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Jill Robbins, Chair 150 W 21st Street, Stop B3700, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-471-4936

Dale A. Koike

Professor Ph.D., University of New Mexico, Albuquerque

Dale A. Koike

Contact

  • Phone: 512.232.4508
  • Office: BEN 3.108
  • Office Hours: T 10-12; Th 11-12 or by appointment
  • Campus Mail Code: B3700

Biography

Dale Koike is a Professor of Spanish and Portuguese Linguistics who specializes in the areas of Pragmatics, Discourse Analysis, and Second Language Acquisition, particularly in the context of interaction. She has taught in Brazil and at the University of California at Santa Barbara and North Carolina State University before coming to the University of Texas at Austin. Her research centers on pragmatics as co-constructed in dialogue (1) between native speakers of Spanish or Portuguese, and (2) between adult language learners and native speakers. She has also begun to work on issues for Spanish Heritage language learning. Her most recent major work is the co-edited volume Pragmatic Variation in First and Second Language Contexts: Methodological Issues (John Benjamins Press) and she also is the lead author for a language textbook, currently in progress.

Interests

Pragmatics in Native and Non-native Talk; Second and Third Language Acquisition; Interaction in SLA; Heritage Language Learners

SPN S327G • Adv Grammar & Compositn I-Spn

88385 • Summer 2014
Meets
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Within the language program, SPN 327G is the first in the Advanced Spanish Grammar and Composition two-course sequence. It is a bridge course between lower and upper-division Spanish designed to:

  • help you inductively master grammar points of particular concern to speakers of English
  • perfect your grammar skills through a variety of tasks designed to clarify and expand your knowledge about particular grammatical points. The oral, reading, and writing activities used to present the grammar offer relevant cultural knowledge that you will be expected to investigate and compare with your own culture.
  • acquire and apply strategies of composition development (pre-writing, writing, revising, editing, and evaluation), and
  • promote critical and integrative thinking skills.

 

This learner-based course will lead you through a guided inductive approach that presents you with selected samples to analyze in order to

  • discover patterns of oral and written discourse,
  • formulate hypotheses about the linguistic and communicative functions of the Spanish language, and
  • develop an understanding of Hispanic culture.

 

All in-class activities, readings, and assignments are in Spanish.

 

ILA 386 • Pragmatic Variation

46800 • Spring 2014
Meets T 900am-1200pm BEN 2.104
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a) Course description:  Departing from Schneider and Barron (2008), this course explores the emerging field of Variational Pragmatics, focusing on work done in this area of pragmatics and discourse analysis, and methods utilized to collect and analyze data in a variety of mainly first (L1) language contexts. The objectives are to: (1) examine variation in such areas of pragmatics as speech acts, conventional expressions, metapragmatics, stance, frames, mitigation, communicative action, (im)politeness, and implicature; and (2) critically review central methodological concerns relevant for research in pragmatic variation, such as coding, ethical issues, qualitative and quantitative methods, and individual variation. Theoretical frameworks vary from variationist and interactional sociolinguistics, to variational pragmatics. Given the theoretical perspectives, methodological focus, and analyses, the course will be of interest to those who study pragmatics, discourse analysis, sociolinguistics, corpus linguistics, and language variation.

b) Kind of course:  This is a course that assumes some familiarity with the field of pragmatics (or beginning graduate students will have to do some extra background readings).

c)  List of basic readings and texts to be used:  The basic readings will be taken from C. Félix-Brasdefer and D. Koike (eds.), 2012. Pragmatic variation in first and second language contexts: Methodological issues. Amsterdam:  John Benjamins, but there will also be a number of readings that will be posted on Blackboard.  Other work will be examined from researchers such as Schneider & Barron, Félix-Brasdefer, Placencia, Ruzickova, Schwenter, Vasquez-Laslop, Briz, Lipski, Labov, Otheguy, Bravo, Silva-Corvalán, and Terkourafi.

d)  What will be required of students:  

Grading system:  Grades are awarded on a plus-minus basis for the final grade and are based on the following categories:

Research paper 40% 

Paper presentation 10%

Semester exam 25% (review 15%; exam 10%)

Article synthesis 5%

Class discussion and preparation 20%

SPN 383M • Interactn & Sec Lang Acquisitn

46710 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm MEZ 1.208
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Description:

This course is general in scope, including various theories about second language acquisition but addressing mainly those that related to interaction.  Objectives: 

(a)  to understand issues and theories of second language acquisition that approach language learning from the perspective of the role of interaction and dialogue; and

(b)  to examine how these issues and theories of second language acquisition can be applied in the classroom learning situation.

The course will follow a seminar style format, in Spanish or English.  After examining some current theories of the role of interaction in second language acquisition, students will analyze and discuss related current studies in Spanish or English second language acquisition.

Texts:

The background text is yet to be determined. The separate articles will be in digital form and posted on Blackboard.   

Requirements:

Each student is expected to participate actively in class discussions and to come to class prepared by reading and criticizing the readings beforehand.  The final grade is based on the following categories:

Grading system:

Research paper                       40%

Paper presentation                   10%

Semester exam                        10%

Article presentation                   10%

Review preparation                    15%

Class discussion and preparation   15%

Students will write a term paper of about 20 pages in length, based on empirical data dealing with Spanish language acquisition.  Students should select topics and have the instructor approve them by the third week of class. A 15 minute presentation of the paper will be given in class.  Each student will be assigned to synthesize at least one of the readings for the class in about 15 minutes.  The written examination will cover issues and topics from the readings and class discussions.  

SPN 383N • Spn Pragmatic/Discourse Anly

46675 • Spring 2012
Meets TH 1000am-100pm UTC 1.136
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Description:  This course presents an introduction to the fields of Spanish discourse analysis and pragmatics, with an emphasis on pragmatics.  Students will explore various issues in Spanish pragmatics and discourse analysis, including recent speech act studies, implicatures, presupposition, mitigation and politeness, discourse grammar, dialogue studies, applications to language acquisition, conversation analysis, narrative, and other topics.  A special focus will be placed on current quantitative and qualitative research, as well as on research design.

Texts:  Readings will be from two textbooks as background material (probably Huang (2007), Pragmatics, and Gee (2010), Introduction to Discourse Analysis), as well as selected articles from various edited volumes and journals such as Journal of Pragmatics, Discourse and Society, Discourse Processes, and Revista Latinoamericana de Estudios del Discurso

Requirements:  Students will engage in an active dialogue with the instructor based on the readings.  Each student will present and critique one article, and also present parts of their research project throughout the semester for discussion. They will take a general semester exam and will also be graded on the preparation of a review of a given area. At the end of the semester, they will turn in an original, twenty-page research paper.

Grading system: 

            Research paper 40%

            Paper presentation 5%

            Semester exam 20%

            Article presentation 10%

            Review preparation 15%

            Class discussion and preparation 10%

 

Sample reading list:

Achugar, Mariana.  2004. “The events and actors of 11 September 2001 as seen from        Uruguay:  Newspapers and editorials.”  Discourse and Society 15(2):291-320

Blackwell, Sarah.  2001.  “Testing the neo-Gricean pragmatic theory of anaphora: The      influence of consistency constraints on interpretations of coreference in Spanish.”          Journal of Pragmatics 33: 901-941.

Carranza, Isolda.  1999.  “Winning the battle in private discourse:  Rhetorical-logical          operations in storytelling.”  Discourse and Society 10(4):509-541

Cashman, Holly.  2005. “Identities at play:  Language preferences and group membership             in bilingual talk in interaction.”  Journal of Pragmatics 37(3):301-315

Cepeda, Gladys.  2006. “La voz empática médica y las estrategias de cortesía verbal.         Estudios Filológicos 41: 55-69

Félix-Brasdefer, César.  2006.  Linguistic politeness in Mexico:  Refusal strategies among male speakers of Mexican Spanish.  Journal of Pragmatics 38 (12):2158-2187

Hernández-Flores, N.  1997. “Cortesía y oscilación de la imagen social en un debate           televisivo.” In J. Murillo Medrano (ed.), Actas del 2º Coloquio Internacional   del Programa EDICE (Estudios de la Cortesía en Español).  37-54.            Stockholm-Costa Rica:  Programa EDICE-    Universidad de Costa Rica.

Koike, Dale, and Clayton Graham.  2006.  “Who is more Hispanic?  The co-construction of identities in a U.S. Hispanic political debate.”  Spanish in Context 3, 2:  181-       213.

Lacorte, Manel, 2007.  “Interacción y contexto(s) en el aprendizaje y  enseñanza de           español como L2.” Spanish in Context  4(1): 73-98.  

Lorenzo-dus, Nuria.  2001. “Compliment responses among British and Spanish     university students:  A contrastive study.  Journal of Pragmatics 33:107-127.

Márquez-Reiter, Rosina.  2005. “Complaint calls to a caregiver service company:  The      case of desahogo.”  Intercultural Pragmatics 14(2): 481-514.

Morales-López, Esperanza, Gabriel Prego-Vázquez, and Luzia Domínguez-Seco. 2005.     “Strategies in conflicts:  Interviews between employers and customers during a      company restructuring process.  Discourse and Society 16 (2): 225-268

Rodríguez Alfano, Lidia, and Dale Koike. 2004.  “La interacción en diálogos transmitidos por la radio en la frontera.”  Revista Latinoamericana de Estudios del Discurso    4,1: 47-72.

SPN 367K • Adv Oral Exp For Teachers

46540 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 930am-1100am BEN 1.106
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Otoño  2011                                                    D. Koike   d.koike@austin.utexas.edu

SPN 367K: Advanced Oral                             Oficina: BEN 3.108

 and Written Expression for                            tel:   232-4508

Teachers                                                          horas de consulta:  T, Th 8:30-9:15; 2-3 o con cita.

Pre-requisito: SPN 327

1.    Objetivo:  El objetivo de este curso es avanzar en su habilidad de expresarse en español al nivel Avanzado o más alto, con diferentes tipos de discurso   Entre ellos, se incluyen las funciones de describir, narrar, evaluar, perifrasear, instruir, reportar, convencer, presentar un punto de vista, y conjeturar.  La mayor parte de estas funciones son las que se espera de un hablante al nivel de Avanzado, en la escala de ACTFL, que es el nivel que se necesita alcanzar para pasar el examen TOPT.

 

2.    Descripción del curso:  Se espera que cada alumno participe al máximo en las actividades de la clase diariamente, con una buena preparación de antemano. La nota final se basa en las siguientes categorías:

 

            Discusión y preparación         15%

            Presentaciones en clase           15%

            Pruebas                                   20%

            Exámenes uno y dos               20%

            Composiciones                       10%

            Entrevista y análisis                10%

            Discusión en pánel                    5%

            Auto-análisis                             5%

 

Cada alumno va a hacer una presentación oral, a veces individualmente, a veces en grupo, después de cada lección.  Se califica a base del éxito en comunicarse con el tipo de discurso que se estudió en ese capítulo.  Hay una rúbrica que se ve en Bb que muestra las categorías que serán evaluadas (por ej, precisión de gramática, función comunicativa, léxico, fluidez). También cada alumno va a hacer una serie de pruebas que reflejen su producción bajo condiciones del laboratorio. 

            Su asistencia en clase es importante y cuenta en la categoría de discusión y preparación.  Después de 4 ausencias (por cualquier motivo), se le quitan 5 puntos de esta parte de la nota.  No se dan make-ups, y la tarea que se entrega tarde va a recibir la mitad del crédito. Si llega atrasado/a a la clase con regularidad, se le cuenta cada 3 ocasiones como una ausencia. Uso el sistema de +/- en las notas.

 

3.    Libro de texto:  Biron, C. and D. Koike, Puntos de vista:  Conversación  (libreta, que se encuentra en la librería).  También hay grabaciones (cintas) para cada capítulo que se encuentran en el sitio de www. laits.utexas.edu/itsaud. (contraseña:  koike)

 

Students with disabilities may request appropriate academic accommodations from the Division of Diversity and Community Engagement, Services for Students with Disabilities, 471-6259, http://www.utexas.edu/diversity/ddce/ssd/

 

Students will follow the UT Honor Code in this course: http://registrar.utexas.edu/catalogs/gi09-10/ch01/index.html)

 

By UT Austin policy, you must notify me of your pending absence at least fourteen days prior to the date of observance of a religious holy day.  If you must miss a class, an examination, a work assignment, or a project in order to observe a religious holy day, you will be given an opportunity to complete the missed work within a reasonable time after the absence.

 

 

Otoño 2011                                                                  D. Koike

SPN 367K

 

Conversación avanzada para los maestros de español

Sílabo

 

ago 25         Introducción

 

      30         Cap. 1; leer y preparar ej. 1-6, cinta sobre Gades (dos partes), ej. 9

sep  1          Cap. 1; Ej. 10-14, 17, 19-21, “Carlos Fuentes”, ej. 23-24.

 

       6          Cap. 1; Ej. 27, “Ahora le toca a Ud. C; Cap. 2; Ej. 1, 3.

       8          Cap. 2; Estereotipos y Conversación pp. 26-27, E. 4-7, 11, Cinta, ej. 13-14.

 

      13         Cap. 2; Ej. 18-19, Lecturas Cap. 2 (al final del cap.)

      15         Cap. 2; “Ahora le toca a Ud. A & B. 

 

      20         Prueba 1*; Cap. 4; “La conversación” y Ej. 1-6, 8, 11, 18,  

      22         Cap. 4; Ej. 18-19, “Medicina naturista”, ej. 20-22, Lecturas Cap. 4,

 

      27        Composición 1. Cap. 4; “Ahora le toca a Ud. A & B,

      29         Cap. 5; Ej. 1, “La conversación” pp. 63-69; Ej. 2-4, Cinta, ej. 5-8.    Cinta de muestra práctica.

 

oct   4         Cap. 5; Ej. 9, “después de escuchar”, ej. 10-16, 17, Lectura “enfrentamiento”, ej. 18-22, Lecturas Cap. 5.

        6         Cap. 5 “Ahora le toca a Ud.” –Ej. 23. Prueba 2*

 

11         Cap. 6, Ej. 1, Conversación, ej. 2-4, Cinta, Ej. 5, “La estructura del      reportaje”, ej. 6.

       13        Cap. 6, ej. 7, 9, Cinta, 10, 11, Pretérito e imperfecto, ej. 14-15.  Composición 2

 

      18          Cap. 6; “Describir y narrar”, ej. 18-21; Lecturas Cap. 6.   Cinta de muestra

      20         Cap. 6; Ej. 25 y lecturas Cap. 6; “Ahora le toca a Ud--ch.”

 

      25         Examen uno*; Cap. 7; Ej. 1-2; “la conversación”, Ej. 3-5, Cinta, Ej. 7-8, 10, “síntesis”.

      27         Cap. 7; Cap. 7; Ej. 1-2; “la conversación”, Ej. 3-5, Cinta, Ej. 7-8, 10, “síntesis”. Cinta, Ej. 12-20, Discusión en pánel

 

nov  1         “La mordaza”, ej. 21, 24, Lecturas Cap. 7. Cap. 7; “Ahora le toca  Ud. Discusión en pánel

        3         Prueba 3*; Cap. 8; Ej. 1, “La conversación” Ej. 2,3,5,15,

 

        8         “La imagen del producto”, Para persuadir, 17, “hacer una síntesis”.  

      10         Cap. 8; Ej. 18, 22-26, 30, 32, “tomar turnos”

 

      15         Cap. 8; Lecturas Cap. 8, “Ahora le toca  Ud.”, auto-análisis

      17         Cap. 9; Ej. 1, 2, “La conversación”, Ej. 3,4,7,8,9,13, “para persuadir” y “dar a            entender”

 

      22         Cap. 9; “Ej. 14; “El paraíso perdido”, “Todos contra la naturaleza”, Ej. 15-16,            Lecturas Cap. 9.  “Ahora le toca a Ud.”

      24         Acción de gracias

 

      29         Prueba 4; Composición 3

dic   1          Examen dos*; Composición 3

 

 

 

*La clase será en Mezes (laboratorio de computación, cuarto piso) los días que hay grabaciones

SPN 383N • Herit Lang Learn/Sec Lang Acqu

46605 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm BEN 1.106
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COURSE DESCRIPTION:

This course focuses on the heritage language learner, a topic that has emerged in the last decade as extremely important given the growing number of these learners in language programs, reflecting the increasing diversity of the population in the U.S. and abroad. 

Objectives: 

(a)  to understand issues related to heritage language learners in second and third language learning situations (e.g., agency, identity, learner strategies, processing approaches), and to see how current theories of SLA need to be redefined in view of these issues; and

(b)  to examine how these issues can be addressed in second and third language teaching practices and materials.

The course will follow a seminar style format, in Spanish or English.  After examining issues related to heritage language learners as well as current theories of  second language acquisition (e.g., Sociocultural Theory, Practice Theory, Emergentism, Translanguaging), students will analyze and discuss studies and data that reflect the applications of these notions.

Texts:

The background text is yet to be determined (probably Potowski’s book, possibly Schwartz). The separate articles will be in digital form and posted on Blackboard.  

Requirements of the course:

Each student is expected to participate actively in class discussions and to come to class prepared by reading and criticizing the readings beforehand.  The final grade is based on the following categories:

Discussion and preparation 20%

Examination 25%

Synthesis of article(s) 5%

Presentation of paper 10%

Final paper 40%

Students will write a term paper of about 20 pages in length, based on empirical data dealing with Spanish language acquisition.  Students should select topics and have the instructor approve them by the third week of class. A 15-minute presentation of the paper will be given in class.  Each student will be assigned to synthesize at least one of the readings for the class in about 15 minutes.  The written examination will cover issues and topics from the readings and class discussions.  

SPN 383M • Intro Spn Second-Lang Acquistn

46740 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm BEN 1.102
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TTh 12:30-2:00 PM

DESCRIPTION:

1.    This course is general, to provide an overview and background of the field of Spanish second language acquisition and acquisition in general. Objectives: 

(a)  To understand current basic issues and theories of language acquisition in classroom and natural second language learning situations;

(b)  To discuss relevant literature on the acquisition of Spanish as a second/foreign language, including the analysis of some aspects of the learners’ interlanguage;

(c)  To examine how these issues and theories of language acquisition can be applied theoretically in the classroom learning situation.

Topics examined will include theoretical approaches currently used in the field, cognitive processes of acquisition, such as transfer, overgeneralization, learning principles, as well as learner strategies, and input properties. These topics will lead into discussion of methods that have developed on the basis of how second language learning takes place but the emphasis of the class is not on teaching methodology. 

Grading criteria: 

Each student is expected to participate actively in class discussions and to come to class prepared by reading and criticizing the readings beforehand.  The final grade is based on the following categories:

Discussion and preparation                        20%

Examination                                          25%

Synthesis of article(s)                               5%

Presentation of paper                               10%

Final paper                                            40%

Students will write a term paper of about 20 pages in length, based on empirical data dealing with Spanish language acquisition.  A 15 minute presentation of the paper will be given in class.  Each student will be assigned to synthesize at least one of the readings for the class and will present it in 15 minutes (handouts are helpful).  The written examination will cover issues and topics from the readings and class discussions. 

 Text: 

Yet to be determined, but probably will be Gass and Selinker, Second Language Acquisition.  This text is used mainly to give a perspective on the issues examined.  There will be a series of readings, pertaining mostly to Spanish language acquisition.  

 

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