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Robert Crosnoe, Chair CLA 3.306, Mailcode A1700, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-232-6300

Sergio Cabrera

Sergio Cabrera

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SOC S302 • Intro To The Study Of Society

87965 • Summer 2014
Meets MTWTHF 1000am-1130am CLA 1.106
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Descripton:   Sociology, it has been said, involves rethinking "common sense" - the re-examination of the society in which we live and the assumptions we make about the dynamics that shape our lives. It touches on all of social life's major dimensions - economic, political, religious, familial, and criminal, to name a few.   This course is an introduction to sociology as the systematic, scientific study of the patterns and processes of social life. We will survey major sociological perspectives, theories, methods, and debates in order to introduce you to the sociological perspective as a way of examining your life as well as important issues facing society today.

 

SOC 308 • Rich And Poor In America

46096 • Fall 2013
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm CLA 1.104
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Description:   Over the last three decades the gap between the very rich and everybody else has grown dramatically. In this class we will explore several broad questions concerning the nature and reproduction of class inequality in the U.S. We will ask, for example: What is unique about the inequality we live with today? How does social class structure our everyday lives? How, in a purportedly democratic and meritocratic society, is class inequality sustained across generations? What institutions and beliefs systems are involved in this reproduction? How do the rich and poor make sense of their place within the distribution of wealth and power? How is it that our society has become simultaneously more open (in terms of race and gender) and unequal? What does all this mean for the viability of a democratic society? And why should we turn to sociologists to help us answer these questions? By exploring answers to these questions I hope to provide you with a toolkit for critical thinking about the complexities of social class in the U.S., as well as an understanding of how your own experiences are the products of systems of stratification.

 

SOC S302 • Intro To The Study Of Society

88275 • Summer 2013
Meets MTWTHF 1000am-1130am CLA 0.102
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Description:

Sociology is the systematic, scientific study of the patterns and processes of social life, touching on all of its major dimensions – economic, political, religious, familial, and criminal, to name a few. It studies both individual actors, and the informal groups and formal organizations that populate the social landscape.   

This course is an introduction to sociology as a way to understanding the world. This course will introduce you to the sociological perspective in examining our lives and social experiences, as well as many issues facing society today. In this course, we will survey major sociological perspectives, theories, methods, and debates. We will explore some of the big questions we face as social beings, and talk about some of the intriguing answers – and questions – that sociologists have provided.

 

SOC 308 • Rich & Poor In Amer: Soc Persp

45655 • Spring 2013
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am WAG 420
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Description

Over the last three decades the gap between the wealthy and poor has grown dramatically. This course aims to explore several broad questions concerning the extent of, effects, and reproduction of class inequality in the U.S., as well as the racial and gender inequalities that are woven through it. We will examine the meanings of the concept “social class”; the nature of economic inequality in the U.S.; the institutions and mechanisms responsible for its production and reproduction; ways that the wealthy and poor make sense of and give meaning to their lived experiences; and what consequences economic inequality has for a democratic society. My goal is to expose you to the theoretical and conceptual tools sociologists use to study social class. I hope to provide you with both a toolkit for critical thinking about the complexity of economic inequality as well as an understanding of how your own experiences are both the products and producers of systems of stratification.

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