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Jill Robbins, Chair 150 W 21st Street, Stop B3700, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-471-4936

New Faculty, Dr. Sergio Romero

Posted: May 24, 2012
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Professor Sergio Romero comes to the Department from Vanderbilt University, where he held an appointment as Assistant Professor in the Department of Anthropology. He earned an MA in Anthropology at Tulane University in 2001 and a PhD in Linguistics at the University of Pennsylvania in 2006, with a dissertation titled, “Sociolinguistic Variation and Linguistic History in Mayan: The Case of K’iche.” His postdoctoral work continues to engage issues at the intersection of the fields of cultural anthropology and quantitative and qualitative sociolinguistics, addressing questions of language variation in the context of socio-cultural movements of migration, evangelization, standardization, and revitalization. The interdisciplinary nature of his work is evident in his scholarly presentations and publications, and is the cornerstone of his recently completed book manuscript, which examines the role of dialect stereotypes in the indexical practices of pan-Mayan movements. He will contribute to the department with course offerings in the expansion, structure, and use of Ibero-American languages that will bridge linguistic and cultural concentrations.

Professor Romero presents a history of fieldwork and language documentation, focused most centrally on the languages of Guatemala, of which he speaks Q’eqchi’, K’iche,’ and Kaqchikel fluently, as well as on Awakateko, a Mayan language of the Mamean subfamily, and Zongolica Nahuatl, an understudied variety spoken in Veracruz, Mexico. He will hold a joint appointment with the Teresa Lozano Long Institute for Latin American Studies, where, in addition to his teaching duties, he will develop curricula and oversee instruction in indigenous Latin American languages. These efforts will be bolstered by his extensive experience in the teaching of indigenous languages, including K’iche’ and Nahuatl, the former as co-director of Vanderbilt’s Summer K’iche’ Program in Guatemala, coordinated with the University of Chicago.

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