b) flows from the interaction between human agency and social structures, c) takes normal paths of social division and degrees of accommodation and social incorporation, d) is partly affected by social constructions regarding different national-origin groups, and e) has its most profound significance within the dynamics of social reproduction.

Course Requirements

1. Class attendance and participation policy

To get the most out of this class you should attend all classes and arrive on time.  Also, you should review previous lecture notes and bring questions to class about points you did not clearly understand—including points from the assigned readings.  Please be attentive in class (turn off phones or set to vibration). You are greatly encouraged to participate in class discussion, and please do so in a manner that respects the rights of others to also participate.  If you have a problem hearing the lectures and discussion, or viewing class presentations, please let me know immediately. Class participation is taken into consideration (10%) for the final grade.

Texts

a) Required books/readings:

Portes, Alejandro, and Ruben Rumbaut.  2006.  Immigrant America:  A Portrait.  Berkeley, CA:  University of California Press. (PR)

Min, Pyong Gap.  2006.  Asian Americans:  Contemporary Trends. Thousand Oaks, CA: Pine Forge Press. (M)

 On-line articles (these are free on-line articles accessible through the UT library or other public sources)

 b) Websites to review: let’s make sure that these are the websites that are reviewed for each topic section.

Census Bureau: http://www.census.gov/

Population Reference Bureau: http://www.prb.org/

Office of Immigration Statistics: http://www.dhs.gov/ximgtn/statistics/

Migration Policy Institute: http://www.migrationpolicy.org/

Pew Hispanic Center: http://pewhispanic.org/

UT Austin Center for Mexican American Studies: http://www.utexas.edu/depts/cmas/

UT Austin Center for Asian American Studies: http://www.utexas.edu/cola/centers/aas/

UT Austin Center for African and African American Studies: http://www.utexas.edu/cola/centers/caaas/

Assignments, Assessments, Evaluation, Dates

a) The course contains three regular exams and a “replacement” final exam. Regular exams will consist of multiple-choice items and an essay question, and the final exam will consist of essay questions. The final exam can be taken to replace the grade of a regular exam.  All exams have to be taken on the dates specified; the only exception to this rule are cases involving a truly pressing situation (medical) or involving authorization by UT Austin.  In such exceptional cases, makeup exams for the first two regular exams have to be taken within a week after the originally designated dates in the sociology room for make-ups. In the rare possibility that a student needs to take a makeup for the third exam, arrangements with have to be made with me. Makeup exams will consist of essay questions. Students who miss a scheduled exam must alert me beforehand and consult with me regarding the makeup.  There is no procedure for making up the final exam outside of cases that are of a true exceptional and unusual personal pressing situation. Students have to take all exams on the dates and times specified.  Exams cannot be taken earlier or later than the dates and times specified.

 b) Students are required to submit a report (minimum of 6 pages double space) based on a review of two articles on immigration-related research that have been published in peer-reviewed journals.  Guidelines for writing this research report are given at the end of this syllabus.  I have selected the following journals for students to review and select the articles: International Migration Review, American Journal of SociologyAmerican Sociological Review,Ethnic and Racial StudiesBlack StudiesJournal of Asian American Studies, Social Forces, and Social Science Quarterly. Additional journals may be added to this list during the semester. Please consult the course schedule below for the due date of the research report.  Late research reports will be accepted up to one class meeting late, but will be assessed a 10-point late penalty. Students have to give the URL address of the articles if they are accessible on-line, or provide a copy of the first page of each article if they are not accessible on-line.

 c) All dates specified in this syllabus for course topics, exams, and papers are subject to change given unforeseen developments.

 4. Use of Blackboard

It is my intention to use Blackboard (http://courses.utexas.edu) to help manage the course and to pursue interaction with students.  I plan to use Blackboard to make announcements, distribute information, communicate with students, and post grades.  Students are encouraged to use Blackboard to communicate and share comments and information.  Please check your Blackboard site regularly to look for communications from me or from other students in the class.  Support for using Blackboard can be obtained from the ITS Help Desk at 475-9400, Monday through Friday, from 8am to 6pm. 

Grading

 a) Three regular exams (40 multiple-choice items and an essay question): 100 points per exam x 3 regular exams = 300 points

 b) Research report: 40 points

 c) Final course grades will be determined based on the percent of total points made out of a grand total of 340 points:  90%-100% = A, 80%-89.5% = B, 70%-79.5% = C, 60%-69.5% = D, below 60% = F.

 

SOC 396P • Coercive Bureaucracies

46010 • Spring 2013
Meets M 300pm-600pm CLA 1.302C
show description

 Description

The seminar addresses the topic of state coercive bureaucracies, that is, government agencies that are involved in coercive or potentially coercive enforcement, including the possible use of lethal force, affecting large numbers of people.   Examples of U.S. coercive bureaucracies include the FBI, CIA, and the Department of Homeland Security bureaus of Immigration and Customs Enforcement and the Border Patrol; numerous other examples exist in countries abroad and in different historical periods.  Coercive bureaucracies that target specific social categories (unauthorized migrants, ethnic groups, dissidents, etc.) often venture into politically sensitive terrain and face special organizational challenges.  This is especially true in democratic societies where state bureaucracies undergo regular parliamentary review.  The seminar is concerned with the conditions and dynamics of coercive bureaucracies involved in carrying out politically sensitive work, that is, with the internal and external political and organizational challenges they face and the techniques of coercion they use.  Three topics will constitute the subject material of the seminar.  Part 1 of the seminar will consist of a conceptual and theoretical overview, including critical perspectives, of bureaucratic organizations, as well as research approaches to the study of the dynamics of coercive bureaucracies.  Part 2 will address the social structure of bureaucratic coercion through case study materials (Nazi exterminations, U.S. mass deportations, “War on Terror,” etc.).  Part 3 will contain a summation of theoretical and research materials reviewed in the seminar and presentations of the student paper projects. 

 

Outline (with selected readings)

Part 1.  Introduction to the Bureaucracy

 

Week 1-2:  Concepts and Theories of Bureaucracies

  • Weber, Max.  1946.  From Max Weber:  Essays in Sociology.  Oxford University Press, New York.
  • Mills, C. Wright.  1956.  Power Elite.  Oxford University Press, New York.
  • Risen, James.  2006.  State of War:  The Secret History of the CIA and the Bush Administration.  Free Press, New York.
  • Frontline.  2007. Cheney’s Law.  PBS DVD.

 

Week 3-4:  Critical Analyses of Bureaucracies

  • Vaughan, Ted R., Gideon Sjoberg, and Larry T. Reynolds (eds.).  1993.  A Critique of Contemporary American Sociology.  General Hall, Inc., Dix Hills, New York.
  • Sjoberg, Gideon, Ted R. Vaughan, and Norma Williams.  1984.  “Bureaucracy as a Moral Issue.”  Journal of Applied Behavioral Research 20: 441-453.
  • Vaughan, Ted R., and Gideon Sjoberg.  1984. The Individual and Bureaucracy:  An Alternative Meadian Interpretation.”  Journal of Applied Behavioral Research 20: 57-69.

 

Week 5:  Data and Methods for Bureaucratic Research

  • The National Security Archive.  2011.  “The Torture Archives,” etc.  The George Washington University.  http://www.aladin.wrlc.org/dl/collection/hdr?torture
  • Jacinto Rodríguez Munguía.  2007.  La otra guerra secreta:  Los archivos prohibidos de la prensa y el poder.  (The other secret war: The prohibited archives of the press and power)  Random House, Mexico City.
  • Feagin, Joe R., Anthony M. Orum, and Gideon Sjoberg.  1991.  A Case for the Case Study.  The University of North Carolina Press, Chapel Hill.
  • Littrell, Boyd.  1993.  “Bureaucratic Secrets and Adversarial Methods of Social Research.”  Pp. 207-231 in Vaughan, Sjoberg, and Reynolds (1993).

 

Part 2.  Social Structure of Bureaucratic Coercive Control

 

Week 6-7:  Techniques of Coercion

  • Bamford, James.  2008.  The Shadow Factory:  The Ultra-Secret NSA from 9/11 to the Eavesdropping on America.  Doubleday, New York.
  • De Genova, Nicholas, and Nathalie Peutz (eds.).  2010.  The Deportation Regime:  Sovereignty, Space, and the Freedom of Movement.  Duke University Press, Durham, North Carolina.
  • Friedländer, Saul.  2007.  The Years of Extermination:  Nazi Germany and the Jews, 1939-1945.  HarperCollins Publishers, New York.
  • Frontline.  The Dark Side.  PBS DVD (U.S. “War on Terror”)
  • Gómez-Barris, Macarena.  2008.  Where Memory Dwells:  Culture and State Violence in Chile.  University of California Press, Los Angeles.
  • Höss, Rudolph.  1992.  Death Dealer:  The Memoirs of the SS Kommandant at Auschwitz.  Da Capo Press, New York.
  • McCoy, Alfred W.  2006.  A Question of Torture:  CIA Interrogation, from the Cold War to the War on Terror.  Metropolitan Books, New York.
  • McSherry, J. Patrice.  2005.  Predatory States:  Operation Condor and Covert War in Latin America.  Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc., Lanham, Maryland.
  • Taxi to the Dark Side.  2007 film of in-depth look at the torture practices of the United States in Afghanistan, Iraq and Guantanamo Bay, focusing on an innocent taxi driver in Afghanistan who was tortured and killed in 2002.

 

Week 8-9:  Production of Ideology for Legitimacy

  • Gramsci, Antonio.  1971.  Selections from the Prison Notebooks.  International Publishers, New York.
  • Marcuse, Herbert.  1964.  One-Dimensional Man:  Studies in the Ideology of Advanced Industrial Society.  Beacon Press, Boston.
  • Thompson, John B.  1990. Ideology and Modern Culture.  Stanford University Press. Stanford, California.

 

Week 10-11:  Ethics and Human Rights Impacts

  • Robben, Antonius C. G., and Marcelo M. Suárez-Orozco (eds.).  2000.  Culture under Siege:  Collective Violence and Trauma.  Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, United Kingdom.
  • Sjoberg, Gideon, Elizabeth Gill, Norma Williams, and Kathryn E. Kuhn.  1995.  “Ethics, Human Rights and Sociological Inquiry:  Genocide, Politicide and Other Issues of Organizational Power.”  The American Sociologists  Spring: 8-19.
  • Talavera, Victor, Guillermina Gina Núñez-Mchiri, and Josiah Heyman.  2010.  “Deportation in the U.S.-Mexico Borderlands:  Anticipation, Experience, and Memory.”  Pp. 166-195 in De Genova and Peutz (2010).

 

Part 3.  Towards a Conceptual Model of Coercive Bureaucracies

 

Week 12:  Salient Features of Coercive Bureaucracies

  • Summation of conceptual/theoretical materials covered in seminar

 

Week 13-15:  Presentation of Case Studies

  • In-depth presentations of student selected case studies (seminar papers) and seminar critiques

 

Grading:

a) Three reaction papers, 3-5 pages each (100 points; 45% of total grade)

b) Seminar paper (100 points; 45% of total grade)

c) Seminar participation (22 points; 10% of total grade)

 

 

 

 

SOC 321K • Us Immigration

45550 • Fall 2012
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm NOA 1.102
(also listed as MAS 374 )
show description

Immigration patterns have significantly affected the development of U.S. society since its inception.  In the 1990s, the United States experienced a record number of new immigrants, and the present decade is maintaining a high volume of immigration, perhaps heading to another record.  This course uses a sociological perspective to address various impacts of immigration in U.S. society.

II.  Course Aims and Objectives

Aims

This course is designed to help students develop an awareness of the significance of immigration in U.S. society.  In the course, students learn to use sociological approaches to better understand the nature of immigration in U.S. society, including an understanding of how immigration affects large (macro) and small (micro) social units.

 Specific Learning Objectives

Gain background information on the development of immigration patterns in U.S. society and discuss the social forces that affect these patterns from the perspective of historical and recent immigration trends.

Review and discuss different social perceptions and attitudes about immigration trends in U.S. society.

Review and analyze government statistical reports concerning annual immigration conditions and characteristics.

Develop an awareness of the significance of immigration for the development of U.S. society.

Review major laws affecting immigration patterns in U.S. society

Gain an ability to analyze current immigration dynamics from a sociological perspective

Format and Procedures

The course is designed with the expectation that it will follow an intertwined format of lectures and class discussions.  A key expectation is that students will come to class prepared to discuss thematic issues covered in the class, or at least come to class with a curious and critical predisposition to become intellectually engaged in the class. All students are expect to contribute to class discussion, with a high regard for an open academic dialogue, which values respect for the ideas, opinions, and views of others. Class attendance is expected and highly encouraged.

During the course students will be asked to give formal and informal anonymous feedback regarding the teaching techniques and progress of the course.  The purpose of the student feedback is to help create an effective learning experience.

Assumptions

My assumptions about the nature of immigration in U.S. society is that it a) follows an historical course, b) flows from the interaction between human agency and social structures, c) takes normal paths of social division and degrees of accommodation and social incorporation, d) is partly affected by social constructions regarding different national-origin groups, and e) has its most profound significance within the dynamics of social reproduction.

Course Requirements

1. Class attendance and participation policy

To get the most out of this class you should attend all classes and arrive on time.  Also, you should review previous lecture notes and bring questions to class about points you did not clearly understand—including points from the assigned readings.  Please be attentive in class (turn off phones or set to vibration). You are greatly encouraged to participate in class discussion, and please do so in a manner that respects the rights of others to also participate.  If you have a problem hearing the lectures and discussion, or viewing class presentations, please let me know immediately. Class participation is taken into consideration (10%) for the final grade.

Texts

a) Required books/readings:

Portes, Alejandro, and Ruben Rumbaut.  2006.  Immigrant America:  A Portrait.  Berkeley, CA:  University of California Press. (PR)

Min, Pyong Gap.  2006.  Asian Americans:  Contemporary Trends. Thousand Oaks, CA: Pine Forge Press. (M)

 On-line articles (these are free on-line articles accessible through the UT library or other public sources)

 b) Websites to review: let’s make sure that these are the websites that are reviewed for each topic section.

Census Bureau: http://www.census.gov/

Population Reference Bureau: http://www.prb.org/

Office of Immigration Statistics: http://www.dhs.gov/ximgtn/statistics/

Migration Policy Institute: http://www.migrationpolicy.org/

Pew Hispanic Center: http://pewhispanic.org/

UT Austin Center for Mexican American Studies: http://www.utexas.edu/depts/cmas/

UT Austin Center for Asian American Studies: http://www.utexas.edu/cola/centers/aas/

UT Austin Center for African and African American Studies: http://www.utexas.edu/cola/centers/caaas/

Assignments, Assessments, Evaluation, Dates

a) The course contains three regular exams and a “replacement” final exam. Regular exams will consist of multiple-choice items and an essay question, and the final exam will consist of essay questions. The final exam can be taken to replace the grade of a regular exam.  All exams have to be taken on the dates specified; the only exception to this rule are cases involving a truly pressing situation (medical) or involving authorization by UT Austin.  In such exceptional cases, makeup exams for the first two regular exams have to be taken within a week after the originally designated dates in the sociology room for make-ups. In the rare possibility that a student needs to take a makeup for the third exam, arrangements with have to be made with me. Makeup exams will consist of essay questions. Students who miss a scheduled exam must alert me beforehand and consult with me regarding the makeup.  There is no procedure for making up the final exam outside of cases that are of a true exceptional and unusual personal pressing situation. Students have to take all exams on the dates and times specified.  Exams cannot be taken earlier or later than the dates and times specified.

 b) Students are required to submit a report (minimum of 6 pages double space) based on a review of two articles on immigration-related research that have been published in peer-reviewed journals.  Guidelines for writing this research report are given at the end of this syllabus.  I have selected the following journals for students to review and select the articles: International Migration Review, American Journal of SociologyAmerican Sociological Review,Ethnic and Racial StudiesBlack StudiesJournal of Asian American Studies, Social Forces, and Social Science Quarterly. Additional journals may be added to this list during the semester. Please consult the course schedule below for the due date of the research report.  Late research reports will be accepted up to one class meeting late, but will be assessed a 10-point late penalty. Students have to give the URL address of the articles if they are accessible on-line, or provide a copy of the first page of each article if they are not accessible on-line.

 c) All dates specified in this syllabus for course topics, exams, and papers are subject to change given unforeseen developments.

 4. Use of Blackboard

It is my intention to use Blackboard (http://courses.utexas.edu) to help manage the course and to pursue interaction with students.  I plan to use Blackboard to make announcements, distribute information, communicate with students, and post grades.  Students are encouraged to use Blackboard to communicate and share comments and information.  Please check your Blackboard site regularly to look for communications from me or from other students in the class.  Support for using Blackboard can be obtained from the ITS Help Desk at 475-9400, Monday through Friday, from 8am to 6pm. 

Grading

 a) Three regular exams (40 multiple-choice items and an essay question): 100 points per exam x 3 regular exams = 300 points

 b) Research report: 40 points

 c) Final course grades will be determined based on the percent of total points made out of a grand total of 340 points:  90%-100% = A, 80%-89.5% = B, 70%-79.5% = C, 60%-69.5% = D, below 60% = F.

 

SOC 344 • Racial And Ethnic Relations

45620 • Fall 2012
Meets MWF 900am-1000am NOA 1.102
(also listed as MAS 374 )
show description

Description

Immigration patterns have significantly affected the development of U.S. society since its inception.  In the 1990s, the United States experienced a record number of new immigrants, and the present decade is maintaining a high volume of immigration, perhaps heading to another record.  This course uses a sociological perspective to address various impacts of immigration in U.S. society.

Aims

This course is designed to help students develop an awareness of the significance of immigration in U.S. society.  In the course, students learn to use sociological approaches to better understand the nature of immigration in U.S. society, including an understanding of how immigration affects large (macro) and small (micro) social units.

 Specific Learning Objectives

Gain background information on the development of immigration patterns in U.S. society and discuss the social forces that affect these patterns from the perspective of historical and recent immigration trends.

Review and discuss different social perceptions and attitudes about immigration trends in U.S. society.

Review and analyze government statistical reports concerning annual immigration conditions and characteristics.

Develop an awareness of the significance of immigration for the development of U.S. society.

Review major laws affecting immigration patterns in U.S. society

Gain an ability to analyze current immigration dynamics from a sociological perspective

Format and Procedures

The course is designed with the expectation that it will follow an intertwined format of lectures and class discussions.  A key expectation is that students will come to class prepared to discuss thematic issues covered in the class, or at least come to class with a curious and critical predisposition to become intellectually engaged in the class. All students are expect to contribute to class discussion, with a high regard for an open academic dialogue, which values respect for the ideas, opinions, and views of others. Class attendance is expected and highly encouraged.

During the course students will be asked to give formal and informal anonymous feedback regarding the teaching techniques and progress of the course.  The purpose of the student feedback is to help create an effective learning experience.

Assumptions

My assumptions about the nature of immigration in U.S. society is that it a) follows an historical course, b) flows from the interaction between human agency and social structures, c) takes normal paths of social division and degrees of accommodation and social incorporation, d) is partly affected by social constructions regarding different national-origin groups, and e) has its most profound significance within the dynamics of social reproduction.

Texts

a) Required books/readings:

Portes, Alejandro, and Ruben Rumbaut.  2006.  Immigrant America:  A Portrait.  Berkeley, CA:  University of California Press. (PR)

Min, Pyong Gap.  2006.  Asian Americans:  Contemporary Trends. Thousand Oaks, CA: Pine Forge Press. (M)

On-line articles (these are free on-line articles accessible through the UT library or other public sources)

b) Websites to review: let’s make sure that these are the websites that are reviewed for each topic section.

Census Bureau: http://www.census.gov/

Population Reference Bureau: http://www.prb.org/

Office of Immigration Statistics: http://www.dhs.gov/ximgtn/statistics/

Migration Policy Institute: http://www.migrationpolicy.org/

Pew Hispanic Center: http://pewhispanic.org/

UT Austin Center for Mexican American Studies: http://www.utexas.edu/depts/cmas/

UT Austin Center for Asian American Studies: http://www.utexas.edu/cola/centers/aas/

UT Austin Center for African and African American Studies: http://www.utexas.edu/cola/centers/caaas/

Grading and requirements

1. Class attendance and participation policy

To get the most out of this class you should attend all classes and arrive on time.  Also, you should review previous lecture notes and bring questions to class about points you did not clearly understand—including points from the assigned readings.  Please be attentive in class (turn off phones or set to vibration). You are greatly encouraged to participate in class discussion, and please do so in a manner that respects the rights of others to also participate.  If you have a problem hearing the lectures and discussion, or viewing class presentations, please let me know immediately. Class participation is taken into consideration (10%) for the final grade.

a) The course contains three regular exams and a “replacement” final exam. Regular exams will consist of multiple-choice items and an essay question, and the final exam will consist of essay questions. The final exam can be taken to replace the grade of a regular exam.  All exams have to be taken on the dates specified; the only exception to this rule are cases involving a truly pressing situation (medical) or involving authorization by UT Austin.  In such exceptional cases, makeup exams for the first two regular exams have to be taken within a week after the originally designated dates in the sociology room for make-ups. In the rare possibility that a student needs to take a makeup for the third exam, arrangements with have to be made with me. Makeup exams will consist of essay questions. Students who miss a scheduled exam must alert me beforehand and consult with me regarding the makeup.  There is no procedure for making up the final exam outside of cases that are of a true exceptional and unusual personal pressing situation. Students have to take all exams on the dates and times specified.  Exams cannot be taken earlier or later than the dates and times specified.

b) Students are required to submit a report (minimum of 6 pages double space) based on a review of two articles on immigration-related research that have been published in peer-reviewed journals.  Guidelines for writing this research report are given at the end of this syllabus.  I have selected the following journals for students to review and select the articles: International Migration Review, American Journal of SociologyAmerican Sociological Review,Ethnic and Racial StudiesBlack StudiesJournal of Asian American Studies, Social Forces, and Social Science Quarterly. Additional journals may be added to this list during the semester. Please consult the course schedule below for the due date of the research report.  Late research reports will be accepted up to one class meeting late, but will be assessed a 10-point late penalty. Students have to give the URL address of the articles if they are accessible on-line, or provide a copy of the first page of each article if they are not accessible on-line.

Three regular exams (40 multiple-choice items and an essay question): 100 points per exam x 3 regular exams = 300 points

Research report: 40 points

Final course grades will be determined based on the percent of total points made out of a grand total of 340 points:  90%-100% = A, 80%-89.5% = B, 70%-79.5% = C, 60%-69.5% = D, below 60% = F.

 

 

SOC F321K • Immigratn/Race/Ethncty/Geo

88475 • Summer 2012
Meets MTWTHF 1000am-1130am NOA 1.110
show description

Description:

The course “Immigration, Geography, and Race/Ethnicity in the United States” will focus on present U.S. immigration patterns from a socio-geographical perspective to understand the social process of migration an how it affects, and is affected by, different geographical conditions. Supplementing this formal course, an advanced graduate student will teach an Stata Lab to the REU students and introduce them to the multivariate analysis of migration data in a laboratory setting.  Data data collected by other Population Research Center associates, and public access data of the large Mexican Migration Project housed at Princeton University will be used for rigorous statistical analytical training of the REU students. In addition, faculty members from the Department of Geography and the Environment will conduct workshops for the REU students that will focus on GIS and spatial data analysis, participatory GIS approaches, qualitative methods, and health and gender issues of research on migration and racial/ethnic relations.  Finally a series of professionalization workshops, or “proseminars,” will be held for the students to discuss issues ranging from getting into and paying for graduate school to the myriad ethical issues that sociologists, demographers, geographers, and other social scientists confront in conducting their research and teaching.

Required Texts  

  • Castles, Stephen & Mark J. Miller.  2009.  The Age of Migration: International Population Movements in the Modern World.  Guilford Press.
  • Messina, Anthony M. & Gallya Lahav (eds.).  2006.  The Migration Reader: Exploring Politics and Policies.  Lynne Rienner.
  • Min, Pyong Gap.  2006.  Asian Americans:  Contemporary Trends. Thousand Oaks, CA: Pine Forge Press.
  • Portes, Alejandro, and Ruben Rumbaut.  2006.  Immigrant America:  A Portrait.  Berkeley, CA:  University of California Press.

 Grading Policy:

The grading policy consists of the following: two exams (200), lab assignments (100), paper (100).   Attendance is also graded, and students will lose ten (10) points from their cumulative points for each day absent. The letter grade will be determined as follows: A (360-400 points), B (320-359 points), C (280-319 points), D (180-279 points, F (less than 180).

SOC 389K • International Migration

45720 • Spring 2012
Meets M 300pm-600pm BUR 214
(also listed as LAS 381, MAS 392 )
show description

Seminar Description

 This seminar focuses on diverse patterns (Latin American, Asian, etc.) of international migration, how they are organized and how they affect societies and their populations across world regions.  The topics addressed in the seminar include the following:  historical and macro contexts of migration, the social organization of migration, gender/women and migration, impacts of economic restructuring, migration of highly skilled workers, levels of social incorporation, theories of international migration, state policies for immigration, restrictions against migrants, impacts of migration on sending communities and settlement areas.

Texts (others may be added or exchanged for listed ones)

Stephen Castles & Mark J. Miller.  2009.  The Age of Migration: International Population Movements in the Modern World.  Guilford Press.

 Ruben Hernández-León.  2008.  Metropolitan Migrants: The Migration of Urban Mexicans to the United States. UC Press.

Pierrette Hondagneu-Sotelo (ed.).  2003.  Gender and U.S. Immigration: Contemporary Trends.  UC Press.

 Anthony M. Messina & Gallya Lahav (eds.).  2006.  The Migration Reader: Exploring Politics and Policies.  Lynne Rienner.

 United Nations.  2009.  Human Development Report: 2009, Overcoming Barriers:  Human Mobility and Development. United Nations Development Program (UNDP), Palgrave Macmillian. (FREE on-line!)

http://hdr.undp.org/en/reports/global/hdr2009/papers/

 Li Zhang.  2001.  Strangers in the City:  Reconfigurations of Space, Power, and Social Networks within China’s Floating Population.  Stanford University Press.

 Grading

 Five reaction papers, 3-5 pages (100 points; 45% of total grade)

Seminar paper (100 points; 45% of total grade)

Seminar participation (22 points; 10% of total grade)

SOC 321K • Us Immigration

45385 • Fall 2011
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm NOA 1.102
(also listed as MAS 374 )
show description

 Course Rationale

Immigration patterns have significantly affected the development of U.S. society since its inception.  In the 1990s, the United States experienced a record number of new immigrants, and the present decade is maintaining a high volume of immigration, perhaps heading to another record.  This course uses a sociological perspective to address various impacts of immigration in U.S. society.

II.  Course Aims and Objectives

Aims

 This course is designed to help students develop an awareness of the significance of immigration in U.S. society.  In the course, students learn to use sociological approaches to better understand the nature of immigration in U.S. society, including an understanding of how immigration affects large (macro) and small (micro) social units.

 Specific Learning Objectives

  Gain background information on the development of immigration patterns in U.S. society and discuss the social forces that affect these patterns from the perspective of historical and recent immigration trends.

  Review and discuss different social perceptions and attitudes about immigration trends in U.S. society.

  Review and analyze government statistical reports concerning annual immigration conditions and characteristics.

  Develop an awareness of the significance of immigration for the development of U.S. society.

  Review major laws affecting immigration patterns in U.S. society

  Gain an ability to analyze current immigration dynamics from a sociological perspective

 III. Format and Procedures

The course is designed with the expectation that it will follow an intertwined format of lectures and class discussions.  A key expectation is that students will come to class prepared to discuss thematic issues covered in the class, or at least come to class with a curious and critical predisposition to become intellectually engaged in the class. All students are expect to contribute to class discussion, with a high regard for an open academic dialogue, which values respect for the ideas, opinions, and views of others. Class attendance is expected and highly encouraged.

 During the course students will be asked to give formal and informal anonymous feedback regarding the teaching techniques and progress of the course.  The purpose of the student feedback is to help create an effective learning experience.

IV.  Assumptions

My assumptions about the nature of immigration in U.S. society is that it a) follows an historical course, b) flows from the interaction between human agency and social structures, c) takes normal paths of social division and degrees of accommodation and social incorporation, d) is partly affected by social constructions regarding different national-origin groups, and e) has its most profound significance within the dynamics of social reproduction.

 V. Course Requirements

1. Class attendance and participation policy

To get the most out of this class you should attend all classes and arrive on time.  Also, you should review previous lecture notes and bring questions to class about points you did not clearly understand—including points from the assigned readings.  Please be attentive in class (turn off phones or set to vibration). You are greatly encouraged to participate in class discussion, and please do so in a manner that respects the rights of others to also participate.  If you have a problem hearing the lectures and discussion, or viewing class presentations, please let me know immediately. Class participation is taken into consideration (10%) for the final grade.

 Religious Holidays

UT Austin policy requires that you notify course instructors at least 14 days in advance if you plan to be absent due to a religious holiday. You will be given an opportunity to make up activities (exams, assignments, etc.) that you miss because of your absence due to a religious holiday.  You will be given a reasonable time to make up an exam or assignment after your absence.

 2. Course Readings/Materials

 a) Required books/readings:

 Portes, Alejandro, and Ruben Rumbaut.  2006.  Immigrant America:  A Portrait.  Berkeley, CA:  University of California Press. (PR)

 Min, Pyong Gap.  2006.  Asian Americans:  Contemporary Trends. Thousand Oaks, CA: Pine Forge Press. (M)

 On-line articles (these are free on-line articles accessible through the UT library or other public sources)

 b) Websites to review: let’s make sure that these are the websites that are reviewed for each topic section.

 Census Bureau: http://www.census.gov/

Population Reference Bureau: http://www.prb.org/

Office of Immigration Statistics: http://www.dhs.gov/ximgtn/statistics/

Migration Policy Institute: http://www.migrationpolicy.org/

Pew Hispanic Center: http://pewhispanic.org/

UT Austin Center for Mexican American Studies: http://www.utexas.edu/depts/cmas/

UT Austin Center for Asian American Studies: http://www.utexas.edu/cola/centers/aas/

UT Austin Center for African and African American Studies: http://www.utexas.edu/cola/centers/caaas/

 3. Assignments, Assessments, Evaluation, Dates

a) The course contains three regular exams and a “replacement” final exam. Regular exams will consist of multiple-choice items and an essay question, and the final exam will consist of essay questions. The final exam can be taken to replace the grade of a regular exam.  All exams have to be taken on the dates specified; the only exception to this rule are cases involving a truly pressing situation (medical) or involving authorization by UT Austin.  In such exceptional cases, makeup exams for the first two regular exams have to be taken within a week after the originally designated dates in the sociology room for make-ups. In the rare possibility that a student needs to take a makeup for the third exam, arrangements with have to be made with me. Makeup exams will consist of essay questions. Students who miss a scheduled exam must alert me beforehand and consult with me regarding the makeup.  There is no procedure for making up the final exam outside of cases that are of a true exceptional and unusual personal pressing situation. Students have to take all exams on the dates and times specified.  Exams cannot be taken earlier or later than the dates and times specified.

 b) Students are required to submit a report (minimum of 6 pages double space) based on a review of two articles on immigration-related research that have been published in peer-reviewed journals.  Guidelines for writing this research report are given at the end of this syllabus.  I have selected the following journals for students to review and select the articles: International Migration Review, American Journal of SociologyAmerican Sociological Review,Ethnic and Racial StudiesBlack StudiesJournal of Asian American Studies, Social Forces, and Social Science Quarterly. Additional journals may be added to this list during the semester. Please consult the course schedule below for the due date of the research report.  Late research reports will be accepted up to one class meeting late, but will be assessed a 10-point late penalty. Students have to give the URL address of the articles if they are accessible on-line, or provide a copy of the first page of each article if they are not accessible on-line.

 c) All dates specified in this syllabus for course topics, exams, and papers are subject to change given unforeseen developments.

 4. Use of Blackboard

It is my intention to use Blackboard (http://courses.utexas.edu) to help manage the course and to pursue interaction with students.  I plan to use Blackboard to make announcements, distribute information, communicate with students, and post grades.  Students are encouraged to use Blackboard to communicate and share comments and information.  Please check your Blackboard site regularly to look for communications from me or from other students in the class.  Support for using Blackboard can be obtained from the ITS Help Desk at 475-9400, Monday through Friday, from 8am to 6pm. 

VI.  Grading

 a) Three regular exams (40 multiple-choice items and an essay question):

100 points per exam x 3 regular exams = 300 points

 b) Research report: 40 points

 c) Final course grades will be determined based on the percent of total points made out of a grand total of 340 points:  90%-100% = A, 80%-89.5% = B, 70%-79.5% = C, 60%-69.5% = D, below 60% = F.

 Note:  I am authorized by the University to discuss grades only with students. To discuss a student’s grades with someone else (a parent), I need to have written permission beforehand from the student.

 

SOC 344 • Racial And Ethnic Relations

45440 • Fall 2011
Meets MWF 900am-1000am NOA 1.102
(also listed as MAS 374 )
show description

DESCRIPTION:

The study of racial and ethnic relations is key to understanding the constitution of societies, especially as they become more diverse in the racial and cultural origins of their populations. This course is designed to provide a sociological understanding concerning the nature of racial and ethnic intergroup relations, as well as an understanding of how large (macro) and small (micro) levels of social interaction affect these relations. The course will cover the following topics:  perspectives of immigration and racial formation; race and culture, structure and stratification; racial and ethnic attitudes and behavior; inter- and intra-group relations among racial and ethnic groups; historical waves of European immigration, new immigrants from eastern and southern Europe in the early 1900s; Native Americans; new racial and ethnic groups from eastern and southeast Asia; African Americans in U.S. society; Latinas/os in U.S. society; religious ethnic groups; and gender attitudinal/behavioral differences in relations between Latinos and African Americans.   

READINGS:  

Vincent N. Parrillo. 2009. Strangers to These Shores: Race and Ethnic Relations in the United States. 9th edition.  New York: Pearson/Allyn and Bacon.

Elizabeth Higginbotham and Margaret L. Anderson. 20012. Race and Ethnicity in Society:  The Changing Landscape. 3rd edition. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth

A series of on-line readings and websites to be listed on final course syllabus

GRADING:

The course includes three in-class exams and a paper assignment of a minimum of five (5) pages. 

 

 

SOC F321K • Immigratn/Race/Ethncty/Geo

88530 • Summer 2011
Meets MTWTHF 1000am-1130am NOA 1.110
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Description:

The course “Immigration, Geography, and Race/Ethnicity in the United States” will focus on present U.S. immigration patterns from a socio-geographical perspective to understand the social process of migration an how it affects, and is affected by, different geographical conditions. Supplementing this formal course, an advanced graduate student will teach an Stata Lab to the REU students and introduce them to the multivariate analysis of migration data in a laboratory setting.  Data data collected by other Population Research Center associates, and public access data of the large Mexican Migration Project housed at Princeton University will be used for rigorous statistical analytical training of the REU students. In addition, faculty members from the Department of Geography and the Environment will conduct workshops for the REU students that will focus on GIS and spatial data analysis, participatory GIS approaches, qualitative methods, and health and gender issues of research on migration and racial/ethnic relations.  Finally a series of professionalization workshops, or “proseminars,” will be held for the students to discuss issues ranging from getting into and paying for graduate school to the myriad ethical issues that sociologists, demographers, geographers, and other social scientists confront in conducting their research and teaching.

Required Texts  

  • Castles, Stephen & Mark J. Miller.  2009.  The Age of Migration: International Population Movements in the Modern World.  Guilford Press.
  • Messina, Anthony M. & Gallya Lahav (eds.).  2006.  The Migration Reader: Exploring Politics and Policies.  Lynne Rienner.
  • Min, Pyong Gap.  2006.  Asian Americans:  Contemporary Trends. Thousand Oaks, CA: Pine Forge Press.
  • Portes, Alejandro, and Ruben Rumbaut.  2006.  Immigrant America:  A Portrait.  Berkeley, CA:  University of California Press.

 Grading Policy:

The grading policy consists of the following: two exams (200), lab assignments (100), paper (100).   Attendance is also graded, and students will lose ten (10) points from their cumulative points for each day absent. The letter grade will be determined as follows: A (360-400 points), B (320-359 points), C (280-319 points), D (180-279 points, F (less than 180).

SOC 389K • International Migration

46265 • Spring 2011
Meets M 300pm-600pm BUR 214
(also listed as MAS 392 )
show description

Cross listed with MAS 392

 

Description:

International migration patterns have become highly dynamic since the mid-twentieth century.  It is estimated that over 200 million persons presently live in countries in which they were not born.  Particularly dramatic is the migration of men and women workers from developing countries to advanced, industrial societies.  This seminar uses an international sociological perspective to focus four dimensions of patterns of international migration:  the social organization of migration, social incorporation and exclusion of new migrants, state policies to regulate international migration, and historical and comparative approaches to the study of international migration. Appropriate readings, including journal articles, will be selected for the seminar.

 

II.  Course Aims and Objectives

Aims

 This seminar is designed to survey social research and theory conducted across various topics of international migration.

Specific Learning Objectives

 *Become familiar with the leading conceptual and theoretical perspectives of the prominent topics in international migration research

*Identify the leading research issues and questions in the prominent topics in international migration research

* Become familiar with the research methods and findings in the prominent topics of international migration research.

Stephen Castles & Mark J. Miller.  2009.  The Age of Migration: International Population Movements in the Modern World.  Guilford Press.

 

Readings

 Nigel Harris.  1995.  The New Untouchables:  Immigration and the New World Worker.  Penguin Books.

 Ruben Hernández-León.  2008.  Metropolitan Migrants: The Migration of Urban Mexicans to the United States. UC Press.

 Pierrette Hondagneu-Sotelo (ed.).  2003.  Gender and U.S. Immigration: Contemporary Trends.  UC Press.

 Anthony M. Messina & Gallya Lahav (eds.).  2006.  The Migration Reader: Exploring Politics and Policies.  Lynne Rienner.

 United Nations.  2009.  Human Development Report: 2009, Overcoming Barriers:  Human Mobility and Development. United Nations Development Program (UNDP), Palgrave Macmillian. (FREE on-line!)

http://hdr.undp.org/en/reports/global/hdr2009/papers/

 Li Zhang.  2001.  Strangers in the City:  Reconfigurations of Space, Power, and Social Networks within China’s Floating Population.  Stanford University Press. 

Grading

 a) Five reaction papers (100 points; 45% of total grade)

b) Seminar paper (100 points; 45% of total grade)

c) Seminar participation (22 points; 10% of total grade)

 

 

 

SOC 321K • Migration And Development

46355 • Spring 2010
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm RLM 7.112
(also listed as MAS 374 )
show description

Migration and Development

SOC 321K (46355)
MAS 374 (35922)

Prerequisite: Upper division standing

The University of Texas at Austin
Spring 2010

Class Meeting: TuTh: 3:30-5:00 PM
Classroom: GEA 105 (first meeting only)
                                                                RLM 7.112 (rest of semester)

Professor Nestor Rodriguez
BUR 580, (nrodriguez@prc.utexas.edu), (512) 471-1122
Office hours: TuTh, 2:30-3:30-11:30 PM, and by appointment. I check my email regularly and reply to student queries within reasonable time periods.

TA: (To be announced)

I. Course Rationale

Presently about 200 million migrants live in countries in which they were not born.  This is the greatest level of international migration ever witnessed, in addition to massive patterns of internal migration as well. A special focus of the course is the question of to what extent does international migration promote economic development in the countries where migrants originate, given that migrants annually remit billions of dollars to their home countries.  Other forms of social and cultural remittances can also promote social development in the sense that these remittances create social change in sending communities.  A special concern of the course are gender differences that may exist in the relationships between migration and development.  The course will also consider the special case of China in which Chinese participation in the global economy had effected rapid economic development stimulating rural to urban migration of over 100 million peasant workers

SOC 321K • Us Immigration

46525 • Fall 2009
Meets MWF 1100-1200 NOA 1.102
(also listed as MAS 374 )
show description

 

U. S. Immigration

 

SOC 321K (46525)

MAS 374 (36227)

 

Prerequisite: Upper division standing

 

The University of Texas at Austin

Fall 2009

 

MWF: 11am-12pm

Classroom: NOA 1.102

 

Professor Nestor Rodriguez

BUR 580, (nrodriguez@prc.utexas.edu), (512) 471-1122

Office hours: MW, 10-11 am, Tue, 10:30-11:30 am, and by appointment. I check my email on a regular basis; I will reply to student queries within reasonable limits.

 

TA:

Paul Kasun (frpaul@mail.utexas.edu); office hours: 2-3:30 pm, by appointment, BUR 554

 

I. Course Rationale

Immigration patterns have significantly affected the development of U.S. society since its inception.  In the 1990s, the United States experienced a record number of new immigrants, and the present decade is maintaining a high volume of immigration, perhaps heading to another record.  This course uses a sociological perspective to address various impacts of immigration in U.S. society.

 

 

II.  Course Aims and Objectives

Aims

 This course is designed to help students develop an awareness of the significance of immigration in U.S. society.  In the course, students learn to use sociological approaches to better understand the nature of immigration in U.S. society, including an understanding of how immigration affects large (macro) and small (micro) social units.

 

Specific Learning Objectives

  • Gain background information on the development of immigration patterns in U.S. society and discuss the social forces that affect these patterns from the perspective of historical and recent immigration trends.

 

  • Review and discuss different social perceptions and attitudes about immigration trends in U.S. society.

 

  • Review and analyze government statistical reports concerning annual immigration conditions and characteristics.

 

  • Develop an awareness of the significance of immigration for the development of U.S. society.

 

  • Review major laws affecting immigration patterns in U.S. society

 

  • Gain an ability to analyze current immigration dynamics from a sociological perspective

 

III. Format and Procedures

The course is designed with the expectation that it will follow an intertwined format of lectures and class discussions.  A key expectation is that students will come to class prepared to discuss thematic issues covered in the class, or at least come to class with a curious and critical predisposition to become intellectually engaged in the class. All students are expect to contribute to class discussion, with a high regard for an open academic dialogue, which values respect for the ideas, opinions, and views of others. Class attendance is expected and highly encouraged.

 

During the course students will be asked to give formal and informal anonymous feedback regarding the teaching techniques and progress of the course.  The purpose of the student feedback is to help create an effective learning experience.

 

IV.  Assumptions

My assumptions about the nature of immigration in U.S. society is that it a) follows an historical course, b) flows from the interaction between human agency and social structures, c) takes normal paths of social division and degrees of accommodation and social incorporation, d) is partly affected by social constructions regarding different national-origin groups, and e) has its most profound significance within the dynamics of social reproduction.

 

V. Course Requirements

1. Class attendance and participation policy

To get the most out of this class you should attend all classes and arrive on time.  Also, you should review previous lecture notes and bring questions to class about points you did not clearly understand—including points from the assigned readings.  Please be attentive in class (turn off phones or set to vibration). You are greatly encouraged to participate in class discussion, and please do so in a manner that respects the rights of others to also participate.  If you have a problem hearing the lectures and discussion, or viewing class presentations, please let me know immediately. Class participation is taken into consideration (10%) for the final grade.

 

Religious Holidays

UT Austin policy requires that you notify course instructors at least 14 days in advance if you plan to be absent due to a religious holiday. You will be given an opportunity to make up activities (exams, assignments, etc.) that you miss because of your absence due to a religious holiday.  You will be given a reasonable time to make up an exam or assignment after your absence.

 

2. Course Readings/Materials

 

a) Required books/readings:

 

  • Portes, Alejandro, and Ruben Rumbaut.  2006.  Immigrant America:  A Portrait.  Berkeley, CA:  University of California Press. (PR)

 

  • Min, Pyong Gap.  2006.  Asian Americans:  Contemporary Trends. Thousand Oaks, CA: Pine Forge Press. (M)

 

  • On-line articles (these are free on-line articles accessible through the UT library or other public sources)

 

b) Websites to review: let’s make sure that these are the websites that are reviewed for each topic section.

 

Census Bureau: http://www.census.gov/

Population Reference Bureau: http://www.prb.org/

Office of Immigration Statistics: http://www.dhs.gov/ximgtn/statistics/

Migration Policy Institute: http://www.migrationpolicy.org/

Pew Hispanic Center: http://pewhispanic.org/

UT Austin Center for Mexican American Studies: http://www.utexas.edu/depts/cmas/

UT Austin Center for Asian American Studies: http://www.utexas.edu/cola/centers/aas/

UT Austin Center for African and African American Studies: http://www.utexas.edu/cola/centers/caaas/

 

3. Assignments, Assessments, Evaluation, Dates

a) The course contains three regular exams and a “replacement” final exam. Regular exams will consist of multiple-choice items and an essay question, and the final exam will consist of essay questions. The final exam can be taken to replace the grade of a regular exam.  All exams have to be taken on the dates specified; the only exception to this rule are cases involving a truly pressing situation (medical) or involving authorization by UT Austin.  In such exceptional cases, makeup exams for the first two regular exams have to be taken within a week after the originally designated dates in the sociology room for make-ups. In the rare possibility that a student needs to take a makeup for the third exam, arrangements with have to be made with me. Makeup exams will consist of essay questions. Students who miss a scheduled exam must alert me beforehand and consult with me regarding the makeup.  There is no procedure for making up the final exam outside of cases that are of a true exceptional and unusual personal pressing situation. Students have to take all exams on the dates and times specified.  Exams cannot be taken earlier or later than the dates and times specified.

 

b) Students are required to submit a report (minimum of 6 pages double space) based on a review of two articles on immigration-related research that have been published in peer-reviewed journals.  Guidelines for writing this research report are given at the end of this syllabus.  I have selected the following journals for students to review and select the articles: International Migration Review, American Journal of Sociology, American Sociological Review, Ethnic and Racial Studies, Black Studies, Journal of Asian American Studies, Social Forces, and Social Science Quarterly. Additional journals may be added to this list during the semester. Please consult the course schedule below for the due date of the research report.  Late research reports will be accepted up to one class meeting late, but will be assessed a 10-point late penalty. Students have to give the URL address of the articles if they are accessible on-line, or provide a copy of the first page of each article if they are not accessible on-line.

 

c) All dates specified in this syllabus for course topics, exams, and papers are subject to change given unforeseen developments.

 

4. Use of Blackboard

It is my intention to use Blackboard (http://courses.utexas.edu) to help manage the course and to pursue interaction with students.  I plan to use Blackboard to make announcements, distribute information, communicate with students, and post grades.  Students are encouraged to use Blackboard to communicate and share comments and information.  Please check your Blackboard site regularly to look for communications from me or from other students in the class.  Support for using Blackboard can be obtained from the ITS Help Desk at 475-9400, Monday through Friday, from 8am to 6pm.

 

VI.  Grading

 

a) Three regular exams (40 multiple-choice items and an essay question):

100 points per exam x 3 regular exams = 300 points

 

b) Research report: 40 points

 

c) Final course grades will be determined based on the percent of total points made out of a grand total of 340 points:  90%-100% = A, 80%-89.5% = B, 70%-79.5% = C, 60%-69.5% = D, below 60% = F.

 

Note:  I am authorized by the University to discuss grades only with students. To discuss a student’s grades with someone else (a parent), I need to have written permission beforehand from the student.

 

VII.  Academic Integrity

 

University of Texas Honor Code

The core values at the University of Texas at Austin are learning, discovery, freedom, leadership, individual opportunity, and responsibility.  Each member of the University is expected to uphold these values through integrity, honesty, trust, fairness, and respect toward peers and community.

 

All students in the course are expected to abide by the University of Texas Honor Code.  Students are encouraged to study together, but they must do their own work on the research report assignments and on the exams. Students suspected of copying research reports from the work of someone else or of committing plagiarism, or cheating on exams, will be reported to the Dean’s Office and other administrators of the University.

 

VIII.  Other University Notices and Policies

 

Use of E-Mail for Official Correspondence to Students

Email is recognized as an official mode of university correspondence; therefore, you are responsible for reading your email for university and course-related information and announcements. You are responsible to keep the university informed about changes to your e-mail address. You should check your e-mail regularly and frequently—I recommend daily, but at minimum twice a week—to stay current with university-related communications, some of which may be time-critical. You can find UT Austin’s policies and instructions for updating your e-mail address at http://www.utexas.edu/its/policies/emailnotify.php.th

 

Documented Disability Statement

If you require special accommodations, you must obtain a letter that documents your disability from the Services for Students with Disabilities area of the Division of Diversity and Community Engagement (471-6259 voice or 471-4641 TTY for users who are deaf or hard of hearing). Present the letter to me at the beginning of the semester so we can discuss the accommodations you need. No later than five business days before an exam, you should remind me of any testing accommodations you will need. For more information, visit http://www.utexas.edu/

diversity/ddce/ssd/.

 

Behavior Concerns Advice Line (BCAL)

If you are worried about someone who is acting differently, you may use the Behavior Concerns Advice Line to discuss by phone your concerns about another individual’s behavior. This service is provided through a partnership among the Office of the Dean of Students, the Counseling and Mental Health Center (CMHC), the Employee Assistance Program (EAP), and The University of Texas Police Department (UTPD). Call 512-232-5050 or visit http://www.utexas.edu/safety/bcal.

 

Emergency Evacuation Policy

Occupants of buildings on the UT Austin campus are required to evacuate and assemble outside when a fire alarm is activated or an announcement is made.  Please be aware of the following policies regarding evacuation:

  • Familiarize yourself with all exit doors of the classroom and the building. Remember that the nearest exit door may not be the one you used when you entered the building.
  • If you require assistance to evacuate, inform me in writing during the first week of class.
  • In the event of an evacuation, follow my instructions or those of class instructors.
  • Do not re-enter a building unless you are given instructions by the Austin Fire Department, the UT Austin Police Department, or the Fire Prevention Services office.

 

VIII. Tentative Course Schedule

This syllabus represents the initial design of the course.  Changes concerning specific substantive content and dates may have to be made to increase the class learning opportunity.  Any such changes that are made will be communicated clearly and are a normal part of the management of a course. 

 

Date

Topic

Readings

Aug 26-28

Course Introduction

PR, chapter 1; M, chapter 1

Aug 31-Sep 4

Immigration Cycles

PR, chapter 2; M, chapter 2

Sep 7-11

Economic Development and Migration

PR, chapter 4; M, chapter 4

Sep 14-18

Social Incorporation, Assimilation and Citizenship

PR, chapter 3, 7; M, chapter 3

Sep 21-23

Theories of Migration

On-line: Massey et al., 1993, “Theories of International Migration:  A Review and Appraisal,” Population and Development Review, Vol. 19, No. 3, pp. 431-466.

Sep 25

Exam 1

Essay question plus multiple choice test

Sep 28-Oct 2

Organizing Migration

PR, chapter 9; M, chapter 5

Oct 5-9

Gender/Women and Migration

Richard Fry, 2006, “Gender and Migration,” at Pew Hispanic Center: http://pewhispanic.org/files/reports/64.pdf

Oct 12-16

High-tech Migrant Labor

M, chapter 9; Steven Vertovec (2002), Transnational Networks and Skilled Labour Migration (http://www.transcomm.ox.ac.uk/working%20papers/WPTC-02-02%20Vertovec.pdf

Oct 19-23

New Migrant Communities and Urban Development

PB chapter 5, 8; M, chapter 6

Oct 23

Paper assignment due

 

Oct 26-28

Immigration Impacts on Intergroup Relations

Min, chapter 7

Oct 30

Exam 2

Essay question plus multiple choice test

Nov 2-6

Migration Impacts in the Sending Community

Min, chapter 8, 11

Nov 9-13

Immigration Policies

PR, chapter 10; Min, chapter 10

Nov 16-20

Border Enforcement and Migrant Deaths

Eschbach et al., 1999, “Death at the Border,” International Migration Review, Vol. 33, No. 2, pp. 430-454.

Nov 23-27

Migration in an Era of Restriction

PR, chapter 6; Eschbach et al., 2008, “U.S. Deportation Policy, Family Separation and Circular Migration,” International Migration Review, Vol. 42, No. 1, pp. 64-88.

Nov 30-Dec 2

Immigration Prospects

M, chapter 12

Dec 4

Exam 3

Essay question plus multiple choice test

Dec 9

Replacement Final

7pm-10pm

 

IX. Guidelines for Writing the Research Report

From the list of approved journals, select two research articles addressing immigration research.   The list of approved social science journals is the following: International Migration Review, American Journal of Sociology, American Sociological Review, Ethnic and Racial Studies, Black Studies, Journal of Asian American Studies, Social Forces, and Social Science Quarterly.

For each of the two (2) selected articles, please provide the following information:

I.  Topic:

  • What are the title and topic of the article?
  • Who are the authors? 
  • Why is the research reported in the article significant?

II.  Research Methods:

  • What type of study is it (quantitative, qualitative, etc.)? 
  • Do the authors have hypotheses or research questions they are trying to answer? If so, what are they?
  • Describe in detail the research methods and procedures used in the research reported in the article?

III.  Findings and Conclusions:

  • What are the key findings of the research?
  • What do the authors conclude from their research?

IV.  Evaluation

Write an evaluation of the research presented in the two articles: how do the articles compare in providing useful research information?  You may comment on the way the articles were written and/or on the actual research conducted.  For example, you can comment on how the articles complement each other, or how they could be improved, or how the research could have been done differently to take into account other factors (such as the influence of gender, etc.).

Please follow these rules when printing your paper.

  • Place your identification (name and EID) on your paper.
  • Double space, 1.25-inch margins, 12-point font, black ink on white paper (letter size) not used previously, insert page numbers.

 

The paper will be graded for substantive content (development of ideas and discussion in the paper) and quality of writing.

 

 

 

 

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