Department of English

CRW 325F • Fiction Writing

34370 • Carey, Edward
Meets TTH 930am-1100am CAL 419
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CRW 325F  l  Fiction Writing

Instructor:  Harvey, J (Carey, E)

Unique #:  34370

Semester:  Fall 2016

Cross-lists:  n/a

Restrictions:  CRW Certificate students

Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites:  One of the following: C L 315, E 603B, (316K,) 316L, 316M, 316N, 316P, 316K, or T C 603B.

Description:  In this class, we will discuss, dissect, criticize, and write short fiction.  We will examine through each other's work and through work previously written the possibilities of the short story.  We shall examine topics such as character, dialogue, setting, plot and language.  Students will read each other’s work with rigor and generosity.

Requirements & Grading:  Attendance: Regular attendance is essential.  A workshop class is a community, and if you don’t show up to discuss your colleagues’ work, there’s no reason for them to read yours with any attention.

You may miss two classes without it affecting the final grade in your class.  You will fail the class after four absences.  Perfect attendance will improve your grade.  Please let me know ahead of time if you know you will miss a class for any reason.

Please be on time to class.  More than four late arrivals will affect your final grade.

Please submit stories to the class via e-mail before class the day your story is due.  I will send out an e-mail list after the first class meeting.  Make sure your work is double-spaced and page-numbered.

Laptops are not allowed to be open and on during class.  Please bring in hard copies of all notes you may need to consult.

All work must be original—that is both your own work, and written for this class.  Please do not recycle work written for other courses.  Do not submit work written by other people, even substantially rewritten.  That includes characters and scenarios: please, no fan fiction or alternate versions of other people’s published work.  If you have any questions, please talk to me.  For additional information on Academic Integrity, see http://deanofstudents.utexas.edu/sjs/acadint.php 

FOR WORKSHOP:  you are required to read the other students’ work and to type at least two paragraphs of respectful critical response.  Please bring in two copies of your critiques, one for the author, and one for me in hard copy.  If I don’t have a hard copy of your student critiques, they will be marked as missing.  You are responsible for critiques even if you are absent for the workshop.

GRADING:  WRITTEN COMMENTS ON OTHER STUDENTS’ WORK: 15%; CLASS PARTICIPATION: 20%; CLASS ASSIGNMENTS: 20%; FIRST STORY: 20%; SECOND STORY: 25%; each story must be a minimum of six pages, double-spaced.


CRW 325F • Fiction Writing

34375 • LaSalle, Peter N
Meets MW 230pm-400pm PAR 302
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CRW 325F  l  Fiction Writing

Instructor:  La Salle, P

Unique #:  34375

Semester:  Fall 2016

Cross-lists:  n/a

Restrictions:  CRW Certificate students

Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites:  One of the following: C L 315, E 603B, (316K,) 316L, 316M, 316N, 316P, 316K, or T C 603B.

Description:  The beginning of the course will stress the development of skills in the various aspects of narration, including writing description, probing character, and plotting.  The latter part of the course will involve the writing and rewriting of a complete short story.

Texts:  The Norton Anthology of Short Fiction, Cassill, ed.

Requirements & Grading:  Four writing assignments: 90%; Attendance and participation: 10%.


CRW 325F • Fiction Writing

34380 • Unferth, Deb Olin
Meets TTH 500pm-630pm CAL 221
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CRW 325F  l  Fiction Writing

Instructor:  Unferth, D

Unique:  34380

Semester:  Fall 2016

Cross-lists:  n/a

Restrictions:  CRW Certificate students

Computer instruction:  No

Prerequisites:  One of the following:  C L 315, E 603B, (316K,) 316L, 316M, 316N, 316P, 316K, or T C 603B.

Description:  Each week for the first half of the semester, we will focus on a different element of craft—everything from intriguing first sentences to breathless endings.  We will spend time on description, setting, dialogue, conflict, and more. I will assign in-class exercises and short take-home assignments, some of which we will discuss in class.  We will read stories by 20th and 21st century writers and focus on how these writers make use of plot, form, voice, and style.  In the second half of the semester, students will each write a complete short story, which we will workshop.  On the last day of class students will hand in short reading responses to individually selected books, identifying an element of craft that particularly interests them.

Through story workshops, generative exercises, discussion of published work, and individual suggested reading, students write new work and read the work of others always with an eye toward inciting fresh ways of thinking about fiction.  Students should emerge from the class with a solid grounding in narrative and with a collection of work in various stages of completion.

Texts:  reading packet.

Requirements and Grading:  Short writing assignments: 40%; Longer Short Story: 30%; Attendance and participation: 20%; Short responses: 10%.


CRW 325M • Creative Writing

34385-34410 • Saurborn, Laurie
Meets TTH 1100am-1200pm ART 1.120
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CRW 325M  l  Creative Writing

Instructor:  Saurborn, L

Unique #:  34385-34410

Semester:  Fall 2016

Cross-lists:  n/a

Flags:  Writing

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites:  One of the following: C L 315, E 603B, (316K,) 316L, 316M, 316N, 316P, 316K, or T C 603B.

Description:  This is an introductory course in reading and writing fiction and poetry, intended for students interested in grounding themselves in a creative writing practice.  During the semester, we will investigate matters of the writer’s craft—such as imagery, character, and structure—and matters of the reader’s connection—such as place, person, and community.

Assignments are designed to explore the principles of poetic composition and prose writing, and to encourage deeper reflection upon the work of poets and writers we read for class.  By the semester’s end, each student will have a portfolio of revised creative work and the foundation from which to create more.

Class meetings will include writing exercises, discussion, and reading.  Every week, students will meet with their small-group discussion sections.  These sections will include the critique of student work, peer review, and analysis of contemporary models.

Texts:  Method and Madness: The Making of a Story, by Alice LaPlante; The Poet’s Companion: A Guide to the Pleasures of Writing Poetry, by Kim Addonizio & Dorianne Laux; When My Brother Was an Aztec, by Natalie Diaz; Seam, by Tarfia Faizullah.

Requirements & Grading:  Short story: 20%; Group of 3-5 poems: 20%; Reading Responses: 20% (Four short assignments, 5% each); Final Portfolio: 20% of final grade (see Note below); Participation, attendance, and skill as a workshop participant: 20%.

Note: In place of a final exam, students will be graded on a final writing portfolio, in which work from over the semester has been revised.

Attendance is required.  Students may not miss more than three classes without lowering the final grade.


CRW 325P • Poetry Writing

34415 • KOCOT-TOMBLIN, NOELLE
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm PAR 302
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CRW 325P  l  Poetry Writing

Instructor:  Kocot-Tomblin, N

Unique #:  34415

Semester:  Fall 2016

Cross-lists:  n/a

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites:  One of the following: C L 315, E 603B, (316K,) 316L, 316M, 316N, 316P, or T C 603B.

Description:  In this class, we will read and write poems, and we will discuss the politics of specificity in each individual poem.  Class meetings will include workshops of student poems, as well as engaging with the poetry and critical work.

Reading list:  250 Poems: A portable Anthology by Peter Schakel and Jack Ridl • Claudia Rankine--Citizen • James Tate--Worshipful Company of Fletchers.

Requirements & Grading:  Grades will be based on a final portfolio of original poems and revisions (40%); weekly creative and/or critical exercises (30%); and class participation (30%).  Attendance is mandatory; more than three absences may result in a reduction of the final grade.


CRW 325P • Poetry Writing

34420 • Olstein, Lisa
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm CAL 221
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CRW 325P  l  Poetry Writing

Instructor:  Olstein, L

Unique #:  34420

Semester:  Fall 2016

Cross-lists:  n/a

Restrictions:  CRW Certificate students

Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites:  One of the following: C L 315, E 603B, (316K,) 316L, 316M, 316N, 316P, or T C 603B.

Description:  In this class, students will read and write intensively with two primary goals in mind:  to generate and hone exciting new poems, and to become increasingly skilled readers of poetry from a practitioner’s perspective.  Part laboratory, part think-tank, part workshop, our class will combine the writing and revising of new poems with close reading and analysis of published poems and essays; active exploration of elements of craft, process, and imagination; and constructive, nuanced response to student poems.

Requirements & Grading:  Requirements include: 1) Meaningful engagement with all aspects of our work, written and oral, via fulfillment of weekly reading and writing assignments, excellent attendance, and active class participation. (80%); 2) A final portfolio of poems written and revised over the course of the semester, accompanied by a short reflection paper regarding process and craft. (20%)


CRW 330 • Literature For Writers

34425 • Moore, Lisa L
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm CAL 419
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CRW 330  l  Literature for Writers

Instructor:  Moore, L

Unique #:  34425

Semester:  Fall 2016

Cross-lists:  n/a

Restrictions:  CRW Certificate students

Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites:  One of the following: CRW 325 (or E 325), 325F (or E 325F), 325M, 325P (or E 325P).

Description:  In this course, we will learn to read like writers.  We will read a range of classic and contemporary poetry and fiction in order to become appreciative and accurate observers of literary form—of how literary language works, not just what it says--and learn to recognize and employ effective techniques from fiction and poetry.  Whether students come in with a primary interest in fiction, poetry, both, or other genres, they will practice poetic and fictional strategies to build their writing skills and add to their literary repertoires.  Students can expect to read excerpts and/or single works from novelists and short story writers such as Austen, James, Woolf, Auster, Kundera, Fowles, Ishiguro, Munro, and Lahiri; and poets such as Shakespeare, Keats, Shelley, Thomas, Merrill, Hacker, Rios, Kizer, Wong, Corral, Brooks, Rukeyser, and Duffy.  By the end of the semester each student will have completed exercises in 15 different literary forms or genres and revised seven of these into a portfolio of their best work.

Texts:  Anne Lamott, Bird by Bird: Some Instructions on Writing and Life • David Lodge, The Art of Fiction • Mark Strand and Eavan Boland, The Making of a Poem: A Norton Anthology of Poetic Forms • Alice Munro, Runaway • Jhumpa Lahiri, The Interpreter of Maladies • Marilyn Hacker, Love, Death, and the Changing of the Seasons • Eduardo Corral, Slow Lightning.

Requirements and Grading:  Weekly Online Practice Journal (250 words): 20% of final grade; 30-minute Class Presentation 20% of final grade; Mid-term portfolio submission: 20% of final grade; Final portfolio submission: 40% of final grade.


CRW 355F • Advanced Fiction Workshop

34430 • Carey, Edward
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm PAR 310
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CRW 355F  l  Advanced Fiction Workshop

Instructor:  Harvey, J (Carey, E)

Unique #:  34430

Semester:  Fall 2016

Cross-lists:  n/a

Restrictions:  CRW Certificate students

Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites:  CRW 340F (or E 341).

Description:  We will discuss, criticize, and write short fiction.  Students will read each other’s work with rigor and generosity.  Students will write three original stories for class.

Class Policies:  Stories will be submitted via e-mail to your fellow students the morning your story is due.  Make sure your work is double-spaced and page-numbered.

Stories should be at least 8 pages and no longer than 25.  No novel excerpts, please.  All work must be original—both your own work, and written for this class.  Please do not recycle work written for other courses.

Please do not write stories with characters invented by other authors.  And, of course, do not submit work written by other people, even substantially rewritten.  For the purposes of this class, I also ask that you do not allow other people to edit your work.  For additional information on Academic Integrity, see http://deanofstudents.utexas.edu/sjs/acadint.php.

A workshop class is a community, if you do not show up to discuss your colleagues work, there’s no reason for them to read yours with any attention.  Much of what you will learn about fiction will be from each other—you will see how actual readers interpret and respond to your work.  If you miss the day of your own workshop you may receive an F for the assignment.

You may miss two classes without it affecting the final grade in your class.  You will fail the class after four absences.  Perfect attendance will improve your grade.  Please let me know ahead of time if you know you will miss a class for any reason.

Please be on time to class.  More than four late arrivals will affect your final grade.

Laptops are not allowed to be open and on during class.  Please bring in hard copies of all notes you may need to consult.

All work must be original—that is both your own work, and written for this class.  Please do not recycle work written for other courses.  Do not submit work written by other people, even substantially rewritten.  That includes characters and scenarios: please, no fan fiction or alternate versions of other people’s published work. If you have any questions, please talk to me.  For additional information on Academic Integrity, see http://deanofstudents.utexas.edu/sjs/acadint.php.

FOR WORKSHOP:  you are required to read the other students’ work and to type at least two paragraphs of respectful critical response.  Please bring in two copies of your critiques, one for the author, and one for me in hard copy.  If I don’t have a hard copy of your student critiques, they will be marked as missing.  You are responsible for critiques even if you are absent for the workshop.

GRADING:  Your final grade will be based on both your written work in the class, and also your participation.  You will receive letter grades on written assignments.

EXTRA CREDIT:  You may earn extra credit by attending readings by authors on campus or at local bookstores and writing a one-page response.  If you are unsure of whether a writer qualifies or not, please ask me.

The breakdown of grading follows:  FIRST STORY, 20%; SECOND STORY: 20%; THIRD STORY: 20%; REVISION: 10%; WRITTEN COMMENTS ON OTHER STUDENTS’ WORK: 15%; CLASS PARTICIPATION: 15%.


CRW 355F • Advanced Fiction Workshop

34435 • Unferth, Deb Olin
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm CAL 221
show description

CRW 355F  l  Advanced Fiction Workshop

Instructor:  Unferth, D

Unique #:  34435

Semester:  Fall 2016

Cross-lists:  n/a

Restrictions:  CRW Certificate students

Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites:  CRW 340F (or E 341).

Description:  This is an advanced course in fiction writing for students working toward the creative writing certificate. Students will write either three original stories of at least 8 pages each or two original stories and one revision.  They will also write extensive comments (1-2 pages) on their classmates’ stories.  All work must be original, written for this class, not for another class taken earlier or concurrently.

Policies:  You may miss two classes without penalty. After that your grade will begin to drop.  This is a no-screens class.  All materials will be used in class in hardcopy.

Readings:  Students will purchase a course packet of selected stories.

Requirements and Grading:  First story 20%; second story 20%; third story/revision 20%; comments on classmates’ work 20%; participation and attendance 20%.


CRW 355F • Advanced Fiction Workshop

34440 • LaSalle, Peter N
Meets MW 400pm-530pm CAL 323
show description

CRW 355F  l  Advanced Fiction Workshop

Instructor:  La Salle, P

Unique #:  34440

Semester:  Fall 2016

Cross-lists:  n/a

Restrictions:  CRW Certificate students

Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites:  CRW 340F (or E 341).

Description:  This is a course for advanced students in fiction writing; the student will write a total of 30-40 pages of original fiction during the semester.

There will be three dates on which work is due, and on each the student will turn in either a complete short story or an installment from a longer work; if the student is working on a longer project (a novella, for instance), approval must be given by the instructor ahead of time.

Student work will be examined in class with workshop discussion, and the student will meet with the instructor in individual conferences to discuss projects and progress.

There will also be reading from two texts.

Texts:  The Norton Anthology of Short Fiction, Seventh Edition, Cassill and Bausch, editors; Dreamtigers, Jorge Luis Borges (fiction and poetry, for discussion of how the two genres influence each other).

Requirements & Grading:  90 percent on writing; 10 per cent on in-class participation and quizzes.

The grade will be a matter, essentially, of the quality of the written work.  Two absences are allowed, and more than that will affect the grade.


CRW 355P • Advanced Poetry Workshop

34445 • Young, Dean H
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm CAL 419
show description

CRW 355P  l  Advanced Poetry Workshop

Instructor:  Young, D

Unique #:  34445

Semester:  Fall 2016

Cross-lists:  n/a

Restrictions:  CRW Certificate students

Computer Instruction:  No

CRW 355P and E 355K may not both be counted.

Prerequisites:  CRW 340P (or E 341L).

Description:  This is a class for practicing poets with workshop experience.  While emphasis will be upon work written by students in the class, we will also foster a vital connection to the work of contemporary and past poets.  Students will be expected to work not only on their own poems but also their ability to articulate a sophisticated and informed relationship to poetry in general.

Requirements & Grading:  About a poem a week to be submitted for workshop although all these poems will not be addressed in class.

Ongoing written responses to the work of classmates as well as occasional assignments made at the discretion of the professor.

Attendance.  Active and vocal engagement demonstrated in class consistently.

A final portfolio of about five poems, the majority of them substantially revised in response to workshop feedback.