Skip Navigation
UT wordmark
College of Liberal Arts wordmark
spanish masthead
Jill Robbins, Chair 150 W 21st Street, Stop B3700, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-471-4936

Diana R Norton

Master of Arts, NYU in Madrid

Contact

Biography

Diana Norton completed her Masters in Spanish and Latin American Languages and Literatures at NYU in MAdrid in 2011. Her MAster's thesis was entitled: El matrimonio, el divorcio y los cuentos de hadas contemporáneas: Las mujeres norteamericanas en ¡Hola! a mediados del siglo xx. It addressed the appropriation and rejection of female Hollywood stars in Spain at mid-century. 

She is currently working on her doctoral qualifying paper, tentaively entitled (Im)migration and Spanish Subjectivity in No habrá paz para los malvados. In it, she will address the position of Spain as a borderland between Europe, Africa and (Latin) America. 

Conference paper presentations include: “Las representaciones de las mujeres estadounidenses en ¡Hola! entre 1944 y 1953: El caso de Elizabeth Taylor” at the NYU in Madrid Graduate Students' Colloquium in 2011 and “The Creation of a Real-Life Fairy-Tale: Ava Gardner, Mario Cabré, and Gender Discourse in Early Franco Spain” at the UT-Austin Department of Spanish and Portuguese Graduate Students' Colloquium in 2012. Most recently, she presented the paper “Representations of Mexico, Hispanidad and Cultural Imperialism in the First Mexican-Spanish Cinematic Co-production: Jalisco canta en Sevilla” at the Society for Cinema and Media Studies professional conference in March of 2013. 

Interests

20th Century Spanish Cultural studies, Iberian Studies, borderland studies, transnationalism, denationalism and cosmopolitanism

SPN S601D • Introductory Spanish

89040 • Summer 2012
Meets MTWTHF 1000am-100pm BEN 1.126
show description

 THE UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT AUSTIN

DEPARTAMENT OF SPANISH AND PORTUGUESE

SPN 601D  INTRODUCTORY SPANISH  

 

  • This document contains important information and represents an agreement between the Department of Spanish and Portuguese and its students.
  • You are responsible for knowing all of the information contained in this document.
  • You indicate acceptance of these policies by registering for this course.

1.  PURPOSE, GOALS, AND OBJECTIVES OF THE LANGUAGE PROGRAM

The objective of the Spanish language program addresses the basic tenet of a liberal arts education: the development of a critical thinking approach towards the analysis of language in society. This objective is framed in an overall worldwide trend towards political and economical internationalization and an increasingly diverse and multicultural work environment.

The Spanish language program focuses on the development of multilingual literacies through the analysis and use of Spanish as a second language. The program focuses on the development of three major types of competencies (all equally ranked in terms of importance):

(1)  linguistic competence (Spanish phonetics / phonology, morphosyntax, lexicon, discourse, etc.)

(2)  communication / interactional competence (sociocultural uses of the language, pragmatics, cultural background / perspectives)

(3)  metalinguistic competence (language as a conceptual, symbolic system)

 

2. COURSE DESCRIPTION, GOALS, AND OBJECTIVES

A. SPN 601D is the first course in The University of Texas lower-division Spanish program. The course focuses on developing speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills in Spanish while building vocabulary, learning basic rules and terminology of Spanish grammar, and gaining a better understanding of Hispanic cultures in order to communicate in an accurate, effective, and informed manner within a variety of sociocultural situations.

B.  GOALS FOR SPANISH 601D:

By the end of the semester you should be able to do the following:

(a)  manage a basic vocabulary and grammatical database to achieve communicational success as detailed below;

(b)  analyze and understand spoken Spanish in conversations, lectures, radio advertisements, TV reports, etc;

(c)  speak in Spanish to communicate ideas and interact with Spanish speakers;

(d)  analyze and understand written Spanish conversations, lectures, radio advertisements, TV reports;

(e)  write short compositions, notes, letters, emails, etc in Spanish;

(f)  understand some of the cultural values and practices of the Hispanic world

bottom border