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Christine L. Williams, Chair CLA 3.306, Mailcode A1700, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-232-6300

David Glisch-Sanchez

M.P.P., University of Michigan - Ann Arbor

Biography

David Glisch-Sánchez is a queer Latin@ scholar originally from the midwest (Milwaukee, WI to be exact!). He attended the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse for his undergraduate studies where he completed a B.S. in Public Administration/Public Policy.  Before going to graduate school he worked at United Council of UW Students, Inc., the country's oldest and largest statewide student association, as an organizer and lobbyist working on issues regarding access to higher education and campus safety issues pertaining to women, students of color, queer students, and students with a disability.  After two years with United Council, he began his graduate studies at the University of Michigan's Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy where he earned a Master's in Public Policy (MPP) with a concentration in civil rights and social welfare policy.  Currently, he is pursuing his Ph.D. in Sociology at the University of Texas at Austin.  His dissertation project is tentatlively titled "‘Listen to what your jotería is saying’: Queer Latin@s Confronting Violence, Seeking Justice."  In this project, he is investigating how transgender, lesbian, gay, bisexual, and queer Latin@s have experienced social harm/violence during the late 20th and early 21st centuries, what is the socio-historical context for their experiences, and how have ideologies of Latin@ gender and sexuality shaped these experiences.

Interests

Sociology of Race, Gender, Sexuality and Class; Sociology of Violence; Latin@ Studies, Feminist Theory, Queer of Color Critique

SOC 309 • Chicanos In American Society

45455 • Spring 2012
Meets MWF 900am-1000am RLM 7.104
(also listed as MAS 310 )
show description

Course Description

In this course we will be critically examining the socio-political experiences of Chican@s, and people of Mexican descent in general, in the United States.  Themes covered and investigated during the semester will include: race/ethnicity and racism; gender, sexism and transphobia; sexualities, in particular queer sexualities, and homophobia; violence; socioeconomic security; immigration; health; and education.  Within each of these topic areas we will pay special attention to how popular culture and other media representations affect our perceptions of these issues as they relate to Chican@s. Although our focus for the course will be on Chican@s, the topics covered will be looked at through a comparative framework that highlights the similarities and differences between Chican@s and other Latin@s.  In particular, special attempt will be made to include Afro-Latin@ experiences in the course. The goal of this class is to improve our understanding and grapple with the institutional and social forces that help shape and influence Chican@ and Latin@ daily life.

Required Text

The only required text is a course reader that has been prepared by the instructor and can be purchased at Jenn’s Copy & Binding (at the Guadalupe & Dean Keeton location).

Grading and Requirements

There are four major components to each student’s final grade in the course: 1) weekly quizzes; 2) Exam 1; 3) Exam 2; and 4) Critical Essay.

SOC 309 • Chicanos In American Society

45298 • Fall 2011
Meets MWF 900am-1000am BUR 112
(also listed as MAS 310 )
show description

In this course we will be critically examining the socio-political experiences of Chicanos, and people of Mexican descent in general, in the United States.  Themes covered and investigated during the semester will include: race/ethnicity and racism; gender, sexism and transphobia; sexualities, in particular queer sexualities, and homophobia; violence; socioeconomic security; immigration; health; and education. Although our focus for the course will be on Chicanos, the topics covered will be looked at through a comparative framework that highlights the similarities and differences between Chicanos and other Latinas. The goal of this course is to improve our understanding and grapple with the institutional and social forces that help shape and influence Chicano daily life.

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