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Christine L. Williams, Chair CLA 3.306, Mailcode A1700, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-232-6300

Wenhong Chen

Ph.D., University of Toronto

Assistant Professor, Radio-Televion-Film, College of Communication (Affiliated)
Wenhong Chen

Contact

SOC 352E • Media Industrs/Entreprenrs

46275 • Fall 2014
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm CMA 3.116
(also listed as AAS 320 )
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Flag: Cultural Diversity in the U.S.

Media industries have been challenged by large social forces such as globalization and technological advancements from analog to digital, wired to wireless, and desktop to cloud. Web 2.0 and social media facilitate former members of the audience to actively participate in media production. While legacy media learn to adapt to a new landscape, new media experiment with and search for viable business models and legitimacy. Great challenges bring unprecedented opportunities and risks for organizational innovations, entrepreneurship, and social change.Drawing on literatures from media studies, management, sociology, and communication, this course helps students to develop a critical understanding of the media industries. We start with a survey of the media landscape. In the second part, we examine the social, political, and economic contexts in which media and culture are produced, distributed, and monetized. Special attention is paid to new media and communication technologies such as Web 2.0, social media, gaming, and mobile phone and apps and the implications of these disruptive innovations for media production and consumption. Cases in old and new media industries from different countries will be analyzed. 
 

SOC 352M • Media Industries & Entreprenrs

46253 • Fall 2013
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am CMA 3.120
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Course Description

Media industries have been challenged by large social forces such as globalization and

technological advancements from analog to digital, wired to wireless, and desktop to cloud. Web

2.0 and social media facilitate former members of the audience to actively participate in media

production. While legacy media learn to adapt to a new landscape, new media experiment with

and search for viable business models and legitimacy. Great challenges bring unprecedented

opportunities and risks for organizational innovations, entrepreneurship, and social change.

Drawing on literatures from media studies, management, sociology, and communication, this

course helps students to develop a critical understanding of the media industries. We start with a

survey of the media landscape. In the second part, we examine the social, political, and economic

contexts in which media and culture are produced, distributed, and monetized. Special attention

is paid to new media and communication technologies such as Web 2.0, social media, gaming,

and mobile phone and apps and the implications of these disruptive innovations for media

production and consumption. Cases in old and new media industries from different countries will

be analyzed.

 

Class Participation 20%

         Class Presentation 10% 

         Blackboard Comment 5%

         Attendance and Participation 5%

Take-home midterm exam 10%

Research Practice 10%

       Questionnaire Design 5%

       Questionnaire Pretest 5% 

Final Project 60%

      Project Proposal 10 

      Project Presentation 20%

      Final Paper 30%  (15-30 pages)

 

Required books

David Hesmondhalgh. 2007. The Cultural Industries. 2nd edition. Sage. $30.52 PCL HM 621

H474 2007

Jennifer Holt and Alisa Perren. (Eds) 2009. Media Industries: History, Theory and Methods.

Willey-Blackwell. $31.46. PCL P 90 M3676

Recommended book

• Mark Deuze. 2007. Media Work. Polity. $20.66 PCL HM 1206 D48 2007

SOC 396P • Socl Capital And Socl Networks

46438 • Fall 2013
Meets W 100pm-400pm CMA 5.130
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Description: The seminal work of Robert Putnam on the decline of social capital in the US has generated agrowing multidisciplinary literature. Social capital can come in many forms (trust, civicengagement, community attachment, and social networks) and has become one of the mostcontested concepts in social sciences. What makes social capital unique is its relationalnature. Social network analysis provides a critical lens and powerful tools to understand thecauses and consequences of social capital. Social network analysis focuses on howconnections and structural positions affect fundamental issues such as cognition, creativity,cultural capital, social status, information flow, political coalition, interlocking directorates,social movement and social change. Scholars and pundits have been debating on theimplications of new communication technologies and digital media for network structure andsocial capital at the individual and community levels.   This course is designed to balance theories, methods, and applications, drawing on literaturesfrom sociology, communication, media studies, and management. It begins with keyconcepts and theories of social capital and social networks. In the second part, we explore therelational and structural embeddedness of actors, communities, and organizations. In the third part, we focus on how to collect network data and do network analysis.                 Grading Policy:Grades are earned based on performance. Grades would not be changed on the basis of need or effort. The final grade uses a plus/minus system according to the followingscale: 93-100A90-92 A-87-89 B+83-86 B80-82 B-77-79C+73-76 C70-72 C-67-69 D+63-66 D60-62 D-59 or lower F The final grade will be based on the following distribution (tentative):Overview and TimelineDeadlineClass Participation (30)Class Presentation (15)ongoingClass Participation (15)ongoingFinal Project (70)Project Proposal (10)Mar 22Project Presentation (20)Apr 26/May 3Final Paper (40)May 10 Students are expected to take an active role. To fully understand and participate in the in-classdiscussions, it is necessary to complete the readings on time. Due to the class size, teamwork for the class presentation and the final project are strongly encouraged. However, the maximum sizeof a team is limited to 3 students to assure positive team dynamics. If you decide to form a team,you will be graded as a team for the class presentation and the final project. All other assignments are individual work and graded accordingly. Class Presentation • Each student/group must “claim” a topic and get the instructor’s approval on a first comefirst served basis. After consultation with the instructor, each student/group will lead one2                   class discussion. Note weeks 12/13 are reserved for lectures and weeks 14/15 for final project presentation. That is, you have to choose from one of the 10 weeks left. • The student/group should distribute discussion questions by Fridays 9 am for class thecoming Wed by posting the questions on blackboard. • The student/group should contact the instructor about how the readings are divided amongteam members by Friday 9 am for class the coming Wed. • The student/group is expected to present on the weekly reading. However, the presentationcan also include any material relevant to the topic of the weekly reading. • A formal PowerPoint presentation is required. Please post your presentation on blackboard toshare with your peers and instructor by Tuesdays 9 am. • The student/group will lead the class discussion, based on the questions distributed to theclass and reactions from the class. Class Participation • Reaction paper (10%). Each student is required to post a reaction paper on the weeklyreading on blackboard by Wed, 9 am. Please post on time so that the instructor and thestudent/group leading the class meeting would have enough time to integrate your reaction totheir presentations. Each reaction paper will be given 1 point and a total of 10 reaction papers are expected. Late posting receives no points. • Participation • In-class discussion (4%). Each student is expected to actively participate in the classdiscussion. You are welcome to bring in an article, image, chart/graph, screen capture,short video (less than three minutes), or any other relevant object. • Meeting with the course instructor F2F (1%). Each student is expected to meet thecourse instructor in person for self introduction within the first two weeks of thesemester. • Attendance: Missing class more than THREE times without proper justification isconsidered as drop out. The Final Project  Project Proposal (5 pages): The research proposal should lay out the research topic and itsrelevance/significance. Students will receive reviews from the instructor to further developand improve their work. Final Project Presentation: As part of pre-professional training, all students are required to present the final project to the class. Students are encouraged to use multimedia to present.Each student/team will give a 15-minute presentation on the term project, including Q&A  . The presentation should be posted on a social media site open to the public such as youtube,3                         Academia © 2013        Social Capital and Social Networksmore by wenhong chen   40 Download (.doc)
  • social_capital_and_social_network_syllabus_spring_2012_final.doc 118 KB
                  Social Capital and Social NetworksTheories, Issues and Methods (Graduate Course)RTF 380G / 08490 || SOC 396P / 49795 Wenhong Chen, PhD Email:wenhong_chen@mail.utexas.eduO: 512-471-4952M:512-917-6317F: 512-471-4077Office hours: Tuesday 9am-12pm or by appointment, CMA 6.136Venue: Thu 9:30-12:30, CMA A3.130 Course Description The seminal work of Robert Putnam on the decline of social capital in the US has generated agrowing multidisciplinary literature. Social capital can come in many forms (trust, civicengagement, community attachment, and social networks) and has become one of the mostcontested concepts in social sciences. What makes social capital unique is its relationalnature. Social network analysis provides a critical lens and powerful tools to understand thecauses and consequences of social capital. Social network analysis focuses on howconnections and structural positions affect fundamental issues such as cognition, creativity,cultural capital, social status, information flow, political coalition, interlocking directorates,social movement and social change. Scholars and pundits have been debating on theimplications of new communication technologies and digital media for network structure andsocial capital at the individual and community levels.This course is designed to balance theories, methods, and applications, drawing on literaturesfrom sociology, communication, media studies, and management. It begins with keyconcepts and theories of social capital and social networks. In the second part, we explore therelational and structural embeddedness of actors, communities, and organizations. In the third part, we focus on how to collect network data and do network analysis.1                     Grading Policy:Grades are earned based on performance. Grades would not be changed on the basis of need or effort. The final grade uses a plus/minus system according to the followingscale: 93-100A90-92 A-87-89 B+83-86 B80-82 B-77-79C+73-76 C70-72 C-67-69 D+63-66 D60-62 D-59 or lower F The final grade will be based on the following distribution (tentative):Overview and TimelineDeadlineClass Participation (30)Class Presentation (15)ongoingClass Participation (15)ongoingFinal Project (70)Project Proposal (10)Mar 22Project Presentation (20)Apr 26/May 3Final Paper (40)May 10 Students are expected to take an active role. To fully understand and participate in the in-classdiscussions, it is necessary to complete the readings on time. Due to the class size, teamwork for the class presentation and the final project are strongly encouraged. However, the maximum sizeof a team is limited to 3 students to assure positive team dynamics. If you decide to form a team,you will be graded as a team for the class presentation and the final project. All other assignments are individual work and graded accordingly. Class Presentation • Each student/group must “claim” a topic and get the instructor’s approval on a first comefirst served basis. After consultation with the instructor, each student/group will lead one2                   class discussion. Note weeks 12/13 are reserved for lectures and weeks 14/15 for final project presentation. That is, you have to choose from one of the 10 weeks left. • The student/group should distribute discussion questions by Fridays 9 am for class thecoming Wed by posting the questions on blackboard. • The student/group should contact the instructor about how the readings are divided amongteam members by Friday 9 am for class the coming Wed. • The student/group is expected to present on the weekly reading. However, the presentationcan also include any material relevant to the topic of the weekly reading. • A formal PowerPoint presentation is required. Please post your presentation on blackboard toshare with your peers and instructor by Tuesdays 9 am. • The student/group will lead the class discussion, based on the questions distributed to theclass and reactions from the class. Class Participation • Reaction paper (10%). Each student is required to post a reaction paper on the weeklyreading on blackboard by Wed, 9 am. Please post on time so that the instructor and thestudent/group leading the class meeting would have enough time to integrate your reaction totheir presentations. Each reaction paper will be given 1 point and a total of 10 reaction papers are expected. Late posting receives no points. • Participation • In-class discussion (4%). Each student is expected to actively participate in the classdiscussion. You are welcome to bring in an article, image, chart/graph, screen capture,short video (less than three minutes), or any other relevant object. • Meeting with the course instructor F2F (1%). Each student is expected to meet thecourse instructor in person for self introduction within the first two weeks of thesemester. • Attendance: Missing class more than THREE times without proper justification isconsidered as drop out. The Final Project  Project Proposal (5 pages): The research proposal should lay out the research topic and itsrelevance/significance. Students will receive reviews from the instructor to further developand improve their work. Final Project Presentation: As part of pre-professional training, all students are required to present the final project to the class. Students are encouraged to use multimedia to present.Each student/team will give a 15-minute presentation on the term project, including Q&A  . The presentation should be posted on a social media site open to the public such as youtube,3                         Academia © 2013   

SOC 321K • Globalization & Social Media

45530 • Fall 2012
Meets MWF 200pm-300pm CMA A3.116
(also listed as AAS 320 )
show description

Cross listed with J349T/RTF 331

Course Description

What are social media doing to us? And we to them? Drawing on literatures from media studies, sociology, communication, and management, this course invites students to engage in critical analysis of the causes, patterns, and consequences of using social media in a global context. Building on cases from diverse cultures and nations, the course provides a rich comparative perspective. The course has three components.

*We start with major debates on the role of communication and media technologies in network society, globalization, and transnationalism.

* In the second part, we focus on how macro social forces and institutions such as state and market shape the development of social media and other new communication technologies. We explore how social inequalities and cultural differences affect digital divides.

* In the third part, we investigate how social media and other new technologies have facilitated changes in politics, organizations, networks, as well as media and culture.

Grading

Class Participation 20% (includes mini assignmnet, 10%  and class presentation 10%)

Research practices 30%

Final Project 50% (includes proposal 10%, presentation 20%  and final paper 20%))

 

 

SOC 321K • Media Industries-W

45525 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm CMA A3.112
show description

Course Description

Media industries have been challenged by large social forces such as globalization and technological advancements from analog to digital, wired to wireless, and desktop to cloud. Web 2.0 and social media facilitate former members of the audience to actively participate in media production. While legacy media learn to adapt to a new landscape, new media experiment with and search for viable business models and legitimacy. Great challenges bring unprecedented opportunities and risks for organizational innovations, entrepreneurship, and social change.

Drawing on literatures from media studies, management, sociology, and communication, this course helps students to develop a critical understanding of the media industries. We start with a survey of the media landscape. In the second part, we examine the social, political, and economic contexts in which media and culture are produced, distributed, and monetized. Special attention is paid to new media and communication technologies such as Web 2.0, social media, gaming, and mobile phone and apps and the implications of these disruptive innovations for media production and consumption. Cases in old and new media industries from different countries will be analyzed.

SOC 396P • Socl Capital And Socl Networks

45795 • Spring 2012
Meets TH 930am-1230pm CMA A3.130
show description

Course DescriptionThe seminal work of Robert Putnam on the decline of social capital in the US has generated a growing multidisciplinary literature. Social capital can come in many forms (trust, civic engagement, community attachment, and social networks) and has become one of the most contested concepts in social sciences. What makes social capital unique is its relational nature. Social network analysis provides a critical lens and powerful tools to understand the causes and consequences of social capital. Social network analysis focuses on how connections and structural positions affect fundamental issues such as cognition, creativity, cultural capital, social status, information flow, political coalition, interlocking directorates, social movement and social change. Scholars and pundits have been debating on the implications of new communication technologies and digital media for network structure and social capital at the individual and community levels.This course is designed to balance theories, methods, and applications, drawing on literatures from sociology, communication, media studies, and management. It begins with key concepts and theories of social capital and social networks. In the second part, we explore the relational and structural embeddedness of actors, communities, and organizations. In the third part, we focus on how to collect network data and do network analysis.

SOC 321K • Globalization & Social Media-W

45360 • Fall 2011
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm CMA A3.116
(also listed as AAS 320 )
show description

Course Description

What are social media doing to us? And we to them? Drawing on literatures from media studies, sociology, communication, and management, this course invites students to engage in critical analysis of the causes, patterns, and consequences of using social media in a global context.  Building on cases from diverse cultures and nations, the course provides a rich comparative perspective. The course has three components.

  • We start with major debates on the role of communication and media technologies in network society, globalization, and transnationalism.
  • In the second part, we focus on how macro social forces and institutions such as state and market shape the development of social media and other new communication technologies. We explore how social inequalities and cultural differences affect digital divides.
  • In the third part, we investigate how social media and other new technologies have facilitated changes in politics, organizations, networks, as well as media and culture.

SOC 321K • Media Industries-W

46090 • Spring 2011
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm GAR 2.112
show description

 Contains a Substantial Writing Component (Will count as a Writing Flag for Liberal Arts Majors)

Cross-listed with RTF 365

DESCRIPTION: Media industries have been challenged by large social forces such as globalization and technological advancements from analog to digital, wired to wireless, and desktop to cloud. Web 2.0 and social media facilitate former members of the audience to actively participate in media production. While legacy media learn to adapt to a new landscape, new media experiment with and search for viable business models and legitimacy. Great challenges bring unprecedented opportunities and risks for organizational innovations, entrepreneurship, and social change.

Drawing on literatures from media studies, management, sociology, and communication, this course helps students to develop a critical understanding of the media industries. We start with a survey of the media landscape. In the second part, we examine the social, political, and economic contexts in which media and culture are produced, distributed, and monetized. Special attention is paid to new media and communication technologies such as Web 2.0, social media, gaming, and mobile phone and apps and the implications of these disruptive innovations for media production and consumption. Cases in old and new media industries from different countries will be analyzed.

SOC 396P • Socl Capital And Socl Networks

46370 • Spring 2011
Meets W 900am-1200pm CMA A3.108
show description

Cross listed with RTF 380G

 

DESCRIPTION: The seminal work of Robert Putnam on the decline of social capital in the US has generated a growing multidisciplinary literature. Social capital can come in many forms (trust, civic engagement, community attachment, and social networks) and has become one of the most contested concepts in social sciences. What makes social capital unique is its relational nature. Social network analysis provides a critical lens and powerful tools to understand the causes and consequences of social capital. Social network analysis focuses on how connections and structural positions affect fundamental issues such as cognition, creativity, cultural capital, social status, information flow, political coalition, interlocking directorates, social movement and social change. Scholars and pundits have been debating on the implications of new communication technologies and digital media for network structure and social capital at the individual and community levels.

This course is designed to balance theories, methods, and applications, drawing on literatures from sociology, communication, media studies, and management. It begins with key concepts and theories of social capital and social networks. In the second part, we explore the relational and structural embeddedness of actors, communities, and organizations. In the third part, we focus on how to collect network data and do network analysis.

SOC 321K • Globalization & Social Media-W

45497 • Fall 2010
Meets MW 300pm-430pm CMA A3.116
(also listed as AAS 320 )
show description

What are social media doing to us? And we to them? How do social media such as Facebook and Twitter affect the way we work, play, and connect? How have new communication technologies changed politics, organizations, networks, as well as the production and consumption of culture and media? How do state policy, market competition, social inequalities, and cultural differences shape the digital divides - the uneven access to and use of social media and other new communication technologies?  This course invites students to engage in a critical analysis of the social impacts of social media in the context of globalization. Building on cases from diverse national and ethnic cultures, the course provides a rich cross-cultural and cross-national comparison.

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