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Robert Crosnoe, Chair CLA 3.306, Mailcode A1700, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-232-6300

Jinwoo Lee

M.A., Korea University

Jinwoo Lee

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Biography

Jinwoo is a PhD candidate in the Department of Sociology and a Graduate Student Trainee in Population Research Center at the University of Texas at Austin. Jinwoo's research interests include Social Relationships and Health, Religion and Health, Social Psychology, Medical Sociology, Family Sociology, Aging and Life Course, and Quantitative Research Method. The overarching theme of his research is social relationships and health. Jinwoo is especially interested in 1) conceptual mechanisms underlying the role of relationship structure (i.e., hierarchical levels of social ties) and relationship content (i.e., positive and negative support) in shaping health outcomes, 2) social contexts (i.e., religious involvement, life course variation) that either promote or suppress the link between social relationships and health, and 3) psychosocial factors, such as mastery and self-esteem, as mediators and moderators of the association between social ties and health. Related to and extending his interest in health consequences of social relationships is his focus on the link between religion and health. His publications in religion and health have appeared in several Journals. Aside from research experiences, he has been teaching ‘Sociology of Health and Well-being’ for several semesters and is interested in teaching social statistics.

Interests

Social Relationships and Health, Religion and Health, Social Psychology, Medical Sociology, Family Sociology, Aging and Life Course, and Quantitative Research Method

SOC 308 • Intro Sociol Health/Well-Being

45640 • Spring 2013
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm WAG 201
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COURSE DESCRIPTION

This course introduces you to a perspective that emphasizes the role of social factors in shaping health inequality in the US. The fact that some people are healthier than others and understanding factors that create and explain those variations will be our primary concern. We will study following topics: class, race, gender, family, and psychosocial factors. The primary objective of this course is to understand how social causes have consequences for health and well-being.

COURSE MATERIALS

1.      Text book: 

Mirowsky, John and Catherine Ross. 2003. Social Causes of Psychological Distress. Hawthorne, NY: Aldine de Gruyter. [available at the University Co-op (2244 Guadalupe)]

2.      All other readings (journal articles and book chapters) will be posted on the Blackboard (courses.utexas.edu).

GRADING

Your grade is based on THREE items:  in-class exams, take-home assignments, and attendance.

Exam We will have three in-class exams. All three exams are a combination of multiple choice and short answer questions and each exam is worth 25% of the final grade. All exams will be held during regular class meetings in the date specified. Note that there is NO exam during the final exam period because we do not have final exam.

Assignment You will have two take-home assignments. Each assignment is worth 10% of the final grade. I will announce the detail about topics in class and post the information on Blackboard. NO assignments will be accepted after the end of class at the due date without excuses listed in the Course Policies.

Attendance Finally, attendance is worth 5% of the final grade. Attendance will be taken 10 times on a random basis throughout the semester. Each student can have 3 absences of the 10 attendance calls without penalty. After this, all absences will result in a 1 point deduction up to 5 points (%).

 

 

 

Grading Item

%

 

 

Grading Scale

Exam 1

25

 

 

A (93≥ %), A- (90-92%)

Exam 2

25

 

 

B+ (87-89%), B (83-86%), B- (80-82%)

Exam 3

25

 

 

C+ (77-79%), C (73-76%), C- (70-72%)

Assignment 1

10

 

 

D+ (67-69%), D (63-66%), D- (60-62%)

Assignment 2

10

 

 

F  < 60%

Attendance

5

 

 

P  ≥ 70%

Total

100

 

 

             

 

 

SOC 308 • Intro Sociol Health/Well-Being

45466 • Fall 2012
Meets MWF 900am-1000am BUR 130
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This course introduces you to a perspective that emphasizes the role of social factors in shaping inequality in health and well-being. We will study following topics: definitions and measures of various types of health; the patterns of health disparity-SES, race/ethnicity, gender; family; and psychosocial factors that may account for why/how those patterns exist. The primary objective of this course is to understand how social causes have consequences for health and well-being.

SOC 308 • Intro Sociol Health/Well-Being

45435 • Spring 2012
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am BUR 224
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Description: 

This course introduces you to a perspective that emphasizes the role of social factors in shaping inequality in health and well-being. We will study following topics: definitions and measures of various types of health; the patterns of health disparity—SES, race/ethnicity, gender and family; and psychosocial explanations that may account for why/how those patterns exist. The primary objective of this course is to understand how social causes have consequences for health and well-being. 

 

SOC 308 • Intro Sociol Health/Well-Being

45266 • Fall 2011
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm BUR 208
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This course introduces you to the social distribution of health and well-being. We will critically examine how social statuses and roles affect physical and mental health. Moreover, we will pay particular attention to the mechanisms through which social causes have consequences in health and well-being. This course emphasizes themes such as gender, race/ethnicity, socioeconomic status (SES), and roles/social relationships, all of which are inherent forces that may generate social inequality in health and well-being, thus serve as major interests to medical sociologists. In this class, we will emphasize diversity, heterogeneity, and inequality, and discuss how medical sociologists study the increasing complexity of health processes. The objectives for this course are to become critical thinkers about social antecedents of individual health outcomes.

Publications

Ellison, Christopher G., and Jinwoo Lee. 2010.  Spiritual Struggles and Psychological Distress: Is there a Dark Side of Religion? Social Indictors Research 98:501-517.

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Page, Robin L., Christopher G. Ellison, and Jinwoo Lee. 2009.  “Religious Involvement and Health Risk Behaviors Among Pregnant and Postpartum Women.” Maternal and Child Health Journal 13: 621-632.

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Ellison, Christopher G., Jinwoo Lee, Neal M. Krause, Terrence D. Hill, and John P. Marcum.2009. “Faith and Fitness: Religious Beliefs, Congregational Support, and Exercise in a Nationwide Survey of Presbyterians.” Pp.  165-184 iIn Faith and Well-Being in Later Life: Linking Theories with Evidence in an Interdisciplinary Inquiry, edited by Amy L. Ai and Monika Ardelt. Hauppauge, NY: Nova Science Publishers.

Ellison, Christopher G., Jinwoo Lee, Maureen R. Benjamins, Neal M. Krause, Daniell Nicole Ryan, and John P. Marcum. 2008.“Congregational Support Networks, Health Beliefs, and Annual Medical Exams: Findings from a Nationwide Sample of Presbyterians.” Review of Religious Research 50:176-193.

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