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Jill Robbins, Chair 150 W 21st Street, Stop B3700, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-471-4936

Naomi E. Lindstrom

Professor Ph. D., Arizona State University

Naomi E. Lindstrom

Contact

  • Phone: 512.475.6316
  • Office: BEN 4.144 and CLA 2.402C
  • Office Hours: T 230-4pm BEN 4.144; TH 230-4pm CLA 2.402C
  • Campus Mail Code: B3600

Biography

Dr. Lindstrom is the author of books and articles on nineteenth- and twentieth-century Latin American literature and is also a translator of Latin American novels and poetry. She works primarily in Spanish American literature and culture, with a secondary interest in Brazil. As well as being in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese, she is the Associate Director of the Schusterman Center for Jewish Studies and a member of the graduate faculty in Comparative Literature. She is the manager of the website of LAJSA, the Latin American Jewish Studies Association (http://www.utexas.edu/cola/orgs/lajsa/) and its listserv (lajsa-list@utlists.utexas.edu). Dr. Lindstrom organized the 16th International Research Conference of LAJSA, hosted by the Schusterman Center in June 2013.

Interests

Gender and the Study of Latin American Literature, Latin American Jewish Studies, On-Line Scholarly Resources, and Sociology of the Arts.

SPC 320C • Jewish Voices From Lat Amer

46870 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm BEN 1.102
(also listed as J S 363, LAS 328 )
show description

The purpose of this course is to acquaint students with some of the outstanding Jewish writers from Brazil and Spanish America, with special emphasis on those who portray in their work the situation of the Jewish communities of their respective cities and countries.  The readings will include works by both Ashkenazic and Sephardic writers from both Brazil and a range of Spanish-speaking Latin American countries, as well as Latino Jews who live and write in the United States. We will also look briefly at the work of Latin American writers who have created their own literary scene within Israel. Another secondary focus will be the Jewish themes that appear prominently in some of the short stories of Jorge Luis Borges.

Approximately one third of the readings will be by Jewish authors from Brazil, one third by those from Spanish American countries, and one third by Jewish-Latino writers working in the United States.

Grading Criteria:  

  • proposal for term paper, 14%
  • first examination, 27.5%
  • final version of term paper, 22.5%
  • quizzes 6%
  • second examination 30%

Attendance Policy:  Attendance is a requirement.  Four cuts permitted; subsequent unexcused absences result in 1% grade reduction each.  An excused absence is an absence satisfactorily explained by a note.

SPN 352 • Latin American Jewish Writers

47355 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm MEZ 1.122
(also listed as LAS 370S )
show description

The purpose of this course is to acquaint students with some of the outstanding Jewish writers, filmmakers, and other creators from Latin America, with special emphasis on those who portray in their work the situation of the Jewish communities of their respective cities and countries.  The readings will include works by both Ashkenazic and Sephardic writers and from a range of Spanish-speaking Latin American countries, along with one Brazilian author and several who represent U.S. Latino Jewish writing in English, in addition to relevant films. Another topic will be the Jewish themes that appear prominently in some of the writings of a non-Jewish author, the renowned Jorge Luis Borges.

            One of the requirements of the class is to write a term paper of at least 1700 words (approximately 6-7 pages in normal-size type) on a topic not covered in the syllabus.  Each student will need to analyze literary works that are not in the course readings, although other writings by the same author may appear in the syllabus.  Any student with a reading knowledge of Portuguese is welcome to write his or her term paper on a Brazilian Jewish writer. The alternative to writing a literary analysis for the term paper is to research and write a paper on a Latin American Jewish creative figure working in some other medium, such as a painter, sculptor, or film director.  

SPN 380K • Spanish Amer Writing & Gender

46935 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm BEN 1.118
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Description

This course involves reading selected Spanish American narrative works that have especially attracted critics with a feminist or genre approach. We will read the primary texts together with relevant examples of criticism on those works. The purposes of the course are: to read some important works of Spanish American narrative, to examine some of the main currents in feminist and gender studies of literature, and to practice evaluating literary criticism.

Required Readings

Course packet with critical articles on the primary works read for the course as well as some more general articles on feminist criticism and gender studies of Spanish American writing.

Tentative list of primary works (some of these may need to be replaced if available editions cannot be located)

Avellaneda, Sab 

Gorriti, Sueños y realidades

De la Parra, Ifigenia: Diario de una señorita que escribió porque se fastidiaba

Puig, El beso de la mujer araña 

Ferré, Papeles de Pandora

Santos-Febres, Sirena Selena vestida de pena

 

Required Activities and Grading Criteria:

Each member of the class will write a term paper of approximately 4200 words (17 pages), which will analyze a work or works of Spanish American literature from some feminist or gender-studies perspective.  While all the works read in common by the students in the course are narrative prose, the term papers can focus on texts in any literary genre or on testimonios.

Term paper topics that go beyond these guidelines may be accepted, but before proposing such a topic the student must consult with the instructor to see how the topic can fit into the course.

Detailed proposal for paper, 35%

Final version of term paper, 60%

Attendance and participation, 5%

 

SPN 352 • Latin American Jewish Writers

46595 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm JES A207A
(also listed as LAS 370S )
show description

The purpose of this course is to acquaint students with some of the outstanding Jewish writers from Latin America, with special emphasis on those who portray in their work the situation of the Jewish communities of their respective cities and countries. The readings will include works by both Ashkenazic and Sephardic writers and from a range of Spanish-speaking Latin American countries, along with one Brazilian author and several who represent U.S. Latino Jewish writing in English. Another topic will be the Jewish themes that appear prominently in some of the writings of a non-Jewish author, the renowned Jorge Luis Borges.

SPN 380K • Spanish Am Narratv/Critcl Anly

46650 • Spring 2012
Meets MW 930am-1100am BEN 1.118
(also listed as LAS 392S )
show description

Nature of Course:  General.  Please note that it is a course not only on Spanish American narrative but also on literary and cultural criticism.

In this course, we will examine five significant works of Spanish American narrative and a sampling of recent critical commentary on these texts.  The five texts, all of which have been attracting considerable critical study in recent years, represent Spanish American writing of the nineteenth, twentieth, and twenty-first centuries. The emphasis of the course is not so much on introducing the narrative works as on examining varying critical approaches to a given text and how problems or issues in literary research are identified, explored, and, in many cases, abandoned in favor of newer perspectives.  A closely related issue is how literary and cultural criticism is assessed and what is meant by such evaluative terms as “well written, “original,” “coherent,” and “based on sound scholarship.”

Each student will be required to write a term paper of 17-20 pages. The approach must be metacritical, surveying and analyzing a particular problem or question in the scholarship on a given text.  The text may be either a literary work or some other type of cultural artifact.  The term paper cannot be first and foremost a textual analysis; its primary focus must be a current problem in literary and cultural research and commentary.

Grading Criteria:

term paper:  proposal, 30% of final grade

final version:  60% of final grade (17-22 pages double spaced and following either MLA or Chicago bibliographic style)

reports in class, 10%

Provisional list of readings:

Each primary text will be read together with a number of critical articles, which will be collected in a course packet.

Gertrudis Gómez de Avellaneda, Sab

María Luisa Bombal, La última niebla, “El árbol,” “Las islas nuevas”

Alejo Carpentier, Los pasos perdidos

Mayra Santos Febres, Sirena Selena vestida de pena

Santiago Gamboa, El síndrome de Ulises

SPN 352 • Latin American Jewish Writers

46510 • Fall 2011
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm PAR 210
(also listed as J S 363 )
show description

The purpose of this course is to acquaint students with some of the outstanding Jewish writers from Latin America, with special emphasis on those who portray in their work the situation of the Jewish communities of their respective cities and countries. The readings will include works by both Ashkenazic and Sephardic writers and from a range of Spanish-speaking Latin American countries, along with one Brazilian author and several who represent U.S. Latino Jewish writing in English. Another topic will be the Jewish themes that appear prominently in some of the writings of a non-Jewish author, the renowned Jorge Luis Borges.

SPN 325K • Intro To Spn Am Lit Thru Mod

46470 • Fall 2010
Meets MWF 900am-1000am GAR 0.128
(also listed as LAS 370S )
show description

Main literary trends and principal writers in Spanish America from the sixteenth century through Modernism. Taught in Spanish.

SPN 352 • Latin American Jewish Writers

46655 • Fall 2010
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm MEZ 1.102
(also listed as J S 363, LAS 370S )
show description

Course Title: Latin American Jewish Writers

Instructor Name: Naomi Lindstrom

 

Description:

The purpose of this course is to acquaint students with some of the outstanding Jewish writers from Latin America, with special emphasis on those who portray in their work the situation of the Jewish communities of their respective cities and countries.  The readings will include works by both Ashkenazic and Sephardic writers and from a range of Spanish-speaking Latin American countries.  We will also look briefly at the work of Spanish American (mostly Argentine) writers who have made aliyah and have created a Spanish-language literary scene within Israel.

Another secondary focus will be the Jewish themes that appear prominently in some of the short stories of Jorge Luis Borges.

No Brazilian works are included among the required readings because the course is offered in Spanish.  However, any student with a reading knowledge of Portuguese is welcome to write his or her term paper on a Brazilian Jewish writer.

 

Texts:

There will be a course packet containing essays, poetry, and short stories by Spanish American Jewish writers.  In addition, the class will read and discuss several novels,

which will be made available through the University Co-op.  The list below is still provisional because the texts need to be obtained from international suppliers.  If any text proves to be too difficult to order, it will be replaced.

Gerchunoff, Los gauchos judíos

Glantz, Las genealogías

Steimberg, Músicos y relojeros

Goldemberg, La vida a plazos de don Jacobo Lerner

Freilich, Cláper

 

 

Grading: 

proposal for term paper 15%

midterm examination 25%

final version of term paper 27.5%

quizzes and participation 5%

final examination 27.5%

SPN 325K • Intro To Spn Am Lit Thru Mod

47985 • Fall 2009
Meets MWF 900-1000 GAR 0.128
show description

 

Fall 2009 Course Syllabus

 

SPN 325K   #47985  LAS 370S # 40960

Introduction to Spanish American Literature through Modernism

MWF 9:00-10:00a, GAR 0.128

 

Primary Instructor:  Prof. N. Lindstrom

       voice mail:   232 4527

       e-mail:  lindstrom@austin.utexas.edu

       office:  BEN 4.116, M 2-3, W 3:30-4:30, Th 3-4

 

Required Text:  Raquel Chang-Rodríguez and Malva E. Filer, Voces de Hispanoamérica

Boston:  Heinle and Heinle, 2004.  3rd ed.  Should be at University Co-op.  In addition, there is a course packet.  You must purchase the packet because it contains required readings.  It is at Jenn’s Copy & Binding, 2200 Guadalupe Street, Austin 78705,

tel. 473 8669, fax 476 6505, or jenns@io.com.

Recommended, but not required:  Lindstrom, Early Spanish American Narrative

 

Grading Criteria:  proposal for term paper, 15%, due Fri. 2 Oct.

                            midterm examination, 27.5%, Wed. 14 Oct.

                            final version of term paper, 22.5%, due Fri. 4 Dec.

                            quizzes and participation 5%, dates of quizzes TBA in class

                            final examination 30%, Sat. 12 Dec. (during finals week),

2-5 p.m.

 

Attendance Policy:  Four cuts permitted;  subsequent unexcused absences result

in 1% grade reduction each.  An excused absence is an absence satisfactorily

explained by a note.

 

Please note:  Final examination is during finals week.   Faculty are not permitted to give early final examinations.  You must take the examination at this time, since no early scheduling is permitted. 

Quizzes, examinations, and papers must be written in Spanish.  The use

of a bilingual dictionary is permitted during examinations and quizzes.  Though they

will not be graded for grammar, it is required that examinations, quizzes, and

papers be legible.  The final term paper must be at least 1750 words (approx 6-7

pages) in length, not counting the bibliography, and must cover a topic and readings

that are not already covered in class sessions.  The paper must have to do with Spanish America previous to 1900, and the topic must be literary or related to some other

cultural form.  The topic must be approved by the instructor.

Any student who requires accommodation because of a disability may request

it.  He or she may be asked to present a note from the Office of Services for

Students with Disabilities specifying the special need.

Students in this course are expected not to disrupt the normal progress of the

class.  Any student who persists in being disruptive will first receive a warning

letter from the instructor.  If the problem persists, it will be reported to the

Dean of Students.

The course syllabus indicates what you should have read ahead of time to

prepare for that day’s class.  If you see “special activity” in the syllabus,

this means that a media activity, such as showing of clips from a film plus

class discussion, is planned for that class session.  You do not need to study for such a session beforehand.

 

Readings:  (Page numbers refer to the main course textbook, Chang-Rodríguez and Filer,

 Voces de Hispanoamérica, unless otherwise noted.)

 

August

 

26 First day;  Introduction to course

 

28 Excerpt from Popol Vuh, pages 16-17

 

31 Nahuatl and Quechua poetry, 17-21

 

September

 

2 Special activity

 

4 Cristóbal Colón, “Carta a Luis de Santángel,” 24-26

 

7 Labor Day, University closed

 

9 Bartolomé de las Casas, excerpt from Historia de las Indias, 30-35

 

11 Alvar Núñez Cabeza de Vaca, excerpt from Naufragios (in packet)

 

14 Special activity

 

16 Bernal Díaz del Castillo, 38-42 middle of page

 

18 Bernal Díaz, 42-46

 

21 Felipe Guaman Poma, in packet;   Inca Garcilaso de la Vega, 63-66 mid page

 

23 Inca Garcilaso,  66-68 ;  more on Incan empire

 

25 Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz, introduction to;  read “Respuesta,” 78-80; 

 

28 Sor Juana,  in section of Redondillas, read I, “Hombres necios que acusáis,”

               80-81;   in section of Sonetos, read I, “Este que ves…,” 83,

               and II, “Rosa divina que en gentil cultura,” 83-84

 

30 J. J. Fernández de Lizardi, excerpt from El Periquillo Sarniento, 88-91

 

October

 

2 Simón Bolívar, excerpt from “Carta de Jamaica” (in packet);

            due date for term paper proposal including bibliography of sources that you

            intend to use

 

5 José Joaquín de Olmedo, excerpt from “La victoria de Junín:  Canto a Bolívar”

(in packet);  more on the Spanish American Independence movement and wars

 

7 Andrés Bello, excerpt from “A la agricultura de la zona tórrida,”  94-97;  Bello,  

              “Autonomía  cultural de América,” 98

 

9 Introduction to Spanish American romanticism;  read handout on romanticism

            in packet;  read José María Heredia, “En una tempestad,” 112-114

 

12 Review for midterm

 

14 Midterm examination

 

16 Special activity

 

19 José María Heredia, “Niágara,” 114-117;  “A mi esposa,” 118

 

21 Juan Francisco Manzano, excerpt from his Autobiografía, poem “Mis treinta años,”

            (both in packet)

 

23 Esteban Echeverría, “El matadero,” 122-135

 

26 Domingo Faustino Sarmiento,  excerpt from Facundo,  Capítulo II, 144-150

 

28 Gertrudis Gómez de Avellaneda, “Al partir,” 156; “A él,” 157-158

 

30 Juan Montalvo, excerpt from Siete tratados, “Washington y Bolívar,” 160-162

 

November

 

2 Ricardo Palma, “Amor de madre,” 165-169

 

4 Ricardo Palma, “El alacrán de Fray Gómez,” 170-173

 

6 Clorinda Matto de Turner, “Para ellas,” 189-190;  “Malccoy,” 191-194

 

9 José Martí, excerpts from Versos sencillos I “Yo soy un hombre sincero,”   210-211 ;  

            X “El alma trémula y sola,” 212-213

 

11 José Martí, “Dos patrias, ” 215;  “Nuestra América,” 216-220; 

 

13 “El modernismo literario” (in packet), Manuel Gutiérrez Nájera, “Para entonces,”

223-224;  “La duquesa Job,” 224-227

 

16 José Asunción Silva, “Nocturno (III),” 234-235;  “Vejeces,” 236-237

 

18 Julián del Casal, “Crepuscular” (packet);  “Elena” (packet)

 

20 Rubén Darío, “Era un aire suave,” 242-245; “De invierno” (packet);

           “Alaba los ojos negros de Julia” (packet)

 

23 Rubén Darío,;   “Yo soy aquel…” 247-250;  “A Roosevelt,” 250-251;

     “Lo fatal,” 251-252

 

 

25 Question and answer session

 

27 Thanksgiving holiday, University closed

 

30 Rubén Darío, “Los cisnes,” 252-253, “Canción de otoño en primavera,”

          253-254

 

December

 

2 Leopoldo Lugones, “Los caballos de Abdera,” “Yzur” (in packet)

 

4 Last class day;  term paper due;  review for final examination

 

 

                                       ***  FINAL EXAMINATION ***

 

                               ***    Sat. 12 DECEMBER 2009 2:00-5:00p   ***

SPN 352 • Latin American Jewish Writers

48170 • Fall 2009
Meets MWF 1100-1200 BEN 1.124
(also listed as J S 363, LAS 370S )
show description

 

 

 

Fall 2009 Course Syllabus:    

 

Latin American Jewish Writers

 

SPN 352 (Unique 48170) JS 363 (Unique 40670) LAS 370S (Unique 40920)

 

Meets in:  BEN 1.124, MWF 11:00-11:50

 

Language of Instruction:  Spanish

 

Instructor:  Prof. Naomi Lindstrom

       voice mail:   232 4527

       e-mail:  lindstrom@austin.utexas.edu

       office:  BEN 4.116, M 2:30-3:30, W 2:30-3:30, Th 3-4

 

Required Texts: 

 

Should be at University Co-op.  In addition, there is a course packet.  You must purchase the packet because it contains required readings.  It is at Jenn’s Copy & Binding, 2200 Guadalupe Street, Austin 78705, tel. 473 8669, fax 476 6505, or jenns@io.com.

 

Timerman, Preso sin nombre, celda sin número

 

Gerchunoff, Los gauchos judíos

 

Shúa, El libro de los recuerdos 

 

Freilich, Cláper (University Co-op will have bound photocopies of this novel)

 

Steimberg, Músicos y relojeros

 

Grading Criteria:  proposal for term paper, 15%, due Wed., Oct. 7

                            midterm examination, 27.5%, Fri., Oct. 23

                            final version of term paper, 22.5%, due Fri., Dec. 4

                            quizzes and participation 5%

                            final examination 30%, Wed., Dec. 9, 7:00-10:00p

 

Attendance Policy:  Attendance is a requirement.  Four cuts permitted;  subsequent unexcused absences result in 1% grade reduction each.  An excused absence is an absence satisfactorily explained by a note.

 

The purpose of this course is to acquaint students with some of the outstanding Jewish writers from Latin America, with special emphasis on those who portray in their work the situation of the Jewish communities of their respective cities and countries.  The readings will include works by both Ashkenazic and Sephardic writers and from a range of Spanish-speaking Latin American countries, along with one Brazilian author and several who represent U.S. Latino Jewish writing in English.  Another topic will be the Jewish themes that appear prominently in some of the writings of a non-Jewish author, the renowned Jorge Luis Borges.

            One of the requirements of the class is to write a term paper of at least 1700 words (approximately 6-7 pages in normal-size type) on a topic not covered in the syllabus.  Each student will need to analyze literary works that are not in the course readings, although other writings by the same author may appear in the syllabus.  Any student with a reading knowledge of Portuguese is welcome to write his or her term paper on a Brazilian Jewish writer. The alternative to writing a literary analysis for the term paper is to research and write a paper on a Latin American Jewish creative figure working in some other medium, such as a painter or film director.   Please note that the term paper must be on a cultural topic and not on non-cultural themes, such as Jewish education or problems in estimating the population of Jewish communities in Latin America.  Your topic must be approved by the instructor for you to receive credit for this assignment,

Any student who requires accommodation because of a disability may request

it.  He or she may be asked to present a note from the Office of Services for

Students with Disabilities specifying the accommodations needed.  Students in this course are expected not to disrupt the normal progress of the class.  Any student who persists in being disruptive will first receive a warning letter from the instructor.  If the problem persists, it will be reported to the Dean of Students.

 The course syllabus indicates what you should have read ahead of time to

prepare for that day’s class.  In some cases a media activity, such as showing of clips from a film, is planned for that class session.  You do not need to study for such a session beforehand.

 

August

 

26 general introduction to course

 

28 historical background to Jacobo Timerman’s story;  begin reading

            Preso sin nombre, celda sin número

 

31 Timerman, Preso sin nombre

 

September 

 

2  Timerman, Preso sin nombre

 

4  historical background on Jewish immigration to Argentina and

            Alberto Gerchunoff;  Gerchunoff, Los gauchos judíos

 

7   Labor Day, University closed

 

9  Gerchunoff, Los gauchos judíos 

 

11 Gerchunoff, Los gauchos judíos

 

14 Carlos M. Grünberg, “Un esposo” from Cuentos judíos (in packet)

           Mordejai Alperson, “El coronel Goldsmid” from Colonia Mauricio (in packet)

 

16 Margo Glantz, excerpt from Las genealogías (in packet)

 

18 Glantz, second excerpt (in packet)

 

21 Background on Ana María Shua;  Shua, El libro de los recuerdos  

 

23 Shua, El libro de los recuerdos

 

25 Shua,  El libro de los recuerdos, information on term paper proposal

 

28 scenes from film Legado  (Yom Kippur;  attendance will not be taken)

 

30 Victor Perera, “Guatemala I,” from The Cross and the

            Pear Tree (in packet)    

 

October

 

2  Perera, “Guatemala II” (in packet)

 

5  Leo Spitzer, “Rootless Nostalgia:  Vienna in La Paz, La Paz

               in Elsewhere” (in packet)    

       more about topics for term paper

 

7  Marjorie Agosín, “Osorio,” “My Husband,” both excerpts from A Cross and a Star: 

            Memoirs of a Jewish Girl in Chile (in packet)

    DUE DATE, proposal for term paper

 

9  Jacobo Fijman, “Canto del cisne” (in packet)

             Edna Aizenberg, “How a Samovar Helped Me Theorize Latin American

             Jewish Writing” (in packet)

 

12 Teresa Porzecanski, “Rojl Eisips” (in packet)

             José Luis Nájenson, “Una parábola neojasídica” (in packet)

 

14 Introduction to Isaac Goldemberg;  poems by Goldemberg (in packet)    

 

16 Moacyr Scliar, “El ejército de un solo hombre” (in packet)

 

19 Glusberg, “Mate amargo”,  Marcos Aguinis, “Profeta en Níneve” (in packet)

 

21 review session for midterm

 

23 midterm examination in regular classroom

 

26 scenes from Adió Kerida

 

28 Freilich, Cláper

 

30 Freilich, Cláper

 

November

 

2  Freilich, Cláper

 

4  Jorge Luis Borges, “Emma Zunz,” “El Golem” (in packet)

 

6  Borges, “La muerte y la brújula” (in packet)

        Introduction to Alicia Steimberg

 

9  Steimberg, Músicos y relojeros  

 

11 Steimberg, Músicos y relojeros  

 

13 Steimberg, Músicos y relojeros  

 

16 Ruth Behar, “Juban American” (in packet)

 

18 Ilan Stavans, “Lost in Translation” (in packet)

 

20 Isaac Chocrón, excerpt from Rómpase en caso de incendio (in packet)

         More on final version of term paper

 

23 scenes from documentary film Havana Nagila 

 

25 question and answer session

 

27 day after Thanksgiving, University closed

 

30 Ariel Dorfman, “The Discovery of Life and Language at an Early Age”

            (in packet)

December

 

2  Ricardo Feierstein, “Judíos latinoamericanos:  una nueva forma del

            mestizaje” (in packet)

 

4  last class day;  term paper due;  review for final examination

 

 

                                                 ***FINAL EXAMINATION***

 

                                           ***  WED., DEC. 9, 7:00-10:00 p.m.  ***

 

 

 

 

 

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