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Jill Robbins, Chair 150 W 21st Street, Stop B3700, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-471-4936

Cory A Reed

Associate Professor Ph.D., Princeton University

Cory A Reed

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Biography

Cory Reed is Associate Professor of Spanish. His research focuses on the study of genre and performance in early modern drama; the representation of identity in sixteenth- and seventeenth-century literature; literary and cultural responses to the emergence of scientific discourse in early modern Spain; and cognitive cultural studies. He is the author of The Novelist as Playwright: Cervantes and the Entremés nuevo and journal articles on Don Quijote, the Novelas ejemplares, Golden Age drama, and film. He is finishing a second book, Scientific and Technological Imagery in Don Quijote and beginning new research projects on utopia and performance in early modern Spanish drama, and on cognitive approaches to early modern literature and culture. Dr. Reed serves on the executive council of the Cervantes Society of America. He has served as faculty director of the interdisciplinary Tracking Cultures Program, which analyzes the historical roots of Southwestern in colonial Mexico and early modern Spain.

 

Interests

Cervantes, Early Modern Spanish Drama, Transatlantic Studies, and Comparative Literature

ILA 387 • Cognitive Cultural Studies

46590 • Fall 2014
Meets T 900am-1200pm BEN 2.104
(also listed as C L 382 )
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DESCRIPTION:

The growing field of cognitive cultural studies operates at the disciplinary intersection of evolutionary psychology, phenomenology, neuroscience, and the humanistic study of literature and culture. Cognitive approaches to literature and culture view all knowledge as embodied, deriving not only from discourse but also from emotional and biological processes of adaptation to the natural environment. This emerging interdisciplinary approach seeks to identify the cognitive bases of literary/cultural discourse, to study the affective aspects of readers’ responses to literature, and to develop a socio-psychological orientation that addresses the effects of literary readings on self and society, thereby building on the important contributions of discursive cultural studies by reintroducing the “evolved human mind” first identified by Raymond Williams.

Literature in the early modern period frequently depicts mind-reading characters who attempt to negotiate an increasingly complex social world during the time in which the modern subject emerges and conceptions of identity and society are first being formed. Focusing on how people think, persuade, and infer the thoughts of others in order to gain social or political advantage, cognitive cultural studies is a particularly appropriate methodology for the study of these dynamics in the early modern world. In this course we will take a cognitive approach to study the formation of social identity, the performance of ethnicity and religion in public theatres, and how critical and/or subversive messages are conveyed in the public arena despite political attempts to silence them, analyzing texts that reflect Spain’s participation in the broader Mediterranean and Transatlantic worlds. In the process, we will consider such theoretical concepts as Theory of Mind, Social and Machiavellian Intelligence, Representational Hunger, and Cognitive Embodiment as ways of understanding how human beings think, feel, and act during a period of controlled mass culture and political hegemony.

REQUIREMENTS AND GRADING:

Class meetings will be organized around active discussion and student participation.  The first part of each meeting will concentrate on the dissemination of theory and background information through a brief lecture, leaving the remaining time for textual analysis and discussion.  Every week, students will be responsible for literary/cultural readings as well as theoretical and critical works.  Students will prepare one oral report on a critical work during the semester. A second brief oral presentation and written abstract on the topic of the final paper is due for the last class meeting. Students will write a term paper of between 15 and 20 pages that analyzes one or more of the works studied during the course.

TEXTBOOKS AND/OR CLASS MATERIALS:

Theoretical Texts

Aldama, Frederick Luis, ed. Toward a Cognitive Theory of Narrative Acts (2010)

Jaén, Isabel and Julien Simon, eds. Cognitive Literary Studies: Current Themes and New Directions (2012)

Leverage, Paula, and Howard Mancing, Richard Schweickert, and Jennifer Marston William, eds. A Theory of Mind and Literature (2011)

McConachie, Bruce and F.Elizabeth Hart, eds. Performance and Cognition: Theatre studies and the cognitive turn (2006)

Simerka, Barbara. Knowing Subjects: Cognitive Cultural Studies and Early Modern Spanish Literature (2013)

Zunshine, Lisa, ed. Introduction to Cognitive Cultural Studies (2010)

Literary Texts

Calderón, El médico de su honra

Ana Caro, Valor, agravio y mujer

Cervantes, Don Quijote (selections)

Cervantes, El trato de Argel, El retablo de las maravillas

Claramonte, El negro valiente en Flandes

Bartolomé de las Casas, Brevísima relación de la destrucción de las Indias

Lazarillo de Tormes

Ruiz de Alarcon, La verdad sospechosa

SPN 376 • Prose & Drama Gold Age Spain

47395 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm MEZ B0.302
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Spain was at a cultural and political crossroads in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, a period that saw the rise of Spain’s imperial power abroad and the formation of a Spanish national identity. Within Spanish society, the new nation faced a legacy of cultural pluralism in which diverse ethnicities struggled to survive in a rigid, hierarchical social order. The wealth of literary production and the rise of mass culture and public theatre at this time testify to these cultural and political tensions. This course will examine major short prose and dramatic works of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries in Spain in the cultural context of these changing times. The course will follow a chronological trajectory, beginning with La Celestina, the work that ushered in the so-called Golden Age of Spanish literature, and Lazarillo de Tormes, which initiated the picaresque tradition, continuing to the dramatic works of Lope de Vega, Tirso de Molina, and Calderón, and ending with the baroque complexity of Cervantes’s novelas ejemplares. Throughout, the course will focus on the development of prose fiction as a potentially subversive form of literature in a time of monumental social change, and the role of drama and the public theatre in the rise of mass culture.

 

Texts:  

Rojas, La Celestina

Lazarillo de Tormes

Lope de Vega, Fuente Ovejuna

Tirso de Molina, El burlador de Sevilla        

Calderón, La vida es sueño

Cervantes, Novelas ejemplares and Entremeses (selections)

 

Grading:  

2 in-class exams (30% each)                           60%

Term Paper (8-10 pp.)                                     30%

Class Work                                                     10%

 

SPN S351 • Don Quijote

88740 • Summer 2013
Meets MTWTHF 1000am-1130am RLM 5.126
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SPN 391 • Transnat Legac Early Mod Spn

46980 • Spring 2013
Meets W 1200pm-300pm UTC 4.114
(also listed as MES 385 )
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DESCRIPTION:

This course examines the trans-Mediterranean and transatlantic cultural and literary legacies of the dynamic pluralism of early modern Spain. We will discuss Spain in the context of its multicultural past, including cultural and artistic hybridity in the Middle Ages, Islamic and Christian hegemony in the Iberian Peninsula, communities of violence, relationships between art and empire, internal colonization, “passing” and identity formation, and other related topics. The overall trajectory of the course begins in the late Middle Ages as a prelude to the Spanish empire, then focuses on the cultural and artistic development of imperial Spain, its Mediterranean conflicts with North Africa and Turkey, and the imposition of Spanish conceptions of race, ethnicity, and blood purity on colonial subjects in the Americas, specifically the castas of colonial Mexico. Readings will include literary texts as well as extra-literary cultural documents and artifacts from the periods and geographies studied.

REQUIREMENTS AND GRADING:

Class meetings will be organized around active discussion and student participation.  The first part of each meeting will concentrate on the dissemination of theory and background information through a brief lecture, leaving the remaining time for textual analysis and discussion.  Every week, students will be responsible for textual readings as well as theoretical and critical works deemed pertinent to that week's topic.  Students will prepare one oral report on a critical work during the semester. A second brief oral presentation and written abstract on the topic of the final paper is due for the last class meeting. Students will write a term paper of between 15 and 20 pages that analyzes one or more of the works studied during the course.

TEXTBOOKS AND/OR CLASS MATERIALS:

Antonio Muñoz Molina, Córdoba de los Omeya (selection)

Ibn Khaldun, Muqaddimah (selection)

Constable, Medieval Iberia (selections of pertinent Jewish, Christian, and Hispano-Islamic   historical documents and cultural texts)

Convivencia, ed. Glick, Dodds, et al (selections on science, art, and material culture)

Romances fronterizos

Miguel de Cervantes, El retablo de las maravillas, La gran sultana, La española inglesa, Don            Quijote (brief selections)

El viaje de Turquia (selection)

Antonio de Sosa, Topografía e historia general de Argel (selection)

Cristóbal Colón, Carta de descubrimiento (Carta a Luis Santángel)

Bartolomé de las Casas, Brevísima relación de la destrucción de las Indias

Pedro Apiano, Cosmografía (selection from 1575 hybrid edition incorporating excerpts from   López de Gómara’s Historia general)

Casta Paintings

Alvar Núñez Cabeza de Vaca, Naufragios

Tirso de Molina, Amazonas en las Indias

Gabriel García Márquez, Crónica de una muerte anunciada

Pertinent secondary readings will also be assigned, including foundational and recent critical and theoretical works by J.M. Díez Borque, J.A. Maravall, Jerrilynn Dodds, Thomas Glick, Jane Gerber, David Nirenberg, María Antonia Garcés, Edward Said, Barbara Fuchs, William Childers, Bruce Burningham, Diana de Armas Wilson, Ann Twinam, and others.

SPN S351 • Don Quijote

89110 • Summer 2012
Meets MTWTHF 1000am-1130am BEN 1.108
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DEPARTMENT OF SPANISH AND PORTUGUESE

THE UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT AUSTIN

COURSE NUMBER:  SPN s351

COURSE TITLE:  Don Quijote

INSTRUCTOR:  Cory Reed

 

DESCRIPTION: 

The course is dedicated to an in-depth study of Cervantes’s masterpiece, Don Quijote.  The entire text of Don Quijote, parts one and two, will be read in the original Spanish, and class discussions will situate the novel within the contexts of 17th-century Spain and literary history.  We will consider such issues as the definition of the modern novel, Cervantine perspectivism, artistic freedom, and the critique of literature.  During the course we will pay special attention to the figure of Don Quijote himself in an attempt to determine how and why the famous madman of La Mancha has achieved universal recognition.  The prerequisite for this course is SPN 326K or the equivalent.  Students should be prepared for relatively long reading assignments in Spanish.  The course, active in-class discussions, and all assignments are conducted entirely in Spanish.

 

GRADING SYSTEM:  

            Midterm                                                          30%

            Final Exam                                                      40%

            Writing Exercises                                            20%

            Class Work                                                     10% 

TEXTBOOKS:

Cervantes, Don Quijote de la Mancha (I and II), ed. Martin de Riquer, Barcelona: Juventud.

SPN 384P • Examination Preparation

46680 • Spring 2012
Meets F 1200pm-300pm BEN 1.118
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This course is for Master's students who will take the MA Comprehensive Exam this semester.

SPN 391 • Conquest And Id In E Mod Drama

46710 • Spring 2012
Meets F 900am-1200pm BEN 1.118
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Recent scholarship in Early Modern Drama has shown that, far from the conservative, monolithic, and conventional genre it appears to be on the surface, the Spanish comedia represents a rich diversity of themes and dramatic structures that defy easy categorization and classification. This course will approach Spanish Golden Age Drama as a genre of both structural and thematic diversity, in which the tensions between the individual and society, and between self and other, are addressed through a kind of collective testimony that requires participation and affirmation from a theatrical audience. In this view, the corral de comedias becomes a microcosm of Spanish society, not only passively viewing, but also contributing actively to its own comprehension of early modern society and the role of both the individual (majority and marginalized voices) and the nation in changing social contexts. In particular, we will study the performative process by which playwrights and their audiences collaborate in the contemplation of ideal societies and the resolution, through fictive imagination, of early modern culture’s most violent and disturbing problems. Special attention will be given to the performance of utopia, conquest, and the other in both canonical and lesser-studied plays. In the case of Cervantes, we also will compare performed and unperformed dramas to analyze how differences in the potential audience (either real or implied) configure the articulation of utopian ideals and the desire for positive social change.

 REQUIREMENTS AND GRADING:

Class meetings will be organized around active discussion and student participation.  The first part of each meeting will concentrate on the dissemination of theory and background information through a brief lecture, leaving the remaining time for textual analysis and discussion.  Every week, students will be responsible for textual readings as well as theoretical or critical works deemed pertinent to that week's topic.  Students will prepare one oral report on a critical work during the semester. A second brief oral presentation and written abstract on the topic of the final paper is due for the last class meeting. Students will write a term paper of between 15 and 20 pages that analyzes one or more of the plays studied or other works by these dramatists.

 TEXTBOOKS AND/OR CLASS MATERIALS:

 Miguel de Cervantes, Numancia, El trato de Argel, La Gran Sultana, El retablo de las maravillas

Lope de Vega, Arte nuevo de hacer comedias, Fuenteovejuna, El nuevo mundo descubierto por Cristóbal Colón, La boda entre dos maridos                                

Tirso de Molina, El burlador de Sevilla, Don Gil de las calzas verdes

Angela de Azevedo, El muerto disimulado        

Ana Caro, Valor, agravio y mujer            

Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz, Loa to El Divino Narciso

Pedro Calderón de la Barca, La vida es sueño, El médico de su honra

Maria de Zayas, La traición en la amistad

 

Pertinent secondary readings will also be assigned, including foundational critical works by Américo Castro, A.A. Parker, J.M. Díez Borque, J.A. Maravall, and Bruce Wardropper, as well as critical approaches to performance theory and identity by Jill Dolan, María Antonia Garcés, Edward Said, Barabara Fuchs, Homi Bhabha, Judith Butler, and others.

 

SPN S351 • Don Quijote

89250 • Summer 2011
Meets MTWTHF 100pm-230pm BEN 1.108
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SPN 384P • Examination Preparation

47300 • Spring 2011
Meets F 1200pm-300pm BEN 1.118
show description

Offered by Professor Cory Reed

SPN 391 • Don Quijote

47325 • Spring 2011
Meets T 100pm-400pm UTC 3.120
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DESCRIPTION

This course will study Cervantes's masterpiece, Don Quijote, in depth and considering a variety of critical interpretations and approaches.  Throughout the semester we will emphasize the author's views on artistic freedom, his manipulation of literary genres and conventions, and the discussions of literary theory that characterize the book as a whole.  We will also focus on important topics such as Cervantes's use of multiple perspectives, the Quijote as a funny book, the relationship between author and reader, the socio-historical context of the book, the humanist vision of Cervantes, and the evolution of the protagonist as an enduring, universal figure.  Other representations of the Don Quijote figure in visual art, music, drama, and film will be brought in for comparison.

CLASS ORGANIZATION

Class meetings will be organized around active discussion and student participation.  The first part of each meeting will concentrate on the dissemination of theory and background information through a brief lecture, leaving the remaining time for textual analysis and discussion. 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

Required readings include literary texts and critical works pertinent to each week’s topic. Students will prepare a 15-minute oral report on a critical work once during the semester. The final term paper (15-20 pages) will analyze an aspect of the Quijote, such as a detailed investigation of a character, theme, or socio-historical perspective. Students will prepare a 10-minute oral report and written abstract on the term paper for the last class meeting. Homework assignments, such as critical abstracts of articles, will be included in the class participation grade.

 GRADING SYSTEM: The student's final course grade will be computed as follows:

Final paper                                                            60%

Oral report                                                            10%

Final paper presentation and abstract                        10%

Class participation                                                20%

TEXTBOOK:

Students should use the edition of Don Quijote ordered for this class, edited by Martín de Riquer (Barcelona: Juventud), available at the University Co-op in two paperback volumes.  Using the same edition is helpful for following along in class.            

SPN 326K • Intro To Spn Lit Before 1700

48010 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm BEN 1.124
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The University of Texas at Austin

Department of Spanish and Portuguese

 

Introduction to Spanish Literature Before 1700

Fall 2009

 

Spanish 326K                                                      Prof. Cory A. Reed

Unique No. 48010                                                      BEN 4.140; 232-4512

T/Th 12:30-2:00                                                      Office Hrs: T/Th  11:00-12:30          

BEN 1.124                                                               creed@mail.utexas.edu

 

 

DESCRIPTION: 

This survey course provides an introduction to medieval and Golden Age Spanish literature, starting with the jarchas and progressing chronologically into the seventeenth century.  Texts include some works in their entirety and selections from others, and are discussed in the context of the literary, cultural, and political history of Spain.  Basic elements of literary criticism also will be introduced in order to increase the student's awareness and comprehension of literary strategies and theories.  Upon completion of this course, the student should be able to recognize and identify major literary figures, genres, and works of early Spain; place these within the context of Spanish society and culture; understand prominent literary trends; differentiate between medieval, Renaissance, and baroque literature; and contrast, compare, and analyze individual literary texts, utilizing theoretical approaches that go beyond the simple discussion of plot situations.  Students should be comfortable speaking and writing in Spanish, since class discussions, lectures, homework, exams, and assignments will be completed entirely in Spanish. 

 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS:

There will be two in-class exams, both with identification, textual commentary, and short answer sections.  The second exam will emphasize literary texts discussed since the first exam, but students will need to maintain a cumulative knowledge of literary theories, or “tools” of literary analysis.  Two reports (4-5 pp. each) will give the student an opportunity to practice writing skills, analyze texts, and explore first impressions of selected readings.  Since being well prepared is essential for maintaining the pace of the course, a class work grade will reflect participation, attendance, and preparation (frequent pop-quizzes, homework, class discussion).

 

GRADING SYSTEM:          

Plus/minus grades will be assigned for final grades in this course. The final grade will be computed as follows:

                           Exam 1                                             30%

                           Exam 2                                              30%

                           2 Reports (4-5 pp. each, 15% each)         30%

                           Class Work                                             10%

 

MAKE-UP POLICY:

Assignments contributing to the class work grade (homework, pop-quizzes, etc.) cannot be made up or handed in late.  No exceptions will be made to this policy.  Extensions for reports will be granted only in extreme circumstances and if requested before the due date.  Students will be allowed to make up exams only if a viable excuse is presented. Extensions and makeup exams are not guaranteed and may be subject to a penalty for every calendar day an assignment is delayed. Students with disabilities may request appropriate academic accommodations from the Division of Diversity and Community Engagement, Services for Students with Disabilities, 471-6259.

 

SCHOLASTIC DISHONESTY:

Cheating, plagiarism, or any other presentation of someone else's work as your own is a serious offense for which the minimum penalty will be a failing grade on the assignment in question.  Please make yourselves familiar with University regulations concerning this matter, which are posted on the Dean of Students web site: http://deanofstudents.utexas.edu/sjs/

 

TEXTBOOK:

Students should purchase Antología de autores españoles antiguos y modernos, vol. 1, edited by Antonio Sánchez-Romeralo and Fernando Ibarra (available at the University Co-op). A required reading packet for this course is available at Jenn's Copy and Binding at 2200 Guadalupe. 

 

ABOUT THE INSTRUCTOR:

Cory Reed holds a Ph.D. in Spanish Literature from Princeton University.  His research interests include Golden Age Drama, Cervantes, and Trans-Atlantic Studies.  He has published a book of literary criticism on Cervantes's short drama (the entremeses) and articles on the entremeses, Don Quijote, the novelas ejemplares, the drama of Calderón, and film. He is presently completing a book on scientific and technological imagery in Don Quijote. He has been a member of the UT faculty since 1989.

COURSE TIMETABLE:

Please note that all assignments are due on the day listed and should be prepared prior to coming to class.  "SR" denotes Sánchez-Romeralo anthology.

 

  August  27  Introduction to course; Lyric vs. Epic

        La lengua española; La Edad Media

        Siglo XI:  las jarchas

        Reading:  SR 1-11

      _______

 

  September    1  Siglo XII; Versification

        Cantar de Mio Cid:  Cantar 1

        Reading:  SR 12-24

 

        3  Cantar de Mio Cid:  Cantares 2-3

        Reading:  SR 24-37

      _______

 

        8  Cantar de Mio Cid:  finish discussion

        In class:  video

 

           10  Siglo XIII

        Gonzalo de Berceo:  Milagros de Nuestra Señora

        Reading:  SR 38-43

      _______

 

      15  Siglo XIV

        Don Juan Manuel:  El Conde Lucanor

        Reading:  SR 44-52

 

      17  Siglo XV

        Lírica popular:  el villancico y el romancero

        Reading:  SR 69-70; 74-79; 80-84

      _______

 

      22  El romancero

        Reading:  SR 80-84 (intro); 84-86 (romances de Rodrigo);

          90-92 (romances del Cid); 92-95 (Abenámar)

        Report 1 due in class today

 

      24  Jorge Manrique:  Coplas por la muerte de su padre

        Reading:  SR 107-116

      _______

 

                  29         Danza de la muerte

        Reading: Packet, to be read in class

 

October   1  Fernando de Rojas:  La Celestina

        Reading:  SR 117-135

      _______

 

                    6         Fernando de Rojas:  La Celestina

             Reading:  SR 135-147

 

        8  Fernando de Rojas:  La Celestina

        Reading:  SR 147-156

      _______

 

       13  Fernando de Rojas:  La Celestina (finish discussion)

 

      15  EXAM 1 (in class) covering all readings and               material presented in class to date                _______

 

      20  El Siglo de Oro; Poesía lírica del siglo XVI

        Garcilaso de la Vega:  Égloga 1 y sonetos

        Reading:  SR 157-174

        In class:  video

 

                  22         La novela en el Siglo de Oro

                           Lazarillo de Tormes

                           Reading:  SR 189-199

           _______

 

      27  Lazarillo de Tormes

        Reading:  SR 199-214

 

      29  Lazarillo de Tormes

        Reading:  SR 214-219

 

  November    3  Lazarillo de Tormes (finish discussion)

 

                    5         Siglo XVII

        Miguel de Cervantes:  Entremeses

        Reading:  SR 219-223; El viejo celoso (packet)

      _______

 

      10  Miguel de Cervantes:  Novelas ejemplares

        ReadingEl celoso extremeño (packet; first half of story)

        Report 2 due in class today

 

      12  Miguel de Cervantes:  Novelas ejemplares

        ReadingEl celoso extremeño (packet; second half of story)

      _______

 

      17  El teatro del Siglo de Oro:  la comedia

        Lope de Vega:  Fuenteovejuna, Act 1

        Reading:  SR 293-313

 

           19  Lope de Vega:  Fuenteovejuna, Act 2

        Reading:  SR 313-329

      _______

 

      24  Lope de Vega:  Fuenteovejuna, Act 3

        Reading:  SR 329-346

 

      26  THANKSGIVING (no class)

                  _______

 

December    1  Poesía lírica del siglo XVII:  Góngora; Quevedo

        Conclusion of course; Course Evaluations

        Reading:  SR 347-355; 362-367 (selections)

 

          3    EXAM 2 (in class) covering all readings and               material presented in class since first exam

SPN 351 • Don Quijote

48165 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 930-1100 BEN 1.124
show description

The University of Texas at Austin

Department of Spanish and Portuguese

 

Don Quijote

 

Spanish 351         (48165)                                             Prof. Cory A. Reed

Fall 2009                                                               BEN 4.140; 232-4512

T/Th  9:30-11:00                                                      Office Hrs: T/Th 11:00-12:30

BEN 1.124                                                               creed@mail.utexas.edu

 

DESCRIPTION: 

This course studies Cervantes's masterpiece, Don Quijote, in depth in the original Spanish.  Throughout the semester we will emphasize the author's views on artistic freedom, his manipulation of literary genres and conventions, and the discussions of literary theory that characterize the book as a whole, leading to the consideration of the Quijote as the first modern novel in Western literature.  We also will focus on the portrayal of the protagonist as an enduring, universal figure that transcends generations and cultures.  Other representations of the Don Quijote figure in art, music, drama, and film will be discussed from time to time for comparison.  This course is designed as a senior-level seminar and requires active student participation and discussion.  Class meetings and all work will be conducted entirely in Spanish. The prerequisite is one semester of introductory literature, preferably SPN 326K. The prerequisite will be enforced strictly.

 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS:

There will be two in-class exams with identification, textual commentary, and short answer sections.  The second exam will emphasize material discussed since the midterm, but students will also be responsible for maintaining a cumulative knowledge of the Quijote and will need to refer back to earlier chapters for comparative purposes.  In the term paper (8-10 pages), the student will analyze a specific aspect of Cervantes's work (a theme, characters, imagery, etc.). The class work grade will reflect participation (including class discussion), attendance, and preparation (including frequent pop-quizzes, homework, and occasional writing assignments that will help students prepare for their final papers).

 

 

 

GRADING SYSTEM:          

Plus/minus grades will be assigned for final grades in this course. The final grade will be computed as follows:

                           Exam 1                                             30%

                           Exam         2                                             30%

                           Term Paper (8-10 pp.)                           30%

                           Class Work                                             10%

 

MAKE-UP POLICY:

As a rule, no extensions will be given and no late work will be accepted. Under extreme circumstances, requests for extensions will be entertained, but only if requested well in advance of the due date.  A penalty may be assessed for every calendar day the exam or assignment is extended. Students with disabilities may request appropriate academic accommodations from the Division of Diversity and Community Engagement, Services for Students with Disabilities, 471-6259.

 

SCHOLASTIC DISHONESTY:

Cheating, plagiarism, or any other presentation of someone else's work as your own is a serious offense for which the minimum penalty will be a failing grade on the assignment in question.  Please make yourselves familiar with University regulations concerning this matter, which are posted on the Dean of Students web site: http://deanofstudents.utexas.edu/sjs/

 

TEXTBOOK:

Students should purchase the edition of Don Quijote ordered for this class, edited by Martín de Riquer (Barcelona: Juventud), available at the University Co-op.  Using the same edition is essential for following along in class. Other handouts will be made available during the semester.

 

ABOUT THE INSTRUCTOR:

Cory Reed holds a Ph.D. in Spanish Literature from Princeton University.  His research interests include Golden Age Drama, Cervantes, and Trans-Atlantic Studies.  He has published a book of literary criticism on Cervantes's short drama (the entremeses) and articles on the entremeses, Don Quijote, the novelas ejemplares, the drama of Calderón, and film. He is presently completing a book on scientific and technological imagery in Don Quijote. He has been a member of the UT faculty since 1989.

COURSE TIMETABLE: Please note that all assignments are due on the day listed and should be prepared prior to coming to class.

 

         August         27         Introduction to course; Romances of chivalry

                                    Reading:  DQ I: 19-25 (prólogo)

                           _______        

 

         Sept.                    1         In Class:  Romance, Star Wars

Reading:  DQ I: 35-66 (ch. 1-5)

 

                              3         In Class:  Romance, Star Wars

                                    ReadingAmadís de Gaula, King Arthur (handouts)

                           _______

 

                             8         Reading:  DQ I: 66-102 (ch. 6-10)

 

                  10         Reading:  DQ I: 103-34 (ch. 11-14)

                           _______        

 

                           15         Reading:  DQ I: 135-90 (ch. 15-20)

 

                           17         Reading:  DQ I: 191-225 (ch. 21-23)

                           _______

 

                           22         Reading:  DQ I: 225-88 (ch. 24-28)

 

                           24         Reading:  DQ I: 289-319 (ch. 29-31)

                           _______

 

                           29         Reading:  DQ I: 320-80 (ch. 32-36)

 

         Oct.                    1         Reading:  DQ I: 381-433 (ch. 37-41)

                           _______

 

                    6         Reading:  DQ I: 433-74 (ch. 42-46)

 

                             8         Reading:  DQ I: 474-523 (ch. 47-52)

                           _______

 

                  13         EXAM 1 (in class)

 

                  15         Reading:  DQ II: 535-39 (prólogo), Avellaneda (handout)

Oct.                  20         Reading:  DQ II: 541-610 (ch. 1-10)

 

                           22         Reading:  DQ II: 610-42 (ch. 11-15)

                           _______

 

                           27         Reading:  DQ II: 642-94 (ch. 16-21)

 

                           29         Reading:  DQ II: 694-719 (ch. 22-24)

                           _______

 

         Nov.                    3         Reading:  DQ II: 719-96 (ch. 25-34)

 

                             5         Reading:  DQ II: 796-837 (ch. 35-41)

                           _______

 

                           10         In Class: Don Quixote (Kozintsev)

                                    Reading:  DQ II: 837-97 (ch. 42-49)

 

                           12         In Class: Don Quixote (Kozintsev)

                                    Reading:  DQ II: 898-928 (ch. 50-53)

                                    Final paper topics due in class today

                           _______

 

                           17         Reading:  DQ II: 928-63 (ch. 54-58)

 

                           19         Reading:  DQ II: 963-1000 (ch. 59-62)

                           _______

 

                           24         Reading:  DQ II: 1000-1068 (ch. 63-74)                                                               Outlines for final paper due in class today                                   

                           26           THANKSGIVING (No class)

                  _______

 

         Dec.                    1         Don Quijote as the first novel; Documentation of sources

                                    Conclusion of course; Course Evaluations

In Class: Illustrations, Musical Reps. of Don Quijote                          

                             3         EXAM 2 (in class)

 

 

         Thursday, December 10, NOON:  Final Paper Due in BEN 4.140

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