The Economics Department

ECO 301 • Introduction To Economics

33250 • Hickenbottom, Wayne R
Meets MWF 900am-1000am SAC 1.402
show description

This course will be a mixture of both Micro and Macro Economics.  Students who wish to be an Economics major MAY NOT use this course toward the major and should take ECO 304K and ECO 304L.

  • Students will learn how economists describe and measure the economy, in the aggregate, as well as specific markets such as the labor market, the housing market, financial markets, and international trade.  Concepts for measurement and data will be covered.
  • Students will learn how economists organize their analysis of economic choices by thinking about how individuals (i) respond to incentives, (ii) seek out exchange in markets, and (iii) form, and participate in, various economic institutions.
  • Students will learn how to think about strategic behavior (for example, markets with a small number of firms, or negotiating trade agreements among a small number of countries).
  • Students will learn about “externalities” and “public goods,” which, by conferring costs or benefits that are not appropriated by individuals or that are “non-rival” in nature (for example, once discovered, a technology can be used by many at the same time), provide reasons for government regulation, taxation, and government-provided goods and services.

ECO 304K • Introduction To Microeconomics

33255 • Houghton, Stephanie
Meets TTH 930am-1100am
show description

ANALYSIS OF THE ECONOMIC BEHAVIOR OF INDIVIDUAL CONSUMERS, FIRMS, AND WORKERS; SPECIAL ATTENTION TO THE ROLE OF MARKETS.

DESIGNED TO ACCOMMODATE 100 OR MORE STUDENTS.

This course provides an introduction to the theory of how consumers and business firms behave in the market economy. The topics include demand and supply in a competitive market, optimal consumption choice by the individual household given its budget constraint, the producer's costs and output decisions, the demand for labor and other inputs, and economic outcomes under product demand structures ranging from perfect competition to pure monopoly. For specific instructor syllabi and requirements, contact individual instructor.


ECO 304K • Introduction To Microeconomics

33258 • Ryngaert, Jane
Meets MWF 800am-900am CBA 4.348
show description

ANALYSIS OF THE ECONOMIC BEHAVIOR OF INDIVIDUAL CONSUMERS, FIRMS, AND WORKERS; SPECIAL ATTENTION TO THE ROLE OF MARKETS.

DESIGNED TO ACCOMMODATE 100 OR MORE STUDENTS.

This course provides an introduction to the theory of how consumers and business firms behave in the market economy. The topics include demand and supply in a competitive market, optimal consumption choice by the individual household given its budget constraint, the producer's costs and output decisions, the demand for labor and other inputs, and economic outcomes under product demand structures ranging from perfect competition to pure monopoly. For specific instructor syllabi and requirements, contact individual instructor.


ECO 304L • Introduction To Macroeconomics

33260 • Mostashari, Shalah
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm BUR 106
show description

ANALYSIS OF THE ECONOMY AS A WHOLE (ITS ORGANIZATION AND THE BASIC FORCES INFLUENCING ITS GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT); MONEY AND BANKING, NATIONAL INCOME, PUBLIC FINANCE, AND INTERNATIONAL LINKAGES.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 304K WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C-.

DESIGNED TO ACCOMMODATE 100 OR MORE STUDENTS.

This course is designed to introduce students to the vocabulary, concepts and models of analysis of macroeconomics. We will discuss the behavior of the aggregate economy, particularly the Gross Domestic Product; Consumption; Savings; Investment,Unemployment; Inflation; the role of the Monetary System and and Policy, the role of Taxes, Government Spending and Fiscal Policy; the National Debt and Government Budget Deficits and Surpluses; Exports, Imports and International Trade.

 


ECO 304L • Introduction To Macroeconomics

33265 • Mostashari, Shalah
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm JES A121A
show description

ANALYSIS OF THE ECONOMY AS A WHOLE (ITS ORGANIZATION AND THE BASIC FORCES INFLUENCING ITS GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT); MONEY AND BANKING, NATIONAL INCOME, PUBLIC FINANCE, AND INTERNATIONAL LINKAGES.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 304K WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C-.

DESIGNED TO ACCOMMODATE 100 OR MORE STUDENTS.

This course is designed to introduce students to the vocabulary, concepts and models of analysis of macroeconomics. We will discuss the behavior of the aggregate economy, particularly the Gross Domestic Product; Consumption; Savings; Investment,Unemployment; Inflation; the role of the Monetary System and and Policy, the role of Taxes, Government Spending and Fiscal Policy; the National Debt and Government Budget Deficits and Surpluses; Exports, Imports and International Trade.

 


ECO 420K • Microeconomic Theory

33290-33295 • Thompson, John S
Meets TTH 800am-930am GSB 2.126
show description

A SURVEY OF NEOCLASSICAL AND CONTEMPORARY THEORIES OF THE PRINCIPAL DETERMINANTS OF PRICES AND OF THE ROLE OF PRICES IN ECONOMIC ORGANIZATION. REQUIRED OF STUDENTS MAJORING IN ECONOMICS.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 304K AND 304L WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C- IN EACH, AND MATHEMATICS 408C AND 408D, OR MATHEMATICS 408K AND 408L, WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C- IN EACH.

The primary objective of the course is to study contemporary theories of the principal determinants of prices and the role of prices in economic organization. The course will emphasize the fundamental concepts of microeconomics and provide concrete examples of their application. The course will cover the demand and supply theories for competitive markets, some instances of market power, basics of the game theory, choice under uncertainty, and equilibrium in an exchange and production economy.


ECO 420K • Microeconomic Theory

33306-33307 • Boyarchenko, Svetlana
Meets MW 1100am-1230pm UTC 3.124
show description

A SURVEY OF NEOCLASSICAL AND CONTEMPORARY THEORIES OF THE PRINCIPAL DETERMINANTS OF PRICES AND OF THE ROLE OF PRICES IN ECONOMIC ORGANIZATION. REQUIRED OF STUDENTS MAJORING IN ECONOMICS.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 304K AND 304L WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C- IN EACH, AND MATHEMATICS 408C AND 408D, OR MATHEMATICS 408K AND 408L, WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C- IN EACH.

The primary objective of the course is to study contemporary theories of the principal determinants of prices and the role of prices in economic organization. The course will emphasize the fundamental concepts of microeconomics and provide concrete examples of their application. The course will cover the demand and supply theories for competitive markets, some instances of market power, basics of the game theory, choice under uncertainty, and equilibrium in an exchange and production economy.


ECO 420K • Microeconomic Theory

33308-33309 • Hickenbottom, Wayne R
Meets MW 1230pm-200pm GSB 2.126
show description

A SURVEY OF NEOCLASSICAL AND CONTEMPORARY THEORIES OF THE PRINCIPAL DETERMINANTS OF PRICES AND OF THE ROLE OF PRICES IN ECONOMIC ORGANIZATION. REQUIRED OF STUDENTS MAJORING IN ECONOMICS.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 304K AND 304L WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C- IN EACH, AND MATHEMATICS 408C AND 408D, OR MATHEMATICS 408K AND 408L, WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C- IN EACH.

The primary objective of the course is to study contemporary theories of the principal determinants of prices and the role of prices in economic organization. The course will emphasize the fundamental concepts of microeconomics and provide concrete examples of their application. The course will cover the demand and supply theories for competitive markets, some instances of market power, basics of the game theory, choice under uncertainty, and equilibrium in an exchange and production economy.


ECO 320L • Macroeconomic Theory

33310 • Sinclair, Tara M
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm WAG 101
show description

THEORY OF THE DETERMINATION OF NATIONAL INCOME, EMPLOYMENT, AND THE PRICE LEVEL, WITH POLICY IMPLICATIONS. REQUIRED OF STUDENTS MAJORING IN ECONOMICS.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C-.

The purpose of this course is to further students' understanding of the central ideas of macroeconomics.  We will study long-run economic growth and short-run economic fluctuations.  Once we have a basic understanding of these phenomena, we will discuss the main macroeconomic tools of the government, fiscal policy and monetary policy.  By the end of the semester, students should be able to critically read articles on current economic issues that appear in publications such as The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, and The Economist.


ECO 320L • Macroeconomic Theory

33315 • Glover, Andrew
Meets MW 1100am-1230pm CAL 100
show description

THEORY OF THE DETERMINATION OF NATIONAL INCOME, EMPLOYMENT, AND THE PRICE LEVEL, WITH POLICY IMPLICATIONS. REQUIRED OF STUDENTS MAJORING IN ECONOMICS.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C-.

The purpose of this course is to further students' understanding of the central ideas of macroeconomics.  We will study long-run economic growth and short-run economic fluctuations.  Once we have a basic understanding of these phenomena, we will discuss the main macroeconomic tools of the government, fiscal policy and monetary policy.  By the end of the semester, students should be able to critically read articles on current economic issues that appear in publications such as The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, and The Economist.


ECO 320L • Macroeconomic Theory

33320 • Trinque, Brian M
Meets MWF 200pm-300pm WAG 214
show description

THEORY OF THE DETERMINATION OF NATIONAL INCOME, EMPLOYMENT, AND THE PRICE LEVEL, WITH POLICY IMPLICATIONS. REQUIRED OF STUDENTS MAJORING IN ECONOMICS.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C-.

The purpose of this course is to further students' understanding of the central ideas of macroeconomics.  We will study long-run economic growth and short-run economic fluctuations.  Once we have a basic understanding of these phenomena, we will discuss the main macroeconomic tools of the government, fiscal policy and monetary policy.  By the end of the semester, students should be able to critically read articles on current economic issues that appear in publications such as The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, and The Economist.


ECO 321 • Public Economics

33325 • Schneider, Helen
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm JES A307A
show description

STUDY OF APPROPRIATE ALLOCATIONS OF ECONOMIC ACTIVITY BETWEEN GOVERNMENT (FEDERAL, STATE, AND LOCAL) AND THE PRIVATE SECTOR. THE WORKINGS OF SOCIAL SECURITY, WELFARE, EDUCATION, POLLUTION CONTROL, DEREGULATION, TAXATION; AND PROPOSALS FOR REFORM.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C-.

 


ECO 321 • Public Economics

33330 • Schneider, Helen
Meets MWF 200pm-300pm WAG 420
show description

STUDY OF APPROPRIATE ALLOCATIONS OF ECONOMIC ACTIVITY BETWEEN GOVERNMENT (FEDERAL, STATE, AND LOCAL) AND THE PRIVATE SECTOR. THE WORKINGS OF SOCIAL SECURITY, WELFARE, EDUCATION, POLLUTION CONTROL, DEREGULATION, TAXATION; AND PROPOSALS FOR REFORM.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C-.

 


ECO 322 • Money And Banking

33335 • Trinque, Brian M
Meets TTH 800am-930am SAC 5.102
show description

THE ROLE OF MONEY AND DEPOSITORY INSTITUTIONS IN THE ECONOMY; INTRODUCTION TO FINANCIAL AND MONETARY THEORY AND POLICY. ONLY ONE OF THE FOLLOWING MAY BE COUNTED: ECONOMICS 322, FINANCE 354, 354H.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K AND 320L WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C- IN EACH.

This course is about economic wealth: its various forms (called assets), the institutions that create, own, and exchange wealth, the government policies that regulate the behavior of these institutions, and the social origins and consequences of these assets, institutions, and policies. Financial assets-including but not limited to money-exist as stores of value, linking the production of goods in the present to the production and consumption of goods in the future. The focus of this course is on the challenge wealth presents to society: the need to ensure thta the public can assess with reasonable accuracy the various rates of return on financial assets. So long as financial assets, on average, meet people's expectations, people will seek to acquire and be willing to hold them. The resulting demand for financial assets is simultaneously a reflection of the public's confidence in them and a principal determinant of their rates of return. The origins and evolution of assets, institutions, and policies may be understood as an endless search for socially effective and privately profitable means of managing the risky task of betting on the future.


ECO 323T • Economic History Of The US

33337 • Van Horn, Patrick
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm UTC 3.104
show description

Study of economic development, emphasizing more recent periods; causal factors, emerging problems, and major policy issues. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Economics 304K and 304L with a grade of at least C- in each.


ECO 324 • Intro To Labor Economics

33340 • Oettinger, Gerald S
Meets MW 200pm-330pm CLA 0.102
show description

STUDY OF LABOR IN INDUSTRIAL SOCIETIES, WITH EMPHASIS ON PRINCIPLES, INSTITUTIONS, AND POLICIES FOR UNDERSTANDING LABOR AND PERSONNEL PROBLEMS.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C-.

 


ECO 327 • Comparative Economic Systems

33345 • Trinque, Brian M
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm GAR 2.112
show description

THEORIES OF AND PRACTICES IN THE PRINCIPAL TYPES OF ECONOMIC SYSTEMS.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 304K AND 304L WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C- IN EACH.

This course is a writing workshop and seminar focusing on economic systems, national and global. The principal objective of the course is to enable your engagement with the scholarly literature on economic systems - that is, to learn how to learn from relevant experts. Secondary course objectives include deepening your understanding of economic systems, exercising your talents in information retrieval and processing, and sharpening your writing skills. Economic transition is an important phenomenon of the 21st century. In a large and expanding number of countries, a transition process is underway or, at least, under discussion. This transition is away from economic systems based on personal authority and inter-personal loyalties toward an economic system based on self-interested and self-reliant competitive struggle under a de-personalized rule of law. Such transitions are altering the global economy and affecting specific societies as diverse as Mexico, Germany, Uganda, Russia, India, and Japan. This course sets aside the contentious debates over the feasibility and desirability of economic transition, attempting instead to understand transition as an historical process. The focus of the course is on two instances of such transition. What caused Great Britain to become the pioneer of transition? What explains the peculiar characteristics of Japan's economic system? In our approach to these specific cases, we examine selected aspects of the evolution of economic systems from ancient times to the present. During the first two-thirds of the semester, lectures will address economic transition as well as practical tips on accessing the literature and composing a coherent term paper. Thereafter, most class meetings will consist of presentations by students of their work-in-progress.


ECO 328 • Industrial Organization

33350 • Ryan, Stephen
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm UTC 4.104
show description

THE ORGANIZATION OF INDUSTRIES AND MARKETS: COMPETITION, MONOPOLY, AND OLIGOPOLY; ANTITRUST POLICY AND ITS ALTERNATIVES.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C-.

Industrial Organization is the study of imperfectly competitive markets. In this course, we will analyze the behavior on economic agents (consumers and firms) in such settings, as well as policy issues that arise therein. Topics we will cover include monopoly, oligopoly, product differentiation, entry deterrence, and the role of asymmetric information. Calculus and game theory will be our primary analytical tools. The goal of the course is to develop your understanding of the forces at work in many kinds of market interactions, as well as to foster your ability to think critically.If more information is needed contact instructor.


ECO 329 • Economic Statistics

33355 • Bencivenga, Valerie R.
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm WCH 1.120
show description

METHODS OF STATISTICAL ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION OF QUANTITATIVE DATA IN THE FIELD OF ECONOMICS. REQUIRED OF ECONOMICS MAJORS.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 304K AND 304L WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C- IN EACH, AND MATHEMATICS 408C AND 408D, OR MATHEMATICS 408K AND 408L, WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C- IN EACH.

Economics 329 is an introduction to Economic Statistics. The aim of the course is to familiarize students with methods of summarizing collections of measurements (data sets) of economic, political and business phenomena. Of particular concern will be an introduction to elementary probability theory and its use in the interpretation of summary statistics (inference) obtained from statistical data sets. A number of economic, political and business applications will be used to illustrate the methods. If more information is needed contact instructor.


ECO 330T • Eurpn Sovereign Debt Crises

33370 • Bencivenga, Valerie R.
Meets TTH 930am-1100am CLA 1.104
show description

This course explores the origins of Greece’s sovereign debt crisis; how membership in the euro zone shaped both Greece’s path and Europe’s responses; the design of the euro and the European Union; and European Central Bank policy.  Greece’s debt crisis will be compared to other fiscal, financial, and currency crises (Argentina, Mexico, Iceland, Chile, and others).  Questions include:  Would Greece have been better off if it had never joined the euro?  Should Greece have left the euro in 2012 or 2015?  Would a differently-designed euro have prevented the crisis?  How is a debt crisis of a state within the United States (or Puerto Rico) similar to and different from the Greek crisis?  What options are available to a heavily-indebted government (default, inflating away the debt, austerity)?  How should it handle capital flight, bank runs, and collapse of the banking system caused by a fear of default?


ECO 330T • Political Economy

33373 • Hickenbottom, Wayne R
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm GDC 4.302
show description

This class uses ideas and concepts taught in introductory economics to analyze the role of government in a free market economy and explain the behavior of agents interacting with, and working for that government.  We will start by looking at the fundamental view of government as a microeconomic entity and issues associated with group decision-making. Examples of this would be whether majority voting generates outcomes consistent with the preferences of the people in a society.   From there we will look at a government’s role in increasing and/or hindering the efficiency of a market economy with a specific emphasis on the actions and incentives of a utility maximizing agent working for and with the government.  What should someone who works for a government agency be trying to do?  Is that consistent with their own best interests?  If time permits we will expand the discussion into the international realm and consider how a self-interested citizenry might want to interact with other nations.  As a consequence of the writing flag associated with this class, there will be two major research papers, along with several smaller written assignments associated with the class.


ECO 330T • Economics Of Health

33375 • Schneider, Helen
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am CLA 0.102
show description

OPEN TO NONMAJORS. TOPICS MAY INCLUDE ECONOMIC THEORY, APPLICATIONS, AND POLICY. ECONOMICS 330T AND 350K MAY NOT BOTH BE COUNTED UNLESS THE TOPICS VARY.
 

 


ECO 334K • Urban Economics

33377 • Ikizler, Devrim
Meets MW 930am-1100am UTC 3.124
(also listed as URB 351)
show description

ECONOMIC ANALYSIS OF URBAN AREAS; EMPHASIS ON THE NATURE OF CURRENT URBAN PROBLEMS--SLUMS, TRANSPORTATION, FINANCE--AND AN EVALUATION OF CURRENT POLICY.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C-.

SAME AS URB 351 (TOPIC 2).

This course is focused o the internal workings of cities and the role of cities in the larger economy.  Using micro economic theory, the class will be examining questions like: Why do so many students live in the Riverside area, 4 miles from campus? Why do high income individuals live in central Paris, but low income individuals live in central Detroit? Is Segregation 'good' or 'bad'? What affect has the automobile and public transportation had on our urban economy? Why might developed economy systems of cities look different than those of less developed economies?


ECO 341K • Introduction To Econometrics

33380 • Trejo, Stephen J.
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm WAG 214
show description

INTRODUCES THE STUDENT TO STANDARD REGRESSION PROCEDURES OF PARAMETER ESTIMATION AND HYPOTHESIS TESTING IN ECONOMICS.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K AND 329 WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C- IN EACH.

Econometrics is an application of statistical methods to the estimation of economic relationships. Students are expected to have an understanding of both statistics and economic theory. This course reveals how relationships among economic variables are discerned from data. The primary focus of this course is on estimation methodology. If more information is needed contact instructor.


ECO 341K • Introduction To Econometrics

33385 • Xu, Haiqing
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm GSB 2.126
show description

INTRODUCES THE STUDENT TO STANDARD REGRESSION PROCEDURES OF PARAMETER ESTIMATION AND HYPOTHESIS TESTING IN ECONOMICS.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K AND 329 WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C- IN EACH.

Econometrics is an application of statistical methods to the estimation of economic relationships. Students are expected to have an understanding of both statistics and economic theory. This course reveals how relationships among economic variables are discerned from data. The primary focus of this course is on estimation methodology. If more information is needed contact instructor.


ECO 341K • Introduction To Econometrics

33390 • Slesnick, Daniel T
Meets TTH 800am-930am WEL 2.312
show description

INTRODUCES THE STUDENT TO STANDARD REGRESSION PROCEDURES OF PARAMETER ESTIMATION AND HYPOTHESIS TESTING IN ECONOMICS.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K AND 329 WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C- IN EACH.

Econometrics is an application of statistical methods to the estimation of economic relationships. Students are expected to have an understanding of both statistics and economic theory. This course reveals how relationships among economic variables are discerned from data. The primary focus of this course is on estimation methodology. If more information is needed contact instructor.


ECO 350K • Advanced Macroeconomics

33395 • Paal, Beatrix
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm UTC 4.124
show description

Study of the central topics of macroeconomics, such as economics growth, business cycles, monetary and fiscal policy, using advanced theoretical tools and empirical methods.  Focus of topics may be adjusted according to student interest and current economic events.


ECO 350K • Econ Prins Of Decisions

33397 • Hatfield, John
Meets MW 1230pm-200pm CBA 4.324
show description

The goal of this course is to help you use economic principles to think strategically about business decisions. The course is structured in two parts. The first part shall focus solely on understanding microeconomic ideas such as the principal-agent problem and using this understanding to make better managerial decisions. Readings will detail each concept; a case elucidating the application of that concept will then be considered. Topics will include adverse selection, game theory, auctions, strategic commitment, barriers to entry, and network effects. The second part of the course considers effective strategic responses to challenges posed by the legal environment. Readings will detail the legal environment of antitrust, intellectual property, etc., as well as strategic options available to managers in dealing with challenges in these areas. Cases will emphasize applying knowledge of the legal environment as well as sound business practices to successfully and ethically deal with the challenges posed. Topics will include regulation and antitrust, intellectual property, trade laws, fiduciary duty, and liability.


ECO 350K • Econ Prins Of Decisions

33398 • Hatfield, John
Meets MW 200pm-330pm CBA 4.324
show description

The goal of this course is to help you use economic principles to think strategically about business decisions. The course is structured in two parts. The first part shall focus solely on understanding microeconomic ideas such as the principal-agent problem and using this understanding to make better managerial decisions. Readings will detail each concept; a case elucidating the application of that concept will then be considered. Topics will include adverse selection, game theory, auctions, strategic commitment, barriers to entry, and network effects. The second part of the course considers effective strategic responses to challenges posed by the legal environment. Readings will detail the legal environment of antitrust, intellectual property, etc., as well as strategic options available to managers in dealing with challenges in these areas. Cases will emphasize applying knowledge of the legal environment as well as sound business practices to successfully and ethically deal with the challenges posed. Topics will include regulation and antitrust, intellectual property, trade laws, fiduciary duty, and liability.


ECO 350K • Business Strategy

33405 • Sibley, David S
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm CLA 1.104
show description

This course will cover basic topics in business strategy, such as: Porter’s Five Forces, pricing, distribution and retailing, mergers and product differentiation. Relevant aspects of antitrust law will also be covered. There will be an emphasis on good business writing.


ECO 350K • Economics Of Education

33410 • Murphy, Richard
Meets TTH 930am-1100am SZB 370
show description

The course will introduce the concept of human capital, and consider the important question of why both individuals and governments invest in education. Using economic principals we will analyse the determinants of human capital. This will cover topics such as, the importance of out of school factors such as family background and age. We then consider in-school determinants of education including class size, peer effects and school types. Going into more detail we go on to discuss the impact of teachers, the methods by which this has been measured and improved. Finally, the course addresses the market for college education, with emphasis on the financing of higher educational systems, and the efficient matching of students to institutions. The course will combine theory with empirical evidence and touch upon current policy issues in education.


ECO 350K • Energy Economics

33415 • Sadler, Michael
Meets MW 1100am-1230pm UTC 3.122
show description

This course is intended as a survey of the economics of various resource andenergy markets, both in the U.S. and globally. The course will emphasize traditionaleconomic models and their application to relevant energy markets. In addition, we willdiscuss major issues and trends associated with global and local energy markets, howthese markets have impacted economic growth and development, and how they areregulated.


ECO 351K • Curr Iss In Business Economics

33420 • Miravete, Eugenio J
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm GDC 2.210
show description

NEWLY EMERGING PROBLEMS IN BUSINESS AND THE APPROACHES USED FOR STRUCTURING, ANALYZING, AND TREATING THEM.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C-.

In this course we will consider how we can use economic principles to analyze actual business problems. We will use a number of business cases to illustrate how classic economic models can be used to understand current business issues, as well as how we can augment simple models to deal with complex business situations. The course is not meant to be a comprehensive cookbook of applications of economics to business problems. The purpose is rather to give students the opportunity to practice making logical economic arguments in the context of examples from the real business world.


ECO 354K • Introductory Game Theory

33425 • Bhaskar, V.
Meets MW 930am-1100am BRB 2.136
show description

INTRODUCTION TO THE FORMAL STUDY OF INTERDEPENDENT DECISION MAKING. APPLICATIONS OF GAME THEORY INCLUDE PRICING AND ADVERTISING STRATEGIES, LABOR-MANAGEMENT BARGAINING, AND TARIFF NEGOTIATIONS.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K AND 329 WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C- IN EACH.

Contact professor for more information.


ECO 354K • Introductory Game Theory

33426 • Stahl, Dale O
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm BRB 2.136
show description

INTRODUCTION TO THE FORMAL STUDY OF INTERDEPENDENT DECISION MAKING. APPLICATIONS OF GAME THEORY INCLUDE PRICING AND ADVERTISING STRATEGIES, LABOR-MANAGEMENT BARGAINING, AND TARIFF NEGOTIATIONS.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K AND 329 WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C- IN EACH.

Contact professor for more information.


ECO 361 • Empirical Public Economics

33429 • Sibley, David S
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm UTC 3.122
show description

In policy debates it is sometimes said that you are entitled to your own opinion, but you are not entitled to your own facts. Nonetheless, despite the presence of many “facts”,  some policy debates seem to go on interminably. Some argue that raising the minimum wage will decrease employment, while others argue that the evidence shows no causal link and therefore support increasing the minimum wage. Similar disagreements exist on whether or not school choice improves educational outcomes, whether Head Start is cost-effective, whether the death penalty deters crime, and in other policy areas. We will read and summarize articles from the professional literature, but will also emphasize the extent to which differing answers come from differing data sets or econometric techniques.


ECO 378H • Honors Tutorial Course I

33440
Meets
show description

SUPERVISED INDIVIDUAL READING, RESEARCH, AND WRITING OF A SUBSTANTIAL PAPER ON A SPECIAL TOPIC IN THE FIELD OF ECONOMICS.

PREREQUISITE: UPPER-DIVISION STANDING, ADMISSION TO THE ECONOMICS HONORS PROGRAM, AND CONSENT OF THE HONORS ADVISER.

MAY BE COUNTED TOWARD THE INDEPENDENT INQUIRY FLAG REQUIREMENT.

Hour(s) to be arranged. Restricted enrollment; contact the department for permission to register for this class.


ECO 379H • Honors Tutorial Course II

33445
Meets
show description

SUPERVISED INDIVIDUAL READING, RESEARCH, AND WRITING OF A SUBSTANTIAL PAPER ON A SPECIAL TOPIC IN THE FIELD OF ECONOMICS.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 378H.

MAY BE COUNTED TOWARD THE INDEPENDENT INQUIRY FLAG REQUIREMENT.

CONTAINS A SUBSTANTIAL WRITING COMPONENT AND FULFILLS PART OF THE BASIC EDUCATION REQUIREMENT IN WRITING.