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Robert Crosnoe, Chair CLA 3.306, Mailcode A1700, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-232-6300

Nina J Palmo

M.S., The University of Texas at Austin

Nina J Palmo

Contact

Biography

Nina Palmo’s research interests are in the area of family demography; in particular, the ways in which family structures and processes contribute to the intergenerational transmission of advantage or disadvantage. To this end, she is interested in studying marriage, union formation and dissolution, the transition to parenthood, and father involvement. Nina is also interested in the interaction of social policy with individual behavior and wellbeing as well as cross-cultural comparisons between the United States and Scandinavia.

SOC S323 • The Family

88295 • Summer 2013
Meets MTWTHF 1000am-1130am CLA 0.112
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Description

American family life today differs dramatically from that of previous generations. The goal of this course is to understand how changes in American family life occurred and what these changes mean for adults and children in contemporary society. In this course, we will examine trends over time in specific aspects of family life, including marriage, cohabitation, mate selection, divorce, parenthood, family structure, and work-family balance. Students will also gain an understanding of the methods that sociologists and demographers use to study the family. 

 

SOC 308 • American Families Past & Pres

45605 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm PAR 203
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Course description

American family life today differs dramatically from that of previous generations. The goal of this course is to understand how changes in American family life occurred and what these changes mean for adults and children in contemporary society. In this course, we will examine trends over time in specific aspects of family life, including marriage, cohabitation, mate selection, divorce, parenthood, family structure, and work-family balance. Students will also gain an understanding of the methods that sociologists and demographers use to study the family.

Required reading

There is no textbook for this course. Instead, the reading comes from articles posted on Blackboard for each topic. I will post two or three readings per topic – typically one article from a peer-reviewed academic journal and one or two from a newspaper or magazine. You should read all articles.

Course requirements

1. Reading response papers (50%)

After you have finished the readings for each week, compose a 400-800 word reading response paper. In the first half of the paper, briefly summarize the main point(s) of each article. In the second half of the paper, offer some discussion. For example: What did you find interesting or surprising? What do you think of the author’s arguments? How do the readings relate to each other? If the reading discusses a problem, what do you see as a solution? A total of six response papers is due over the course of the fifteen topics we will cover this semester. You may choose the weeks that you write and do not write papers, but you must turn in at least two papers before spring break. Papers are due at the beginning of class on the date listed on the course calendar. Because we will discuss the papers during class, late papers will not be accepted.

2. Group presentation (10%)

Some topics will be covered by an in-class presentation instead of or in addition to a lecture/discussion. The presentations will be done in groups of three students vs. three students.

3. Family interview assignment (10%)

For this assignment, you will interview a family member or another individual over the age of 65. The purpose of the interview is to get another generation’s perspective on family life. You should plan to turn in a 4-5 page paper. More details will be provided later in the semester.

4. Exam 1 (15%)

The first exam will cover the topics from the first half of the semester.

5. Exam 2 (15%)

The second exam will cover the topics from the second half of the semester. 

SOC 308 • American Families Past & Pres

45410 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 800am-930am BUR 134
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Description:

Is dating dead? Is cohabitation a good idea? Are divorce rates on the rise? Why are there so many single parent families? What does same sex marriage mean for the future of marriage? In this course, we examine recent trends in family life from a sociological perspective. The goal of this course is to understand how diverse family forms came to exist and what these changes mean for adults and children in contemporary society. We will examine recent trends in several aspects of family life, including dating & courtship, cohabitation, marriage, divorce, parenthood, family structure, and work-family balance. Students will also gain an understanding of the methods that sociologists and demographers use to study the family.

Required Texts:

Academic and non-academic articles posted on Blackboard. Selections include:

 Martin King Whyte. 1992.  “Choosing Mates – The American Way.” Society.

Jeffrey Jensen Arnett. 2000. “Emerging Adulthood: A Theory of Development From the Late Teens Through the Twenties.” American Psychologist.

Andrew Cherlin. 2004. “The Deinstitutionalization of American Marriage.” Journal of Marriage and Family.

Linda Waite. 1995. “Does Marriage Matter?” Demography.

Steven Nock. 2005. “Marriage as a Public Issue.” The Future of Children.

Peter McDonald. 2006. “Low Fertility and the State: The Efficacy of Policy.” Population and Development Review.

Suzanne Bianchi, Melissa Milkie, Liana Sayer, & John Robinson. 2000. “Is Anyone Doing the Housework? Trends in the Gender Division of Household Labor.” Social Forces.

 Brad Wilcox. 2009.“The Evolution of Divorce.” National Affairs.

Jeremy Travis, Elizabeth Cincotta McBride, & Amy Solomon. 2005. “Families Left Behind: The Hidden Cost of Incarceration and Reentry.” Urban Institute (Justice Policy Center).

Grading Policy:

Reading response papers (60%)

Family interview assignment (20%)

Final exam (20%)

Final letter grades will be assigned as follows:

A (93-100), A- (90-92), B+ (87-89), B (83-87), B- (80-82), C+ (77-79), C (73-76), C- (70-72),

D+ (67-69), D (63-66), D- (60-62), F (59 or below) 

SOC F323 • The Family

88545 • Summer 2011
Meets MTWTHF 100pm-230pm BUR 220
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SOC 308 • American Families Past & Pres

45955 • Spring 2011
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm PAR 301
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Description:

Is dating dead? Is cohabitation a good idea? Are divorce rates on the rise? Why are there so many single parent families? What does same sex marriage mean for the future of marriage? In this course, we examine recent trends in family life from a sociological perspective. The goal of this course is to understand how diverse family forms came to exist and what these changes mean for adults and children in contemporary society. We will examine recent trends in several aspects of family life, including dating & courtship, cohabitation, marriage, divorce, parenthood, family structure, and work-family balance. Students will also gain an understanding of the methods that sociologists and demographers use to study the family.

 

Required Texts:

 Academic and non-academic articles posted on Blackboard. Selections include:

 Martin King Whyte. 1992.  “Choosing Mates – The American Way.” Society.

 Jeffrey Jensen Arnett. 2000. “Emerging Adulthood: A Theory of Development From the Late Teens Through the Twenties.” American Psychologist.

 Andrew Cherlin. 2004. “The Deinstitutionalization of American Marriage.” Journal of Marriage and Family.

 Linda Waite. 1995. “Does Marriage Matter?” Demography.

 Steven Nock. 2005. “Marriage as a Public Issue.” The Future of Children.

 Peter McDonald. 2006. “Low Fertility and the State: The Efficacy of Policy.” Population and Development Review.

 Suzanne Bianchi, Melissa Milkie, Liana Sayer, & John Robinson. 2000. “Is Anyone Doing the Housework? Trends in the Gender Division of Household Labor.” Social Forces.

 Brad Wilcox. 2009.“The Evolution of Divorce.” National Affairs.

 Jeremy Travis, Elizabeth Cincotta McBride, & Amy Solomon. 2005. “Families Left Behind: The Hidden Cost of Incarceration and Reentry.” Urban Institute (Justice Policy Center).

 Grading Policy:

 Reading response papers (60%)

Family interview assignment (20%)

Final exam (20%)

 Final letter grades will be assigned as follows:

A (93-100), A- (90-92), B+ (87-89), B (83-87), B- (80-82), C+ (77-79), C (73-76), C- (70-72),

D+ (67-69), D (63-66), D- (60-62), F (59 or below) 

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