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Robert Crosnoe, Chair CLA 3.306, Mailcode A1700, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-232-6300

Peter Ward

Ph.D., University of Liverpool

Professor, Dept of Sociology, C. B. Smith Sr. Centennial Chair in US-Mexico Relations
Peter Ward

Contact

  • Phone: 512-232-6319
  • Office: CLA 3.730
  • Office Hours: Wednesday 1:30-3:15 LBJ SChool; 3:30-5:00pm Sociology
  • Campus Mail Code: A1700

Biography

Peter M. Ward received his Ph.D. from the University of Liverpool in 1976 and subsequently has held senior teaching and research positions at University College London (1976-85), The University of Cambridge (1985-91), and at The University of Texas at Austin (1991-present) where he holds the C.B. Smith Sr. Centennial Chair in US-Mexico Relations, and is professor in the Department of Sociology (College of Liberal Arts), and in the Lyndon B. Johnson School of Public Affairs.  Between 1993-7 and 2001-05, he was Director of the Mexican Center at the Lozano Long Institute of Latin American Studies.  Between 2002-7 he was Editor-in-Chief of the Latin American Research Review. In 2006 he led the initiative to create the Latin American Housing Network which he coordinates at the University of Texas at Austin www.lahn.utexas.org

In addition to over 120 scholarly articles and book chapters on public policy in Mexico and Latin America, he has written fifteen books including: Housing, the State and the Poor: Policy and Practice in Latin American Cities (with Alan Gilbert), Welfare Politics in Mexico: Papering Over the Cracks, and Mexico City: The Production and Reproduction of an Urban Environment (all translated into Spanish); Self-Help Housing: A Critique, Corruption, Development and Inequality (editor), Methodology for Land and Housing Market Analysis (coeditor), Political Change in Baja California: Democracy in the Making? (with Victoria Rodriguez), and Opposition Governments in Mexico: Past Experiences and Future Opportunities(with Victoria Rodriguez). Mexico City (second edition), New Federalism and State Government in Mexico: Bringing the States Back In (with Victoria Rodriguez), Colonias and Public Policy in Texas: Urbanization by Stealth.  His most recent books are Governance in the Americas: Decentralization Democracy and Subnational Government in the USA, Mexico, and Brazil (2008), Metropolitan Governance in the Federalist Americas (2012), and (2014) Housing Policies in Latin American Cities: A New Generation of Strategies and Approaches for 2016 UN-HABITAT III.

His principal research interests are Latin American urbanization, contemporary Mexican politics, housing policy and planning, Mexico City, and colonia-type housing in the United States. At various times he has served as adviser to the Mexican government and to a number of international development agencies.

NIH Biosketch

Interests

Academic: Housing and Governance in Mexico and Latin America. Non academic: Opera & Longhorn Football.

SOC 395D • Housing Prac/Publ Pol Lat Am

45200 • Spring 2015
Meets W 900am-1200pm SRH 3.221
(also listed as LAS 381 )
show description

Description:

This one semester course is part of a sequence of classes tied to the Latin American Housing network research initiatives (www.lahn.utexas.org).  UN-HABITAT convenes bi-decennially: the first meeting was in Vancouver in 1976; the second in Istanbul in 1996; and the third will take place in 2016 (venue yet to be specified).  Each meeting basically reviews the progress of policy and practice since the previous meeting, and sets the housing and urban development agenda for the next 20 years. More regular meetings of the World Urban Forum take place intermittently (every two to three years).

It is hoped that the research and policy findings of the LAHN study and recent publication Housing Policy in Latin American Cities: A New Generation of Strategies and Approaches for 2016 UN-HABITAT III  http://www.routledge.com/9781138776869/ will form part of the agenda as governments turn back to the existing stock of the city and emphasize housing and community rehab as an integral part of urban development.  However, the aim of the class will be to review the changing paradigms of urban development and housing policy since the early 1970s, and to review the extent to which these modes of thinking and policy advocacy became integrated into the two previous  UN-HABITAT meetings, and the impact that the congresses have had in shaping the agendas of housing policy; rights to the city; the expansion and support of housing NGOs; sustainability and changing urban governance practices, etc., and how these are embedded within macro economic and development policies of the past 50 years.   Working in groups, students will undertake detailed archival review and content analysis of the two previous congresses, together with several of the WUF meetings as a basis to better understand the dynamics and calculus of conference agenda-setting, and of policy change in the subsequent period.  In addition we will undertake a detailed analysis and review of the preparations and framing of the 2016 UN-HABITAT.

Two sets of student products are anticipated. First, a major paper that reviews  and analyzes the dynamics and impact of  HABITAT I & II and how this appears to feed into HABITAT III.   This will not only review UN documentation and reports but will also gauge how a number of specific countries had shaped their policies (or not) as a result of the changing conventional wisdoms arising from UN-HABITAT.  Second, students will draft a series of position statements that we view as imperatives for consideration in HABITAT III and which arise from: contemporary interdisciplinary research, from critical theory and from contemporary urban and housing challenges that Latin American and other developing areas confront.  In short whither housing policies and practice in the 20 years?  There will also be a final essay exam.

Depending upon the venue it may be possible to support some student participation in HABITAT III. 

SOC 335 • Society Of Modern Mexico

46250 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm BUR 130
(also listed as GRG 356T, LAS 325, MAS 374, URB 354 )
show description

COURSE AIMS AND PURPOSE

This course seeks to understand Mexico through three lenses. First to introduce students to modern Mexico - its geography, economy, polity and society, and to examine in detail the nature and the forces of change that have impacted so dramatically upon the country during the past two decades. Second, we will examine Mexico-US bi-lateral relations both historically as well as in the contemporary sphere. Third, our lens will focus attention upon “Mexico Here”, and will analyze the dramatic Hispanic “rise” in the USA since 1990, with a special emphasis upon the ways in which the minority majority of Mexicans and Mexican Americans are shaping our own society, economy and polity of central Texas.

The first half of the course will offer an overview of the modern Mexico – its economic and political opening, challenges of overcoming poverty, and more recently the instability born of the drug cartels. Here too we will examine the key bilateral issues between the two countries: immigration reform; insecurity; and economic integration.  The second half of the course is designed to analyze the demographic and socio-cultural changes and policy challenges that Mexican-origin populations confront today in here Central Texas: in education, health care, citizenship aspirations, access to housing, justice and human rights and wellbeing. The aim is to gain a more sensitive and nuanced awareness of how Mexican populations specifically, and Hispanic populations more generally, are transforming the cultural and political landscape of Texas and the US, in order to offer a broad-brush introduction that will allow us consider the public policy dilemmas and imperatives that we have to confront today.

The course will comprise a substantial writing component including three essays. In class participation is expected, and in addition an important element of the class assessment will comprise two group projects about how Mexicans and Mexican-American identities are shaping politics, society & culture (broadly defined) here in Central Texas. There will be one midterm exam, but no final.

Assessment

Essays and Papers 40%

Participation 25%

Mid-term 15%

Group Projects 20%

 

SOC 387L • Qualitative Meths For Socl Sci

46365 • Fall 2014
Meets T 900am-1200pm SRH 3.124
(also listed as GRG 396T, LAS 381 )
show description

Course Description

This graduate class is designed to complement existing courses on methods and quantitative techniques of data collection and analysis that already exist at the LBJ School, as well as in the Sociology and Geography departments. Depending upon the final class size, instruction will be largely through a lecture format although much of the work will be conducted in small groups working on a collaborative research design utilizing and applying different qualitative methods. Specifically the aim of this course is to develop awareness and expertise in a range of qualitative survey research methods, approaches and designs, ranging from participant observational techniques through semi-structured interviewing to more formal questionnaire and census-type surveys.  The course will address issues of research project design and targeting, sampling, ethnography, case studies, ethics, data and informational handling arising from the different techniques, as well as the preparation of final reports based upon social survey analysis.  Participants will be required to undertake IRB training at the outset.

 Among the specific methods in which training will be offered are: Observational Techniques (participant, "mass", focus groups, social monitoring, etc.); Ethnography, Case Studies; Content Analysis; Focus Groups; "Elite"/Key Informant Interviewing; Questionnaire Design and Application; Qualitative Data Analysis and Presentation/Writing, Behavioral/Psychological testing (TAT Tests, Repertory Grids etc.).

It is designed for two principal constituencies: first, for Ph.D. students who are (usually) in the earlier stages of their doctoral programs; and second, for Master students especially those embarking upon their PR’s and theses, although it also forms part of the extended core curriculum in the masters’ program at the LBJ School of Public Affairs.  Each semester students work in small groups to develop a real research design on a topic that will be used throughout the semester, and which will apply each of the techniques in turn. Thus, a primary element of the course is to develop "hands-on" experience in adapting a range of qualitative research techniques to that group’s research design. The research question identified usually will be a project for which no definitive outcome is expected, other than that of having fun, and developing the training exercises itself.

Grading and Requirements:

30% for the Final (Group) Report

30% for an unseen essay exam (three hours)

40% for class participation and performance (which will include the book report and an element of peer group assessment). 

SOC 387L • Qualitative Meths For Socl Sci

45720 • Fall 2012
Meets T 900am-1200pm SRH 3.124
(also listed as GRG 396T, LAS 381 )
show description

Cross listed wiht PA 397C

Description

Aims and Purposes

 This graduate class is designed to complement existing courses on research methods and quantitative techniques of data collection and analysis that already exist in Sociology, the LBJ School, and the Geography department. (The course also forms part of the extended core curriculum of the LBJ School of Public Affairs.)  Prospective students should note that the large class size requires that this be taught in a lecture rather than seminar format, although much of the work will be conducted in small groups. (This has worked quite well in previous years.)  Specifically, the aim of this course is to develop awareness and expertise in a range of qualitative survey research methods, approaches and designs, ranging from participant observational techniques through semi-structured interviewing to more formal questionnaire and census-type surveys.  The course addresses issues of research project design and targeting, sampling, ethnography, case studies, ethics, data and informational handling arising from the different techniques, as well as the preparation of final reports based upon social survey analysis.  Participants will undertake IRB training. Among the specific methods in which training will be offered are: Observational Techniques (participant, "mass", focus groups, social monitoring, etc.); Case Studies; Content Analysis; Focus Groups; "Elite"/Key Informant Interviewing; Questionnaire Design and Application; Qualitative Data Analysis and Presentation/Writing, Behavioral/Psychological testing (TAT Tests, Repertory Grids etc.).

It is designed for two principal constituencies: Ph.D. students who are (usually) in the earlier stages of their doctoral programs; and Masters students, especially those embarking upon their PR and theses.  Each class will require students to work in small groups developing a real research design on a topic that will be used throughout the semester, and which will apply each of the techniques in turn. Thus, a primary element of the course is to develop "hands-on" experience in constructing as research design and then adapting a range of qualitative research techniques to that group’s project. The research question identified usually will be one for which no definitive (publishable!) outcome is expected, other than that of developing the training exercises itself.  

Most classes will involve a mixture of formal lecture around pre-circulated notes that are designed to foster class discussion, followed by in-group preparation to apply one or other of the various techniques. Thus, there will be a substantial practical component to this course outside of class hours as each group develops and applies each technique as part of its own mini-research design agenda.  Please note that the time slot deliberately allows participants to continue group work after the class during the lunch period or later in the afternoon/early evening. To the extent possible, please allow for that flexibility as you prepare your fall schedules.

All students will need to log onto the Blackboard, since this will be the principal mechanism for information dissemination, and group liaison. Please note that I do not allow computers or PDAs to be open during lectures so if you want to play at multi-tasking this course is not for you. Sorry!

SOC 395D • Whither The Mexican Pol System

45769 • Spring 2012
Meets M 900am-1200pm SRH 3.316
(also listed as LAS 381 )
show description

Since the 1990s the Mexican political system has experienced a dramatic transition from the hegemonic PRI-dominated structure of 70 years, to that of a plural and consolidating democracy. Since 1997, and especially since the PAN’s historic presidential victory in 2000 and retention of the presidency in 2006, the Mexican political system has struggled to recast and strengthen its political institutions and practices: across the three branches (Executive, Legislative and Judiciary); in the day-to-day practices of governance and public administration; in the modernization of technology and information processing; in press and media freedom, and investigative reporting; and in reforms to the criminal justice system. However, many of these institutions have come under threat as rising insecurity and violence associated with President Calderón’s decision to face down the violence and insecurity born of the drug cartels and associated gangs has come to threaten the democratic consolidation process. Now, in 2011, it looks as though the PRI is ready to bounce back and will win the 2012 federal elections. Will it? Why? And what are the implications for a return of the PRI for Mexico’s democratic future and for US-Mexico relations?

This course will examine the reforms and the changing nature of governance and public policy making in Mexico, as well as evaluate the lessons learned from the Fox and Calderón administrations as the country heads into the next election cycle in July 2012.  In particular we will examine how the respective parties are seeking to mobilize and frame their agendas in order to win elections, and we will assess how citizens in Mexico currently measure and evaluate public policy performance at the federal, state, and local levels. The aim is to better understand the dynamics of the Mexican political system and the nature of the policy making process.

While the focus will be upon Mexico, we will also explore how political values are formed in Mexico, and how these change among Mexican origin populations in the USA, and how they appear to be shaping our own political culture and electoral dynamics as the USA, also, prepares for presidential elections in 2012.

A reading knowledge of Spanish is desirable, but not required for this course. Classes will comprise primarily seminar presentations and discussions led by the students themselves, built around course readings and class notes that will be circulated on Blackboard. In addition, I will be inviting several senior scholars and public policy officials from all three principal parties to visit campus during the semester to inform our discussions and debate the various scenarios of Mexico’s political future and its implications for US-Mexico relations.

Student assessment will be based upon two term papers that analyze institutional change and policy outcomes; the preparation of an opinion editorial relating to the forthcoming elections, and participation in class discussions.

SOC 387L • Qualitative Meths For Socl Sci

45535 • Fall 2011
Meets T 900am-1200pm SRH 3.124
(also listed as GRG 396T, LAS 381 )
show description

 Course Aims and Purpose

This graduate class is designed to complement existing courses on research methods and quantitative techniques of data collection and analysis that already exist in Sociology, the LBJ School, and the Geography department. (The course also forms part of the extended core curriculum of the LBJ School of Public Affairs.)  Prospective students should note that the large class size requires that this be taught in a lecture rather than seminar format, although much of the work will be conducted in small groups. (This has worked quite well in previous years.)  Specifically, the aim of this course is to develop awareness and expertise in a range of qualitative survey research methods, approaches and designs, ranging from participant observational techniques through semi-structured interviewing to more formal questionnaire and census-type surveys.  The course addresses issues of research project design and targeting, sampling, ethnography, case studies, ethics, data and informational handling arising from the different techniques, as well as the preparation of final reports based upon social survey analysis.  Participants will undertake IRB training. Among the specific methods in which training will be offered are: Observational Techniques (participant, "mass", focus groups, social monitoring, etc.); Case Studies; Content Analysis; Focus Groups; "Elite"/Key Informant Interviewing; Questionnaire Design and Application; Qualitative Data Analysis and Presentation/Writing, Behavioral/Psychological testing (TAT Tests, Repertory Grids etc.).

 It is designed for two principal constituencies: Ph.D. students who are (usually) in the earlier stages of their doctoral programs; and Masters students, especially those embarking upon their PR and theses.  Each class will require students to work in small groups developing a real research design on a topic that will be used throughout the semester, and which will apply each of the techniques in turn. Thus, a primary element of the course is to develop "hands-on" experience in constructing as research design and then adapting a range of qualitative research techniques to that group’s project. The research question identified usually will be one for which no definitive (publishable!) outcome is expected, other than that of developing the training exercises itself.  

 Most classes will involve a mixture of formal lecture around pre-circulated notes that are designed to foster class discussion, followed by in-group preparation to apply one or other of the various techniques.  Thus, there will be a substantial practical component to this course outside of class hours as each group develops and applies each technique as part of its own mini-research design agenda.  Please note that the time slot deliberately allows participants to continue group work after the class during the lunch period or later in the afternoon/early evening. To the extent possible, please allow for that flexibility as you prepare your fall schedules.

 All students will need to log onto the Blackboard, since this will be the principal mechanism for information dissemination, and group liaison. Please note that I do not allow computers or PDAs to be open during lectures so if you want to play at multi-tasking this course is not for you. Sorry!

SOC 395D • Housing Prac/Publ Pol Lat Am

46325 • Spring 2011
Meets M 900am-1200pm SRH 3.316
(also listed as LAS 381 )
show description

Cross listed with PA 388K/CRP388

 

This cross-listed course with the LBJ School of Public Affairs (PA388K) and Community and Regional Planning (CRP388) and Latin American Studies (LAS 381) is a research-and-teaching project that forms part of the “Urban Sustainability” doctoral program in the School of Architecture. The class builds upon a sustainable housing applications class in the Spring of 2010 which reviewed the array of approaches for self build home improvements in low-income Latin American irregular settlements; colonias and informal subdivisions; and the “innerburbs” of Texas.  An initial phase of the class project will be to explore generic housing rehab and conservation policy experiences and approaches in Europe, the USA and Latin America.  This will allow us to begin to address the primary goal of the class project which is to develop policies appropriate for upgrading and rehab of the older (now) consolidated irregular self-built settlements that now occupy the intermediate ring of many Latin American cities.  Settled some thirty or more years ago, these stable working class settlements now have high densities and are often quite deteriorated with urgent infrastructure and home improvement needs. While more recently formed settlements remain the focus for housing actions, little research is being undertaken to explore the rehab and renovation needs for the existing settlements of yesteryear.

 

Housing and urban rehab will be set within a broader understanding of the nature of these housing production systems, and other aspects of sustainability in such areas – intermediate technology for drainage and wastewater systems; fiscal sustainability; and social sustainability (mobilization of human capital); juridical sustainability & inheritance; and how best to introduce such research into the policy process in Latin America.

 

Baseline data for the class will come from an eleven city study in Latin America coordinated by Professor Ward at the University of Texas at Austin (www.lahn.utexas.org) and will provide housing rehab policy inputs to that network as they move forward into the final phase of the study which will outline and disseminate policy approaches appropriate for self-help dwelling and community renovation. It will lead to a capstone conference in April 2011.

 

SOC 387L • Qualitative Meths For Socl Sci

45700 • Fall 2010
Meets T 900am-1200pm SRH 3.124
(also listed as GRG 396T, LAS 381 )
show description

Meets with PA 397C/LAS 381/GRG396T

 

Prequisite:  SOC 384L or equivalent

 

This graduate class is designed to complement existing courses on methods and quantitative techniques of data collection and analysis that already exist at the LBJ School, as well as in the Sociology and Geography departments. This methods course also forms part of the extended core curriculum of the LBJ School of Public Affairs. Prospective students should note that the large class size requires that the class be taught in a lecture rather than seminar format although much of the work will be conducted in small groups. (This worked quite well in fall 2007 & 2008 when there were 35 students.) Specifically, the aim of this course is to develop awareness and expertise in a range of more qualitative survey research methods, approaches and designs, ranging from participant observational techniques through semi-structured interviewing to more formal questionnaire and census-type surveys. The course will address issues of research project design and targeting, sampling, ethnography, case studies, ethics, data and informational handling arising from the different techniques, as well as the preparation of final reports based upon social survey analysis. Participants will undertake IRB training. Among the specific methods in which training will be offered are: Observational Techniques (participant, "mass", focus groups, social monitoring, etc.); Case Studies; Content Analysis; Focus Groups; "Elite"/Key Informant Interviewing; Questionnaire Design and Application; Qualitative Data Analysis and Presentation/Writing, Behavioral/Psychological testing (TAT Tests, Repertory Grids etc.). It is designed for two principal constituencies: first, Ph.D. students who are (usually) in the earlier stages of their doctoral programs; and second, Masters students, especially those embarking upon their PR and theses. Each class will require students to work in small groups developing a real research design on a topic that will be used throughout the semester, and which will apply each of the techniques in turn. Thus, a primary element of the course is to develop "hands-on" experience in adapting a range of qualitative research techniques to that group's research design. The research question identified usually will be a project for which no definitive outcome is expected, other than that of developing the training exercises itself.

SOC 395 • Housing Prac/Publ Pol Lat Am

46603 • Spring 2010
Meets W 900-1200 SRH 3.214
(also listed as P A 388K, CRP 388 )
show description

SOC 395D - Housing Practices & Public Policies: Sustainability for Low Income Informal Settlements

in the Americas

 

This cross-listed course with the LBJ School of Public Affairs (PA388K), Community and Regional Planning (CRP388), & Latin American Studies (LA381)  

 

Spring Semester 2010                                                                   Instructor: Peter M Ward,

Unique Number: SOC = 46603; PA = 62485;                          peter.ward@mail.utexas.edu

CRP = 01512; LAS = 40749                                Office SRH 3.228 (LBJ) & BUR 532 (SOC)                                                                         

Meeting Time: Wednesdays 9:12:00                    Office Hours: Th 2:00-:4:00 SRH 3.228                                                                           

Meeting Place SRH: 3.214                                                 or by appointment 475-8621 with

                                                                                                   Deborah Holley (471-0289)

                                                                                                    dsholley@mail.utexas.edu

                                                                                                                                                                       

COURSE AIMS AND PURPOSE

 

This research-and-teaching project forms part of the core “Urban Sustainability” doctoral program in the School of Architecture. The class will explore low-cost sustainable technology applications and policy development proposals for installation and retrofitting lower-income homes in the Southern parts of the USA (primarily) and by extension to consolidating and consolidated self-build settlements in Latin American cities. In the USA we will analyze the state of the art relating to sustainable housing and infrastructure applications for lower and lower middle income urban populations in inner urban and first suburb neighborhoods of Austin. The aim is to identify the potential applications for low income self-managed housing in Texas border colonias; in Informal Homestead Subdivisions (IfHSs) in the peri-urban rural hinterlands of metropolitan areas in Texas; and in consolidating and consolidated self-help settlements in Latin American cities. The class is likely to involve some fieldwork in Austin, Dallas, Houston, San Antonio and El Paso.

Previous policy oriented classes at the LBJ School (Policy Research projects) have explored a number of these topic areas: housing practices in Latin American and Southern US cities; low densities and densification policies for colonias; intermediate technology drainage and wastewater systems. This course will build upon those class materials and will explore best practices and applications for sustainable (low-income) housing development throughout the Americas.  While we will examine a number of areas of sustainability our primary task will be to figure out the extent to which significant savings and advances in sustainability can be achieved through sensitive policy development and implementation in the various housing arenas that we are considering.

In Southern climatic conditions solar panels (especially) can provide significant energy supplementation.  Solar water heating panels, especially, may be expected to generate warm water for household needs, and can be retrofitted to traditional gas water heaters with savings of up to 80% of normal water heating costs.  The seminar will investigate what technologies already exist (or are under development) and the potential for their adaptation and production at low cost. It will also examine how such applications might be integrated within new and existing housing structures and lot arrangements (either as roof components or as stand-alone panels in the yard). Associated with the integration of renewable energy components would be insulation technology improvements.  All these elements form part of the Obama Administration’s current thinking and stimulus package. What is absent from these discussions is more general thinking about how to develop and provide incentives for widespread applications among poorer neighborhoods; how to develop NGO and local community involvement and participation; and how to embed such initiatives within the statewide and city legislative process.

 

Therefore the primary focus will be on energy efficient applications and self-managed home design and improvements, as well as the wider use of renewable energy technologies in low income housing production and housing rehab.  We expect to advance understanding of the opportunities for housing adaptation (and production) of low cost solar panels in order to provide warm water and energy suitable for low-income householder needs in informal homestead subdivisions and colonias.  These applications will be set within a broader understanding of the nature of these housing production systems, and other aspects of sustainability in such areas – intermediate technology for drainage and wastewater systems; fiscal sustainability; and social sustainability (mobilization of human capital); judicial (legal) sustainability & inheritance; and how best to introduce such research into the policy and legislative process.

 

All students will need to log onto the Blackboard, since this will be the principal mechanism for information dissemination and group liaison.

 

KEY TEXTS.

 

I do not expect to assign any one particular text, but as you go along part of the task will be to prepare an annotated bibliography of materials consulted in order to provide a master reference list for future work. However, as particular readings of importance are identified, these will be uploaded onto Blackboard to provide efficient access to everyone.

 

Key texts that you should probably consult sooner rather than later are:

 

Peter Ward. 1999. Colonias and Public Policy in Texas and Mexico: Urbanization by Stealth. University of Texas Press. Paperback. $25 +/-

 

Steven Moore (ed) 2010. Pragmatic Sustainability: Theoretical and Practical Tools. Routledge. $36 paperback.  Not available until February 14.

 

 

GRADING AND FINAL EXAM.

 

Assessment will be assigned thus: 30% for the contributions to briefing papers, working papers, etc., 70% for class participation and performance; (30% of which half will be on the basis of peer group assessment).

 


                                                             COURSE OUTLINE

Week               Topic

 

1)         Jan 20.  Introduction:

            Class Organization and Goals           

Overview Lecture: Self-help housing, Irregular Settlements; and Public Policy in Latin America. (Reading = See Document “Readings Week 1”) 

 

2)         Jan 27. Innerburbs; Colonias, & Informal Subdivisions – Our Study Arenas

            Overview Lecture:  1) Colonias in the Texas Border – Comparisons with Mexico

2) Colonias outside of the border – Informal Homestead Subdivisions. (Reading = See Document “Readings Week 2”

3) The innerburbs…& Urban Rehab.

 

½ day fieldwork – to be arranged.  Probably Friday 5th or Saturday 6th.

 

3)         Feb 3rd Preparation of the Preliminary Matrix Identifying the Key Variables Impacting Upon Implementation of Sustainable Techologies

            In class brainstorming for each urban setting (LA cities, colonias, innerburbs etc.)

            Deliverable # 1: Summary overview related to the Matrix. (For 9th Feb).

 

4)         Feb 10th Introduction of Arenas of Sustainability

            Introduction

Dwelling applications for renewable energies and energy conservation

            Site environmental applications

            Other alternative & low tech approaches towards sustainability:

                        Solid waste management

                        Sewage and Wastewater systems (gray and black water)

            Group Work Begins

           

5)         Feb 17th  Group Progress Reports & Discussion

                                   

6 )        Feb. 24.   Group work Continues

            Drafting of Individual Base Documents and Annotated Bibliographies

            Deliverable # 2 due Tuesday March 2nd

 

7)         March 3rd Introduction & Overview of the Spheres of Policy Making for Sustainability in Texas & other selected

            First thoughts - Brainstorming

i)                    Technical & Programmatic (dwelling and site)

ii)                   Fiscal and Financial

iii)                 Judicial/Legal

iv)                 Social & Organizational:

                  NGOs

                                    Community   mobilization

             

            Group assignments & group work begins; data collection.

 


 

8)         March 10th Group Work and Data Collection Strategies/Search

Class meets to discuss progress reports and to describe their research goals and strategies.

 

9)         March 17th No Class Spring Break - but fieldwork can continue if that suits

 

10)       March 24   Class Meeting & Progress Report

 

11)       March 31  “Fieldwork”/ Data Collection & Group Work Continues

            Drafting of Base Document begins

 

12)       April 7  Class Presentations & Discussion of Base Document

            (Deliverable # 3)  Deliverable # 3 due today

 

13)       April 14: Defining the Matrix and Identification of Suite of Policy Recommendations & Applications

            In class brainstorming

            Allocation of tasks by group and aims of final paper and Matrix discussion

 

14)      April 21st Preparation of Final Papers & Deliverable # 4 (continues)

 

15)       April 28th Presentations of Deliverable # 4

 

14)       May 5th Whither (or Wither) Sustainable Housing? Priorities & Future Perspectives and Imperatives

            Class Discussion and Roundtable with UT experts.

 

PMW 1/14/2010

 

 

Publications

Recent Publications 2011 -- present.  (See c.v. for full list since 1976.) 

2011

(98)
“Repensando el espacio geopolítico metropolitano en México: ¿Como lograr un verdadero gobierno y gobernabilidad para todos?” pp. 211-44 La Geografía Contemporánea y Elisée Reclus.  Guénola Capron, Carmen Icazuriaga Montes, Silvana Levi, Eulalia Ribera Carbó and Virginie Thiébaut, Eds.  Publicacions de la Casa Chata: DF.

(99) “Con el título en la mano: The Meaning of Full Property Titles, and the Impact of Titling Programs upon Low Income Housing Improvements in Texas Colonias.”   (Lead author in collaboration with Jane Larson, Flavio de Souza and Cecilia Giusti).*   Law and Social Inquiry. 36, 1, 1-82. *

(100) Self-help Housing Policies for Second Generation Inheritance and Succession of the House that Mum and Dad Built.   Peter Ward [lead author] and Edith Jiménez, in collaboration with Erika Grajeda and Claudia Ubaldo Velázquez.  Habitat International  Vol. 35, 467-485.*

(101) Governança metropolitan nas Américas. Cadernos Metrópole, Vol 13, 25, 15-44  (with Robert Wilson [lead author] and Peter Spink).

 2012

(102) “A Patrimony for the Children”: Low Income Homeownership and Housing (im)Mobility in Latin American Cities.  Annals of the Association of American Geographers (AAAG). Volume 102, Issue 6, 1489-1510.

 (103) Housing and Urban Regeneration in the First Suburbs and “Innerburbs” of the Americas. In International Encyclopedia of Housing and the Home. Susan Smith, Editor in Chief. Elsevier, pp 559-572

(104) Housing Policies in Developing Countries. In International Encyclopedia of Housing and the Home. Susan Smith, Editor in Chief. Elsevier. pp 219-227.

(105) Section Editors’ Introduction: Housing and Wellbeing. . In International Encyclopedia of Housing and the Home. Susan Smith, Editor in Chief. Elsevier.  (With Chris Hamnett.) pp xxx-xxxiii

(106) Sustainable Housing Design and Technology Applications and Policies for Low-income Self-help Settlements, Habitat International  (With Esther Sullivan). Sustainable housing applications and policies for low-income self-build and housing rehab”, Habitat International,  Volume 36, Issue 2, April 2012, Pages 312–323

(107) “Self-Help Housing: Ideas and Practice in the Americas”, Bish Sanyal, Lawrence Vale and Christina Rosan, eds.  Planning Ideas That Matter: Livability, Territoriality, Governance and Reflective Practice . MIT Press.  pp.283-310

(108) “Metropolitan government and governance in Mexico: A contradiction in terms?”  (With Hector Robles*). Pp.141-170 In Metropolitan Governance in the Americas, edited by Peter Spink, Peter Ward and Robert Wilson, University of Notre Dame Press.

(109) Inheritance and Succession among Second and Third Generation Squatter Households in Mexico City (With Erika Grajeda)  Latin American Research Review. Special Issue, pp139-162.

(110) Introductory Overview. Contextualizing Disability: Issues of Immigration, Economics and Family. In Angel. J.,  Markides K., and Torres-Gil, F. eds.Latino Health and Aging. Springer  Publishing Co., New York.

(111) “Hacia una nueva generación de política habitacional en colonias populares consolidadas en México. Regeneración urbana y rehabilitación del hábitat. pp147-258. In Jiménez Huerta, Edith, and Heriberto Cruz Solís, Editors. 2012. Superado la informalidad, nuevos desafíos: políticas para las colonias populares consolidadas. Editorial Universitaria: Universidad de Guadalajara. Mexico

 Metropolitan Governance in the Federalist Americas: Case Studies and Strategies for Equitable and Integrated Development.   (With Peter Spink and Robert Wilson).  2012. The University of Notre Dame Press.

 2013

 (112) “Intergovernmental Collaboration in Metropolitan Areas: The Case of the Federalist Americas.” (with Peter K. Spink and Robert Wilson [lead author]), in Next City: Planning for a New Energy and Climate Future, (Proceedings from the 10th International Urban Planning and Environment Association Symposium), Nicole Gurran, Peter Phipps, and Susan Thompson, eds. (University of Sydney, 2013)  pp. 218-243.

 2014  

(113) The Reproduction of Informality in Low Income Self-Help Housing Communities in the USA In Anastasia Loukaitou-Sideris and Vinit Mukhija, editors The Informal City in the USA , MIT Press.

 (114) Measuring Self-Help Home Improvements in Texas Colonias: A Ten Year Natural Experiment”.  With Noah Durst.  Urban Studies.*

 (115) Intensive Case Study Methodology for the Analysis Of Self-Help Housing Consolidation, Household Organization and Mobility. Current Urban Studies, Vol 2.  (Lead Author with E. Jiménez and M. Di Virgilio).

 Housing Policy in Latin American Cities: A New Generation of Strategies and Approaches for UN-Habitat III in 2016., Routledge: Research in Urban Politics and PolicySeries  (Lead Author with E. Jiménez and M. Di Virgilio, & author or coauthor of six chapters).

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